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Correspondence

Collection Creator:
Stephen Radich Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Extent:
2 Linear feet (Boxes 2-4)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1956-1979
Scope and Contents:
The majority of correspondence is regarding exhibitions, artwork loans, advertising, and orders. The files may include forms, lists, and other material related to nearby correspondence. Correspondence is with the Art Dealers Association of America, Dwan Gallery, Museum of Modern Art, Stendahl Galleries, other museums and galleries, artists, and arts publications.
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Stephen Radich Gallery records, 1942-1979. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.stepradi, Series 2
See more items in:
Stephen Radich Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-stepradi-ref12

Art Dealers Association of America

Collection Creator:
Stephen Radich Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Container:
Box 2, Folder 7-9
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1967-1971
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Stephen Radich Gallery records, 1942-1979. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Stephen Radich Gallery records
Stephen Radich Gallery records / Series 2: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-stepradi-ref19

Pullman Palace Car Company Photographs

Creator:
Pullman Palace Car Co.  Search this
Donor:
Pullman-Standard  Search this
Names:
Lincoln, Robert Todd  Search this
Pullman, George M., 1831-1897  Search this
Extent:
128.5 Cubic feet (147 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Glass plate negatives
Photographs
Date:
circa 1882-1955
Summary:
Collection consists of approximately 13,500 images (original photographs, copy prints, and film and glass plate negatives) for freight, passenger, private, and street and rapid transit cars manufactured by the Pullman Palace Car Company. The collection contains primarily early railroad Americana, including interior and exterior views of private and business cars as well as passenger and street cars. The collection is an important part of the historical record of the railroad car-building industry as well as the history of architecture and interior design.
Scope and Contents:
The collection consists of approximately 13,500 images (original photographs, copy prints, and film and glass plate negatives) for freight, passenger, private, and street and rapid transit cars manufactured by the Pullman Palace Car Company. The collection contains primarily interior and exterior views of private and business cars as well as passenger and street cars. The collection is an important part of the historical record of the railroad car-building industry as well as the history of architecture and interior design. Historians, designers, railroad enthusiasts, model railroad hobbyists, scholars, and others will find this collection useful.

The glass plate negatives in this collection were produced using the wet collodion process, which was introduced to the United States in 1855 and used into the 1880s. The plates were coated with chemicals, sensitized, exposed and developed, all while the plate was wet. Later, Pullman photographers used the dry collodion process. This process involved using glass plates with a photographic emulsion of silver halides suspended in gelatin. This process had shorter exposure times.

George Pullman assembled a variety of photographers to document his company's work. The photography was primarily used as a record of work, especially for the Operating Department and Manufacturing Department at Pullman, as well as for prospective corporate customers.

Before establishing an in-plant photographic department in 1888, Pullman relied on local photographers. Some of the photographers included John Jex Bardwell, Wylie Dennison, Henry R. Koopman, J. W. Taylor, Thomas S. Johnson, Wylie Dennison, John P. Van Vorst, Clayton Ford Smith, Joseph McAllister, Melvin C. Horn, Ernie Stutkus, and Donald J. O'Barski. Many of the photographers signed the glass plates using their initials. For example, John P. Van Vorst signed his J.P.V.V.

Photography of Pullman activities began in the Detroit Shops (property of the Detroit Car & Manufacturing Co. which was purchased by Pullman in 1873 and operated as the Detroit Shops of Pullman) in the 1870s and expanded to include photographing the town of Pullman, steel car construction, shop accidents, workers, panoramic views, and in some instances, for company publications. In-plant photography was started with Wylie Dennison in 1888. Dennison was the first full-time Pullman photographer, and he created the Pullman Photographic Department. Dennison instituted the practice of recording each photograph, noting the negative number, description of the car, the type of view (typically one interior view and one exterior view) and lot number. All of Dennison's photography was done outside in the daylight.

The negative numbers assigned to the glass plates were identified with a "lot" number. The lot number identified the production order, and in later years, the plan number was added, designating the layout of the car. Photographing one car out of each new lot was the intital practice, but over-time, the Photographic Department began taking six or more views of the interior and exterior as well as end views.

Lot numbers include:

Lots 1 - 500 (Pullman Car Works - Chicago)

Lots 1 - 500 (Detroit Car Works)

Lots 500 plus (can be freight and passenger mixed)

Lots 1000 to 4999 (Pullman passenger equipment)

Lots 5000 to 5999 (Pullman freight equipment)

Lots 5000 + Haskell and Barker (Pullman overlap)

Lots 6000 to 7000+ (Pullman and P-S passenger)

Lots 8000 to 9999 (Pullman freight equipment)

Lots 10000+ (Pullman freight equipment)

Series 1, Original prints, circa 1880-1949, are arranged numerically by Pullman numbers. The original prints begin with number 7343 and end with number 33091. The photographs document Pullman cars, including freight, passenger, private, and street railway/rapid transit. Many of the images depict interior views of the cars, and there are some views of porters and passengers. There is some documentation of the workmen constructing the cars. The prints are primarily 8" by 10" black-and-white and were originally bound into books and backed on linen. The prints were unbound at some time. Many of the original prints bear an embossed stamp "Built by Pullman Car and Manufacturing Corporation Chicago." Some photographs are sepia-tone and there are no negatives for these prints.

Series 2, Copy prints, 1885-1955, consists of prints made from the glass plate negatives by the Smithsonian photographic services office. The copy prints were originally stored in loose binders but were re-housed into folders and arranged numerically according to the original Pullman Company number. The number is typically found in the lower right corner of the image. The copy prints are black-and-white and are either 5" x 7" or 8" x 10".

Series 3, Film negatives, 1917-1955, consists of film negatives (4" x 5" and 8" x 10") that are arranged numerically by Pullman numbers. In some instances, information on the enclosure includes the type of car (e.g. sleeper, freight), the name of the car if applicable, name of railroad company, geographical information, and date(s). In some instances, "repro," or "broken glass" are recorded. For negatives that did not conform to the Pullman numbering system, the container list provides additional information. For example, Haskell and Barker Car Company (Haskell and Barker merged with the Pullman Company in 1922) machine shop views, or Pullman cars in St. Paul, Minnesota are recorded in the collection inventory listing.

Series 4, Glass plate negatives, [circa 1882-1948], is divided into two subseries, Subseries 1, 6" x 8" negatives and Subseries 2, 8" x 10" negatives. The series consists of approximately 13,500 glass plate negatives arranged by Pullman Company negative number. The negatives document primarily Pullman cars, including freight, passenger, private and street railway/rapid transit. Many of the images depict interior and exterior views of the cars and some views of porters and passengers. The interior views include details such as seating, window treatments, lighting fixtures, bathroom fixtures, wood paneling, marquetry work, fabrics, floor treatments, and other furnishings. There is some documentation of the construction of the cars by workmen in the factory.

