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Interview with Kristopher Sith

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2011
Scope and Contents:
Artist Kristopher Stith grew up in southeast Washington, D.C., and attended Duke Ellington School of the Arts and American University. Stith states Dragon Ball Z inspired him to draw as a child. He describes drawing Pokemon cards in the back of the classroom when he was in elementary school, and cartooning and creating his own characters when he was in middle school. He talks about his experience as a youth council member and earning a stipend; preparing his portfolio for entrance to Duke Ellington School of the Arts; and how the students and teachers at Duke Ellington inspired and motivated him to do better. Stith states the Anacostia community inspired and encouraged him to pursue his artistic skills. He talks about his competitive nature, preference of working with acrylic and charcoal, interest in painting people, strive to paint better, creative process, and artistic style. There are a few shots of his artwork; Stith talks about each of the pieces. Stith describes the similarities and differences between Washington, D.C.'s Wards 3 and 8; he talks about the changes he observes in Ward 8. Stith talks about how the community support and the arts, particularly how he thinks information and resources should be shared, and his desire to help people when he becomes successful. He also talks about Picasso, the evolution of Picasso's style, and Picasso's connection to his community through his artwork.
Interview. Dated 20110320.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Kristopher Sith, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005231
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7f731aca9-8c60-4490-9ba5-40509ebf8f11
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref100

Interview with Anthony Anderson

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2011
Scope and Contents:
Filmmaker Anthony Anderson lived in Anacostia in southeast Washington, D.C. until he entered high school when he moved to Montgomery County, Maryland. Anderson started creating and writing stories at a young age, and involved himself in the performing arts, including stage plays in high school. After several unsuccessful attempts to secure a role on 'The Wire,' Anderson was inspired by Spike Lee interview in which Lee stated you have to create your chance. Anderson explains this inspiration lead him to revisit his previously written scripts and start making films. He talks about his first film 'The Ties that Binds,' and his web series 'Anacostia.' Anderson explains his inspiration comes from people in Washington, D.C. and what success means to him. He talks about his creative process, where his ideas come from, trusting people he works with, and his biggest struggles creating the web series. Anderson provides advice to aspiring Anacostians.
Interview. Dated 20110210.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Motion picture producers and directors  Search this
African American motion picture producers and directors  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Anthony Anderson, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005206
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7db5449e6-7121-464b-991f-8646c11bdb34
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref101

Interview with Maria Goodwin

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2011
Scope and Contents:
Maria Goodwin - member of the Daughters of Dorcas and Sons quilt guild - discusses her quilting experience, the evolution of quilt making, and the Washington, D.C. based quilting group - Daughters of Dorcas and Sons. Goodwin recalls her early memories of cutting out triangles and sewing them together with her mother, who was a seamstress; she states her mother taught her an appreciation for fabric. She explains she was not interested in clothes making, and decided to explore quilting because she found quilt making less confining. Goodwin explains how the members of Daughters of Dorcas and Sons interact with one another, and describes the various styles the members employ in their quilt making. She talks about how the quilt has evolved from a functional piece to a piece of artwork displayed on the wall; the development and evolution of art quilt; use of technology in quilting; the increase in pricing of quilting and sewing machines; the evolution of fabric house; special quilting fabric lines; the various types of quilting; and working with colors in quilting. Goodwin explains the debate and development of categories in quilt competition shows; use of other media, in addition to fabric, in quilting; the intersection between quilting, family history, and scrapbooking; the growth of quilting communities; the importance of a foundation for beginner quilters; and how quilters build their skills over time. Goodwin talks about her creative style, her creative process, how she designs her quilt, where she finds inspiration, and how her interest in quilting grew. She loves the challenge of designing and incorporating ancient history, including illuminated manuscripts, into her quilts. Goodwin talks about the future of quilting, including children learning to quilt; the importance of preserving old quilts because they document family and quilting heritage; and the importance of documenting the creation of the quilts through video and photographs so the creation process is preserved.
Interview. Dated 20110131.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Quiltmakers  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Maria Goodwin, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005219
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7d6bb5217-6f90-4490-b778-b412ff2d70b4
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref102

