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Brief and Incomplete: Votes for Women

Creator:
National Museum of American History  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2022-03-01T17:00:21.000Z
YouTube Category:
Nonprofits & Activism  Search this
Topic:
American History  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianAmHistory
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianAmHistory
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_Ij6d_n5xfSE

Gathered visions: selected works by African American women artists exhibition records

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Curator of an exhibition:
Hall, Robert L., 1950-  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1.25 Linear feet (4 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Exhibition records
Correspondence
Date:
undated
Summary:
An exhibition on contemporary African American women artists curated by Robert L. Hall and exhibited at the Anacostia Museum of the Smithsonian Institution from November 1990 to April 1991. Artists included are: Erlena Chisolm Bland, Lilian Thomas Burwell, Yvonne Pickering Carter, Margo Humphrey, Martha Jackson-Jarvis, Viola Burley Leak, Winnie Owens-Hart, Stephanie E. Pogue, Malkia Roberts, Gail Shaw-Clemons, Sylvia Snowden, Renée Stout, Denise Ward-Brown, Joyce E. Wellman, and Adell Westbrook.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
African American women artists -- Exhibitions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Exhibition records -- 1990-2004
Correspondence
Citation:
Gathered visions: selected works by African American women artists exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-044
See more items in:
Gathered visions: selected works by African American women artists exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa73bb700cd-9866-48a6-983b-b0ba52e1913b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-044
Online Media:

Gathered Visions: selected works by African American women artists audiovisual records

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Hall, Robert L., 1950-  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Collection Curator of an exhibition:
Hall, Robert L., 1950-  Search this
Extent:
0.5 Linear feet
4 Sound recordings (4 audio cassette sound recordings)
7 Video recordings (7 VHS 1/2" video recordings)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Date:
1990
Scope and Contents note:
Audiovisual materials related to an exhibition on contemporary African American women artists curated by Robert L. Hall and exhibited at the Anacostia Museum of the Smithsonian Institution from November 1990 to April 1991. Artists included in the exhibit were: Erlena Chisolm Bland, Lilian Thomas Burwell, Yvonne Pickering Carter, Margo Humphrey, Martha Jackson-Jarvis, Viola Burley Leak, Winnie Owens-Hart, Stephanie E. Pogue, Malkia Roberts, Gail Shaw-Clemons, Sylvia Snowden, Renée Stout, Denise Ward-Brown, Joyce E. Wellman, and Adell Westbrook.This collection contains the audiovisual materials related to the exhibit, including artist interviews, exhibit tours and docent training recordings.
Related Archival Materials note:
Anacostia Community Museum. Gathered visions: selected works by African American women artists.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Museum exhibits  Search this
Women artists  Search this
African Americans  Search this
African American women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Citation:
Gathered Visions: selected works by African American women artists audiovisual records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-044, Series ACMA AV03-044
See more items in:
Gathered visions: selected works by African American women artists exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa73a4c4f0f-7faa-4748-8c02-4d9c8e247fba
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-044-ref606

Gathered Visions: Exhibition Audio Tour in Espanol

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Collection Curator of an exhibition:
Hall, Robert L., 1950-  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (audio recording , audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1990
Scope and Contents:
Audio tour for the exhibition 'Gathered Visions: Selected Works by African American Women Artists' in Spanish. Narrator described the artists, their lives, and their works throughout the exhibition.
Audio tour. Sound only, Spanish. Related to exhibition 'Gathered Visions: Selected Works by African American Women Artists.' Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
Gathered Visions: Selected Works by African American Women Artists' included fifteen individuals whose creative efforts reflect a multitude of experiences and universal concerns. Among the works on display were prints that comment on contemporary living, mixed-media sculptures that explore social and historical questions, and paintings that address women's issues. The exhibition presented the richness of the African American artistic traditions in the greater Washington area. It was held from November 18, 1990 to April 28, 1991 at the Anacostia Museum
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Women artists  Search this
African American women artists  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Series Citation:
Gathered Visions: selected works by African American women artists audiovisual records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-044, Item ACMA AV001390
See more items in:
Gathered visions: selected works by African American women artists exhibition records
Gathered visions: selected works by African American women artists exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-044: Gathered Visions: selected works by African American women artists audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7a5d9cc14-a155-4f08-9ee2-783fca168ca8
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-044-ref607

Gathered Visions: Docent Training with Robert Hall

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Collection Curator of an exhibition:
Hall, Robert L., 1950-  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1990
Scope and Contents:
Curator Robert Hall led docent training for the exhibition 'Gathered Visions: Selected Works by African American Women Artists.' Hall introduced the docents to the various art forms and media used by artists. With a slide presentation, he explained, in detail, the specific artworks displayed throughout the exhibition.
Related to exhibition 'Gathered Visions: Selected Works by African American Women Artists.' Dated 19901108.
Biographical / Historical:
Gathered Visions: Selected Works by African American Women Artists' included fifteen individuals whose creative efforts reflect a multitude of experiences and universal concerns. Among the works on display were prints that comment on contemporary living, mixed-media sculptures that explore social and historical questions, and paintings that address women's issues. The exhibition presented the richness of the African American artistic traditions in the greater Washington area. It was held from November 18, 1990 to April 28, 1991 at the Anacostia Museum
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Women artists  Search this
African American women artists  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Series Citation:
Gathered Visions: selected works by African American women artists audiovisual records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-044, Item ACMA AV002056
See more items in:
Gathered visions: selected works by African American women artists exhibition records
Gathered visions: selected works by African American women artists exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-044: Gathered Visions: selected works by African American women artists audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa73fffcdac-6ee1-46eb-ad8c-ae1a2250ab21
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-044-ref608

