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Portrait of Anna J. Cooper

Subseries Creator:
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Scurlock, Robert S. (Saunders), 1917-1994  Search this
Custom Craft  Search this
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Scurlock, George H. (Hardison), 1919-2005  Search this
Container:
Box 69
Type:
Archival materials
Subseries Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.

Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives. Special arrangements required to view negatives due to cold storage. Using negatives requires a three hour waiting period. Contact the Archives Center at 202-633-3270.
Subseries Rights:
When the Museum purchased the collection from the Estate of Robert S. Scurlock, it obtained all rights, including copyright. The earliest photographs in the collection are in the public domain because their term of copyright has expired. The Archives Center will control copyright and the use of the collection for reproduction purposes, which will be handled in accordance with its standard reproduction policy guidelines. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Subseries Citation:
Scurlock Studio Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History. Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.1: Black-and-White Silver Gelatin Negatives
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.1: Black-and-White Silver Gelatin Negatives / 4.1: Black-and-White Silver Gelatin negatives
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep89144d22a-e411-4377-bc5e-ffebd3868c97
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0618-s04-01-ref2151

Donald Jayne Lehmer papers

Creator:
Lehmer, Donald Jayne, 1918-1975  Search this
Names:
River Basin Surveys  Search this
Extent:
1.66 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
North America
Date:
1927-1977
Scope and Contents:
These papers reflect the professional life of Donald Jayne Lehmer (1918-1975), archaeologist and professor of anthropology. Included are correspondence, diaries, fieldnotes, project reports, applications, articles, contracts, reference materials, mimeographed hand-outs, maps, diagrams, photographs and one sound recording. The bulk of the material relates to Lehmer's early archaeological career and to his later research work while a professor at Dana College, Lincoln, Nebraska. There are very few documents in this collection which relate to the period between 1956 and 1964. The only expedition in which Lehmer participated and for which there are field notes in this collection is the 1940-1941 expedition to Mesilla Valley, New Mexico, sponsored by the Museum of New Mexico and the Arizona State Museum. References to Lehmer's other fieldwork are made in some of the correspondence in series 2, 3, and 5. The correspondence also contains numerous references to Lehmer's personal life.

Persons for whom there are considerable correspondence or who are represented by the written material include: Ernst V. Antevs; Bryant Bannister; Robert E. Bell; William E. Bittle; Elaine Bluhm; Wesley Bradfield; John Ortis Brew; Thomas N. Campbell; John L. Champe; Earle A. Clark; Joan Clark; Donald Collier; Paul L. Cooper; John M. Corbett; Harriet S. Cosgrove; Herbert W. Dick; Henry F. Dobyns; Bertha P. Dutton; Fred R. Eggan; Gordon F. Ekholm; Florence Hawley Ellis; John C. Ewers; Paul H. Ezell; Fred C. Fagergren; Malcolm F. Farmer; Geroge E. Fay; Franklin Fenega; Harold S. Gladwin; John M. Goggin; James B. Griffin; Donald D. Hartle; George B. Hartzog, Jr.; Emil W. Haury; John J. Hoffman; Earnest A. Hooton; Roman L. Hruska; Wesley R. Hurt; Jesse D. Jennings; Elden Johnson; Frederick Johnson; Richard B. Johnston; J. Charles Kelley; Alfred V. Kidder II; Marvin F. Kivett; Clyde Klukhohn; Bert Kraus; Alex D. Krieger; Toimi E. Kyllonen; Wilfred D. Logan; Boas Long; Charles C. Madsen; Oscar L. Mallory; Paul S. Martin; John Y. McCollister; William Mulloy; Welson Murdock; Douglas Osborne; Erik K. Reed; John B. Rinaldo; Frank H. H. Roberts, Jr.; Hugo G. Rodeck; Edward B. Sayles; Anna O. Shepard; Allan H. Smith; Carlyle S. Smith; G. Hubert Smith; Albert C. Spaulding; James E. Sperry; Leslie Spier; Robert L. Stephenson; Frank H. Stewart; Stanley A. Stubbs; Floyd V. Studer; William C. Sturtevant; Paul Tolstoy; James B. Watson; Waldo R. Wedel; Denver Fred Wendorf, Jr.; H. D. Weston; Richard P. Wheeler; Theodore E. White; Arnold M. Withers; W. Raymond Wood; Richard Woodbury; A. M. Woolsey; H. Marie Wormington.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Biographical Note:
Chronology:

October 9, 1918 -- Born in Omaha, Nebraska

1935-1937 -- Undergraduate, University of New Mexico

1938-1939 -- Excavation supervisor, La Junta de los Rios Expedition at Presidio, Texas (sponsored by Sul Rose College, Museum of New Mexico, and Works Project Administration)

1940 -- B.A., University of Arizona

1940-1942 -- Research Archaeologist, Museum of New Mexico

1940 & 1941 (summers) -- Director, Mesilla Valley Expedition, Las Cruces, New Mexico (sponsored by the Museum of New Mexico and the Arizona State Museum)

1941-1942 -- Assistant Curator for Branch Museums, Museum of New Mexico

1942-1946 -- Private U.S. Army

1946-1948 -- Graduate School, University of Chicago while also working for the Oriental Institute

1948 -- M.A., University of Chicago Dig foreman, University of Arizona Point of Pines Field School, San Carlos, Arizona The Jornada Branch of the Mogollon

1949 -- Director, Mexican (Sonora) Archaeological Expedition (Sponsored by the Chicago Natural History Museum, the University of Chicago, and the University of Arizona)

1949-1950 -- Graduate School, Harvard University

1950-1951 -- Archaeologist, Bureau of American Ethnology River Basin Surveys, Lincoln, Nebraska

1950 -- Dodd Site, Oahe Reservoir, South Dakota

1951 -- Tenkiller Reservoir, Oklahoma

1952-1953 -- Research Archaeologist, Laboratory of Anthropology, University of Nebraska, Lincoln

1952 -- Field Director, University Archaeological Field School, Harlem Co., Nebraska Ph.D., Harvard University

1953 -- Archaeologist, El Paso Natural Gas Company Pipeline Project

1953-1954 -- Visiting Professor of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle

1954 -- Married Evelyn Garton Archeological Investigations in the Oahe Dam Area, South Dakota, 1950-51

1955 -- City Planner, Omaha, Nebraska

1955-1960 -- Lecturer in Anthropology and History, Strategic Air Command Headquarters and the University of Omaha, Nebraska

1961-1975 -- Professor and Chairman, Department of Anthropology and Sociology, Dana College, Blair Nebraska

1964 (summer) -- Research Archaeologist, State Historical Society of North Dakota

1969 -- Visiting Professor of Anthropology, University of Minnesota

1971 -- Introduction to Middle Missouri Archeology

June 5, 1975 -- Died, Blair, Nebraska (?)
Related Materials:
Additional material in the National Anthropological Archives that relates to Donald J. Lehmer can be found in the Records of the River Basin Surveys.
Restrictions:
The Donald J. Lehmer papers are open for research. Access to the Donald J. Lehmer papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Archaeology  Search this
Citation:
Donald Jayne Lehmer papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.1979-48
See more items in:
Donald Jayne Lehmer papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3f82608c5-ab5c-4a73-887e-c9302df93948
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1979-48

To Achieve These Rights: Docent Training with Dr. Paul Cook

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1991
Scope and Contents:
In preparation of the exhibition 'To Achieve These Rights: The Struggle for Equality and Self-Determination in the District of Columbia, 1791-1978,' Dr. Paul Cook spoke to docents about racial segregation, integration, and discrimination during the 1940s and 1950s in Washington, D.C., and the civil rights movement. He spoke about his personal experiences, and events he witnessed or participated. Cook began his lecture speaking about Anna J. Cooper, who was an educator at M Street School (later Dunbar High School) in southeast Washington, D.C.
Docent training - lecture. Related to exhibition 'To Achieve These Rights: The Struggle for Equality and Self-Determination in the District of Columbia, 1791-1978.' Dated 19911127.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Race discrimination  Search this
Racism  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Civil rights leaders  Search this
Civil rights movements  Search this
Activists  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Collection Citation:
To achieve these rights: the struggle for equality and self-determination in the District of Columbia, 1791–1978 exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-033, Item ACMA AV002125
See more items in:
To achieve these rights: the struggle for equality and self-determination in the District of Columbia, 1791–1978 exhibition records
To achieve these rights: the struggle for equality and self-determination in the District of Columbia, 1791–1978 exhibition records / Series 2: AudioVisual Materials
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7c240cdc0-2b07-4380-905f-98f4970cded1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-033-ref515

Maryland

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Maryland was this year's featured State, and programming focused in particular on three themes: water, horse, and metal traditions, selected on the basis of their richness and significance within the State.

As the Nation's leading "fishing hole," the Chesapeake Bay, home of the last remaining commercial sailing fleet still in operation in the United States, has clusters of skilled craftspeople and fisherfolk whose Iives are part of the waters and their yield. At Hains Point in West Potomac Park, and thanks to the assistance and cosponsorship of the National Park Service, the Festival showed ships and crafts related to the Chesapeake waterways. The history of these and other crafts could be seen in the National Museum of History and Technology's Hall of Maritime History.

The breeding, training, and racing of horses is one of Maryland's largest industries and, like the watermen, those who work with horses carry some of the most carefully guarded traditions and skills to be found in oral tradition. Visitors could see demonstrations of different breeds as well as skills such as dressage; other presentations explored the traditions associated with fox hunting, horse pulls, mounted police officers and fruit vendors and their horse-drawn carts.

The Nation's oldest silversmith, Samuel Kirk and Son, its largest producer of pewter ware, Steiff Co., and numerous skilled metal workers in copper, brass, iron, and tin are all to be found in Maryland. Hand skills, learned through apprenticeship, are the mainstay of these industries and they provided a natural link between the cottage industries and the Union Workers' exhibits. Festival visitors could see demonstrations of Maryland metal crafts such as brass and iron founding, pewter and silversmithing, tin and coppersmithing. "Museum Guide" signs at the Festival directed visitors to similar and sometimes identical products of this craftsmanship in the National Museum of History and Technology.

Crafts and music presentations from rural Maryland and its largest city, Baltimore, rounded out the program. A large community of Greek Americans from the Highlandtown neighborhood of Baltimore presented the celebratory traditions of the village of Olymbos on the island of Karpathios, from which they had immigrated over the previous half-century, and particularly since the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965.