Interview with Ira Blount

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2011
Scope and Contents:
Artist Ira Blount talks about the influence of his father and mother as well as the Shaker Movement and their belief in frugality on his life and his art. He talks about ROTC training while he was a student at Tuskegee Institute and training troops to go overseas when he was stationed at Fort Lee, Virginia. Blount states his life after the army was unpleasant because of his divorce. When he moved to Washington, D.C., he focused on craft making, particularly calligraphy, to overcome his drinking problems. Blount gradually became involved in different programs in his church, Asbury United Methodist Church, and eventually started a handbell choir in the early 1990s. Blount talks about his other creative endeavors in basket weaving, origami, and woodcarving as well as his interest in oriental arts. Specifically, Blount talks about his first attempt at basket weaving, his fondness of the egg basket, using natural grapevine frames with commercial reed for his baskets, making origami kimonos and cranes, and the beauty of the grain when he carving wood. He talks about his creative process and working hard to perfect a craft. Blount explains an inner need to create and his hope that his work will inspire other people to do craft work. He talks about the need to engage senior citizens in creativity and craft; and the lack, and therefore necessity, of a craft museum in Washington, D.C. He stresses the need of a vehicle to encourage untrained people to create particularly those who live in Ward 7.
Interview. Dated 20110316.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Ira Blount, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005209
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7bc3a4714-d0b4-4a7e-ae23-505c7360d91f
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref103

Interview with Kristopher Sith

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2011
Scope and Contents:
Kristopher Sith . . .
Interview. Dated 20110320.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Kristopher Sith, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005231
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa72ef298f8-2d8f-4684-a327-d1f6a5b44fa1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref104

Interview with Erin Jackson

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2011
Scope and Contents:
Comedian Erin Jackson talks about her start in comedy, her first open mic experience, performing at comedy clubs in Baltimore and Washington, D.C., taping for Comedy Central, the semi-finals of Last Comic Standing, being a guest on The Ellen Degeneres Show, and her journey to full time comedian and leaving her full time day job. She explains the importance and specifics of the business side of being a comedian. Jackson talks about others' perception of the black female comedian, and the division line between black or urban comedy and mainstream comedy. She describes her comedic style: laid back, confrontational, and personal. Jackson talks about her favorite comedians, specifically Bill Cosby; the comedians who influence her style, which are different than her favorite comedians; how she prepares for a show, including her process right before she goes onto the stage; and stage fright. Jackson explains how living in Washington, D.C., particularly Ward 7, impacts her comedy; she tells stories of specific people. She talks about loving her job and the desire to be able to support herself doing what she loves. Jackson explains she has so much farther to go in her career, her interest in doing a show that involves sports and comedy, and her interest in writing for television and film.
Interview. Dated 20110302.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Comedians  Search this
African American comedians  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Erin Jackson, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005221
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7342b2605-ea1c-4891-9807-448edc476a5b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref105

Interview with Maurice 'Moe' Shorter 2010

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Barry Farms (Washington, D.C.)
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2010
Scope and Contents:
As a long-time resident of Washington, D.C.'s Ward 8, Maurice 'Moe' Shorter - impresario for Junkyard Band - talks about the history of Junkyard Band and go-go music; and the marketing and management of go-go bands, particularly Junkyard Band. Shorter details the origin of Junkyard Band, which was formed by a group of children in the Barry Farms community of southeast Washington, D.C. He describes the band's various rehearsal spaces in the community; involvement in the community; creativity in regards to the creation of their improvised instruments and later the writing of their music; and the growth of their audience and change in performance venues over the years. He talks about working with Derrick McCraven, who brought two neighborhood bands together to create Junkyard Band. Shorter describes go-go as a musical experience and the community intertwined; he explains why Wards 7 and 8 of Washington, D.C. were attracted to go-go music. He talks about the evolution of go-go music and go-go bands from Chuck Brown to Junkyard Band to those of the late 1990s and 2000s; the subgenres of go-go music which include gospel go-go, bounce beat (beat-ya-feet), traditional, and grown and sexy; differences in the crowds who attend the various sub-genre performances; what influenced the development of go-go music; the improvisation and freestyle of go-go rappers; and the change in venues for go-go performances over the decades. Shorter talks about his ability to take the tools he learned at Howard University and use them to the best of his ability to promote and manage bands; he is able to combine his business skills with something he loves - music. In addition to managing bands, Shorter served as a commissioner for D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities for 12 years.
Interview. Dated 20101203.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
Musicians  Search this
Go-go (Music)  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Maurice 'Moe' Shorter 2010, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005229
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7a82ca2f9-b99b-4c4b-abce-df24562b8b97
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref106