Gathered Visions: Docent Training with Malkia Roberts

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Collection Curator of an exhibition:
Hall, Robert L., 1950-  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1990
Scope and Contents:
Artist Malkia Roberts led docent training for the exhibition 'Gathered Visions: Selected Works by African American Women Artists.' Roberts talked about docent techniques to reach museum visitors. With a slide presentation, she discussed art created by Black artists, not in the exhibition. Roberts also showed her two works, which would be in the exhibition, and explained them.
Related to exhibition 'Gathered Visions: Selected Works by African American Women Artists.' Dated 19901025.
Biographical / Historical:
Gathered Visions: Selected Works by African American Women Artists' included fifteen individuals whose creative efforts reflect a multitude of experiences and universal concerns. Among the works on display were prints that comment on contemporary living, mixed-media sculptures that explore social and historical questions, and paintings that address women's issues. The exhibition presented the richness of the African American artistic traditions in the greater Washington area. It was held from November 18, 1990 to April 28, 1991 at the Anacostia Museum
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Women artists  Search this
African American women artists  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Series Citation:
Gathered Visions: selected works by African American women artists audiovisual records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-044, Item ACMA AV002148
See more items in:
Gathered visions: selected works by African American women artists exhibition records
Gathered visions: selected works by African American women artists exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-044: Gathered Visions: selected works by African American women artists audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7ac2e8932-01b2-4013-a0ee-1a1729018ea4
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-044-ref609

Gathered Visions Artist Interview with Winnie Owens-Hart

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Collection Curator of an exhibition:
Hall, Robert L., 1950-  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1990
Scope and Contents:
At the Anacostia Museum, Robert Hall interviewed artist Winnie Owens-Hart, who spoke of her work as a ceramist. Owens-Hart provided detailed description about two of her works: 'Trimesters' and 'Four Star Water Jar;' both works of art are part of the recording. She also spoke of her experience learning how to make traditional Nigerian pottery.
Interview. Dated 19901024.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
African American women artists  Search this
Ceramics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Series Citation:
Gathered Visions: selected works by African American women artists audiovisual records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-044, Item ACMA AV002129
See more items in:
Gathered visions: selected works by African American women artists exhibition records
Gathered visions: selected works by African American women artists exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-044: Gathered Visions: selected works by African American women artists audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7f2e77b56-dc5c-4555-a439-ae505aedc7b0
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-044-ref610

Gathered Visions: Artist Interviews

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Collection Curator of an exhibition:
Hall, Robert L., 1950-  Search this
Extent:
4 Video recordings (VHS)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1990
Scope and Contents:
African American women artists talked about their artwork in-detail, including technique and meaning of work; the various types of media and tools they use to produce their work; their creative and work processes; and when and how they became interested in the media they are working. Additionally, Gail Shaw-Clemons spoke of her Anacostia roots. Most of the interviews took place in the artists' studios; and some of the artists, such as printmaker Stephanie Pogue, demonstrated part of their work process. All interviews included samples of the artists' work. The painters, sculptors, printmakers, mixed media, and performance artists included Viola Burley Leak (7-25-90), Erlena Chisolm Bland (7-27-90), Joyce Wellman (7-31-90 and 9-22-90), Malkia Roberts (8-1-90), Stephanie Pogue (8-3-90), Renee Stout (8-6-90 and 9-5-90), Gail Shaw-Clemons (8-7-90), Lilian Thomas Burwell (8-8-90), Adell Westbrook (8-10-90), Margo Humphrey (8-15-90), Yvonne Pickering Carter (8-17-90), Martha Jackson Jarvis (8-20-90), Denise Ward-Brown (9-7-90), and Sylvia Snowden (9-22-90).
Interview. AV002070: dated 19900725, 19900727, 19900731, 19900801. AV002071: dated 19900803, 19900806, 19900807, 1990808. AV002072: dated 19900810, 19900815, 19900817, 19900820. AV002073: dated 19900820, 19900905, 19900907, 19900922.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV002071

ACMA AV002072

ACMA AV002073
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Painters  Search this
Performance artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
African American women artists  Search this
Sculptors  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
Mixed media (Art)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Series Citation:
Gathered Visions: selected works by African American women artists audiovisual records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-044, Item ACMA AV002070
See more items in:
Gathered visions: selected works by African American women artists exhibition records
Gathered visions: selected works by African American women artists exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-044: Gathered Visions: selected works by African American women artists audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7bd21f11e-ebe0-4da3-999c-b07a1b9bed1e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-044-ref611