The Maryland program was made possible through the sponsorship of the Governor of Maryland, the Department of Economic and Community Development, the Maryland National Relations Office, and National Brewing Company. The Maryland Waterways presentation at Hains Point was co-sponsored by the National Park Service and the Smithsonian Institution.
Fieldworkers:
Paul Diggs, Ben Evans, Carol Hackney, John A. Hostetler, Richard Hulan, Martin Koenig, Jean du Pont McConnell, M. Gail Moran, Gerald Parsons, Maxine Perlmutter, Alta Schrock, Richard Spottswood, Georgine Winslett, Ethel Raim-Zinser
Participants:
Water Traditions

Charles Abbott, skipjack captain of "Thomas Clyde," built 1911, Maryland

Paul Benton, skipjack captain of "Geneva May," built 1908, Maryland

Henry Brown, sail maker, Deal Island, Maryland

Walter Carrion, trainer, Chesapeake Bay retrievers, Ellicott City, Maryland

Melvin Christy, skipjack captain of "Bernice J.," built 1904, Maryland

Calvin E. Crouch, 1922-1997, boat builder, Maryland

Calvin E. Crouch, Jr., boat builder, Maryland

Earl Daniels, crab scrape maker, Maryland

Frank B. Daniels, sail maker, Maryland

Arthur Dierker, waterfowl guide, net and fyke maker, Maryland

Hazel Downey, 1914-1994, net and fyke maker, Rock Hall, Maryland

Newton Downey, 1888-1975, decoy carver, Rock Hall, Maryland

Johnny Evans, waterman, Maryland

Captain Carl Huffman, waterman, Maryland

Alex Kellam, 1908-1986, waterman, Maryland

Dewey Landon, 1898-1976, waterman, Maryland

Charlton Marshall, 1900-1973, boat model maker, Maryland

Captain Roland Parks, 1914-1985, muskrat trapper, Maryland

Lesley Schunick, cooper, Maryland

George Taylor, skipjack captain of "Annie Lee," built 1912, Maryland

Zack Taylor, 1901-1978, Maryland

Clifton Webster, 1897-1987, skipjack captain of "Maggie Lee," built 1903, Maryland

Discussion leaders:

Robert H. Burgess

George Carey

Mack McCormick

Metal Traditions

Burton Cimino, silver engraver, Maryland

Harry M. Evans, 1924-, brass founder, Easton, Maryland

Nelson Kratz, 1911-1994, silver chaser, Maryland

William Lane, 1897-1977, blacksmith, Easton, Maryland

Jon Manning, pewter smith, Maryland

George Rapp, 1906-1981, pewter spinner, Maryland

Erwin Thieberger, 1908-1987, coppersmith, Wheaton, Maryland

Horse Traditions

Al-Marah Arabian Farm, demonstration of Arabians -- Al-Marah Arabian Farm, demonstration of ArabiansMrs. Garvin E. Tankersley, MarylandJohn T. Connor, Maryland

American Saddlebred, demonstration of American Saddlebred horses -- American Saddlebred, demonstration of American Saddlebred horsesHelen Curtin, MarylandJohn Jones, Maryland

William F. Cahill, Ringmaster, Maryland

Chartley Farm, horse-pulling contest, P.O.A. and Shetland pony demonstrations -- Chartley Farm, horse-pulling contest, P.O.A. and Shetland pony demonstrationsRobert Shirley, MarylandSally Shirley, MarylandDaniel Shirley, Maryland

Clear View Farm, demonstration of Shires coaching and hunting horn demonstration -- Clear View Farm, demonstration of Shires coaching and hunting horn demonstrationHoward StreakerHoward Streaker, Jr.

Cold Saturday Morgan Farm, demonstration of Morgans -- Cold Saturday Morgan Farm, demonstration of MorgansMrs. H. H. Hackney, MarylandCarol Hackney, MarylandKelly Marsh, MarylandSharon Port, MarylandNancy Radtke, Maryland

Dickey Farm -- Dickey FarmGary Stanley, jockey, MarylandJennifer Dickey, pony demonstrations, MarylandJocelyn Dickey, pony demonstrations, Maryland

Fair Hill Farm -- Fair Hill FarmJean du Pont McConnell, commentator for fox-hunting demonstration, Maryland

Homewood, demonstration of Appaloosas -- Homewood, demonstration of AppaloosasMrs. John Shallcrosse, MarylandMichael Hubbard, Maryland

Hunters and Hunting, fox-hunting demonstration -- Hunters and Hunting, fox-hunting demonstrationHoward County Hunt, MarylandHazel L. Welsh, MarylandBeverly Abbott, MarylandMelanie Abbott, MarylandKitty Magrogan, Maryland

Ray Kline Jr., hay rides, Myersville, Maryland

Maryland Stock Farm, demonstration of Pintos -- Maryland Stock Farm, demonstration of PintosJo Ann Mullins, Maryland

Lawrence Merrifield, mounted officer, City of Baltimore, Maryland

Murry Hill Farm, crossbred pony demonstration -- Murry Hill Farm, crossbred pony demonstrationJohn Johnson, Maryland

Pegasus Meadowbrook Stable, hunting demonstration -- Pegasus Meadowbrook Stable, hunting demonstrationMr. and Mrs. James H. Little, Maryland

Pipe Creek Farm, coordinators, dressage demonstration -- Pipe Creek Farm, coordinators, dressage demonstrationCol. and Mrs. D. W. Thackeray, Maryland

Ponies for Children, Inc., pony breeds and demonstrations -- Ponies for Children, Inc., pony breeds and demonstrationsLouise Hollyday, Maryland

Potomac Horse Center, dressage demonstration -- Potomac Horse Center, dressage demonstrationBetty Howett, Maryland

Quarterhorse Association, demonstration of Quarterhorses -- Quarterhorse Association, demonstration of QuarterhorsesRobert Spedden, MarylandMarni Pearl, MarylandCindy Rammel, Maryland

Jack Vordemberge, commentator

Janet Walker, harness maker

Washington International Horse Show Association -- Washington International Horse Show AssociationGeorgine Winslett, commentator, Maryland

Crafts

Lawrence Brenneman, 1904-1977, trough and shingle maker, Bittinger, Maryland

William Clark, 1942-, arabber, Maryland

Angelo DiBlasi, stonecutter, Baltimore, Maryland

Paul Diggs, arabber, Maryland

Charles Duvall, arabber, Maryland

Helen Englar, quilter, Maryland

Mike Farinacci, 1902-1975, stonecutter, Glen Burnie, Maryland

Emma Glotfelty, 1903-1987, rug weaver, Accident, Maryland

Orval Glotfelty, 1889-1980, trough maker, Accident, Maryland

Walter Kelly, arabber, Maryland

James W. McCrobie, 1919-1993, basket weaver, Gormania, West Virginia

Benjamin Meekins, arabber, Maryland

Clara Pierce, 1901-1972, rug hooker and braider, Maryland

Marian Stephen, soap maker, Maryland

Anna Weir, rug hooker and braider, Maryland

Claude Yoder, 1904-1991, woodcarver, Potomac Park, Maryland

Hazel Yoder, 1907-1975, quilter and baker, Maryland

Music

Sergio Brotto, northern Italian singer, Maryland

Bruni Calcara, 1922-1992, northern Italian singer, Maryland

Alec Campbell & Ola Belle Reed (1916-2002) String Band, string band musicians, Rising Sun, Maryland

Ralph Case, square dance caller, Upper Marlboro, Maryland

Betsy & John Coffey, string band musicians, Maryland

Angelo Ciulla, 1907-1983, southern Italian musician, Maryland

Wanda Deckert, 1921-2002, northern Italian singer, Maryland

Mike Farinacci, 1902-1975, southern Italian musician, Glen Burnie, Maryland

Louise Foreacre, mountain musician, Elkton, Maryland

Emin Gunduz, Turkish musician, Baltimore, Maryland

Frank Hovington, 1919-, blues musician, Seat Pleasant, Maryland

Gina Iocca, northern Italian singer, Maryland

Leonard Lanciotti, southern Italian musician, Maryland

Reed Martin, mountain musician, Maryland

Orlinda Monaldi, northern Italian singer, Maryland

John Ribero, northern Italian singer, Maryland

St. John's Methodist Church, Intermediate Choir, gospel choir, Maryland

Dan & Earl Swift (1909-1997), mountain musicians, Maryland

Elsa & Francis Tarasco (1912-1990), northern Italian musicians, Maryland

Fields Ward, 1911-1987, mountain musicians, Baltimore, Maryland

Greek musicians -- Greek musiciansVasilios Dargakis, MarylandVasilios Georgakis, MarylandEvgenia Hiotis, Baltimore, MarylandIoannis Hiotis, 1928-1980, Baltimore, MarylandKalliope Hiotis, 1927-2011, MarylandKasiani Hiotis, Baltimore, MarylandPhillippe Hiotis, 1922-2000, Baltimore, MarylandVasilios Kakarolis, Baltimore, MarylandFotini Konsolas, MarylandManuel Mastromanolis, Baltimore, MarylandSophia Mastromanolis, Baltimore, MarylandIoannis Nikitas, 1906-1989, MarylandNick Nikitas, 1938-2012, Baltimore, MarylandKonstantine Nikolaides, MarylandMaria A. Nikolaides, MarylandMaria K. Nikolaides, MarylandGeorge Nikolau, MarylandVasilios Nikolau, MarylandMinas Pappaminas, 1933-1998, MarylandEvgenia Paragios, MarylandFoula Paragios, 1945-2004, MarylandSophia Paragios, MarylandNikolaos Protopapas, MarylandIoannis Sofillis, Baltimore, MarylandVasilios Vasilaides, Maryland
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1972 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1972, Series 2
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1972 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5cbdb354a-a21f-42db-835d-86acf7144345
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1972-ref18

Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Cooper, Anna J., Dr., 1858-1964  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Extent:
11.38 Linear feet (23 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Exhibition records
Photographic prints
Exhibit scripts
Correspondence
Brochures
Date:
1981-02 - 1982-09
Summary:
An exhibition on Anna J. Cooper, Washington D. C. educator and author. It was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982. Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, research files, exhibit scripts, administrative records, brochures, press coverage, education packets, loan agreements, and floor plans.
Related Archival Materials note:
Audiovisual materials related to this exhibition located in Anacostia Community Museum Archives.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
African American women  Search this
Genre/Form:
Exhibition records -- 1967-1989
Photographic prints
Exhibit scripts
Correspondence
Brochures
Citation:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7baeb937a-7a9b-4af9-8430-a44780a10a81
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-029
Online Media:

Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South audiovisual records

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Cooper, Anna J., Dr., 1858-1964  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
5 Video recordings (5 open reel 1/2" video recordings)
0.5 Linear feet
13 Sound recordings (1 open reel 1/4" sound recordings ; 12 audio cassette sound recordings)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1981-1983
bulk 1981-1981
Scope and Contents note:
Audiovisual materials associated with an exhibition on Anna J. Cooper, Washington D. C. educator and author. The exhibition was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982. Louise Daniel Hutchinson
Related Archival Materials note:
Anacostia Community Museum. Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American women  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Citation:
Anna J. Cooper Audiovisual Records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Series ACMA AV03-029
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa78c8e28e2-d071-45f2-8ca4-02c1b633afed
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref1360

The Dunbar Legacy: Dr. Sterling A. Brown Lecture on Anna J. Cooper

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Dunbar High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Fisk University  Search this
Howard University  Search this
M Street High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Oberlin College  Search this
Preparatory High School for Colored Youth (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Université de Paris IV: Paris-Sorbonne  Search this
Virginia Theological Seminary and College (Lynchburg, Va.)  Search this
Brown, Sterling A., 1901-1989  Search this
Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964  Search this
Egypt, Ophelia Settle  Search this
Martin-Felton, Zora  Search this
Terrell, Mary Church, 1863-1954  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Video recordings (open reel, 1/2 inch)
2 Sound recordings (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Lectures
Poetry
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
Lynchburg (Va.)
United States
Southern States
Date:
1981
Scope and Contents:
Dr. Sterling A. Brown talks about his experiences and teachers, including Anna J. Cooper, at M Street High School (later known as Dunbar High School); and education and segregation, which was fought by Cooper and Mary Church Terrell. He provides a short history and legacy of Cooper, who he considers a role model; and reads prose by Anna J. Cooper which highlights her educational philosophy and her views regarding education and the roles of teachers. Brown talks about his education and academic career; reminiscences his teaching experiences particularly at Virginia Theological Seminary and College, and living in Lynchburg, Virginia; and reads a few of his own poems, which focus on black life experiences in the Southern United States. Ophelia Settle Egypt, a friend of Sterling Brown, reminiscences about her experiences attending Howard University and adventures with Brown and his wife, Daisy: their resentment of Jim Crow and riding on a segregated bus. Mr. Muhammad reads his poems in tribute of Sterling Brown and "for everyone in the struggle of identifying what is what and who is who and what we need to do about it." Zora Martin-Felton introduces the speakers throughout the lecture series.
Lecture, and poetry and prose reading. AV003057 and AV003051: video. AV001053 and AV001353: audio only. Part of Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records. AV003057, AV003051, and AV001053: undated. AV001353: dated 19810426.
Biographical / Historical:
The collection, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records, contains sound and video recordings of exhibit tours, gallery talks, and lectures associated with an exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The exhibition presented the life and times of Washington, D.C. black educator and author Anna Julia Haywood Cooper through historical documents, photographs, memorabilia, and re-creations of her home and classroom settings. It was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982; Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. The exhibition was based on an unpublished manuscript by the late Dr. Leona Gable, Smith College; and titled after Cooper's written work, A Voice from the South: By a Black Woman of the South.;Educator, author, and speaker Anna Julia Haywood Cooper (1858-1964) was born into slavery and educated at Saint Augustine's Normal School and Collegiate Institute in Raleigh, North Carolina. While teaching at St. Augustine's, she married George A. C. Cooper, who died two years later. After her husband's death, Cooper moved to Washington, D.C., attended Oberlin College, taught at Wilberforce College and M Street High School, and later went on to earn her Ph.D. from the University of Paris-Sorbonne. Cooper taught Greek, Latin, geometry, and science; and created a path for African Americans to attend Ivy League schools. Although she taught and served as principal (1902-1906) of the M Street High School (now Dunbar High School) in Washington, D.C., her role and influence extended beyond its boundaries. Cooper was an advocate of human rights who lectured on a broad range of topics that affected blacks and women, including race relations, poverty, and gender inequality; a feminist of her day. She was a contributor to the District of Columbia's Colored Settlement House; served as president of Frelinghuysen University, which offered affordable liberal arts and professional courses for working African Americans; and wrote A Voice from the South by a Black Woman of the South, the first book-length volume of black feminist analysis in the United States.;Professor, poet, and literary critic Dr. Sterling A. Brown (1901-1989) was born and raised in the Washington, D.C area. He grew up on a farm in Howard County, Maryland; and attended Waterford Oaks Elementary, Dunbar High School, Williams College in Massachusetts, and Harvard University. He married Daisy Turnbull in 1927. Brown taught at Howard University, Fisk University, Vassar College, New York University, Atlanta University, Yale University, and Virginia Theological Seminary and College in Lynchburg, Virginia. His studies and poetry focused on black history and culture of the Southern United States.;Originally named Preparatory High School for Colored Youth and later known as M Street High School, Paul Laurence Dunbar High School, located in Washington, D.C., was the first black public high school in the United States. During the first half of the twentieth century, Dunbar was an academically elite public school with many of its teachers holding master and doctorate degrees. By the 1950s, the school was sending 80 percent of its students to college. During the late twentieth century and early twenty-first century, Dunbar struggled to keep its prestigious reputation and high standards. As with many troubled urban public schools, Dunbar standards fell and some students struggle with basic reading and math. The Dunbar Legacy Lecture Series, which was held at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum in the early 1980s, consisted of lectures by and about people associated with Dunbar High School.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003051