The negative numbers and lot numbers are etched on the glass plates. Overall the series is in good condition, although there are some broken plates which have been separated. The negatives are not inclusive and some plates are missing, or there are two copies. If plates are missing or additional copies exist, this is noted in the collection inventory. In some instances, plates are labeled 3937 and then 3937-A. This numbering distinguished two different views/angles of the same car.

Many of the envelope enclosures contain the negative number, sometimes preceed by the letter "P" (e.g. P9597), lot number (L4700), and in some instances, text describing the negative. Text typically includes the type of car (sleeper, freight), the name of the car if applicable, name of railroad company, geographical information, and date(s). If a copy print was created from the negative plate, the enclosure is stamped "printed." However, this practice was not consistent. Plates that were not printed are occasionally noted, but not with any consistency.

The 6" by 8" glass plates numbered 82-4130 to 82-4167, represent numbers assigned by the Office of Photographic Services, Smithsonian Institution. Previously labeled "Pullman" on the enclosures, the plates primarily document engines and passenger cars for the New York, New Haven, & Hartford Railroad, 1870-1890 and undated. The plates do not have Pullman negative numbers etched in the lower left or right corners and it is unclear if these plates belong to this collection.

Series 5, Indices, 1990 and undated include bound, typescript indices to the Pullman negatives. Created by the National Museum of American History, Division of Transportation (now known as the Division of Work and Industry), the indices include listings by railroad, private cars, freight cars, street cars and rapid transit, and Pullman negatives. The indices provide the name of the railroad/railway (e.g. Chicago & Alton), type of car (e.g. coal car or box car), number, lot, remarks (e.g. baggage area), year, type of view (e.g. exterior or interior) and frame number (for the laser disc).

One index is a supplemental guide listing sepia tone prints for which no negative exists in our collection. The indices for the negative listings on laser discs one and two are available. However, the actual lasers discs are missing.

References

Horn, Don. "The Pullman Photographers," Railroad Heritage, No. 7, 2003, pp. 5-13.

Arnold, Rus. "This Negative File was a Sleeper." Technical Photography. May 1970, pp. 21-XX.

Pullman State Historic Site, http://www.pullman-museum.org/theCompany/timeline.html (last accessed April 18, 2011)
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into five series.

Series 1, Original prints, 1904-1949

Series 2, Copy prints, 1885-1955

Series 3, Film negatives, undated

Series 4, Glass plate negatives, circa 1882-1948

Series 5, Indices, 1990 and undated
Biographical / Historical:
Recognizing a market for luxurious rail travel, George M. Pullman, who had earlier experimented with sleeping car construction and was wealthy from the provisioning and transporting of Colorado miners in the early 1860s, incorporated the Pullman's Palace Car Company in 1867. By the 1870s his operations were already national and included the operation of sleeping cars under contract with the nation's railroads, the manufacture of cars at the Detroit Works, and the creation of subsidiary firms serving Great Britain and Europe. In the three decades before the turn of the century, the prosperous company grew enormously and included a much heralded model company town adjacent to the new car works at Pullman, Illinois. Acclaim turned to condemnation following the nationwide strike that originated at the Pullman Car Works in 1894. Pullman died in 1897, two years before his company absorbed its last major competitor, the Wagner Palace Car Company, which had been financed by the Vanderbilts.

The Pullman's Palace Car Company entered the twentieth century with a new name, the Pullman Company, and a new president, Robert Todd Lincoln. An extremely profitable virtual monopoly, the Pullman Company began replacing its wood cars with safer all steel bodied models (heavyweights) in its newly segregated manufacturing department and at the same time (1906) came under the regulation of the Interstate Commerce Commission. From 1918 to 1920, the United States Railroad Administration, citing the war emergency, assumed control of the operating arm of the firm, renamed the Pullman Car Lines for the duration of federal control.

The Pullman Company reached its peak during the 1920s, manufacturing new heavyweight cars at a rapid pace. Seeking to expand its freight car production, Pullman merged with the Haskell and Barker Car Company in 1922. Edward F. Carry and his Haskell and Barker associates assumed the presidency and other executive positions in the enlarged Pullman Company. More reorganization took place in 1924, when the Pullman Company Manufacturing Department became a distinct firm, the Pullman Car and Manufacturing Corporation, and in 1927, when a parent or holding company, Pullman Incorporated, was created to oversee the two subsidiary firms. In 1929, following Carry's death, President David A. Crawford engineered the merger of the Pullman Car and Manufacturing Corporation with the Standard Steel Car Company, forming the Pullman-Standard Car Manufacturing Company.

During the first three decades of the twentieth century Pullman sought to impede the unionization of its workers by offering new benefits, including a pension plan in 1914, a death benefit plan in 1922, and a plan of group insurance in 1929. F. L. Simmons' Industrial Relations Department, created in 1920, also directed the formation of company-sponsored occupationally-based unions under the plan of employee representation. A. Philip Randolph's Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters and other unions would not successfully organize company workers until the New Deal Railway Labor Act of 1934 forbade corporate interference in union matters. The Depression marked the end of Pullman prosperity. Both the number of car orders and sleeping car passengers declined precipitously. The firm laid off car plant and service workers, reduced fares, and introduced such innovations as the single occupancy section in an effort to fill its cars. During this decade the firm built fewer new cars, but it added air conditioning to its existing heavyweights and remodeled many into compartment sleepers.

In 1940, just as orders for lightweight cars were increasing and sleeping car traffic was growing, the United States Department of Justice filed an anti-trust complaint against Pullman Incorporated in the U. S. District Court at Philadelphia (Civil Action No. 994). The government sought to separate the company's sleeping car operations from its manufacturing activities. In 1944 the court concurred, ordering Pullman Incorporated to divest itself of either the Pullman Company (operating) or the Pullman-Standard Car Manufacturing Company (manufacturing). After three years of negotiations, the Pullman Company was sold to a consortium of fifty-seven railroads for around forty million dollars. Carroll R. Harding was named president of this new Pullman Company. The new Pullman Company started out optimistically in 1947 with good passenger traffic figures, but the years following brought steady and marked decline. Regularly scheduled lines were cancelled; all shops except St. Louis and Chicago were closed; employees were furloughed, and major railroad owners such as the New York Central and Pennsylvania Railroad totally or partially withdrew from service. On January 1, 1969, at the age of 102, the Pullman Company ceased operation, though it maintained a small central office staff to wind up affairs and handle an equal pay-for-equal-work lawsuit (Denver Case) that continued in the courts until 1981.