Oral history interview with Carrington Lloyd Buddoo

Names:
Howard University  Search this
Mico College (Kingston, Jamaica)  Search this
United States. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission  Search this
Buddoo, Carrington Lloyd  Search this
Marley, Bob  Search this
Thomas, Clarence, 1948-  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Digital files
1 Sound cassette
Culture:
Jamaicans  Search this
Afro-Jamaican  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital files
Sound cassettes
Place:
Jamaica
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1993 January 30
Scope and Contents:
Carrington Lloyd Buddoo, known as Lloyd Buddoo, talked extensively about Jamaica, including the country's history, living and working conditions, education, government, geography, growing up under the British colonial system, and how things changed after independence. Buddoo spoke in detail about his parents and siblings, the disciplinarian in the family, living and growing up in rural Jamaica and the tight knit community, the fruits and vegetables grown by his family, his parents' work and skills, the schools and colleges he attended, his family's religious traditions as Seventh Day Adventists, family traditions, and extended family history, including the origin of his last name "Buddoo" and his grandfather's East Indian traditions. Buddoo also talked about teaching in Jamaica, immigrating and sponsoring relatives to come to the United States, where he worked when he arrived in the United States, applying to and attending Howard University, life in Jamaica versus life in the United States, working as a taxicab driver, his wife and children, why he decided to go to law school, working for Clarence Thomas at Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, his thoughts about Jamaican culture and the culture's influence on other communities, Rastafarianism, his music interests including Bob Marley, holiday celebrations, importance of Jamaican organizations, his thoughts on Jamaican posses, immigration law and discrimination, and disciplining his children.

Carrington Lloyd Buddoo was interviewed on January 30, 1993. Interview is in English. Digital audio files include white noise and static; interviewee can be heard clearly for the most part.
General:
Associated documentation for this interview is available in the Anacostia Community Museum Archives.
Title created by ACMA staff using text written on sound cassette, contents of audio recording, textual transcript, and/or associated archival documentation.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Jamaican Americans  Search this
Rastafari movement  Search this
Manners and customs  Search this
Education  Search this
Seventh-Day Adventists  Search this
Imperialism  Search this
Independence  Search this
Emigration and immigration  Search this
Discrimination  Search this
Social history  Search this
Taxicab drivers  Search this
Discipline of children  Search this
Gangs  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Citation:
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. Exhibition Records
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. Exhibition Records / Series 2: Research Files / Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7a4f2e8ec-1d1b-412b-abd9-795788e8ff4d
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-027-ref1868

Oral history interview with Abraham Joseph

Interviewer:
Brown, Tamara, 1969-  Search this
Names:
Tontons macoutes  Search this
Joseph, Abraham  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Digital file
1 Sound cassette
Culture:
Haitian Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital files
Sound cassettes
Place:
Haiti
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1994 July 26
Scope and Contents:
Abraham Joseph, a driving school owner from Haiti, talked about his family, including his siblings, his parents who were farmers, and his children; walking to school; the village, Gros-Morne, where he lived in Haiti; and working as a carpenter in Haiti and the Bahamas before immigrating to the United States in 1980 because he had a fear of Tonton Macoute. He explained the power of Tonton Macoute, including the time his brother was arrested. Joseph described traveling on a little boat from Haiti to the Bahamas and then to Miami; moving to Washington, DC because his fiancée, who he met in the Bahamas, lived in DC with her relatives; and his reaction to seeing snow for the first time in Washington, DC.

Joseph detailed the challenges of working as a porter, his first job in Washington, DC. He explained his decision to become a taxi driver and how he accomplished his goal; how he helped others from all over the world learn how to drive; why he opened a driving school, called AB Discount Driving School; and the challenges of running a business and securing insurance for the driving school.

Abraham Joseph was interviewed by Tamara Brown on July 26, 1994. Interview is in English. Digital audio files include very loud white noise, static, and background noise; interviewee can be heard clearly for the most part.
General:
Associated documentation, including partial transcripts, for this interview is available in the Anacostia Community Museum Archives.  The textual transcripts are not verbatim of the audio recordings. 
Title created by ACMA staff using text written on sound cassette, contents of audio recording, textual transcript, and/or associated archival documentation.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Haitians  Search this
boat people  Search this
Emigration and immigration  Search this
Porters  Search this
Taxicab drivers  Search this
Automobile driver education  Search this
Automobile driver education teachers  Search this
Businesspeople  Search this
Family-owned business enterprises  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Citation:
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. Exhibition Records
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. Exhibition Records / Series 2: Research Files / Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7bfee7267-f378-44c7-9ca6-12dc889a5367
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-027-ref1869

Oral history interview with Alex Bruks

Interviewer:
Taylor, Grace  Search this
Fleming, Peggy, 1937-  Search this
Names:
Bruks, Alex  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Digital file
1 Sound cassette
Culture:
Ghanaians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital files
Sound cassettes
Place:
Ghana
West Indies
Africa
Takoma Park (Md.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1993 May 28
Scope and Contents:
Alex Bruks, co-owner of Bruks International Market, spoke about the origin and history of Bruks International Market, which opened in 1990; the products, including imported grocery items from Africa and the Caribbean, sold in the market; demographics of his customers; how the store came to be located in Takoma Park, Maryland; his employees; and future plans.