Interview with Christylez Bacon

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Video recordings (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2010
Scope and Contents:
Hip-hop artist Christylez Bacon plays the acoustic guitar, western African djembe, beat-boxing, ukulele, and spoons. Bacon explains he was raised to not curse in his music, and taught the importance of subject matter and topics in music. He performed his first open mic while attending Duke Ellington School of the Arts in northwest Washington, D.C. He studied web design and graphic design at Duke Ellington and during one semester at Montgomery College. Bacon explains he worked hard at his web design/graphic design while hitting the open mic scene hard throughout Washington, D.C. He states he realized what is happening in southeast Washington, D.C. is happening in other places through listening to the music of artists from other places. Bacon talks about the evolution of his career from open mics in Washington, D.C. to development of a children's album which led to a Grammy nomination to his present endeavors. He also talks about the MLK program with youth, Strathmore residency, what he learned during his residencies in Idaho and Utah, teaching hip-hop, and performing for children and adults. He states his performances are about teaching and education. Bacon discusses his musical style, the inspiration for his lyrical content, the future of his art, his desire to tour the world and learn about other types of music, and his advice for up-and-coming artists. At end of the interview, he raps freestyle a summary of his life.
Interview. Dated 20101203.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
Musicians  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Christylez Bacon, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005207
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7c44403d8-a8b9-4f2e-aca1-29b326bc5fac
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref107

Interview with Juanita Britton

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Video recordings (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2011
Scope and Contents:
Entrepreneur Juanita Britton talks about her early entrepreneurial pursuits; traveling to Seoul, South Korea when she was 17; traveling overseas when she was a graduate student at Howard University; securing a job working with the state department so she could work with indigenous cultures overseas; the Anacostia Arts Gallery; Busy Bee Gift and Holiday Show at Shiloh Baptist Church in Anacostia; launching Red Bird water cleaning system in Senegal; and the importance of culture. Britton, who grew up in a middle class Detroit neighborhood, began her entrepreneurial pursuits selling lemonade at age 10 and expanding the business to 6 different corners by the age of 14. She held bake sales and built a relationship with the mayor so she could travel to Seoul, South Korea as an exchange student at the age of 17, and organized a reception for President Mugabe of Zimbabwe when she traveled overseas as a graduate student. Working with indigenous cultures overseas, Britton helped indigenous people sell goods at fair trade value, and she wanted as many people as possible to travel to Africa to see indigenous cultures and that life was fine in Africa. While visiting Anacostia in southeast Washington, D.C., Britton stumbled upon a house which she transformed into an art gallery and artistic community center. She was active in the Anacostia community taking neighborhood children on field trips. Britton speaks of the importance of spending time and mentoring children. She organized 78 Busy Bee Gift and Holiday Shows at the Shiloh Baptist Church over a 20-year period. Britton speaks of specific stories of artists and their successes, and teaching young people about business and entrepreneurship while they are working with her on the craft shows. Britton talks about the villages in Senegal in which she will launching Red Bird water cleaning systems; she states she figured out a way to transport the machine between communities in a single day so the communities will have clean water every day. Britton also talks about marketing events; how she brings culture into the corporate shops which she owns; East of the River artists including BK Adams; the development of an arts district in Anacostia; and the importance of involving the current community in the development. Britton - nicknamed 'Busy Bee' since she was a child - explains how her multitasking and networking abilities. Britton talks about her love of culture; anything different or unique; personal adornments; and learning other languages; and others' perceptions of culture and things that are different or unique.
Interview. Dated 20110302.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Businesswomen  Search this
African American businesspeople  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Juanita Britton, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005210
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa70034785d-2bf2-453a-a45c-23d66256b62e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref108