ACMA AV001053_A

ACMA AV001053_B

ACMA AV001353_A

ACMA AV001353_B
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Freedmen  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American women educators  Search this
Women  Search this
Educators  Search this
Education  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Race  Search this
Human Rights  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Women's rights  Search this
Civil rights leaders  Search this
African American authors  Search this
African American women authors  Search this
Authors  Search this
African American poets  Search this
Poets  Search this
Social history  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Lectures
Poetry
Citation:
The Dunbar Legacy: Dr. Sterling A. Brown Lecture on Anna J. Cooper, Exhibition Records AV03-029, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Item ACMA AV003057
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-029: Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa79edeef52-7937-45d7-a672-debe3f035b47
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref906

The Dunbar Legacy: Dr. Paul Phillips Cooke Lecture

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Dunbar High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Frelinghuysen University (Washington, D.C.).  Search this
M Street High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Miner Teachers College  Search this
Oberlin College  Search this
Preparatory High School for Colored Youth (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
St. Augustine's Normal School and Collegiate Institute  Search this
Université de Paris IV: Paris-Sorbonne  Search this
Wilberforce University  Search this
Cooke, Paul P.  Search this
Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964  Search this
Cooper, George A. C., Reverend  Search this
Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963  Search this
Grimké, Francis J. (Francis James), 1850-1937  Search this
Hunt, Ida Gibbs, 1862-1957  Search this
Martin-Felton, Zora  Search this
Terrell, Mary Church, 1863-1954  Search this
Washington, Booker T., 1856-1915  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Video recordings (open reel, 1/2 inch)
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Lectures
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
Raleigh (N.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1981
Scope and Contents:
Dr. Paul Phillips Cooke speaks on the subject of Anna J. Cooper: Teacher and Human Being. He talks about Cooper's life and the time in which she lived; and her human and religious influences. Cooke, who assisted with the Cooper exhibition at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum, provides an overview of Cooper's history and addresses questions from the lecture audience. Cooke also provides an overview of the history of educational institutions and schools, and the education system in Washington, D.C. He discusses civil rights, legislation changes in D.C., and how civil rights legislation affected Cooper, W. E. DuBois, and Booker T. Washington. Zora Martin-Felton introduces Cooke providing a short history of his Anacostian roots.
Lecture. AV003264: Part 1. AV003220: Part 2. Part of Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records. AV003264 and AV003220: undated. AV001346: dated 19830925, audio only, contains part of (copy of) AV003220 recording.
Biographical / Historical:
The collection, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records, contains sound and video recordings of exhibit tours, gallery talks, and lectures associated with an exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The exhibition presented the life and times of Washington, D.C. black educator and author Anna Julia Haywood Cooper through historical documents, photographs, memorabilia, and re-creations of her home and classroom settings. It was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982; Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. The exhibition was based on an unpublished manuscript by the late Dr. Leona Gable, Smith College; and titled after Cooper's written work, A Voice from the South: By a Black Woman of the South.;Educator, author, and speaker Anna Julia Haywood Cooper (1858-1964) was born into slavery and educated at Saint Augustine's Normal School and Collegiate Institute in Raleigh, North Carolina. While teaching at St. Augustine's, she married George A. C. Cooper, who died two years later. After her husband's death, Cooper moved to Washington, D.C., attended Oberlin College, taught at Wilberforce College and M Street High School, and later went on to earn her Ph.D. from the University of Paris-Sorbonne. Cooper taught Greek, Latin, geometry, and science; and created a path for African Americans to attend Ivy League schools. Although she taught and served as principal (1902-1906) of the M Street High School (now Dunbar High School) in Washington, D.C., her role and influence extended beyond its boundaries. Cooper was an advocate of human rights who lectured on a broad range of topics that affected blacks and women, including race relations, poverty, and gender inequality; a feminist of her day. She was a contributor to the District of Columbia's Colored Settlement House; served as president of Frelinghuysen University, which offered affordable liberal arts and professional courses for working African Americans; and wrote A Voice from the South by a Black Woman of the South, the first book-length volume of black feminist analysis in the United States.;Educator, author, statesman, and former president of the District of Columbia Teacher's College Dr. Paul Phillips Cooke (1917-2010) was born in New York City and raised in Washington, D.C. He attended Dunbar High School, Miner Teachers College, New York University, Catholic University of America, and Columbia University, where he received his doctorate. Cooke was married to Rose Cooke for 63 years.;Originally named Preparatory High School for Colored Youth and later known as M Street High School, Paul Laurence Dunbar High School, located in Washington, D.C., was the first black public high school in the United States. During the first half of the twentieth century, Dunbar was an academically elite public school with many of its teachers holding master and doctorate degrees. By the 1950s, the school was sending 80 percent of its students to college. During the late twentieth century and early twenty-first century, Dunbar struggled to keep its prestigious reputation and high standards. As with many troubled urban public schools, Dunbar standards fell and some students struggle with basic reading and math. The Dunbar Legacy Lecture Series, which was held at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum in the early 1980s, consisted of lectures by and about people associated with Dunbar High School.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003220

ACMA AV001346_B
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Freedmen  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American women educators  Search this
Women  Search this
Educators  Search this
Education  Search this
Religion  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Race  Search this
Human Rights  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Women's rights  Search this
Civil rights leaders  Search this
African American authors  Search this
African American women authors  Search this
Authors  Search this
Social history  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Lectures
Citation:
The Dunbar Legacy: Dr. Sterling A. Brown Lecture, Exhibition Records AV03-029, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Item ACMA AV003264
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-029: Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7339fd41a-e5ad-4e20-affa-f96e5b2bc664
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref907

Anna J. Cooper Exhibit: Music, Literary Reading, and Sound Effects

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Music
Sound effects recordings
Literary readings (radio programs)
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1981
Scope and Contents:
Components used for exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. Recording of song Moonlight Sonata; literary reading of Send Me No Flowers which has religious influences; and ambient sound of children talking (schoolroom sound effect).
Music, literary reading, and sound effects. Part of Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records. Dated 19810127.
Biographical / Historical:
The collection, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records, contains sound and video recordings of exhibit tours, gallery talks, and lectures associated with an exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The exhibition presented the life and times of Washington, D.C. black educator and author Anna Julia Haywood Cooper through historical documents, photographs, memorabilia, and re-creations of her home and classroom settings. It was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982; Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. The exhibition was based on an unpublished manuscript by the late Dr. Leona Gable, Smith College; and titled after Cooper's written work, A Voice from the South: By a Black Woman of the South.;Educator, author, and speaker Anna Julia Haywood Cooper (1858-1964) was born into slavery and educated at Saint Augustine's Normal School and Collegiate Institute in Raleigh, North Carolina. While teaching at St. Augustine's, she married George A. C. Cooper, who died two years later. After her husband's death, Cooper moved to Washington, D.C., attended Oberlin College, taught at Wilberforce College and M Street High School, and later went on to earn her Ph.D. from the University of Paris-Sorbonne. Cooper taught Greek, Latin, geometry, and science; and created a path for African Americans to attend Ivy League schools. Although she taught and served as principal (1902-1906) of the M Street High School (now Dunbar High School) in Washington, D.C., her role and influence extended beyond its boundaries. Cooper was an advocate of human rights who lectured on a broad range of topics that affected blacks and women, including race relations, poverty, and gender inequality; a feminist of her day. She was a contributor to the District of Columbia's Colored Settlement House; served as president of Frelinghuysen University, which offered affordable liberal arts and professional courses for working African Americans; and wrote A Voice from the South by a Black Woman of the South, the first book-length volume of black feminist analysis in the United States.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Freedmen  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American women educators  Search this
Women  Search this
Educators  Search this
Students  Search this
Children  Search this
Religion  Search this
African American authors  Search this
African American women authors  Search this
Authors  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Music
Sound effects recordings
Literary readings (Radio programs)
Citation:
Anna J. Cooper Exhibit: Music, Literary Reading, and Sound Effects, Exhibition Records AV03-029, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Item ACMA AV003514
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-029: Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7dfe6758f-fd50-42c5-875f-5ef616dcd4af
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref908

Anna J. Cooper Exhibit: Puppet Show

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum Black Heritage Puppet Theatre  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Dunbar High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Frelinghuysen University (Washington, D.C.).  Search this
M Street High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Oberlin College  Search this
Preparatory High School for Colored Youth (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Université de Paris IV: Paris-Sorbonne  Search this
Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (open reel, 1/2 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Music
Puppet plays
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1981
Scope and Contents:
A puppet show, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum Black Heritage Puppet Theatre, provides school children with an introduction to the exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The main character in the puppet show is a student who needs to present a report on a black woman who lived in Washington, D.C. and who made an outstanding contribution to the lives of black people. The puppet show highlights Cooper's teaching career; her advocacy for education, black students, and civil rights; and the period of time in which she lived. Music played prior to puppet show, and children in the audience sing a rhyme about Cooper's live after puppet show.
Puppet show. Part of Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records. Dated 19810415.
Biographical / Historical:
The collection, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records, contains sound and video recordings of exhibit tours, gallery talks, and lectures associated with an exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The exhibition presented the life and times of Washington, D.C. black educator and author Anna Julia Haywood Cooper through historical documents, photographs, memorabilia, and re-creations of her home and classroom settings. It was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982; Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. The exhibition was based on an unpublished manuscript by the late Dr. Leona Gable, Smith College; and titled after Cooper's written work, A Voice from the South: By a Black Woman of the South.;Educator, author, and speaker Anna Julia Haywood Cooper (1858-1964) was born into slavery and educated at Saint Augustine's Normal School and Collegiate Institute in Raleigh, North Carolina. While teaching at St. Augustine's, she married George A. C. Cooper, who died two years later. After her husband's death, Cooper moved to Washington, D.C., attended Oberlin College, taught at Wilberforce College and M Street High School, and later went on to earn her Ph.D. from the University of Paris-Sorbonne. Cooper taught Greek, Latin, geometry, and science; and created a path for African Americans to attend Ivy League schools. Although she taught and served as principal (1902-1906) of the M Street High School (now Dunbar High School) in Washington, D.C., her role and influence extended beyond its boundaries. Cooper was an advocate of human rights who lectured on a broad range of topics that affected blacks and women, including race relations, poverty, and gender inequality; a feminist of her day. She was a contributor to the District of Columbia's Colored Settlement House; served as president of Frelinghuysen University, which offered affordable liberal arts and professional courses for working African Americans; and wrote A Voice from the South by a Black Woman of the South, the first book-length volume of black feminist analysis in the United States.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Freedmen  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American women educators  Search this
Women  Search this
Education  Search this
Educators  Search this
Students  Search this
Children  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Race  Search this
Human Rights  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Music
Puppet plays
Citation:
Anna J. Cooper Exhibit: Puppet Show, Exhibition Records AV03-029, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Item ACMA AV003070
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-029: Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa737cdb9d1-f2cb-4763-815a-62b0c110bd10
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref909