Bruks also spoke about the town where he was born and his school experience in Ghana; his extensive work experience in the agriculture, poultry, and meat industries; his migration to the United States in 1975; his higher education experience in Indiana and Ohio; his family; his decision to become a United States citizen; Ghanaian government policies; the African and Caribbean communities in Washington, DC; and festivities or ceremonies when introducing newly born child to the community, including the food served, and Ashanti cultural dances and clothing. Alex Bruks was interviewed by Peggy Fleming and Grace Taylor at Bruks International Market in Takoma Park, Maryland on May 28, 1993. Interview is in English; Bruks spoke briefly to a customer in Ashanti. Digital audio files include white noise and static, and background noise throughout entire interview. Interviewee's voice is intelligible for the most part.
General:
Associated documentation for this interview is available in the Anacostia Community Museum Archives.
Title created by ACMA staff using text written on sound cassette, contents of audio recording, textual transcript, and/or associated archival documentation.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Businesspeople  Search this
Ashanti (African people)  Search this
Africans  Search this
Caribbeans  Search this
Grocery trade  Search this
Family-owned business enterprises  Search this
Food  Search this
Emigration and immigration  Search this
Agricultural industries  Search this
Manners and customs  Search this
Rites and ceremonies  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Citation:
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. Exhibition Records
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. Exhibition Records / Series 2: Research Files / Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7e304bc2d-64ab-42e4-a50e-5a7b267ae04d
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-027-ref1870

Oral history interview with Anne Marie Hogarth

Names:
Anacostia High School  Search this
Federal City College  Search this
Nazareth College (Louisville, Ky.)  Search this
Hogarth, Anne Marie  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Digital files
1 Sound cassette
Culture:
Haitian Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital files
Sound cassettes
Place:
Haiti
Kentucky
Salisbury (Md.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1993
Scope and Contents:
Anne Marie Hogarth spoked about her migration story to the United States from Haiti in 1961; her educational and teaching background in Haiti and the United States; teaching French and English in Kentucky, Washington, DC, and Maryland; and working with Haitian migrant farm workers in Salisbury, Maryland and Winchester, Virginia, and for the DELMARVA Rural Ministry Health Project. Hogarth detailed her exchange student experience at Nazareth College in Kentucky where she learned English and taught French as well as earned an American degree in education in the early to mid-1960s. She discussed her difficulty adjusting to life in Kentucky because of the differences in food, weather, and language as well as her age of almost 40 and recent death of her mother; and the support of the sisters at the small, religious Catholic College. She explained her decision to move from Kentucky to Washington, DC.

Having taught in public schools in Haiti prior to arriving in the United States, Hogarth described the differences in teaching styles between Haiti and the United States. She also explained the differences in her experiences, the environment, and how she was perceived at Nazareth College versus Anacostia Senior High School as well as she was perceived in regards to race in Haiti versus the United States. Hogarth talked about teaching at Gordon Junior High School and Federal City College; completing her master's degree at Laval University in Quebec City, Canada; and connecting with Haitian community, music, dance, and her country in Washington, DC in the late-1960s. She also talked about her experiences and relationship to the Black Power Movement and civil rights in the 1960s as well as the challenges of school integration, bussing, and large class sizes when she was teaching in DC public schools.

Hogarth described her work with Haitian migrant farm workers beginning in 1980; first on the Eastern Shore of Maryland and later in Winchester, Virginia. She spoke in detail about Haitian American Training Institute (HATI) in Salisbury, Maryland and funded by the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare; teaching English to migrant workers; and the working conditions and everyday life of the migrant workers. Next, Hogarth described her work as an outreach interpreter with the DELMARVA Rural Ministries Health project in which she helped migrant people with interpretation, health service work, and transportation. She explained some of the health issues and conditions of Haitian people in detail, and the migrant streams on the East Coast and West Coast of the United States. Hogarth also explained why she worked with Haitian migrant workers during the summer.

Anne Marie Hogarth was interviewed in 1993. Interview is in mostly English with minimal non-English language, most likely French or Haitian Creole. Digital audio files include white noise and static. There are several minutes within the last 10 minutes of the recording ACMA_AV000749_B in which no voices can be heard (too far from microphone / think interviewee is looking for something and talking at the same time). Interviewer's voice is very soft and difficult to hear for the most part, particularly in regards to recording ACMA_AV000749_A.
General:
Associated documentation for this interview is available in the Anacostia Community Museum Archives.
Title created by ACMA staff using text written on sound cassette, contents of audio recording, textual transcript, and/or associated archival documentation.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Haitians  Search this
Women  Search this
Teachers  Search this
Women teachers  Search this
Emigration and immigration  Search this
Public health  Search this
Public schools  Search this
School integration  Search this
Race  Search this
Black power  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Migration, Internal  Search this
Migrant labor  Search this
Agricultural laborers, Foreign  Search this
Agricultural laborers, Foreign  Search this
Foreign workers  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Citation:
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. Exhibition Records
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. Exhibition Records / Series 2: Research Files / Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7bb324a88-b672-49d8-a5cf-9c655dc2f471
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-027-ref1871