John H. White (1933-), historian and curator, collected the Pullman photographs in 1969. White was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, and graduated with a bachelors of arts in history from Miami University Ohio in 1958. Shortly after receiving his degree, He joined the staff of the Smithsonian Institution as Assistant Curator of the Division of Transportation, Department of Science and Technology, Museum of History and Technology. White later became Associate Curator of the Division, 1961-1966, Curator, 1967-1985, and Senior Historian, 1986-1989. White specialized in land transportation, particularly the history of railroads.

White worked closely with Arthur Detmers Dubin (1923-) to acquire the Pullman photographs for the museum. Dubin was an avid train enthusiast and collector, and he frequently used the Pullman "archives" for his own research on railroads. Dubin was born in Chicago, Illinois and began his architectural education at the University of Michigan in 1941 but his education was interrupted by World War II, and he served with distinction in the United States Army until 1946. After completing his studies in 1949, Dubin joined his father's and uncle's architectural firm, Dubin and Dubin, as a second--eneration architect. The leadership of the firm soon passed to Arthur and his brother, Martin David, and in 1965 they were joined by John Black and in 1966 by John Moutoussamy. Arthur's life--ong interest in trains and transportation and their implications for architecture is evident in transit stations commissions and service on transportation--elated advisory boards (Dubin was a member of the Illinois Railroad Commission), as well as in his writings and personal collections.

In July, 1966, Dubin contacted then Vice President of Public Relations at Pullman-Standard E. Preston Calvert about the history and future of the photographic negative plates. Dubin appealed to Calvert to preserve these materials. Dubin and White were also in contact by correspondence and in June, 1967, White contacted Calvert also, stating that the Chicago Historical Society or Illinois State Historical Society should be offered the plates as a first option. Failing a local Illinois repository accepting the materials, White indicated that the Smithsonian would accept the negatives.

During the spring of 1968, White, working with Dubin and Nora Wilson, editor of the company's publications, coordinated a visit by White to Chicago to examine the photographic negatives at the Pullman Car Works factory in south Chicago. In April 1968, White examined the vast collection of glass plate negatives (approximately 20,000). From April, 1968 to August, 1969, Pullman-Standard and the Smithsonian negotiated acquisition details, including shipping and related costs. In August, 1969, White returned to complete the task of sorting the glass plates, discarding broken plates, and weeding repetitive views. He selected approximately 13,500 glass plates. Views of Pullman towns were donated to the Chicago Historical Society. Dubin appraised the photographic plates and film negatives, presumably on behalf of Pullman-Standard, and estimated the plates to be worth between $54,000 and $67,500 dollars.

References

Historical note courtesy Martha T. Briggs and Cynthia H. Peters, Guide to Pullman Company Archives, The Newberry Library, Chicago, 1995.

Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago Area Architects Oral History Project http://www.artic.edu/aic/resources/resource/734?search_id=1 (last accessed on February 23, 2011)

John H. White papers, 1959-1989, Record Unit 007384, Smithsonian Institution Archives, Washington, D.C.

Telephone conversation of Alison Oswald, archivist, with John H. White, April 14, 2011.
Related Materials:
Materials in the Archives Center

Pullman Palace Car Company Materials, 1867-1979 (AC0181)

John H. White, Jr. Railroad Reference Collection, 1880s-1990 (AC0523)

Materials in Other Organizations

•Art Institute of Chicago

•Bombardier Corporation

•California State Railroad Museum

•Chicago History Museum

•Arthur Dubin Collection at Lake Forest College

•Illinois Railway Museum

•Indiana University Northwest's Calumet Regional Archives

Pullman-Standard Railroad Car Manufacturing Company Personnel Records—Personnel Record Series CRA 314 This index of employee names was created from the original personnel cards housed at Indiana University Northwest's Calumet Regional Archives from the Indiana locations. Although the records are not complete from the Michigan City plant for the entire period from 1912 to the 1970's, there may be information that will assist researchers with finding key details of a family member. The Hammond Pullman plant was merged with the Haskell Barker Company of Michigan City in 1922.

•Newberry Library, Chicago

The Pullman Company archives at the Newberry Library consists of 2,500 cubic feet of records from the Pullman Company and Pullman heirs. The collection is comprised of business archives of the Pullman Palace Car Company from 1867 and includes records of the entire firm up to the 1924 split into operating (sleeping car operation, service, and repair) and manufacturing companies. From 1924 to 1981 the records chronicle the activities of the operating company only.

•Pennsylvania State Archives

•Pullman State Historic Site

•Pullman Technology (Harvey, Illinois)

•Smithsonian Institution Archives

•South Suburban Genealogical & Historical Society (South Holland, Illinois)
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Pullman-Standard Company, through Nora Wilson, editor of employee publications for the Department of Public Relations and Advertising, on October 8, 1969.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but the negatives are stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Special arrangements required to view original glass plate and film negatives due to cold storage. Using negatives requires a three hour waiting period. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Rights:
Copyright held by the Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Freight cars  Search this
Railroads -- Dining-car service  Search this
Roomette car  Search this
Hospital cars  Search this
Dining cars  Search this
Hotel car  Search this
Sleeping cars (Railroads)  Search this
Local transit  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass plate negatives
Photographs -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film -- 1890-1900
Photographs -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film -- 1900-1950
Citation:
Pullman Palace Car Company Photographs, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1175
See more items in:
Pullman Palace Car Company Photographs
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1175
Online Media:

Gig Harbor -- Hillside Gardens

Landscape architect:
Adams, R. David  Search this
Provenance:
Tacoma Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Hillside Gardens (Gig Harbor, Washington)
United States of America -- Washington -- Pierce County -- Gig Harbor
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, a garden plan, and narrative description by owner.
General:
Two major loops form the design of this two-acre garden. The first begins at the pond that fronts the Asian-style home. Inside the gate, is a "Sweet Pea Teeppee," several Peony trees and samples of cement art made by the owner. A series of planned plateaus provides places for roses, strawberries, verbena, and vegetables.These plateaus, as well as the entire garden, are managed by a 26 zone sprinkling system, two wells and a large holding tank. A waterfall ends in a natural looking pond surrounded by a rock garden to form the entry garden.
Person(s) associated with the garden include: R. David Adams (landscape architect, 1994).
Related Materials:
Hillside Gardens related holdings consist of 1 folder (11 35 mm. slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Washington (State) -- Gig Harbor  Search this
Water gardens  Search this
Rock gardens  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File WA035
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Washington
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref11412