Anna J. Cooper Exhibit: Audio Tour

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
5 Sound recordings (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1981
Scope and Contents:
Audio tour for the exhibition 'Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South.'
Audio tour. Audio only. Part of Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records. AV001370: expanded version. AV001050: abbreviated version. AV001395: undated. AV001347: expanded version, undated. AV001348: abbreviated version, dated 19820416. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
The collection, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records, contains sound and video recordings of exhibit tours, gallery talks, and lectures associated with an exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The exhibition - Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South - presented the life and times of Washington, D.C. black educator, activist, and author Anna Julia Haywood Cooper through historical documents, photographs, memorabilia, and re-creations of her home and classroom settings. It was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982; Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. The exhibition was based on an unpublished manuscript by the late Dr. Leona Gable, Smith College; and titled after Cooper's written work, A Voice from the South: By a Black Woman of the South.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV001050_A

ACMA AV001395

ACMA AV001347

ACMA AV001348_A
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American women educators  Search this
Women  Search this
Educators  Search this
African American authors  Search this
African American women authors  Search this
Authors  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Anna J. Cooper Exhibit: Audio Tour, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Item ACMA AV001370
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-029: Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7bfe84274-873b-46a4-9c9a-b012844ad1dd
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref910

Anna J. Cooper Exhibit: Student Tests

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1982
Scope and Contents:
Instructions to be used for the pretest and the post-test given to student groups regarding the exhibition 'Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South.'
Instructions. Sound only. Part of Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records. Dated 19820416.
Biographical / Historical:
The collection, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records, contains sound and video recordings of exhibit tours, gallery talks, and lectures associated with an exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The exhibition - Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South - presented the life and times of Washington, D.C. black educator and author Anna Julia Haywood Cooper through historical documents, photographs, memorabilia, and re-creations of her home and classroom settings. It was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982; Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. The exhibition was based on an unpublished manuscript by the late Dr. Leona Gable, Smith College; and titled after Cooper's written work, A Voice from the South: By a Black Woman of the South.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American women educators  Search this
Women  Search this
Educators  Search this
African American authors  Search this
African American women authors  Search this
Authors  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Museums and community  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Anna J. Cooper Exhibit: Student Tests, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Item ACMA AV001348_B
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-029: Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7acb1bcd8-6fee-40b6-93d8-0ff6a95fdb19
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref911

The Dunbar Legacy: Sallie Underdue and Herbert Nicholson Lecture

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Dunbar High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
M Street High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1981
Scope and Contents:
Sallie Underdue and Herbert Nicholson, 1917 graduates of Dunbar High School in Washington, D.C., reminescenced about their former teacher, Anna J. Cooper. They also provided historical context about Anna J. Cooper and Dunbar High School.
Lecture. Audio only. Very poor audio quality. Part of Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records. Dated 19810217.
Biographical / Historical:
The collection, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records, contains sound and video recordings of exhibit tours, gallery talks, and lectures associated with an exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The exhibition - Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South - presented the life and times of Washington, D.C. black educator and author Anna Julia Haywood Cooper through historical documents, photographs, memorabilia, and re-creations of her home and classroom settings. It was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982; Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. The exhibition was based on an unpublished manuscript by the late Dr. Leona Gable, Smith College; and titled after Cooper's written work, A Voice from the South: By a Black Woman of the South.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American women educators  Search this
Women  Search this
Educators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
The Dunbar Legacy: Sallie Underdue and Herbert Nicholson Lecture, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Item ACMA AV001378
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-029: Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7d4d122c6-3197-4535-983e-596bc4a62cfd
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref912

Pinpoint Production: Anna Julia Cooper

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (open reel, 1/2 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Drama
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1970s
Scope and Contents:
Pinpoint, an educational theater group, presents a dramatic program about Anna Julia Cooper.
Dramatic performance. Part of ACM Museum Events, PR, and Ceremonies Recordings. Poor audio. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
Educator, author, and speaker Anna Julia Haywood Cooper (1858-1964) was born into slavery and educated at Saint Augustine's Normal School and Collegiate Institute in Raleigh, North Carolina. While teaching at St. Augustine's, she married George A. C. Cooper, who died two years later. After her husband's death, Cooper moved to Washington, D.C., attended Oberlin College, taught at Wilberforce College and M Street High School, and later went on to earn her Ph.D. from the University of Paris-Sorbonne. Cooper taught Greek, Latin, geometry, and science; and created a path for African Americans to attend Ivy League schools. Although she taught and served as principal (1902-1906) of the M Street High School (now Dunbar High School) in Washington, D.C., her role and influence extended beyond its boundaries. Cooper was an advocate of human rights who lectured on a broad range of topics that affected blacks and women, including race relations, poverty, and gender inequality; a feminist of her day. She was a contributor to the District of Columbia's Colored Settlement House; served as president of Frelinghuysen University, which offered affordable liberal arts and professional courses for working African Americans; and wrote A Voice from the South by a Black Woman of the South, the first book-length volume of black feminist analysis in the United States.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Educators  Search this
African American educators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Drama
Citation:
Pinpoint Production: Anna Julia Cooper, Record Group AV09-023, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Item ACMA AV000814
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa755bc7d38-4a27-4dc3-b5b3-cc2ddc6166a3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref913

Handbook Outlining the Principles of Senior Management

Created by:
Booker T. Washington High School, American, founded 1913  Search this
Medium:
ink on paper
Dimensions:
H x W: 8 x 5 1/2 in. (20.3 x 14 cm)
Type:
manuals
Place made:
Tulsa, Tulsa County, Oklahoma, United States, North and Central America
Date:
1934
Topic:
African American  Search this
American South  Search this
American West  Search this
Education  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of the Families of Anita Williams Christopher and David Owen Williams
Object number:
2011.60.10
Restrictions & Rights:
Public domain
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Memorabilia and Ephemera
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd516815195-1b9b-40fc-bd1d-b9e90ec98f42
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2011.60.10
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  • View <I>Handbook Outlining the Principles of Senior Management</I> digital asset number 1

Kraushaar Galleries records

Creator:
Kraushaar Galleries  Search this
Names:
Art Institute of Chicago  Search this
Carnegie Institute  Search this
Cleveland Museum of Art  Search this
Ernest Brown and Co.  Search this
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
New Britain Institute. Art Museum  Search this
Toledo Museum of Art  Search this
University of Nebraska--Lincoln. Department of Art  Search this
Whitney Museum of American Art  Search this
Wichita Art Museum  Search this
Albrizio, Humbert, 1901-1970  Search this
Allard, J.  Search this
Arnest, Bernard, 1917-  Search this
Bacon, Peggy, 1895-1987  Search this
Beal, Gifford, 1879-1956  Search this
Beal, Reynolds, 1866-1951  Search this
Bignou, Etienne  Search this
Bouché, Louis, 1896-1969  Search this
Brueming, Karen  Search this
Cantene, David  Search this
Cowles, Russell, 1887-1979  Search this
DeLonga, Leonard  Search this
Demuth, Charles, 1883-1935  Search this
Evett, Kenneth Warnock, 1913-  Search this
Fausett, Dean, 1913-  Search this
Flannery, Vaughn  Search this
Glackens, Edith  Search this
Glackens, William J., 1870-1938  Search this
Guillaume, Paul, 1891-1934  Search this
Halberstadt, Ernst, 1910-1987  Search this
Hardy, Thomas, 1921-  Search this
Harrison, Preston  Search this
Hartell, John  Search this
Heliker, John, 1909-2000  Search this
Juley, Peter A., 1862-1937  Search this
Kirsch, Frederick D. (Frederick Dwight), b. 1899  Search this
Kraushaar, Antoinette M., 1902-1992  Search this
Kraushaar, John F., 1871-1946  Search this
Kuhn, Walt, 1877-1949  Search this
Lachaise, Gaston, 1882-1935  Search this
Lasker, Joe  Search this
Laurent, Robert, 1890-1970  Search this
Lechay, James  Search this
Luks, George Benjamin, 1867-1933  Search this
Miller, Harriette  Search this
Morris, Carl, 1911-1993  Search this
Murdock, Roland P. -- Art collections  Search this
Navas, Elizabeth S., 1885-1979  Search this
Penney, James, 1910-1982  Search this
Phillips, Duncan, 1886-1966  Search this
Prendergast, Charles, 1863-1948  Search this
Prendergast, Maurice Brazil, 1858-1924  Search this
Robinson, Boardman, 1876-1952  Search this
Ruellan, Andrée, 1905-2006  Search this
Schnakenberg, H. E. (Henry Ernest), 1892-1970  Search this
Sloan, John, 1871-1951  Search this
Smalley, David, 1940-  Search this
Smith, Vernon, 1894-1969  Search this
Stanley, Alix W.  Search this
Williams, Esther, 1907-1969  Search this
Wilson, Ralph L.  Search this
Extent:
100.3 Linear feet
0.181 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Photographs
Sketches
Drawings
Exhibition catalogs
Financial records
Notes
Sketchbooks
Date:
1877-2006
Summary:
The records of New York City Kraushaar Galleries measure 100.3 linear feet and 0.181 GB and date from 1877 to 2006. Three-fourths of the collection documents the gallery's handling of contemporary American paintings, drawings, and sculpture through correspondence with artists, private collectors, museums, galleries, and other art institutions, interspersed with scattered exhibition catalogs and other materials. Also included are John F. Kraushaar's estate records; artists' files; financial ledgers documenting sales and gallery transactions; consignment and loan records; photographs of artwork; sketchbooks and drawings by James Penney, Louis Bouché, and others; and two scrapbooks.
Scope and Content Note:
The records of New York City Kraushaar Galleries measure 106.3 linear feet and 0.181 GB and date from 1877 to 2006. Three-fourths of the collection documents the gallery's handling of contemporary American paintings, drawings, and sculpture through correspondence with artists, private collectors, museums, galleries, and other art institutions, interspersed with scattered exhibition catalogs and other materials. Also included are John F. Kraushaar's estate records; artists' files; financial ledgers documenting sales and gallery transactions; consignment and loan records; photographs of artwork; sketchbooks and drawings by James Penney, Louis Bouché, and others; and two scrapbooks.

The collection reflects all activities conducted in the day-to-day administration of the business and relates to the acquisition, consignment, loan, sale, and exhibition of art by twentieth-century American artists and European artists of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The records document specific arrangements for loans and exhibitions, artist-dealer relations, relationships with public and private collectors, interaction with the art dealer community, and routine requests for information.

Much of the artist correspondence relates to practical arrangements for exhibitions of artwork, but in many cases also documents the development of individual artists and the effect of their relationship with the galleries on their ability to produce marketable work. Many of the artists represented in the collection also wrote lengthy letters, particularly to Antoinette Kraushaar, describing their attitudes to their work and providing insight into how that work was shaped by events in their personal lives.

The bulk of the correspondence with museums and institutions concerns practical arrangements for loans of artwork and provides detailed information about market prices and insurance values. It offers insight into the general climate of opinion toward particular artists and styles at any given time. Correspondence with other galleries and dealers also concerns loans and sales of artwork but, due to the typically cordial and cooperative nature of relations between the Kraushaars and their contemporaries, may also provide a more extensive and personal view of relationships and trends in the art dealer community. Similarly, while a portion of the correspondence with private collectors concerns routine requests for information and loans of art on approval, there is also substantive correspondence documenting the development of the artistic vision of collectors such as Preston Harrison, Elizabeth S. Navas, and Duncan Phillips.