Oral history interview with Anne Marie Hogarth

Names:
Anacostia High School  Search this
Federal City College  Search this
Nazareth College (Louisville, Ky.)  Search this
Hogarth, Anne Marie  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Digital files
1 Sound cassette
Culture:
Haitian Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital files
Sound cassettes
Place:
Haiti
Salisbury (Md.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1995
Scope and Contents:
Anne-Marie Hogarth spoked about her family history; and being born, raised, and educated in Léogâne, a little town near Port-au-Prince, Haiti. She explained she was raised with people and among people. She described Léogâne, and some of its history and geography. She detailed her extended family history on both sides of her family, where they originated from, and when her family (father and mother) migrated to Léogâne.

Hogarth explained she continued her education in Port-au-Prince, including completing the teaching program at Normal School for Teachers; and taught at different public schools in Haiti before migrating to the United States. She described how her life changed with the death of her mother, and her decision to finally study English. Hogarth spoked about her exchange student experience at Nazareth College in Kentucky where she learned English and taught French as well as earned an American degree in education in the early to mid-1960s. She talked about completing her master's degree in French language and literature at Laval University in Quebec City, Canada; and teaching at Anacostia Senior High School, Gordon Junior High School and Federal City College in Washington, DC. She retired from teaching in the early-1990s.

Hogarth described her work with Haitian migrant farm workers during summers, harvest time; first on the Eastern Shore of Maryland and later in Winchester, Virginia. She spoke about teaching English as a Second Language (ESL) to migrant workers in Salisbury, Maryland, under President Carter's Department of Health, Education, and Welfare; and the working conditions and everyday life of the migrant workers. Next, Hogarth described her work as an outreach interpreter with the DELMARVA Rural Ministries Health project in which she helped migrant people with interpretation and transportation.

Hogarth spoke about what she has done since her retirement, and her continued work and connection with the Haitian community. She talked about the current events and conditions in Haiti, Haitian people coming to the United States on boats, and the number of Haitian people dying in Haiti and during migration by boat. She explained that she has friends and extended relatives still in Haiti, and how she would like to go back to Haiti and help with rebuilding in Haiti when travel to Haiti is possible. After the interview, Hogarth explained her connection and Haiti's connection to Our Lady of Perpetual Help, located in southeast Washington, DC. Anne-Marie Hogarth was interviewed by J. Penn, circa 1995. Interview is in mostly English with minimal non-English language, most likely French or Haitian Creole. Digital audio files include white noise and static. Interviewee can be heard clearly for the most part; there are a few moments where interviewee voice's is very soft and difficult to hear.
General:
Associated documentation for this interview is available in the Anacostia Community Museum Archives.
Title created by ACMA staff using text written on sound cassette, contents of audio recording, textual transcript, and/or associated archival documentation.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Haitians  Search this
Women  Search this
Teachers  Search this
Women teachers  Search this
Emigration and immigration  Search this
Public schools  Search this
School integration  Search this
Black power  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Migration, Internal  Search this
Migrant labor  Search this
Migrant agricultural laborers  Search this
Agricultural laborers, Foreign  Search this
Foreign workers  Search this
boat people  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Citation:
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. Exhibition Records
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. Exhibition Records / Series 2: Research Files / Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa748c81eb6-601f-499e-989a-2ec1163c17fe
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-027-ref1872

Oral history interview with Arturo Griffiths

Interviewer:
Corporan, Héctor, 1945-  Search this
Names:
Griffiths, Arturo  Search this
Shaffer-Corona, Frank  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Digital files
1 Sound cassette
Culture:
Panamanians  Search this
West Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital files
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States -- Foreign relations
Panama
Canal Zone
Mount Pleasant (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1992 December 23
Scope and Contents:
Arturo Griffiths spoke about the creation of the Community Coalition, Multicultural Leadership Summit, and Multicultural Leadership Council after disturbances in the Mount Pleasant neighborhood in Washington, DC to address the needs of the Latino community and the Black community, and to bring communities together. And later, the creation and evolution of the Afro-Latino institute because the Latino community was not addressing their lack of inclusivity in regards to the Black community.

Griffiths explained United States foreign policy, including why Central Americans flee to the US; Latinos' goals living in the United States; Latinos' lack of understanding regarding United States history, current events, racism, and inclusivity; the isolation of the Black community in the US which led to a lack of knowledge regarding Black people from other parts of the world; the lack of relationship and connection between the Black community and Latino community as well as between the Black people in the US and Black people from the rest of the world; and the attempts by the Black community in the US to reach out to other communities in the US and their efforts were not reciprocated. Griffiths spoke about Latinos' struggle for empowerment and lack of voting power; Frank Shaffer-Corona, the first elected Latino in DC area and first Latino on school board; racism within the Latino community; the Latino community leadership's lack of Black representation; and how people from various ethnic groups identify themselves and which groups feel isolated.