Interview with Melvin Deal

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Video recordings (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2011
Scope and Contents:
Melvin Deal - expert on African dance and drumming - talks about the Kingman Park neighborhood and working immigrant community in which he grew up in Washington, D.C. He talks about attending lectures at the Smithsonian Institution when he was a child, and his determination for a life outside of the neighborhood where he grew up. He describes how his interest in dance began with learning about Native American traditional dance. Deal talks about his vastly different experiences at Northeast Academy of Dance and Howard University dance department. He talks about completing field research on African dance in Africa; traveling alone in Africa; visiting different countries, cultures, and ethnic groups, including Yoruba people; and learning and sharing African dance. Deal discusses starting of a dance company of African cultural dancers and drummers, later named African Heritage Dancers and Drummers, in the early 1960s in Washington, D.C.; various locations where the group rehearsed throughout Washington. D.C.; obtaining funds to run the organization; and his experience as a resident artist at the New Thing Art and Architecture Center from 1968-1973. Deal describes how he touches the community through dance and music through working with children and senior citizens in his workshops; teaching and working with students at Duke Ellington School of the Arts; teaching the context of African dance and respect for African culture; and giving young people and adults an opportunity to embrace the art of dance and not be judged by it. Deal discusses the dehumanization of slavery how learning about African culture and dance improves black people's self-esteem; black people's acceptance or lack of acceptance and awareness of their blackness in the United States; African culture, particularly Afro-Cubana, in Washington, D.C.; and the customary differences of sexuality in African and European cultures. Deal also talks about his work ethic, creative process, spirituality, and commitment to helping and encouraging people; and the importance of God in life and his art.
Interview. Related to 'Citified: Arts and Creativity East of the Anacostia River.' Dated 20110420.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American dancers  Search this
Dancers  Search this
African culture  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Neighborhoods  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Melvin Deal, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005214
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa70eef1465-9dcc-46ec-96e8-2b988024d140
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref109

Interview with Cold Hearted Band

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Video recordings (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2011
Scope and Contents:
Drummer Marc Griffith and Rapper Cardel Prince of Cold Hearted Band, and Tyron Parker, a fan of Cold Hearted Band, talk about go-go music, how the band formed, and what keeps the members of the band motivated and moving forward. They explain they were drawn to go-go music because it was a way to express themselves; go-go is the way of life in Washington, D.C. Griffith and Prince talk about their experiences in the high school marching band, and their personal musical influences, particularly the go-go crowd (audience). They explain their creative process, particularly how the whole band works together to create their original music. They list go-go clubs in the Washington, D.C. area. Locally, Cold Hearted Band performs mostly in Prince George's County, Maryland. Griffith and Prince talk about performing on the road and the differences between a local crowd and an out-of-town crowd. Discussion includes their thoughts on women go-go bands; experience working with female singers; respect or lack of respect of females in lyrics of rap, go-go, and hip hop music; and the media's negative coverage of go-go music, particularly connecting go-go to violence. They stress go-go does not promote violence; it brings peace and togetherness. Griffith and Prince talk about the future of Cold Hearted Band, and provide advice for up-and-coming, and current go-go bands.
Interview. Related to 'Citified: Arts and Creativity East of the Anacostia River.' Dated 20110503.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
Musicians  Search this
Go-go (Music)  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Cold Hearted Band, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005236
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7b24ba44d-cd40-4f0b-bdd3-2ff990cee74e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref110

Interview with Linda Leaks

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Video recordings (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2011
Scope and Contents:
Linda Leaks - co-founder of Empower DC - talked about her passion for limited equity housing cooperatives. She detailed her experiences while organizing and forming housing cooperatives, and the obstacles she and the community overcame in regards to securing housing cooperatives. Leaks talked extensively about housing, including public housing, rental housing, and mixed income communities, in Washington, D.C. She also detailed Empower DC's work with residents in Ivy City.
Interview. Dated 20110525.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Housing  Search this
Housing, Cooperative  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Linda Leaks, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005224
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa75baae56c-cd66-4827-827f-a9701a310654
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref124