From 1917 to the mid-1930s correspondence was handled mainly by John Kraushaar, and the bulk of that relating to European galleries and European art can be found during these years. Although there are only a handful of materials before 1926, records from the 1920s and 1930s document Kraushaar Galleries' growing commitment to American artists and the climate of the market for their work. The financial hardships of the Depression are vividly depicted in the numerous letters written during the 1930s seeking payment on accounts receivable and requesting extensions on accounts payable.

From the mid-1930s to 1968 correspondence was conducted primarily by Antoinette Kraushaar and, to some degree, by her assistants in later years. As the galleries' focus on American art increased, so did the volume of correspondence with artists, and the collection is particularly rich during the 1940s and early 1960s. In later years to 2006, most of the correspondence was conducted by Carol Pesner and gallery assistants.

The exhibition catalogs included in the collection do not represent a complete set. Those found are working copies used by the galleries in preparation for exhibitions and are often annotated with prices or insurance values. Additional exhibition catalogs can be found on the microfilm described in the Administrative Information section of this finding aid.

The majority of Kraushaar Galleries' insurance records can be found in files relating to the company Wm. E. Goodridge & Son, later known as Wm. E. Goodridge, Inc. Shipping and transportation records are generally filed under the names of the companies used for such transactions and can primarily be found under Davies, Turner & Co., Hudson Forwarding & Shipping Co., Railway Express Agency, Inc., and W. S. Budworth & Son, and to a lesser degree under American Railway Express Company, Arthur Lenars & Cie., C. B. Richard & Co., De La Rancheraye & Co., Hayes Storage, Packing & Removal Service, Inc., and Willis, Faber & Co. Ltd.

The 2008-2017 additions include correspondence similar in content and with correspondents as described above, as well as some artists' Christmas cards. However, the bulk of the additional correspondence dates from 1965-1989, with a handful of miscellaneous correspondence from 1877 to the mid-twentieth century. Also found are financial and business records including records from the closing of the John F. Kraushaar estate; over 40 ledgers providing nearly complete documentation of the gallery's sales and transactions from its establishment to 1946; incoming consignment records, including account statements and correspondence with artists, from the 1940s to 2006; and outgoing consignment and loan records from 1899-2006. The gallery's representation of its stable of artists is documented through artists' files containing printed and digital materials, exhibition catalogs and announcements, price lists, and biographical information, as well as containers of photographs and negatives of artwork. Also found is a 1933 sketchbook by James Penney, drawings and sketchbooks by Louis Bouché, and two scrapbooks.

There is a 6.0 linear foot unprocessed addition to this collection donated in 2022 that includes correspondence with artists, galleries, organizations and individuals regarding works of art, filed alphabetically by year. Materials date from circa 1959-1996, with the bulk from 1990-1999.

See Appendix for a list of Kraushaar Galleries exhibitions
Arrangement:
Kraushaar Galleries generally filed all types of records together with correspondence in a combination of alphabetical and chronological files. Thus financial records, insurance records, receipts, photographs, and exhibition catalogs can be found interfiled with general correspondence in Series 1-3. A group of photographs of artwork maintained separately by Kraushaar Galleries constitutes Series 4. Series 6 was minimally processed separately from Series 1-5, and the arrangement reflects the original order of the addition for the most part.

Records in Series 1-3 were originally filed alphabetically by name of correspondent and then by month, by a span of several months, or by year. The alphabetical arrangement has been retained, but to facilitate access the collection was rearranged so that correspondence was collated by year. From 1901 to 1944 outgoing letters and incoming letters are filed separately; in 1945 some outgoing letters are filed separately, with the bulk of the material filed together as correspondence; from 1946 to 1968 incoming and outgoing letters are filed together as correspondence.

For Series 1-3 organizations or individuals represented by at least 15 letters are filed in separate file folders. All other correspondents are arranged in general files by letters of the alphabet, with selected correspondents and subjects noted in parentheses after the folder title.

Series 2 and several boxes in Series 3 contain a variety of notes and receipts received and created by Kraushaar Galleries that were originally unfoldered. The notes can be found in folders adjacent to the receipts and include handwritten notes of customer names and addresses, financial notes and calculations, catalogs of exhibitions, invitations and announcements to exhibitions frequently used as note paper, and other miscellany. Although most of the miscellaneous notes are undated, they are filed, with the receipts, at the end of the year to which they appear to relate. For the years 1929 and 1930 Kraushaar Galleries created separate alphabetical files for some of the billing statements received from other businesses. These have been filed adjacent to "Miscellaneous Notes" and "Receipts" in the appropriate years.

Kraushaar Galleries tended to file correspondence with businesses alphabetically according to the letter of the last name: for example, Wm. E. Goodridge & Son would be filed under G rather than W.

Missing Title

Series 1: Outgoing Letters, 1920-1945 (boxes 1-9; 9 linear ft.)

Series 2: Incoming Letters (boxes 10-26; 16.25 linear ft.)

Series 3: Correspondence, 1945-1968 (boxes 26-53; 27.75 linear ft.)

Series 4: Photographs, undated (box 54; 0.5 linear ft.)

Series 5: Artwork, [1926, 1938] (box 53; 2 items)

Series 6: Addition to the Kraushaar Galleries Records, 1877-2006 (boxes 55-99, 101-111, BV100; 46.8 linear feet, ER01-ER02; 0.181 GB)

Series 7: Unprocessed Addition, circa 1959-1996, bulk 1990-1999 (Boxes 112-117)
Historical Note:
Charles W. Kraushaar established Kraushaar Galleries in 1885 as a small store on Broadway near Thirty-first Street in New York City. Initially the store sold artist materials, photogravures, and reproductions. Drawing on his previous experience working with William Schause, a leading dealer in European paintings, Kraushaar soon progressed to selling original watercolors, paintings, and engravings by European artists, primarily landscapes of the Barbizon School.

In 1901 Kraushaar moved the business to 260 Fifth Avenue and with the assistance of his brother, John F. Kraushaar, began adding more modern French and American painters to the inventory. Of particular interest to John Kraushaar was the group of American realists known as "The Eight," who had held a self-selected, self-organized exhibition at the Macbeth Gallery in 1908. The Eight were Arthur B. Davies, William Glackens, Robert Henri, Ernest Lawson, George Luks, Maurice Prendergast, Everett Shinn, and John Sloan. Luks, whom John Kraushaar met around 1902, was probably the first major American artist represented at Kraushaar Galleries. In 1917 John Sloan was invited to hold his first one-person show at the galleries despite accusations that his exhibition at the Whitney Studio the previous year had represented a brutal depiction of life that lacked subtlety and sensitivity.

When Charles Kraushaar died suddenly in 1917, John assumed control of the galleries and soon enlisted the assistance of his daughter, Antoinette Kraushaar. Antoinette had suffered a bout of pneumonia during the influenza epidemic of 1918 that cut short her education; grooming her for a career in the galleries was a logical step. Following the end of the First World War, Kraushaar resumed his buying trips to Europe, often accompanied by Antoinette, and exhibited works by European artists such as André Derain, Henri Matisse, Amedeo Modigliani, Pablo Picasso, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, and Vincent Van Gogh. However, it was the increasing commitment to contemporary American artists for which the galleries would become best known. In addition to The Eight, the Kraushaars developed their inventory of American paintings and etchings with exhibitions of work by artists such as Gifford Beal, Charles Demuth, Guy Pène Du Bois, Gaston Lachaise, Jerome Myers, Charles Prendergast, and Henry Schnakenberg.

Returning from a buying trip to Europe in 1929, John Kraushaar wrote to California collector Preston Harrision on July 26 that "the prices over there, especially for modern pictures are astounding." Nevertheless, Kraushaar believed that investing in modern art would yield benefits within the next five years, and he refused to be influenced by museums and critics outside of New York who were reluctant to agree. He exhibited a healthy disrespect for museum directors in general, whom he referred to in his letters to Harrision as "dead heads" who ought to be sent to different art centers of the world in order to "get in touch with what is going on there" (March 11, 1929).

Like most of its contemporaries, Kraushaar Galleries suffered considerably during the Depression of the 1930s and struggled to collect and, in turn, pay accounts due. On October 5, 1931, John Kraushaar confessed to H. S. Southam, "Business is very bad with us, and I know that you will treat it confidentially when I tell you that I have had to sacrifice a good part of my personal holdings to provide cash for my own business." By 1934 the rent on the galleries' current location at 680 Fifth Avenue, where Kraushaar had moved in 1919, was out of all proportion to the amount of business that was being generated. In 1936, a timely move to 730 Fifth Avenue allowed the family to effect substantial economies without a disproportionate loss of business.

During the 1930s, John Kraushaar's health began to fail, and he was frequently absent from the galleries. Consequently, Antoinette Kraushaar took on greater responsibility for the operation of the business with the assistance of her brother Charles. Although Antoinette was one of few women to hold such a prominent position in the art business at that time, there is no evidence in the records to suggest that artists or customers who had been accustomed to dealing with John Kraushaar had any difficulty accepting the transition in management from father to daughter.

Nevertheless, collecting accounts remained difficult, and although business had improved by 1938 it was now stymied by the threat of war in Europe. The warmth of relations between the Kraushaars and the artists they handled, and their colleagues, was crucial to Antoinette during these years. She repeatedly expressed her gratitude for their understanding and assistance in her letters as she struggled to meet financial obligations and operate the business in her father's absence, experimenting with different strategies as she evolved an approach that would sustain the business. In a letter to Gifford Beal dated August 6, 1941, she spoke of "hellish times" and stressed, "I have learned a great many things during the past few years and hope that we are groping our way towards a working solution of our own affairs at least."

While there is no question that Antoinette Kraushaar shared her father's genuine interest in contemporary American artists, the growing commitment to these artists that was forged during these years was driven in large part by necessity. By increasing her stock of American art and adding "younger painters of promise," she was able to sell work in a much broader price range. Consequently she could reach a wider audience and increase the likelihood that the business would remain solvent. This method of business also suited her personality far more than having a very specialized inventory of highly priced work, an approach that she confessed to J. Lionberger Davis on December 3, 1940, "requires a particular kind of temperament, and frankly I neither like it nor believe in it."

Throughout her career Antoinette imbued the business with her personal style. She understood that elitism alienated art buyers of moderate income, who constituted her bread and butter, and believed strongly that the gallery environment should not be intimidating to potential customers. She corresponded at length with old and new clients alike, patiently offering advice when asked and maintaining liberal policies for those who wished to borrow artwork on approval. She also participated in events that promoted efforts to make art available to a wider audience, such as a 1951 exhibition and seminar at the Florida Gulf Coast Art Center that addressed problems of buying and selling art. She was a two-time board member of the Art Dealers Association of America and considered the organization to be an important source of support for the gallery community.

In her dealings with other commercial galleries and art institutions, Antoinette Kraushaar exhibited a strong spirit of cooperation and enthusiasm, consistently lending art to small, locally owned businesses and community organizations as well as to more established galleries and world-class museums. She also developed long and mutually beneficial associations with the art departments of many educational institutions across the country, which proved to be fertile ground for young and upcoming artists.

Antoinette Kraushaar exhibited the same honesty and fairness in dealing with artists as her father had, expressing her opinions of their work in a forthright manner and maintaining a policy of always looking at the work of any artist who came to her. She understood the inherent difficulties of dealing with living artists but relished the excitement of encouraging their work and watching them develop. On November 14, 1947, in reply to a letter from the artist Bernard Arnest, in which Arnest apologized for burdening her with his worries, she reminded him, "One of the functions of a dealer is to act as a safety valve. Didn't you know?"

Although she would not retain artists indefinitely if she felt their work had deteriorated in quality, Antoinette often stressed that she was prepared to accept little or no initial financial return on the work of artists who showed promise or whose work held a particular appeal for her. In a letter of December 30, 1940, she reassured Walt Dehner that the lack of sales from his recent exhibition would not lead her to withdraw his work from the galleries. In typically unassuming style she advised Dehner to "go on painting whatever interests you. We have found that there is no recipe for success, either artistic or material."