Griffiths also spoke about his extended family history and ethnic background, which included West Indian and English ancestry; the racial segregation system, imposed by the United States, in the Canal Zone of Panama; the tension between Blacks of English descent and Blacks of Spanish descent; his politically active Afro-Panamanian father, who was forced out of Panama City and arrived in the United States in the middle of the Civil Rights movement; and his father's work in the US, including the organization of the Washington Ghetto Industrial Development and Investment Corporation to empower the ghettoes and Black communities economically through controlling the distribution of goods.

Griffiths spoke about his childhood in Panama City as a Black West Indian kid who spoke Spanish and was raised by his mother; his school experience; racism within his family; and his family's economic instability. He described what he knew about the United States prior to arriving in the United States; his family's migration to the United States, including their migration preparations in Panama; his first impressions arriving in the center of the Black community in northwest Washington, DC during the Civil Rights Movement; and the segregation and discrimination he witnessed in the US. Griffiths talked about playing basketball when he was young; clashing with the Black kids in the US because he was a foreigner and spoke Spanish; being a part of one of the gangs to survive; learning English; and living in both and between the Latino community and the Black community.

Arturo Griffiths was interviewed by Hector Corporan on December 23, 1992. Interview is in English and minimal Spanish. Digital audio files include white noise and static, and minimal background noise. Interviewee's voice is intelligible for the most part.
General:
Associated documentation for this interview is available in the Anacostia Community Museum Archives.
Title created by ACMA staff using text written on sound cassette, contents of audio recording, textual transcript, and/or associated archival documentation.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Afro-Panamanians  Search this
Black West Indians  Search this
Latin Americans  Search this
Black people -- Latin America  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Community activists  Search this
Community organization  Search this
Riots  Search this
Race relations  Search this
Racism  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Emigration and immigration  Search this
Government and politics  Search this
Black power  Search this
Cultural pluralism  Search this
Race  Search this
Identity  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Citation:
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. Exhibition Records
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. Exhibition Records / Series 2: Research Files / Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa728f20ff2-12bc-4938-b196-7dfc20bc18f8
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-027-ref1873

Oral history interview with Addie Green

Names:
Green, Adeletha "Addie"  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
3 Digital files
3 Sound cassettes
Culture:
Trinidadians  Search this
West Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital files
Sound cassettes
Place:
Trinidad
West Indies
England
Adams Morgan (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1992-1993
Scope and Contents:
Addie Green – owner, manager, and chef of The Islander, a restaurant located on Columbia Road in northwest Washington, DC – explained the boundaries of the Adams Morgan neighborhood. She talked in detail about her restaurant The Islander, her migration from Trinidad to England to the United States, her love for her country and childhood memories in Trinidad, her leadership in building the Caribbean community in the Washington, DC area, her mother's migration to and work in the United States, and the importance of cultural authenticity when organizing and running events, particularly carnivals and festivals. Note, Addie Green is also known as Adeletha "Addie" Green. Green explained The Islander specializes in Trinidadian cuisine but also cooks and serves foods from other Caribbean islands; the founding of the restaurant in 1978 and how the menu evolved; and she visits the islands to learn about the food and how to cook the food before she prepares it in her restaurant. She talked about the reviews she and The Islander have received from the press, including The Washington Post; and catering for government agencies, events, and festivals, including the Smithsonian Folklife Festival and Caribbean Festival Day.

Green talked about her experience traveling on a Norwegian ship to England, attending school in England, and marrying her American husband and birthing her first child in England. She explained why did not want to migrate to the United States; that racial differences, discrimination, and bias did not register for her until she arrived in the United States; her experience working in the United States; how and why she got involved in the food and restaurant industry; and her husband's reaction to her working outside of the house. Green also talked about cultural organizations, including the Trinidad-Tobago Association, Jamaican National, and West Indian American Cultural Organization; how and why the Caribbean community has changed in Washington, DC; carnival culture in Trinidad and how it differs from carnivals and festivals in the United States; and Trinidadian athletic societies represented in Washington DC area.

Interview is in English. Digital audio files include loud music and talking in background. Interviewee's voice is intelligible for the most part; interviewer's voice is soft and difficult to hear at times.
General:
Associated documentation for this interview is available in the Anacostia Community Museum Archives.
Title created by ACMA staff using text written on sound cassette, contents of audio recording, textual transcript, and/or associated archival documentation.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Women  Search this
Women cooks  Search this
Businesswomen  Search this
Caribbeans  Search this
Women-owned business enterprises  Search this
Restaurants  Search this
Cooking, Caribbean  Search this
Cooking, Trinidadian  Search this
Festivals  Search this
Communities  Search this
Associations, institutions, etc.  Search this
Emigration and immigration  Search this
Race discrimination  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Citation:
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. Exhibition Records
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. Exhibition Records / Series 2: Research Files / Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa74853a1ae-ffff-412a-a1d1-8d29472d83fc
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-027-ref1874