Vancouver -- Helene Schoen Garden

Landscape designer:
Shephard, Frank  Search this
Gardener:
Garner, Randy  Search this
Provenance:
The Portland Garden Club  Search this
The Portland Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Helene Schoen Garden (Vancouver, Washington)
United States of America -- Washington -- Clark County -- Vancouver
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes a worksheet, a garden plan, and 15 color photographs.
General:
This 1.5-acre garden site was established in 1944. Located within sight of the Columbia River, it is constructed along a hillside with several paths taking the garden visitor down the hill. Plantings include a collection of rhododendrons and magnolias and other flowering shrubs, a collection of bulbs, and a very well maintained rose garden. A swimming pool is on the second level surrounded by conifers and Japanese maples.
Persons associated with the garden include: Frank Shephard (landscape designer, 1944-?) and Randy Garner (gardener, 1979 to date).
Related Materials:
Helene Schoen Garden related holdings consist of 1 folder (19 35 mm. slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Washington (State) -- Vancouver.  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File WA026
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Washington
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref11428

Milwaukee -- Pickerel Run

Provenance:
Green Tree Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Pickerel Run (Milwaukee, Wisconsin)
United States of America -- Wisconsin -- Milwaukee County -- Milwaukee
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes a work sheet, site plans, and narrative description.
General:
The decorative arts and architecture from 17th century New England served as inspiration for this garden. The site for the garden was prepared in fall of 1981 and built in spring 1982. The layout of the raised geometric beds, gravel paths, and picket fence was modeled after early Colonial designs. The central beds are devoted to herbs. The outer beds hold perennial flowers, similar to those of Colonial New England. By contrast, the garden beds around the house are filled with native plants. A knot garden of green velvet boxwood, inspired by an inlay design on an early 18th century Pennsylvania chest, was added to the kitchen terrace. The beds adjacent to the knot garden, composted only of green and white white, service as a "restful haven under the shade of the the surrounding giant oak trees."
Persons and firms associated with the garden include: Aimee Scott Sheets (horticulturist, 2001-?).
Related Materials:
Pickerel Run related holdings consist of 1 folder (22 35 mm. slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Wisconsin -- Milwaukee  Search this
Raised bed gardening  Search this
Formal gardens  Search this
Herb gardens  Search this
Woodland gardens  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File WI037
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Wisconsin
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref11677

Oconomowoc -- Tatterdemalion

Former owner:
Cran, C. R.  Search this
Sherry, Avery  Search this
Beverung, William  Search this
Landscape architect:
Griggs, Judson  Search this
Consultant:
Sproule, Michael  Search this
Gardener:
Johnson, Kyle  Search this
Johnson, Trevor  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Tatterdemalion (Oconomowoc, Wisconsin)
United States of America -- Wisconsin -- Waukesha County -- Oconomowoc
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes a worksheet and narrative description, a copy of the garden plan, and a plant list. The garden is noted for its Edwardian strolling garden, boxwood plantings, and roses, all complementing the arts and crafts style lakeside cottage.
General:
The gardens of Tatterdemalion, situated on a two-acre site, are designed to complement this 1907 arts and crafts style lakeside cottage. The wrap-around porch is surrounded by a stone terrace edged with tea roses and a lavender hedge. Steps to the west lead across the drive to an Edwardian strolling garden, bordered by an antique 1850 wrought iron fence, acquired in Madison, Indiana. Gently curving paths radiate from a circular path which encloses a weeping crabapple tree surrounded by lamb's ears. A low box hedge curves around in a flowing line to define the lawn. A semi-circle of purple lilacs and white Blanc Double de Coubert roses frame a bronze statue of Mercury.
Hemlocks and viburnums screen the adjoining property and form the backround for antique rose bushes, the mainstay of the garden. Flowering continues throughout the summer with the addition of pastel old-fashioned flowers. A dooryard fern garden on the north side of the house faces a small orchard. To the east is a Victorian reflecting pool centered in a semi-circular enclosure of shrubs. A wisteria and rose-covered arbor frames the view into the garden.
Persons associated with the property include: C. R. Cran (former owner, 1907-1939); Avery Sherry (former owner, 1939-1957); William Beverung (former owner, 1957-1986); Judson Griggs (landscape architect, 1987-1998); Michael Sproule (consultant, 1995-1997); Kyle Johnson (hardscape gardener, 1998); and Trevor Johnson (hardscape gardener, 1998).
Related Materials:
Tatterdemalion related holdings consist of 1 folder (29 35 mm. slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Wisconsin -- Oconomowoc  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File WI025
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Wisconsin
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref11680

Georgia S. Vance Slides

Creator:
Vance, Georgia S.  Search this
Provenance:
The Augusta Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides (photographs)
Scope and Contents:
This series of 35mm slides includes images of flower arrangements and various public and private American and European gardens visited by Georgia S. Vance. The collection covers the period from the 1950s to the 1990s with the bulk of images dating from the 1950s to the 1970s. Slides depicting flower arrangements represent both personal and professional arrangements by Vance; several appear in her book, The Decorative Art of Dried Flower Arrangement. The collection also includes images of Vance's own garden in Alexandria, Virginia.
Biographical / Historical:
Georgia Shank Vance (July 29, 1908 - November 17, 2002) was noted for her talent of preserving and arranging dried flowers. A native of Harrisonburg, Virginia, she married James Davis Vance, Sr., an Army Colonel, in 1935. Georgia Vance was a graduate of Hood College in Frederick, Maryland, and in the 1960s began a career in floral design. For more than 35 years, her flower arrangements decorated the Diplomatic Reception Rooms at the U.S. Department of State as well as the White House and other historic homes. Her book, The Decorative Art of Dried Flower Arrangement, published in 1972, received the Helen S. Hull Award for Literary Horticultural Interest from the National Council of State Garden Clubs. She lectured nationally and conducted flower arrangement workshops at her home, Short Glade Farm, which she and her husband purchased in 1973 in Mount Solon, Virginia. Georgia Vance was a member of the Garden Club of America, the Garden Club of Virginia, the Garden Club of Alexandria (Virginia), and the Officer's Wives Garden Club of Fort Belvoir (Virginia). The Georgia S. Vance Award for Most Creative Arrangement, presented annually by the Garden Club of Virginia, was named in her honor.
Related Materials:
Georgia S. Vance Slides related holdings consist of approximately 430 35mm slides (photographs)
Documentation on Short Glade Farm, Vance's garden in Mount Solon, Virginia, is included in the Garden Club of America Collection at the Archives of American Gardens.
Provenance:
The slides were donated on behalf of the Augusta Garden Club of Staunton, Virginia to the Archives of American Gardens in September 2013.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Flower arrangement  Search this
Dried flower arrangement  Search this
Gardens -- Virginia  Search this
Gardens -- Florida  Search this
Gardens -- England  Search this
Gardens -- France  Search this
Gardens -- Germany  Search this
Gardens -- Australia  Search this
Gardens -- Austria  Search this
Genre/Form:
Slides (photographs)
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref30017

Tacoma -- Point Defiance Park

Landscape architect:
Hare & Hare  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
United States of America -- Washington -- Pierce County -- Tacoma
Scope and Contents:
20 35mm slides and 1 folder. The folder includes a site appraisal, history, brochures, and newspaper articles.
General:
This 698 acre public park was established in 1888. It features a Japanese-styled garden with a Shinto Shrine and Torii Gate given to the city in 1961 from Sister City Kitakyushu, Japan and were relocated to the Japanese Garden on April 29, 1982. The Pagoda was designed by Luther Twitchwell and built in 1914. It is a replica of a 17th century Japanese lodge structure and not a true pagoda.