Interview with Anacostia Rollers

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2011
Scope and Contents:
Roller skating performances by The Anacostia Rollers and Friends in the parking lot at Anacostia Community Museum.
Performance. Transcribed from physical asset: no audio for Frank Mobley - battery cut off during sixscouter. Dated 20110326.
Biographical / Historical:
'Citified: Arts and Creativity East of the Anacostia River' elebrates the creativity, identity, and community of far southeast Washington, D.C. neighborhoods. The program, presented in collaboration with the Smithsonian's Anacostia Community Museum, highlights the connections among residents of urban communities as expressed through arts and creativity. 'Citified: Arts and Creativity East of the Anacostia River' is part of a long-term Anacostia Community Museum initiative, 'Call and Response,' which explores arts and creativity through exhibitions, installations, museum collections, and community-focused programs.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Roller skating  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Citified: Anacostia Rollers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005238
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa741972b7f-3531-4331-acd9-ebf1feae6203
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref420

Interview with AB the Producer

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2010
Scope and Contents:
AB the Producer, also known as AB the Pro or Aleem Bilal, talks about his musical background, his music and projects, how he got to where he is at in his career, and the producers who influence him. He defines rap music, and explains his creative style and creative process. AB also talks about growing up in Ward 8, located in southeast Washington, D.C., and his involvement and connection with the community. He explains southeast D.C. and helping the community are his inspirations. AB also performs a little rap.
Interview. Dated 20100314.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
Musicians  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with AB the Producer, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005239
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa779bbaaa2-cb2c-42e0-965e-82859ad68133
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref83

Interview with Roderick Turner

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2011
Scope and Contents:
Artist Roderick Turner, raised in Providence and attended RISD, talks about his artistic family, his early art experiences, the murals he painted, his inspiration and sources of encouragement, and teaching and working with youth and senior citizens. He explains his creative thought process, importance of creating art for the artist, how an artist works in regards to his/her mind as well as technique, and the value of art to the community. Turner describes how his work has evolved, and how his European experience changed his life and affected his art. He also describes the relationship between his artwork and where he lives; he records the changes in his community - Ward 8 of Washington, D. C. - through his paintings.
Interview. Dated 20110519.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Roderick Turner, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005235
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7dc6544be-a879-471e-809b-202eb2531386
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref84

Interview with Peter Krsko and Alicia Cosnahan

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2010
Scope and Contents:
Peter Krsko and Alicia Cosnahan talk about Albus Cavus, a non-profit public arts organization in southeast Washington, D.C., and their personal work. Artist Peter Krsko considers himself an explorer, and combines science and art to complete his work; he explains discovery and sharing are inspirations for his work. As a co-founder of Albus Cavus, Krsko explains that Albus Cavus is a collective of artists, educators, and other creative people interested in creating interactive public spaces. The collective runs workshops (interactive performances) and educational programs about art, technology, and community dynamics. Krsko explains how Albus Cavus engages the community in the development of the interactive public spaces, which increase creativity and learning opportunities of the community. He describes the artwork - murals and sculptures - created through Albus Cavus' workshops and programs. Krsko also describes the state of art east of the Anacostia River; there are lots of creative people but not enough places for people to share their artwork. Artist and educator Alicia Cosnahan, a coordinator of Albus Cavus workshops, explains the inspiration and creative process involved in coordinating the workshops. She describes the intimacy of the workshops because of their size and the opportunity to work with local D.C. artists. She explains how Albus Cavus workshop participants bring what they learn through the workshops back into their communities. Cosnahan talks about the inspiration for her personal projects as a painter, art in society, the importance of art, and the effect art has on people. She also explains what is creativity is to her and why she loves public art.
Interview. Dated 20101203.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Peter Krsko and Alicia Cosnahan, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005223
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7b2bbeac7-15e0-409c-8dac-62bdedfe2cbb
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref85