Conversation with Angela Newell and others

Names:
Newell, Angela  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Digital files
1 Sound cassette
Culture:
Panamanians  Search this
West Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital files
Sound cassettes
Place:
Canal Zone
Panama
West Indies
Latin America
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1993 May 26
Scope and Contents:
Contents of this audio recording is more of a discussion, rather than an interview, involving at least 3 people. According to transcription from physical asset, one of the people is Angela Newell. Discussion topics included extended family, including where they were born; where lived in Panama and neighbors; Creole language; education and teachers in Panama; leaving Panama; being in armed services, stationed in Korea; Panamanian community in Washington, DC; tension between "Spanish speaking Latinos" and Black Panamanians; relations between white Latinos and Black Latinos, and within the Black community; identifying self and how others identify others; Black people, citizenship, and land ownership; why Black people were pushed out of Panama; Black Panamanians and language; and the Panama Canal Zone.

Interview / discussion is in English and minimal Spanish. Digital audio files include very loud white noise and static; multiple and overlapping voices; and lots of background noise, sound interference, and/or sound distortions. Voices are difficult to hear and often unintelligible. Overall, very poor audio quality.
General:
Associated documentation for this interview is available in the Anacostia Community Museum Archives.
Title created by ACMA staff using text written on sound cassette, contents of audio recording, textual transcript, and/or associated archival documentation.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Afro-Panamanians  Search this
Latin Americans  Search this
Caribbeans  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Women  Search this
Identity  Search this
Citizenship  Search this
Language and languages  Search this
Emigration and immigration  Search this
Race  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Citation:
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. Exhibition Records
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. Exhibition Records / Series 2: Research Files / Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7a9024666-e248-4f38-ab5e-b9570e64ee9a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-027-ref1875

Oral history interview with Ato Ansah

Names:
Ansah, Ato  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Digital file
1 Sound cassette
Culture:
Africans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital files
Sound cassettes
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1992-1993
Scope and Contents:
Ato Ansah, a barber in Washington, DC, spoke about migrating to the United States in 1974; his path to becoming a barber, including cutting hair when he lived in Africa; his daily work as a barber; challenges as a barber; the barbershop where he worked, including the atmosphere; gaining confidence as a barber; stories; his clientele – white people and Black people, and all different ethnicities with all different types of hair; creating his own hairstyles; his love of cutting hair; the basic tools he used; educating people about the importance of hair grooming; who cuts his hair; and his future goals and dreams. Ansah explained which hairstyles he came across in the United States that related to hairstyles in Africa; Africans, as a whole, complain that both Black and white American barbers are only interested in money; and how Africans perceive his work as a barber.

Interview is in English. Digital audio files include minimal white noise and static, and minimal background noise. Interviewee's voice is intelligible.
General:
Associated documentation for this interview is available in the Anacostia Community Museum Archives.
Title created by ACMA staff using text written on sound cassette, contents of audio recording, textual transcript, and/or associated archival documentation.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Barbers  Search this
Barbering  Search this
Barbershops  Search this
Emigration and immigration  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Citation:
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. Exhibition Records
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. Exhibition Records / Series 2: Research Files / Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7ae82b2d0-7a6b-4f2f-aa57-24c9235d3f14
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-027-ref1876

Oral history interview with Mahama Bawa and customers

Interviewer:
Ansah, Ebow  Search this
Names:
Bawa, Mahama  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Digital files
1 Sound cassette
Culture:
Ghanaians  Search this
West Africans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital files
Sound cassettes
Place:
Ghana
Africa
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1992 November 17
Scope and Contents:
Mahama Bawa spoke about the origin and purpose of his African clothing store, Kobos, located in the Adams Morgan neighborhood of Washington, DC. He explained why he choose to sell African clothing; his passion for African culture, and his work selling African clothing and accessories; the impact of his store and work on the community; the African American community's acceptance of the store; and little support from the Ghanaian and West African community. Bawa also spoke about resources to learn African languages, Kwanzaa, his future plans, his wife and daughters, the meaning of African names, and the uses of Kente cloth and Kente cloth patterns. Bawa spoke about his educational experience, his parents, his family's West African ancestry, and being raised within his culture and living his culture, including African values. He also briefly spoke about his migration to the United States from Ghana, working in the foreign office of Ghana, coming to the US on professional training within the field of foreign affairs, and teaching African studies at American University.

Bawa described in detail jewelry, clothing, and other items sold in his store. The descriptions included what country the items are from, the materials the items are made of, how made they are made, and the ethnic and cultural history of the items. Bawa explained how he chooses the merchandise for the store, including working with small scale designers and tailors in West Africa, and African artisans located in Washington, DC. Customers spoke about why they visit the store, supporting African businesses, their families, and where they are from. Description and explanation of Kente cloth, cultural insensitivity, body politics, clothing as communication, and languages and dialects in Ghana were also discussed during these customer interviews. The recording also captured the atmosphere of the store, including the music played in the store and Bawa interacting with customers.