In the early 1940s Antoinette Kraushaar implemented two changes to her inventory. Sensing that interest in sculpture was growing, she rearranged the space to give that medium more room and attention. The market for etchings had been declining since the late 1930s, and as she reduced this part of her inventory she also acted on her personal passion for drawings by opening a small gallery devoted to contemporary American drawings that were priced well within the range of most customers.

By the time Kraushaar Galleries moved to 32 East Fifty-seventh Street, late in 1944, American art had become the main focus of the business. While the long-standing interest in The Eight and other artists of that period continued, the galleries also handled contemporaries such as Louis Bouché, Samuel Brecher, John Heliker, Andrée Ruellan, and Karl Schrag. When John Kraushaar died in December 1946, Antoinette and Charles legally assumed control of the business. This partnership continued until 1950, when Antoinette assumed sole ownership of the gallery.

In 1955 the galleries moved uptown to smaller quarters at 1055 Madison Avenue, and Antoinette Kraushaar gave up the greater part of her print business. She was inundated with requests from artists to be allowed a chance to show her their work, and the galleries' exhibition schedule was always full. Contemporary artists she now represented included Bernard Arnest, Peggy Bacon, Russell Cowles, Kenneth Evett, William Dean Fausett, William Kienbusch, Joe Lasker, and George Rickey, and she continued to exhibit artwork by Charles Demuth, William Glackens, George Luks, Maurice Prendergast, Boardman Robinson, and John Sloan.

By the late 1950s the artists of the generation that her father had promoted in the early part of the century had died, but Antoinette Kraushaar had the pleasure of seeing his faith in them come to fruition. In a letter to Ralph Wilson dated October 20, 1958, she stated with satisfaction, "The Boston Museum is taking (at long last) a deep interest in (Maurice) Prendergast, and they will probably do an important show within the next year." Her correspondence with William Glackens's son Ira in the 1960s reveals the extent to which Glackens's popularity had grown since his death in 1938, and the market for John Sloan's work had been increasing steadily since the late 1920s. In 1962 James Penney summed up Kraushaar Galleries' success in the foreword of a catalog for an exhibition of paintings and sculpture the galleries had organized with the Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute at Hamilton College:

Missing Title

1854 -- Charles W. Kraushaar born

1871 -- John F. Kraushaar born

1885 -- Kraushaar Galleries established on Broadway near Thirty-first Street

1901 -- Galleries moved to 260 Fifth Avenue

1902 -- Antoinette Kraushaar born

1917 -- Charles W. Kraushaar died; John Kraushaar assumed control of the business, increasing inventory of modern American and European artists; first John Sloan exhibition

1919 -- Galleries moved to 680 Fifth Avenue

[1920] -- Antoinette Kraushaar began assisting with the business

1924 -- Maurice Prendergast died

1936 -- Galleries moved to the Heckscher Building at 730 Fifth Avenue

1938 -- William J. Glackens died

1944 -- Galleries moved to the Rolls Royce Building at 32 East Fifty-seventh Street; American art now the main focus of the business

1946 -- John Kraushaar died; Antoinette and Charles Kraushaar assumed control of the business

1948 -- Charles Prendergast died

1950 -- Antoinette Kraushaar assumed sole ownership of Kraushaar Galleries

1951 -- John Sloan died

1955 -- Galleries moved to 1055 Madison Avenue

1959 -- Carole Pesner joined Kraushaar Galleries

1964 -- Galleries extended into adjacent building

1981 -- Galleries moved to 724 Fifth Avenue

1986 -- Katherine Kaplan joined Kraushaar Galleries

1988 -- Antoinette Kraushaar retired from day-to-day management of the business

1992 -- Antoinette Kraushaar died
Appendix: List of Kraushaar Galleries Exhibitions:
The Archives of American Art does not hold a complete collection of catalogs from exhibitions held at Kraushaar Galleries; therefore the dates and titles of exhibitions provided in this appendix are inferred from a variety of sources including correspondence, notes, artists' files, and requests for advertising. Italics indicate that the exact title of an exhibition is known.

Missing Title

Jan., 1912 -- Paintings by Gustave Courbet and Henri Fantin-Latour

Apr., 1912 -- Paintings by Frank Brangwyn and Henri Le Sidaner

Jan., 1913 -- Paintings by Ignacio Zuloaga

May, 1913 -- Etchings by Seymour Haden

June, 1913 -- Paintings and Lithographs by Henri Fantin-Latour

Oct., 1913 -- Etchings by Frank Brangwyn

Jan., 1914 -- Ignacio Zuloaga

Mar., 1914 -- Paintings by Alphonse Legros

Apr., 1914 -- George Luks

May, 1914 -- Seven Modern Masterpieces including Gustave Courbet, Henri Fantin-Latour, Alphonse Legros, Matthew Maris, and James McNeill Whistler

undated, 1915 -- Paintings by John Lavery

Jan.-Feb., 1917 -- James McNeill Whistler's White Girl

Feb.-Mar., 1917 -- Paintings by Augustus Vincent Tack

Mar.-Apr., 1917 -- Paintings and Etchings by John Sloan

Summer, 1917 -- Works by French artists including A. L. Bouche, Josef Israels, Gaston La Touche, and Alphonse Legros

Oct., 1917 -- Monoprints by Salvatore Antonio Guarino

Nov., 1917 -- Etchings and Mezzotints by Albany E. Howarth

Jan., 1918 -- Recent Paintings by John Lavery

Jan.-Feb., 1918 -- Paintings and Watercolors by George Luks

Feb.-Mar., 1918 -- Paintings by Augustus Vincent Tack

Mar., 1918 -- Paintings by John Sloan

Apr.-May, 1918 -- Paintings by A. L. Bouche

May, 1918 -- War Paintings by J. Mortimer Block, Charles S. Chapman, Guy Pène Du Bois, H. B. Fuller, George Luks, W. Ritschell, John Sloan, and Augustus Vincent Tack

Oct., 1918 -- Oil Paintings by William Scott Pyle

Nov., 1918 -- Paintings by Gustave Courbet, Henri Fantin-Latour, Alphonse Legros, Edouard Manet, Antoine Vollon, James McNeill Whistler, and Ignacio Zuloaga, and bronzes by Antoine Louis Bayre, Emile Antoine Bourdelle, and Mahonri Young

Apr., 1919 -- Paintings and Monoprints by Salvatore Anthonio Guarino

Jan.-Feb., 1919 -- Decorative Panels and Other Paintings by Augustus Vincent Tack

Mar., 1919 -- Paintings and Drawings by John Sloan

May, 1919 -- Paintings by George Luks, Monticelli, and A. P. Ryder

Sept., 1919 -- Work by Jean Louis Forain

Oct., 1919 -- Etchings and Lithographs by Alphonse Legros

Jan., 1920 -- Recent Paintings by George Luks

Feb., 1920 -- Recent Paintings by John Sloan

Feb., 1920 -- Paintings by William Scott Pyle

Mar., 1920 -- Recent Paintings by Gifford Beal

Apr., 1920 -- Recent Paintings by Augustus Vincent Tack

Apr., 1920 -- Paintings by Henri Le Sidaner

Apr., 1920 -- Paintings and Drawings by Jean Louis Forain

Apr.-May, 1920 -- Paintings and Drawings by Jerome Myers

May, 1920 -- Paintings by Henrietta M. Shore

Jan., 1921 -- Paintings by French and American Artists

Jan.-Feb., 1921 -- Paintings by George Luks

Feb., 1921 -- New Paintings by Augustus Vincent Tack

Apr., 1921 -- John Sloan Retrospective

Summer, 1921 -- French and American Artists

Oct., 1921 -- Paintings of Mountford Coolidge

Oct., 1921 -- Works by Henri Fantin-Latour and Henri Le Sidaner

Nov., 1921 -- Frank Van Vleet Tompkins

Dec., 1921 -- Paintings and Bronzes by Modern Masters of American and European Art

Jan., 1922 -- Exhibition of Recent Paintings and Watercolors by George Luks

Feb., 1922 -- Paintings by Augustus Vincent Tack

Mar., 1922 -- Paintings and Watercolors by Gifford Beal

Apr., 1922 -- Exhibition of Paintings by Guy Pène Du Bois

Summer, 1922 -- Paintings by Modern Masters of American and European Art

Oct., 1922 -- Recent Paintings of the Maine Coast by George Luks

Jan., 1923 -- Exhibition of Paintings by George Luks

Feb., 1923 -- Paintings and Decorative Panels by Augustus Vincent Tack

Mar., 1923 -- Landscapes by Will Shuster

Mar., 1923 -- Paintings by Samuel Halpert

Apr., 1923 -- Marine Figures and Landscapes by Gifford Beal

Apr.-May, 1923 -- Paintings by John Sloan

May, 1923 -- Paintings by Frank Van Vleet Tompkins

June, 1923 -- Etchings by Marius A. J. Bauer

Oct., 1923 -- American Watercolors by Gifford Beal, Reynolds Beal, George Luks, Maurice Prendergast, and William Zorach

Dec., 1923 -- Etchings and Lithographs by Alphonse Legros

Dec., 1923 -- Paintings, Drawings, and Pastels by Charles Adolphe Bischoff

Jan., 1924 -- Paintings by Celebrated American Artists

Mar., 1924 -- Paintings and Drawings by Guy Pène Du Bois

Apr., 1924 -- New Paintings by George Luks

May, 1924 -- Paintings by Marjorie Phillips

Summer, 1924 -- French and American Modern Artists

Oct., 1924 -- Painting, Watercolors, and Sculpture by William Zorach

Nov., 1924 -- Watercolors by Seven Americans

Dec., 1924 -- French Paintings

Jan., 1925 -- Paintings by John Sloan

Jan.-Feb., 1925 -- Maurice Prendergast Memorial Exhibition

Mar., 1925 -- Plans and Photographs of Work in Landscape Architecture by Charles Downing Lay

Apr., 1925 -- Paintings by William J. Glackens

Dec., 1925 -- Watercolors by Gifford Beal, Reynolds Beal, Carl Broemel, Richard Lahey Jerome Myers, Maurice Prendergast, Henry E. Schnakenberg, Abraham Walkowitz, and William Zorach

undated, 1926 -- Lower Broadway by W. Walcot

Feb., 1926 -- Paintings by Paul Burlin

Feb., 1926 -- Portraits of Duncan Phillips, Esq. Charles B. Rogers, Esq. & The Hon. Elihu Root Painted by Augustus Vincent Tack

Mar., 1926 -- Paintings, Watercolors, and Drawings by Gifford Beal

Apr., 1926 -- John Sloan

Sept.-Oct., 1926 -- Exhibition of Etchings by C. R. W. Nevinson

Oct., 1926 -- Drawings, Etchings, and Lithographs by Nineteenth-Century French Artists

Oct., 1926 -- Paintings and Drawings by Mathieu Verdilhan

Dec., 1926 -- Exhibition of Watercolors by Gifford Beal, Reynolds Beal, Carl Broemel, Guy Pène Du Bois, Ernest Fiene, Samuel Halpert, Henry Keller, Louis Kronberg, Richard Lahey, Charles Lay, Jerome Myers, Maurice Prendergast, Henry

Dec., 1926 -- Schnakenberg, A. Walkowitz, Martha Walters, William Zorach

Jan., 1927 -- French Drawings and Prints

Feb., 1927 -- Paintings, Drawings, Etchings, and Lithographs by John Sloan

Mar., 1927 -- Gifford Beal

Mar.-Apr., 1927 -- Decorative Panels and Watercolors by Margarett Sargent

Mar.-Apr., 1927 -- Exhibition of Drawings and Lithographs of New York by Adriaan Lubbers