Persons associated with the property include Hare & Hare (landscape architect), Metropolitan Park District (owner), Luther Twitchwell (designer of the pagoda), 1914).
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Washington (State) -- Tacoma  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File WA019
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Washington
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref32632

Fox Point -- Deep Dene

Provenance:
Green Tree Garden Club  Search this
Landscape architect:
Stark, Judith Z.  Search this
Lipp, Franz, 1897-1996  Search this
Owner:
Bryson, Olive V. D.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Deep Dene (Fox Point, Wisconsin)
United States of America -- Wisconsin -- Milwaukee County -- Fox Point
Scope and Contents:
1 folder and 14 digital images. Images 001-014 were photographed by Sandy Dawson.
General:
Located on approximately five acres overlooking Lake Michigan, the owner of this garden had been gardening on the property since she was five years old. The original design included formal gardens, beds of iris and phlox, wildflowers in the surrounding ravines, and a large vegetable garden. Landscape architect Franz Lipp designed a circle of yews, two large hedged gardens, a boundary garden and a stone wall, all placed at a distance from the house to be visited as a pastime. In 1990 a garden room with French doors was built so a new rose garden could be seen and enjoyed from inside. A nine-foot tall dark green lattice fence was installed to protect the rose garden from deer. The design is formal with four parterres each centered by a rose standard with multiple bushes in each quadrant, climbing hydrangea on the fence, and a small central pool with a statue. Lush annual, perennial and shrub borders are maintained alongside the terrace, stone wall and another fountain with mature maple and crab apple dotting the lawns.

Favorite roses include Mr. Lincoln, Double Delight, Chicago Peace, Legends, and Drop Dead Red. The garden borders include day lilies and Asiatic lilies, peonies, boxwood, hosta, zinnias, dusty miller, marigolds, geraniums and more roses. Visitors include art students and members of the Garden Conservancy.

Persons associated with the garden include: Helen and William Van Dyke (former owners, 1926-1972); Olive V. D. Bryson (owner, 1972- ); Franz Lipp (1897-1996) (landscape architect, dates unknown); Judith Stark (landscape architect, 1990).
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Wisconsin -- Deep Dene  Search this
Rose gardens  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File WI058
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Wisconsin
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref33212

Unidentified -- Canadian Rockies

Creator:
Lockwood, W. A., Mrs.  Search this
Bulkley, Jonathan Mrs  Search this
Stewart, John A. Mrs  Search this
Sloan, Samuel Mrs  Search this
Lynch, John H. Mrs  Search this
duPont, Pierre Mrs  Search this
Morse, Robert C. Mrs  Search this
Williams, Percy C. Mrs  Search this
Thomas, James R. Mrs  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Canada -- Alberta -- Lake Louise
Canada -- Alberta -- Canadian Rockies
Canada -- Alberta
General:
The 1930 Annual Meeting of the Garden Club of America (GCA) took place in Seattle, Washington, in July, with pre-meeting tours to the Northwest United States and Canada. Before the annual meeting, GCA members toured Banff and Lake Louise in Alberta, and Victoria in British Columbia. After the meeting GCA members went on tours of Mount Rainier, Tacoma, Washington, and Portland, Oregon, and Yellowstone National Park.
The nine glass slides of the Canadian Rockies and Lake Louise in Alberta, Canada in this series appear to have been commercially produced by the Victor Animatograph Corporation in Davenport, Iowa. It is unlikely that their source images were taken during the GCA trip.
Persons associated with the trip include: Mrs. W. A. Lockwood, President; Mrs. Jonathan Bulkley, Vice President, New York; Mrs. John A. Stewart, Jr., Ex-President, New York; Mrs. Samuel Sloan, Ex-President, New York; Mrs. John Lynch, Secretary, Connecticut; Mrs. Pierre duPont, Director, Delaware;Mrs. Robert C. Morse, Director, Boston, Mass.; Mrs. Percy C. Williams, Connecticut; and Mrs. James R. Thomas, Director, West Virgina.
Related Materials:
Canadian Rockies related holdings consist of 1 folder (9 lantern slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File CAN010
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 2: International Garden Images / Canada
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref4153

The Butchart Gardens: stone cliffs and ledges from an old quarry used as design elements with herbaceous and woody plant material and lawns for the sunken garden.

Colorist:
Van Altena, Edward  Search this
Former owner:
Butchart, Robert Pim  Search this
Butchart, Jennie  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Extent:
1 Lantern slide (col., 3 x 5 in.)
Type:
Archival materials
Lantern slides
Place:
Butchart Gardens, The (Victoria, British Columbia, Canada)
Canada -- British Columbia -- Victoria
Date:
[1930?]
General:
Persons associated with the garden include Robert P. and Jennie Butchart (former owners).
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Cliffs  Search this
Trees  Search this
Flower beds  Search this
Lawns  Search this
Thuja  Search this
Gardens -- Canada -- British Columbia -- Victoria  Search this
Genre/Form:
Lantern slides
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, Item CAN006005
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 2: International Garden Images / Canada / CAN006: Victoria -- The Butchart Gardens
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref4154

Sutton Courtenay -- Sutton Courtenay Manor House

Garden designer:
Lindsay, Norah Bourke, 1873-1948  Search this
Former owner:
Lindsay, Norah Bourke, 1873-1948  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Sutton Courtenay Manor House (Sutton Courtenay, Oxfordshire, England)
United Kingdom -- England -- Oxfordshire -- Sutton Courtenay
General:
Although various parts of the Sutton Courtenay Manor House were built between the 13th through 17th centuries, development of its gardens did not occur until the early 20th century. Norah Bourke Lindsay, who became an influential garden designer in England after World War I, lived in the house and created its gardens, which demonstrate the influence of Gertrude Jekyll and William Robinson. The property was visited by the Garden Club of America on June 11, 1929, during its English garden tour. At that time the property was in Berkshire, but in 1974 county boundary changes transferred it to Oxfordshire. Two of the six lantern slides in the Archives of American Gardens collection were produced from images taken during the tour by Mrs. P. H. Williams, while the others may have been made from images taken by other tour participants or may have been produced commercially. A complete copy of the GCA tour itinerary was printed in the Bulletin of the Garden Club of America (Fourth Series, No. 5), September 1929, pp. 6-25.
Persons associated with the garden include Norah Bourke Lindsay (former owner and garden designer, 1895-1948).
Related Materials:
Sutton Courtenay Manor House related holdings consist of 1 folder (6 lantern slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- England -- Oxfordshire -- Sutton Courtenay  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File ENG014
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 2: International Garden Images / United Kingdom -- England
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref4485