Mahama Bawa and customers were interviewed by Ebow Ansah. Interviews are in English. Digital audio files include white noise and static; loud buzzing sound during a portion of interview; and background noise. Interviewees' voices are intelligible for the most part.
General:
Associated documentation for this interview is available in the Anacostia Community Museum Archives.
Title created by ACMA staff using text written on sound cassette, contents of audio recording, textual transcript, and/or associated archival documentation.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Businesspeople  Search this
Teachers  Search this
Africans  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Clothing and dress  Search this
Dress accessories  Search this
Kente cloth  Search this
Fashion  Search this
Stores, Retail  Search this
Emigration and immigration  Search this
Kwanzaa  Search this
Language and languages  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Citation:
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. Exhibition Records
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. Exhibition Records / Series 2: Research Files / Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa79b04cc2d-8923-43cd-97ea-ad3b2aaa0be8
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-027-ref1877

Oral history interview with Betty Reyes

Names:
Reyes, Betty  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Digital file
1 Sound cassette
Culture:
Salvadorans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital files
Sound cassettes
Place:
El Salvador
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1993 June
Scope and Contents:
Betty Reyes, co-owner of restaurant El Tamarindo, spoke about the demographics of restaurant patrons, the evolution of the menu, source of food for restaurant, where and how often advertise, how neighborhood has changed since restaurant opened, why like working in restaurant, and why does not like working in restaurant. She identified the Salvadoran dishes on the menu, noted much of the menu is Mexican food at this location, and listed the ingredients of the horchata, her mother's recipe from El Salvador.

Reyes also spoke about her children, the food she cooks at home for her family, food from other cultures she eats, restaurants she eats at when she goes out to eat, the Salvadoran American cultural organization, her husband's involvement in a soccer fundraiser for children in El Salvador, her sister's restaurant in Wheaton, Maryland, and visiting El Salvador. She also explained why she moved to Washington, DC.

Interview is in English. Digital audio files include white noise and static, and background noise. Interviewee's voice is intelligible for the most part.
General:
Associated documentation for this interview is available in the Anacostia Community Museum Archives.
Title created by ACMA staff using text written on sound cassette, contents of audio recording, textual transcript, and/or associated archival documentation.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Women  Search this
Restaurateurs  Search this
Businesswomen  Search this
Restaurants  Search this
Family-owned business enterprises  Search this
Cooking, Salvadoran  Search this
Cooking, Mexican  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Citation:
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. Exhibition Records
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. Exhibition Records / Series 2: Research Files / Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa71eb82577-d0f5-46dd-96dd-d8198ae9f77d
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-027-ref1878

Oral history interview with Bill Brown

Interviewer:
Cadaval, Olivia, 1943-  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Barry, Marion, 1936-  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Digital files
1 Sound cassette
Culture:
Brazilians  Search this
Cubans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital files
Sound cassettes
Place:
Brazil
Boston (Mass.)
New York (N.Y.)
New Orleans (La.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1986 September 26
Scope and Contents:
Bill Brown spoke about organizing Brazilians for the Festival in Washington, DC; Cubans in Washington, DC organically starting the Festival; why the Cubans temporarily stopped participating in the Festival; the similarities and differences between the Festival in Washington, DC and Carnival in Brazil; the different groups and countries involved in the Festival; and who organized the different groups and countries for the Festival. He recounted, in detail, notable moments of the Festival over the years, including some controversies and conflict.

Brown explained what the Festival does for the community; how the Festival pulls the community, including different ethnicities and races, together; how Brazilians fit in with the rest of the Latino community in Washington, DC; how Brazilians immigrate to the United States; the voting power of the Latino community in Washington, DC; Mayor Marion Barry has protected the Latino community from immigration authorities; the relationship between the Latino community and the Black community; and the Smithsonian Institution's relationship with the Black community.

Brown also spoke about other festivals in the Washington, DC area and New York City; Brazilians being invited and participating in the Folklife Festival organized by the Smithsonian; his thoughts on the educational panels at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival; and the Brazilian community in New York, New Orleans, Boston, and Washington, DC region. Brown identified himself as a Black American, born in Washington, DC, with no Brazilian ancestry. He spoke out how he became involved with the Brazilian community; learning Spanish, Portuguese, and about Brazilian and Cuban culture, including Santeria; working in public health as a Peace Corps volunteer in Brazil; and his participation with Santeria. Bill Brown was interviewed by Olivia Cadaval. Interview is in English and minimal Portuguese. Digital audio files include loud white noise and static, and some loud background noise. Interviewee's voice is intelligible for the most part. During a few small portions of the interview, the interviewee stepped away from the microphone and could not be heard.
General:
Associated documentation for this interview is available in the Anacostia Community Museum Archives.
Title created by ACMA staff using text written on sound cassette, contents of audio recording, textual transcript, and/or associated archival documentation.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Latin Americans  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Festivals  Search this
Carnival -- Brazil -- Rio de Janeiro  Search this
Manners and customs  Search this
folklife  Search this
Emigration and immigration  Search this
Voting  Search this
Race  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Citation:
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. Exhibition Records
Black Mosaic: Community, Race, and Ethnicity among Black Immigrants in Washington, D. C. Exhibition Records / Series 2: Research Files / Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7349dfe18-5894-47cf-adda-09c587a1dbe6
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-027-ref1879

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