Apr., 1927 -- Paintings and Etchings by Walter Pach

Apr.-May, 1927 -- Paintings and Watercolors by Leopold Survage

Apr.-May, 1927 -- Etchings and Woodcuts by D. Galanis

May, 1927 -- Paintings by Guy Pène Du Bois

Summer, 1927 -- Paintings by American Artists

Summer, 1927 -- Paintings, Watercolors, and Drawings by Georges Braque, Honoré Daumier, Edgar Degas, André Derain, Henri Fantin-Latour, Jean Louis Forain, Constantin Guys, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Edouard Manet, Henri Matisse, Amedeo Modigliani, Claude Monet, Morissot, Pablo Picasso, Camille Pissarro, Odilon Redon, Segonzac, and Georges Seurat

Oct.-Nov., 1927 -- Exhibition of Etchings in Color by Bernard Boutet de Monvel

Nov., 1927 -- Exhibition of Paintings, Drawings, Lithographs, and Watercolors by Ernest Fiene

Dec., 1927 -- Watercolors by American Artists including Gifford Beal, Reynolds Beal, Carl Broemel, Charles Demuth, Guy Pène Du Bois, Ernest Fiene, Henry G. Keller, Richard Lahey, Charles Downing Lay, Howard Ashman Patterson, [Maurice] Prendergast, Henry E. Schnakenberg, Abraham Walkowitz, Frank Nelson Wilcox, and [William] Zorach

Dec., 1927 -- Paintings by Guy Pène Du Bois

Dec., 1927 -- Paintings, Sculpture, and Decorative Media by George Biddle

Jan.-Feb., 1928 -- Paintings by S. J. Peploe

Feb., 1928 -- Drawings by Henri Fantin-Latour

Feb., 1928 -- Pastels and Drawings by Margarett Sargent

Feb., 1928 -- Drawings for Balzac's Les Contes Drolatiques by Ralph Barton

Feb.-Mar., 1928 -- Sculpture by William Zorach

Mar., 1928 -- Recent Paintings by Marjorie Phillips

Mar.-Apr., 1928 -- Exhibition of Paintings by William Glackens

Apr., 1928 -- Paintings, Drawings and Lithographs by R. H. Sauter of London, England

Oct., 1928 -- Modern French Paintings, Watercolors and Drawings

Oct.-Nov., 1928 -- Paintings, Watercolors, Drawings, Etchings, and Lithographs by Richard Lahey

Nov., 1928 -- Exhibition of Paintings and Sculpture by J. D. Fergusson

Nov.-Dec., 1928 -- Paintings, Drawings and Etchings by Walter Pach

Dec., 1928 -- Paintings and Watercolors by Abraham Walkowitz

Jan., 1929 -- Exhibition of Paintings by Margarett Sargent

Jan., 1929 -- Watercolors by Rodin

Jan.-Feb., 1929 -- Exhibition of Sculpture by Arnold Geissbuhler

Feb., 1929 -- Paintings and Watercolors by Guy Pène Du Bois

Feb.-Mar., 1929 -- Paintings by Gifford Beal

Mar., 1929 -- Exhibition of Paintings by Adriaan Lubbers

Mar.-Apr., 1929 -- Exhibition of Etchings by Gifford Beal, Frank W. Benson, Childe Hassam, Kenneth Hayes Miller, and John Sloan

Apr., 1929 -- Exhibition of Paintings by Arnold Friedman

Apr., 1929 -- Sculpture by Harriette G. Miller

May, 1929 -- Paintings by Howard Ashman Patterson

May, 1929 -- Paintings by William Meyerowitz

Oct., 1929 -- Exhibition of Modern French Paintings, Watercolors and Drawings

Nov., 1929 -- Modern French and American Paintings, Watercolors, Prints, and Sculpture (at Gage Galleries in Cleveland)

Jan., 1930 -- Paintings by Paul Bartlett

Feb., 1930 -- Watercolors by Auguste Rodin

Feb.-Mar., 1930 -- Paintings by Guy Pène Du Bois

Summer, 1930 -- Paintings by American Artists

Oct., 1930 -- Paintings and Watercolors by Maurice Prendergast

Nov., 1930 -- Paintings by Ruth Jonas

Nov., 1930 -- Sculpture by Harriette G. Miller

Jan., 1931 -- Paintings and Watercolors by Richard Lahey

Jan.-Feb., 1931 -- Paintings by Erle Loran Johnson

Feb.-Mar., 1931 -- Paintings, Watercolors and Etchings by Gifford Beal

Mar., 1931 -- Paintings and Watercolors by Walter Pach

Mar.-Apr., 1931 -- Paintings, Drawings, and Etchings by Rudolf H. Sauter

May, 1931 -- Exhibition of Watercolors by John La Farge, Gifford Beal, H. E. Schnakenberg, Maurice Prendergast, Guy Pène Du Bois, Richard Lahey

Fall, 1931 -- Modern French Paintings, Watercolors, and Drawings

Dec., 1931 -- Exhibition of Drawings and Watercolors by D. Y. Cameron, Joseph Gray, Henry Rushbury, Muirhead Bone, Edmund Blampied, Gwen John

Dec., 1931 -- Lithographs and Posters by H. de Toulouse-Lautrec

Jan., 1932 -- Watercolors by Pierre Brissaud

Feb., 1932 -- Paintings and Drawings by A. S. Baylinson

Mar., 1932 -- Watercolors and Pastels by French and American Artists

Apr., 1932 -- Paintings by Nan Watson

May, 1932 -- Sculpture by Behn, Bourdelle, Geissbuhler, Lachaise, Maillol, Miller, Nadelman, Renoir, Young, Zorach; Decorative Panels by Max Kuehne, and Charles Prendergast

June-Aug., 1932 -- Paintings and Watercolors by American Artists

Oct.-Nov., 1932 -- Paintings, Watercolors, and Drawings by Various Artists

Jan., 1933 -- Paintings by Paul Bartlett

Jan.-Feb., 1933 -- Lithographs by Henri Fantin-Latour

Feb., 1933 -- Etchings of Dogs by Bert Cobb

Feb.-Mar., 1933 -- Paintings by American Artists

Feb.-Apr., 1933 -- Paintings by Contemporary Americans

Apr., 1933 -- Paintings by Maurice Prendergast

Oct., 1933 -- Exhibition of French Paintings, Watercolors, and Drawings

Oct.-Nov., 1933 -- Drawings by Emily W. Miles

Oct.-Nov., 1933 -- Exhibition of Etchings and Lithographs

Nov., 1933 -- Paintings and Watercolors by Henry E. Schnakenberg

Dec., 1933 -- Watercolors by Gifford Beal

Jan., 1934 -- Exhibition of Drawings by Denys Wortman for "Metropolitan Movies"

Summer, 1934 -- Paintings by Gifford Beal, Reynolds Beal, Isabel Bishop, Ann Brockman, Preston Dickinson, Guy Pène Du Bois, William J. Glackens, Richard Lahey, Ernest Lawson, George Luks, Harriette Miller, Maurice Prendergast, Henry E. Schnakenberg, and John Sloan

Oct.-Nov., 1934 -- Exhibition of Etchings and Lithographs

Nov.-Dec., 1934 -- Paintings by Gifford Beal

Mar., 1935 -- Complete Collection of Etchings by Mahonri Young

July-Aug., 1935 -- Paintings by American Artists including Gifford Beal, Reynolds Beal, Ann Brockman, Guy Pène Du Bois, William J. Glackens, Max Kuehne, Richard Lahey, Ernest Lawson, George Luks, Harriette G. Miller, Maurice Prendergast, Henry E. Schnakenberg, John Sloan, and Abraham Walkowitz

Oct.-Nov., 1935 -- Decorative Panels by Charles Prendergast

Nov., 1935 -- Exhibition of Paintings by H. E. Schnakenberg

Mar., 1936 -- Paintings by Louis Bouché

Apr., 1936 -- Paintings by Gifford Beal

Oct.-Nov., 1936 -- Loan Collection of French Paintings

Dec., 1936 -- Monotypes in Color by Maurice Prendergast

Jan., 1937 -- Recent Watercolors by H. E. Schnakenberg

Jan., 1937 -- Paintings of Flowers by William J. Glackens

Feb., 1937 -- Etchings by John Sloan

Feb., 1937 -- A Group of American Paintings

Sept., 1937 -- A Group of Paintings by Gifford Beal, Louis Bouché, Guy Pène Du Bois, William J. Glackens, Ernest Lawson, George Luks, Maurice Prendergast, Theodore Robinson, John Sloan, J. Alden Weir

Oct.-Nov., 1937 -- Decorative Panels by Charles Prendergast

Dec., 1937 -- American Watercolors

Jan.-Feb., 1938 -- Paintings by Gifford Beal

Feb.-Mar., 1938 -- Drawings by William Glackens, Guy Pène Du Bois, John Sloan, Denys Wortman

Apr., 1938 -- Paintings by Louis Bouché

May, 1938 -- Paintings and Pastels by Randall Davey

Oct., 1938 -- Selected Paintings by Modern French and American Artists

Nov., 1938 -- Paintings by Guy Pène Du Bois from 1908 to 1938

Nov., 1938 -- Paintings and Sculpture by Harriette G. Miller

Dec., 1938 -- Watercolors by Prendergast, Keller, Demuth, Wilcox and Others

Jan., 1939 -- Paintings by H. H. Newton

Oct., 1939 -- French and American Paintings

Oct.-Nov., 1939 -- Drawings by William Glackens of Spanish-American War Scenes

Nov., 1939 -- Paintings and Watercolors by Russell Cowles

Jan.-Feb., 1940 -- Recent Paintings by Louis Bouché

Feb.-Mar., 1940 -- Paintings by Henry Schnakenberg

Mar.-Apr., 1940 -- Paintings by Maurice Prendergast

Apr.-May, 1940 -- Watercolors by Charles Kaeselau

May-June, 1940 -- A Group of Recent Paintings by Gifford Beal, Russell Cowles, John Koch, Henry Schnakenberg, Esther Williams, Louis Bouché, Guy Pène Du Bois, Harriette G. Miller, John Sloan, Edmund Yaghjian

Oct., 1940 -- Drawings by American Artists

Nov., 1940 -- Walt Dehner

Mar., 1941 -- John Koch

May-June, 1941 -- Watercolors and Small Paintings by Gifford Beal

Oct.-Nov., 1941 -- Recent Paintings by Russell Cowles

Nov.-Dec., 1941 -- Paintings and Watercolors by Henry E. Schnakenberg

Dec., 1941 -- Charles Prendergast

Jan., 1942 -- Paintings by Samuel Brecher

Jan.-Feb., 1942 -- Recent Paintings by Guy Pène Du Bois

Mar.-Apr., 1942 -- Recent Paintings by Louis Bouché

Mar.-Apr., 1942 -- Illustrations by Boardman Robinson Commissioned by the Limited Editions Club for Edgar Lee Masters' "Spoon River Anthology"

Dec., 1942 -- Paintings from the Period of the Last War

Feb., 1943 -- Paintings and Watercolors by William Dean Fausett

Mar., 1943 -- Paintings by John Hartell

May-July, 1943 -- Watercolors by Contemporary American Artists

Feb.-Mar., 1944 -- Samuel Brecher

Feb.-Mar., 1944 -- Paintings, Gouaches, and Drawings by Andrée Ruellan

Mar., 1944 -- Vaughn Flannery

Mar.-Apr., 1944 -- Recent Paintings by Russell Cowles

Apr.-May, 1944 -- Recent Paintings by Louis Bouché

May-June, 1944 -- Retrospective Exhibition of Paintings and Watercolors by Henry G. Keller

Oct., 1944 -- Esther Williams

Nov.-Dec., 1944 -- Paintings and Watercolors of France by Maurice Prendergast

Dec., 1944 -- William J. Glackens Sixth Memorial Exhibition

Dec., 1944 -- Kraushaar Galleries Sixtieth Anniversary Exhibition of Paintings by William J. Glackens, Ernest Lawson, George Luks, Maurice Prendergast, and John Sloan