Newport -- Wildacre

Former owner:
Olmsted, Albert H.  Search this
Greeley, Howard  Search this
Bennett, Thomas  Search this
Newlin, Lilian  Search this
Fissell, Ethel  Search this
Claggett, C. Thomas  Search this
Bove, Maria  Search this
Bove, Michael III  Search this
de Savary, Peter  Search this
Hamilton, Dorrance H.  Search this
Garden designer:
Hamilton, Dorrance H.  Search this
Architect:
Gill, Irving, 1870-1936  Search this
Spencer, Madison  Search this
Landscape architect:
Olmsted, Frederick Law, Jr., 1870-1957  Search this
Olmsted Brothers  Search this
Olmsted, Frederick Law, 1822-1903  Search this
Gardener:
Quarry, Dave  Search this
Landscape designer:
Flanagan, Mary Ellen  Search this
Provenance:
Newport Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Wildacre (Newport, Rhode Island)
United States of America -- Rhode Island -- Newport -- Newport
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, oversize photocopies of original plans, images, and articles.
General:
The Olmsted Brothers' 1901 design for the one-acre gardens within a seven-acre seaside property exemplified the great interest in Japonism at that time, featuring a koi pond, tea shelter, and thatch roofed parasols. The landscape design complemented California architect Irving John Gill's 1902 house, described as an Arts & Crafts variation on the New England shingle style with oriental features. The site is a rocky outcropping above a salt water cove and the gardens highlighted natural features such as rocky outcroppings while preserving the wild character of the location. Wildacre, also known as the Japanese garden, was designed as a strolling garden with both open views of the ocean and composed garden rooms. Nearly 100 years later the garden was rejuvenated with reference to the original Olmsted plans and drawings.
The restoration included planting replacement specimen trees and adding a mixed layer of deciduous and evergreen trees as a privacy barrier along the road since the property had been reduced to 2.5 acres. A dense privet hedge clipped to resemble waves that acts as a buffer against the ocean was restored, and a gravel bocce court was installed nearby. Mostly white flowering trees, shrubs, bulbs and perennials were included in the predominantly green planting scheme. Gardens include the Japanese-themed entrance garden with a momi fir planted by Olmsted, a new Zen garden, a wisteria-covered tea shelter and surrounding garden, a pond garden, iris garden, peony garden, mountain garden and mountain top built from local rock. Many varieties of hosta, ferns, ornamental grasses, succulents, mosses, azaleas and conifers were planted throughout the property.
Persons associated with the garden include Albert H. Olmsted (1842-1929) (former owner, 1901- ); Howard Greeley (former owner, 1924- ); Thomas Bennett (former owner, 1929- ); Lilian Newlin (former owner, 1932- ); Ethel Fissell (former owner, 1935- ); C. Thomas Claggett (former owner, 1945- ); Maria Bove (former owner, 1953- ); Michael Bove III (former owner, 1982- ); Peter de Savary (former owner, 1997- ); Dorrance H. Hamilton (former owner, 1998- ); Irving John Gill (1870-1936) (architect, 1902); Madison Spencer (restoration architect, 1998); Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr. (1870-1957) (landscape architect, 1902); Dave Quarry (head gardener, 1998-2013); Mary Ellen Flanagan (landscape designer, 1998- ); Dorrance H. Hamilton (garden designer, 1998-2013).
See also 35mm copy of 1919 postcard in the Richard Marchand Historical Postcard Collection. Image number RI091004.
Related Materials:
Wildacre related holdings consist of 3 folders (4 35mm slides; 20 digital images)
Records related to this site can be found at the Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site, Olmsted Job Number 02221, A. H. Olmsted.
See others in:
Richard Marchand historical postcard collection, circa 1900s-1970s, bulk 1920-1940s.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Rhode Island -- Newport  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File RI091
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Rhode Island
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref10570