Interview with Mary E. Brown

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
2010
Scope and Contents:
Mary E. Brown, co-founder of Life Pieces to Masterpieces, talks about the origin, evolution, and culture of Life Pieces to Masterpiece, an organization which works with boys and young men. Brown states the Life Pieces to Masterpieces started as an opportunity for boys and young men to learn and create Larry Quick's art form, engage in conversations, eat, go to museums, and have fun. Once the founders (Brown, Quick, and Benjamin Johnson) gained further understanding of the boys and young men's needs, they added more programs, such as homework center and partnering with other groups; engaged the community more helping more boys and young men; creating and participating in public art, such as the Kites in the Heights project; and figuring out how to support them in really being children. Brown speaks of specific stories of success, specific backgrounds and life circumstances of the boys and young men, the involvement and contribution of each of the co-founders, and the big vision and goals for the future of Life Pieces to Masterpieces. Brown states Life Pieces to Masterpieces 'demonstrated art is essential for living,' and provided her with a fulfillment of purpose in life.
Interview. Dated 20101208.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Mary E. Brown, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005212
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7dba52ae9-f537-43fd-85f3-9f6bf4e30b6c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref86

Interview with Tisha Thorne

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2011
Scope and Contents:
Tisha Thorne, founder and coordinator of the East of the River Sewing and Quilting Guild, talks about her techniques as a fabric media artist, when and how she started sewing, and teaching herself to sew when she was a teenager. She also talks about her involvement in the community, teaching and working with children and senior citizens, and her book projects. Thorne explains what creativity means to her, sources of inspiration, and her creative style and creative process. Thorne talks about the origin and goals of the East of the River Sewing and Quilting Guild, how the guild is involved in the community, and the diversity of the guild's membership. Footage of artwork - quilts, clothing, fashion accessories, and other mixed media fabric art - follows the interview.
Interview. Dated 20110425.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Tisha Thorne, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005234
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7205b8c2e-23f0-4e2f-a6dc-8c94ae329de8
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref87

Interview with Wanda Aikens

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2011
Scope and Contents:
Artist Wanda Aikens - Executive Director of Ward 7 Arts Collaborative - talks about the artistic endeavors of her parents and grandparents, and her early art experiences. She explains the importance of art and her family's deep appreciation for the arts. Aikens talks about her creative process, her research process, and her thoughts on color and the use of color in art. She describes her artwork; and her interest in rocks, nature, mother nature, trees; and how color travels through nature. She explains what people appreciate and do not appreciate about art. Aikens talks about securing funding and nonprofit status for the organization, Ward 7 Arts Collaborative, which is an arts collaborative with the mission is to build capacity in the community and build community in the arts. Aikens talks about the diversity of skills, education, techniques, media, types, and styles of the Ward 7 artists. She discusses the challenges in helping an underserved community to understand their self-worth and the importance of art as well as the work involved in gaining the interest and investment of the community. Aikens describes the public art in Marvin Gaye Park, at Nannie Helen Burroughs School, and on Nannie Helen Burroughs Avenue as well as a mural by Rick Freeman. As a teacher and administrator at IDEA Public Charter School, Aikens also talks about working with high school students, and the importance of sharing to learn from one another.
Interview. Dated 20110317.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Wanda Aikens, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005205
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa74dcd10f3-998e-4276-8ed3-851e32f17f13
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref88

Interview with Aja Graydon

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2011
Scope and Contents:
Singer Aja Graydon from 'Kindred The Family Soul' talks about her earliest memories singing and performing, including her participation in a DC youth theater program called CUE (Children Urban Ensemble). Early in her life, she thought she would pursue theater arts and then Broadway; she did not realize she would be a R & B singer. She talks about the creativity generated when she played outside in her neighborhood growing up. Graydon states 'Kindred The Family Soul,' created with husband Fatin Dantzler, brings together the styles of Philadelphia and DC music. She describes the duos music, which is about family and togetherness. She talks about coming up with the title for 'Kindred The Family Soul.' Graydon describes her musical style and creative process, and what creativity means to her. As a mother of six, Graydon explains how she balances motherhood and the creation of music, and gives advice for other creative mothers who say they do not have time to pursue their creativity. She talks about how she fosters individual creativity in her family and provides the opportunity for her children to learn and discover on their own. Graydon also states she is a person who craves interaction of all kinds, talks about her musical inspirations, and sings one of her songs.
Interview. Dated 20110510.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
Musicians  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Aja Graydon, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005213
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7013b82c8-54a6-4a39-99ca-e2323bf589ec
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref89

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