Newport -- Warren House-Tunnard Garden

Former owner:
Tanner Family  Search this
Gardner, Samuel F.  Search this
Lawton, Robert  Search this
Lawton, Penelope  Search this
Austin, Samuel Reverend  Search this
Henderson, Francis  Search this
Brinley, Fanny S.  Search this
Lawrence, Sallie C.  Search this
Paul, Allen G.  Search this
Paul, Florence S.  Search this
Warren, George  Search this
Warren, Katherine Urquhart  Search this
Preservation Society of Newport County  Search this
Gardener:
Pleitez, Eusebio  Search this
Landscape designer:
Tunnard, Christopher  Search this
Provenance:
Newport Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Warren House-Tunnard Garden (Newport, Rhode Island)
United States of America -- Rhode Island -- Newport -- Newport
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, site plans, photocopies of articles.
General:
This Modernist garden was created right after World War II, designed by Christopher Tunnard. It still survives today, perhaps the only existing commissioned landscape design by the man who influenced many of the United States most celebrated postwar architects and landscape architects. At only 65' x 42', the garden has an extreme austerity in design with a hint of luxury in its fountains, thick hedges and sculpture. The plants are cut and trimmed into an ordained shape, and the pattern is designed to be seen from the ground, where its curves interlock and turn back on themselves. Only two kinds of trees are used - lime (Tilia) and arbor vitae (Thuja); and three kinds of permanent plants - ivy (Hedera), box (Buxus) and yew (Taxus). The lime trees will eventually be pleached into an architectural block to throw the ground pattern into even greater contrast. The ivy is in slightly raised mounds, edged in places with small summer flowers. The bedding plants are purple and white petunias with carnations and lemon-yellow thunbergias." The sculpture, 'Chimerical Font,' by Jean Arp, is golden bronze centered on a plinth in a black lacquered rectangular pool. The other pools (two circular, one biomorphic) are shallow and painted white. Of note are the unusual shapes of the pruned boxwoods in the shapes of question marks and semi-colons; the colorful flowers; and the 6th linden along the left and end wall, now covered in Boston ivy, and originally painted white to complete a design that very much relied on strong figure-ground relationship.
Christopher Tunnard (1910-1979) was born in Canada, moved to England in 1929 and received a diploma from the Royal Horticultural Society the following year. The period of the eclectic Arts and Crafts movement (which he characterized as "romantic trivialization" of garden design) prompted him to introduce his Modernist views of landscape design. This approach avoided decoration, sentimentality and classical allusion "in favor of functional minimalist designs that provided a friendly and hospitable milieu for rest and recreation." After 10 years practicing garden and landscape work, he immigrated to America at the invitation of Walter Gropius to teach at Harvard's Graduate School of Design (1938-1943). Following the War, Tunnard taught city planning at Yale, advancing to professor and chairman of this department; he did little garden design from that point forward, making this 1949 garden probably one of his last commissions. For the final thirty years of his life, Tunnard put his energies into urban planning and the preservation of historic buildings; his publications in this area include "Man-made America: Chaos or Control?" (1963) which won the 1964 National Book Award in Science, Philosophy and Religion. It is perhaps ironic that Christopher Tunnard ended up of very much the same sentiment as his American patron, Mrs. George W. (Katherine) Warren, founder of the Preservation Society of Newport County (1945). In "Pioneers of American Landscape Design," (2000), Lance Neckar notes that "by the time of his death, he had come full circle to be identified with conservation-and-preservation-oriented attributes toward city revitalization which were antithetical to the Modern movement" that Tunnard had originally espoused.
Tunnard's patrons, George and Katherine Warren, who purchased the property on Mill Street in 1933, chose a part of Newport that was then considered "the other side of the tracks" by their social set, most of whom resided out on Ocean Drive. In New York, where the couple lived "off season," Katherine Warren collected modern art and was on the Advisory Committee of the Museum of Modern Art. Interesting to note that the garden was commissioned in 1949 and distinguished by its functional, minimalist modern design in sharp contrast with its early Federal-style house. The Warrens also added two glass-enclosed rooms on the first and second floors of their home on the garden side, presumably to enjoy this new garden to its full extent. Mrs. Warren died in 1976, bequeathing her home to the Preservation Society of Newport County, which moved its offices to this location in 1977. While the Preservation Society of Newport County owned the property, the garden was heavily shaded by a large beech tree and had become overgrown. It was maintained as they found it without major renovation. The current owner moved into the Mill Street house in 1994 and restored the Tunnard garden in 2001 and has proven to be a conscientious caretaker of this rare, nationally significant garden.
Persons associated with the garden include Tanner Family (former owners, 1776-1807); Samuel F. Gardner (former owner, 1807-1809); Robert Lawton (former owner, 1809-1810); Penelope Lawton (former owner, 1810-1822); Reverend Samuel Austin (former owner, 1822-1826); Francis Henderson (former owner, 1826-1857); Fanny S. Brinley (former owner, 1857-1863); Sallie C. Lawrence (former owner, 1863-1886); Allen G. Paul (former owner, 1886-1916); Florence S. Paul (former owner, 1916-1932); George and Katherine Warren (former owners, 1932-1977); Preservation Society of Newport County (former owner, 1977-1994); Christopher Tunnard (landscape designer, 1949); Eusebio Pleitez (gardener, 2001- ).
Related Materials:
Warren House-Tunnard Garden related holdings consist of 1 folder (10 digital images)
Additional photographs are also located in the collections of the Preservation Society of Newport County.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Rhode Island -- Newport  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File RI201
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Rhode Island
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref10575

South Kingstown -- Croftmere Garden

Former owner:
Cocroft Family  Search this
Architect:
Sheldon, Walter G., 1855-1931  Search this
Landscape architect:
Smith, Sibley Coslett  Search this
Garden installation:
Whaley, Carder  Search this
Restoration garden designer:
Lapin, Linda  Search this
Gardener:
McCloskey, Brenda  Search this
Fence restoration:
McCluster, Glen  Search this
Provenance:
South County Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Croftmere Garden (South Kingstown, Rhode Island)
United States of America -- Rhode Island -- Washington County -- South Kingston -- Matunuck
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets and photocopies of original plants lists and orders.
General:
Croftmere's sunken garden has been restored to the Arts & Crafts style designed in 1915 by landscape architect Sibley C. Smith. Adjacent to the 1906 wood shingle-style house the 44 by 74 feet garden room is part of an eight acre property that was part of a larger tract divided in the early 1900s among family members. The sunken garden is entered by descending three rough cut granite steps and surrounded on three sides by crisscross cedar fencing set on stone walls and supported by rough stone columns. At the far end of the garden room steps lead to a stone pergola draped with roses and wisteria. Small millstones are used for tables and a large one is sited on the grass terrace between the house and garden. A rectangular stone-lined lily pond with its original fountain is in the center of the garden room and deep beds of perennial flowers have been planted between the fences and the lawn as part of the restoration. Trimmed boxwood and viburnum, clematis and roses grow on the terrace and on an arbor alongside the house.
Persons associated with the garden include members of the Cocroft family since 1906; Walter G. Sheldon (1855-1931) (architect, 1906); Sibley C. Smith, ASLA (landscape architect, 1915); Carder Whaley (garden installation, 1916); Linda Lapin (restoration garden designer, 2000); Brenda McCloskey (gardener, 2005- ); Glen McCluster (fence restoration, 2015).
Related Materials:
Croftmere Garden related holdings consist of 2 folders (8 35mm slides; 35 digital images; 4 reference prints)
See others in:
Eleanor Weller collection, circa 1978-2006.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Rhode Island -- South Kingstown  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File RI149
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Rhode Island
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref10580

Nashville -- Cheekwood

Former owner:
Cheek, Mabel  Search this
Cheek, Leslie, 1908-  Search this
Sharp, Walter, Mrs.  Search this
Sharp, Walter  Search this
Architect:
Fleming, Bryant  Search this
Landscape architect:
Fleming, Bryant  Search this
Coile, W. James  Search this
Callicott, P. Duncan  Search this
Sartor, Carolyn S.  Search this
Kevin Tucker and Associates  Search this
Horticulturist:
Andrews, Jenny  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Cheekwood (Nashville, Tennessee)
United States of America -- Tennessee -- Davidson County -- Nashville
Scope and Contents:
Materials relating to the public gardens of the Tennessee Botanical Gardens and Fine Arts Center, located in Nashville, Tennessee. The folder includes a slide list, brochures of Cheekwood, plans of the property, excerpts from publications featuring the property, and a worksheet and description completed by GCA researchers Richard C. Page and Cynthia Wall.
General:
"Once the private estate of the Leslie Cheek family, of the Maxwell House Coffee forturne, Cheekwood is a stunning example of an elegant lifestyle. The three-story neo-Georgian mansion features architectural treasures from some of the great houses of Europe, selected by the Cheeks and their archictect, Bryant Fleming."
"Outstanding ornaments include towering mahogany doors, an Adam mantel of lapis lazuli, a magnificent staircase, brilliant chandeliers, and trompe l'oeil paintings to panel the walls. Today, the 55-acre Cheek Estate is a lasting tribute to one of the wealthiest eras in American history. Its stately mansion, built in 1929 with Tennessee limestone quarried on the property, is surrounded by breathtaking grounds designed by the Cheeks' landscape architect. The original gardens feature marble sculptures, water gardens, bubbling streams and grand vistas."
"Guests continue to marvel at the historical Bryant Fleming landscape. Surrounding his design are 11 principal botanical garden areas - the award winning Howe Wildflower Garden, an Herb Study Garden, the Wills Perennial Garden, the Carell Dogwood Trail and a traditional Japanese Garden. Botanic Hall features horticultural exhibits, flower shows, and the popular Trees of Christmas celebration every December. There is no better place to experience the season of Middle Tennessee."
Persons associated with the property include: Bryant Fleming (architect and landscape architect); W. James Coile (landscape architect); P. Duncan Callicott (landscape architect); Carolyn S. Sartor (landscape architect); Kevin Tucker and Associates (landscape architects); Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Cheek (former owners); Mr. and Mrs. Walter Sharp (former owners); and Jenny Andrews (horticulturist).
The folders include two slides of Cheekwood brochures and two slides from an article in Country Life magazine.
Related Materials:
Cheekwood related holdings consist of 2 folders (44 35 mm. slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Tennessee -- Nashville  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File TN045
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Tennessee
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref10954

Nashville -- The Mr. and Mrs. Walter M. Robinson Jr. Garden

Architect:
Asmus, Christian A.  Search this
Clark, Richard R.  Search this
Landscape architect:
Page, Ben  Search this
Provenance:
Garden Club of Nashville  Search this
Garden Club of Lookout Mountain  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
The Mr. and Mrs. Walter M. Robinson Jr. Garden (Nashville, Tennessee)
United States of America -- Tennessee -- Davidson -- Nashville
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, photocopies of articles and other information.
General:
The garden and residence of Mr. and Mrs. Walter M. Robinson represents one of the first "Country Place Era" gardens in Nashville. The Neoclassical home, designed by architects A. Christian Asmus and Richard R. Clark, was built in 1929 by F.J. McCarthy and his wife Mary Byrd McCarthy. When the current owners assumed ownership of the property in 1987, the garden areas near the house were primarily lawns surrounded by towering boxwood hedges, formal and static in design. With the desire to allow more light into the Neoclassical style house as well as to create terraces to accommodate an eight foot change in elevation and a garden room for a swimming pool, the owners turned to their sons-in-law, landscape architect Ben Page (ASLA) and architect Stephen P. Rick (AIA) to renovate the property. The four garden rooms that were designed are arranged laterally alongside and below the house with surrounding high walls and interior low walls. A pre-existing 50-foot antique wrought iron fence and a pergola built on massive piers were incorporated into the design and separate the garden rooms from the natural garden that comprises the rest of the property. The first room is a large terrace that can be tented for special events, with steps down to a more intimate sunken terrace for family use, followed by more steps to a formal parterre rose garden with a pool and fountain in the middle and pear trees espaliered against one wall, and lastly a landscaped pool and new pool house converted from a three car garage with cutting and vegetable gardens nearby. A door in the garden wall closes off the swimming area when it is out of season.
This garden features plant material and hardscape with provenance, starting with the Seven Sisters climbing roses that were transplanted from another family property in the 1930s. Peonies planted by the current owner's mother still thrive below the pool house and border the cutting and vegetable gardens. The antique wrought iron fence was salvaged from another Nashville property and bricks used for the walks once comprised East Nashville sidewalks laid in the late 1800s. A Charlie Hunt sculpture "Dove of Peace" was carved from a foundation stone salvaged from an East Nashville church, Saint Ann's Episcopal (1882-1998). Native limestone and Tennessee Crab Orchard stone are local materials used for the walls and terraces.
In early spring a row of Yoshino cherry trees blooms along one side of a brick walkway just inside the high limestone wall with tulips blooming on the other side. Pansies and tulips surround the fountain in the rose garden for early color. In summer Annabelle hydrangeas border the swimming pool, and perennial flower beds come into bloom.
The gardens on the estate provide ample opportunities for a wide variety of social, civic and charitable events. One such event was the 1993 Swan Ball Patron's Party for the benefit of Cheekwood Botanical Barden and Museum of Art. The current owner has also hosted a series of literary salons to benefit the Nashville Public Library. Numerous local non-profits have benefited from fundraisers and garden tours hosted at the estate.
Persons associated with the garden include Mr. F.J. and Mary Byrd McCarthy (former owners, 1929-1931); Mr. Edwin Wilson Craig and Elizabeth Wade Craig (former owners, 1931-1987); Christian A. Asmus and Richard R Clark (architects, 1929-1939); Ben Page, ASLA (landscape architect, 1988-1990); Stephen P. Rick (architect, 1988-1990); William Ralston (sculptor); Charlie Hunt (sculptor); Pink Ray (groundskeeper, 1931-1958); Mark Owen (groundskeeper, 1948-1971); Roy Goddard (groundskeeper, 1972-1981); Malcolm Campbell (grounds manager, 1981-1990); Norman David Pugh (grounds manager, 1990-present); Michele Webber (gardener, 2010-present).
Related Materials:
The Mr. and Mrs. Walter M. Robinson Jr. Garden related holdings consist of 1 folder (69 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Tennessee -- Nashville  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File TN076
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Tennessee
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref10964

[River Gallery Sculpture Garden]: the garden looking up toward the Art District's restaurants and bed-and-breakfasts; sculpture is "Daquqi" by Peter Lundberg.

Photographer:
Frierson, Maureen K.  Search this
Sculptor:
Lundberg, Peter  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col., 35 mm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Place:
River Gallery Sculpture Garden (Chattanooga, Tennessee)
United States of America -- Tennessee -- Hamilton County -- Chattanooga
Date:
2000 May.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Tennessee -- Chattanooga  Search this
Sculpture gardens  Search this
Sculpture  Search this
Trees  Search this
Sidewalks  Search this
Lawns  Search this
Shrubs  Search this
Buildings  Search this
Fences -- wrought iron  Search this
Lampposts  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, Item TN059004
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Tennessee / TN059: Chattanooga -- River Gallery Sculpture Garden
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref10980

Opryland Hotel

Architect:
Earl Swensson Associates  Search this
Creator:
Earl Swensson Associates  Search this
Landscape architect:
Schumm, Werle & Maxian  Search this
Werle, Robert  Search this
Sevy, Pamela  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Place:
Tennessee -- Nashville
United States of America -- Tennessee -- Davidson County -- Nashville
Date:
04/01/1984
General:
Opryland's tropical retreat is appealing for people to stay with the state-of- the-art interiorscape.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Spring  Search this
Conservatories  Search this
Interior landscaping  Search this
Interior views  Search this
People  Search this
Hotels  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, Item TN046001
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Tennessee / TN046: Nashville -- Opryland Hotel
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref11292

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