Jan.-Feb., 1945 -- Paintings by Gifford Beal

Feb.-Mar., 1945 -- Paintings by Andrée Ruellan

Apr.-May, 1945 -- Charles Locke

May-June, 1945 -- William Dean Fausett

Oct., 1945 -- Paintings by John Hartell

Nov.-Dec., 1945 -- Recent Watercolors by Marion Monks Chase

Nov.-Dec., 1945 -- Gouaches by Cecil Bell

Dec., 1945 -- Memorial Exhibition of Paintings and Watercolors by Ann Brockman

undated, 1946 -- Russell Cowles

Jan.-Feb., 1946 -- Richard Lahey

Feb., 1946 -- John Koch

Feb.-Mar., 1946 -- Paintings by Ernst Halberstadt

Mar., 1946 -- Paintings of Mexico and Guatemala by Henry E. Schnakenberg

Mar., 1946 -- Iver Rose

Apr., 1946 -- Louis Bouché

Apr.-May, 1946 -- Russell Cowles

May-June, 1946 -- Paintings by Bernard Arnest, Charles Harsanyi, Irving Katzenstein, Anna Licht, James Penney, Etienne Ret, and Vernon Smith

Sept., 1946 -- Retrospective Exhibition of the Work of Boardman Robinson

Nov., 1946 -- Guy Pène Du Bois

Nov.-Dec., 1946 -- William J. Glackens Eighth Memorial Exhibition

Jan., 1947 -- Karl Schrag

Feb.-Mar., 1947 -- Sculpture by Robert Laurent

Feb.-Mar., 1947 -- Paintings by Iver Rose

Feb.-Mar., 1947 -- Recent Paintings by Vernon Smith

Apr., 1947 -- Charles Prendergast

Apr., 1947 -- Louis Bouché

Apr.-May, 1947 -- Esther Williams

Oct.-Nov., 1947 -- Anna Licht

Nov., 1947 -- William J. Glackens Ninth Memorial Exhibition, with Works by Lenna Glackens

Mar., 1948 -- Russell Cowles

Apr.-May, 1948 -- Bernard Arnest

Aug.-Sept., 1948 -- New York Paintings and Watercolors

Oct.-Nov., 1948 -- Kenneth Evett

Nov.-Dec., 1948 -- Watercolors and Pastels by Harriette G. Miller

Jan.-Feb., 1949 -- John Hartell

Sept.-Oct., 1949 -- Contemporary American Watercolors and Gouaches

Oct., 1949 -- Contemporary Paintings

Jan., 1950 -- Maurice Prendergast Retrospective of Oils and Watercolors

Jan.-Feb., 1950 -- James Penney

Feb.-Mar., 1950 -- Paintings by Karl Schrag

Mar.-Apr., 1950 -- Russell Cowles

Jan.-Feb., 1951 -- William Sommer

Feb., 1951 -- Prints and Drawings by Various Artists

Feb., 1951 -- Paintings by Louis Bouché

Mar., 1951 -- Kenneth Evett

Apr.-May, 1951 -- Paintings by Gallery Artists

May-July, 1951 -- Contemporary American Watercolors

July-Aug., 1951 -- Paintings on the Summer Theme

Sept.-Oct., 1951 -- Vaughn Flannery

Oct.-Nov., 1951 -- Recent Paintings by Gallery Artists

Nov., 1951 -- Paintings by John Koch

Nov.-Dec., 1951 -- Joe Lasker

Dec., 1951 -- Small Prints and Drawings

Jan., 1952 -- Recent Gouaches by William Kienbusch

Jan., 1952 -- John Sloan: Recent Etchings from 1944-1951, and Etchings and Drawings Selected from All Periods of His Career

Feb.-Mar., 1952 -- Andrée Ruellan

Mar.-Apr., 1952 -- Bernard Arnest

Apr.-May, 1952 -- Recent Sculpture by Robert Laurent

May, 1952 -- Recent Paintings by Contemporary American Artists

May-June, 1952 -- Watercolors by Joseph Barber, Edward Christiana, Walt Dehner, Sidney Eaton, Wray Manning, and Woldemar Neufeld

July-Aug., 1952 -- Color Prints (Woodcuts, Etchings, and Lithographs) by Eleanor Coen, Caroline Durieux, Max Kahn, Tom Lias, Woldemar Neufeld, James Penney, George Remaily, Ann Ryan, and Karl Schrag

Nov., 1952 -- Karl Schrag

Dec., 1952-Jan. 1953 -- Eight Oregon Artists

Jan., 1953 -- Charles Prendergast Memorial Exhibition

Jan.-Feb., 1953 -- John Hartell

May, 1953 -- John Heliker

June, 1953 -- Humbert Alberizio, Vaughn Flannery, William Kienbusch, George Rickey, Andrée Ruellan, and Karl Schrag

Sept., 1953 -- Works by Gifford Beal, Kenneth Evett, Tom Hardy, John Koch, and James Lechay

Sept.-Oct., 1953 -- Paintings by Glackens, Lawson, Prendergast, Sloan

Oct.-Nov., 1953 -- Paintings by E. Powis Jones

Oct.-Nov., 1953 -- Recent Works by John Koch

Nov., 1953 -- Kenneth Evett: Drawings from Greek Mythology

Nov.-Dec., 1953 -- Recent Metal Sculptures by Tom Hardy

Nov.-Dec., 1953 -- Pastels, Drawings and Prints by Peggy Bacon

Nov.-Dec., 1953 -- Recent Paintings by Ralph Dubin

Feb.-Mar., 1954 -- Russell Cowles

Mar.-Apr., 1954 -- James Penney

Nov.-Dec., 1954 -- Tom Hardy: Metal Sculptures

Jan., 1955 -- Mobiles, Machines, and Kinetic Sculpture by George Rickey

Jan.-Feb., 1955 -- James Lechay

Feb., 1955 -- Mobiles by George Rickey

Feb.-Mar., 1955 -- Drawings, Etchings, and Lithographs by John Sloan (with a selection of prints by artists whose work influenced him in his early years: Rembrandt, Hogarth, Goya, Rops, Daumier, Rowlandson and others, to mark the publication of John Sloan: A Painter's Life by Van Wyck Brooks)

Mar.-Apr., 1955 -- Jane Wasey

Apr., 1955 -- Recent Work by Joe Lasker

May-June, 1955 -- Sculpture and Drawings by Contemporary American Artists

Jan., 1956 -- Carl Morris

Jan.-Feb., 1956 -- John Laurent

Feb.-Mar., 1956 -- William Kienbusch

Mar., 1956 -- Andrée Ruellan

Mar.-Apr., 1956 -- Karl Schrag

Apr.-May, 1956 -- John Heliker

May, 1956 -- Monotypes by Maurice Prendergast

Oct., 1956 -- The Eight

Jan.-Feb., 1957 -- Paintings by John Hartell

Apr., 1957 -- James Penney

Apr.-May, 1957 -- John Heliker

May-June, 1957 -- Fourteen Painter-Printmakers (American Federation of Arts exhibition)

June-July, 1957 -- 20th Century American Artists

Nov., 1957 -- William Glackens and His Friends (based on the book by Ira Glackens)

Nov., 1957 -- Marguerite Zorach

Jan., 1958 -- Gouches, Drawings and Small Glyphs by Ulfert Wilke

Jan.-Feb., 1958 -- Tom Hardy

Feb.-Mar., 1958 -- John Koch

Feb.-Mar., 1958 -- Still Life Exhibition with Works by William J. Glackens and Maurice Prendergast

Feb.-Mar., 1958 -- Cecil Bell

Mar., 1958 -- Karl Schrag

Mar., 1958 -- Carl Morris

Mar.-Apr., 1958 -- Louis Bouché

Apr., 1958 -- Paintings and Drawings by Joe Lasker

Apr.-May, 1958 -- Paintings and Drawings by Walter Feldman

Apr.-May, 1958 -- Sculpture by Henry Mitchell

May-June, 1958 -- Works in Casein and Gouache by Bernard Arnest, William Kienbusch, Carl Morris, and Karl Schrag

July, 1958 -- Still Life Paintings and Watercolors by American Artists

Oct.-Nov., 1958 -- Kenneth Evett

Nov., 1958 -- Elsie Manville

Nov.-Dec., 1958 -- John Laurent

Jan., 1959 -- Kinetic Sculpture by George Rickey

Jan.-Feb., 1959 -- Bernard Arnest

Mar., 1959 -- Karl Schrag

Mar.-Apr., 1959 -- Paintings by Joe Lasker

Apr.-May, 1959 -- Henry Mitchell

Sept.-Oct., 1959 -- Robert Searle

Oct.-Nov., 1959 -- Russell Cowles

Nov., 1959 -- Caseins and Paintings by William Kienbusch

Dec., 1959 -- Paintings by Vaughn Flannery

Feb., 1960 -- James Lechay

Apr., 1960 -- Landscapes by John Sloan

Apr.-May, 1960 -- John Guerin

May-June, 1960 -- Drawings and Small Sculpture by Gallery Artists

Oct., 1960 -- Ainslie Burke

Oct.-Nov., 1960 -- Leon Goldin

Nov.-Dec., 1960 -- Ulfert Wilke

Jan., 1961 -- Leonard DeLonga

Jan., 1961 -- Kenneth Evett

Jan.-Feb., 1961 -- Walter Feldman

Feb.-Mar., 1961 -- Watercolors and Pastels by Early Twentieth-Century American Artists

Mar., 1961 -- Paintings by Ralph Dubin

Mar.-Apr., 1961 -- James Penney

Apr.-May, 1961 -- John Koch

June, 1961 -- Works by Humbert Albrizio, Bernard Arnest, Cecil Bell, Louis Bouché, Ralph Dubin, Kenneth Evett, Walter Feldman, John Hartell, John Heliker, William Kienbusch, John Koch, Robert Laurent, James Lechay, Elsie Manville, Henry Mitchell, James Penney, George Rickey, Andrée Ruellan, Henry E. Schnakenberg, Karl Schrag, Jane Wasey, and Marguerite Zorach

Sept., 1961 -- Works by Contemporary Americans

Oct., 1961 -- George Rickey: Kinetic Sculpture

Oct.-Nov., 1961 -- Carl Morris

Nov.-Dec., 1961 -- Peggy Bacon

Dec., 1961 -- Selected Works by Twentieth-Century Americans

Jan., 1962 -- Polymer Resin and Sumi Ink Paintings by Kenneth Evett

Jan.-Feb., 1962 -- Louis Bouché

Feb.-Mar., 1962 -- Karl Schrag

Mar., 1962 -- Marguerite Zorach

Apr., 1962 -- John Laurent

Apr.-May, 1962 -- Sculpture by Tom Hardy

May-June, 1962 -- Drawings by Contemporary American Artists

July-Aug., 1962 -- Group Exhibitions - Paintings, Drawings and Sculpture by 20th Century American Artists

Oct., 1962 -- Bernard Arnest

Feb., 1963 -- William Kienbusch

Feb.-Mar., 1963 -- John Guerin

Mar., 1963 -- John Hartell

Sept.-Oct., 1963 -- Andrée Ruellan

Oct.-Nov., 1963 -- Ainslie Burke

Nov., 1963 -- Walter Feldman

Dec., 1963 -- Drawings by John Koch

Dec., 1963 -- Paintings by Contemporary Americans

Jan., 1964 -- Leonard DeLonga

Jan.-Feb., 1964 -- Joe Lasker

Feb.-Mar., 1964 -- Leon Goldin

Mar., 1964 -- Paintings by Ralph Dubin

Apr., 1964 -- Carl Morris

Apr.-May, 1964 -- Paintings and Drawings by John Heliker

Oct.-Nov., 1964 -- Louis Bouché

Nov.-Dec., 1964 -- Karl Schrag

Dec., 1964 -- Kenneth Evett

Feb., 1965 -- Russell Cowles

Feb.-Mar., 1965 -- James Lechay

Mar.-Apr., 1965 -- James Penney

Apr.-May, 1965 -- Gifford Beal

Feb., 1966 -- Dennis Leon

Feb.-Mar., 1966 -- Henry Schnakenberg

Mar.-Apr., 1966 -- John Hartell

Apr., 1966 -- Elsie Manville

Oct., 1966 -- Contrasts - Early and Late Works by Selected Contemporaries

Oct.-Nov., 1966 -- Tom Hardy

Nov.-Dec., 1966 -- Francis Chapin

Dec., 1966-Jan., 1967 -- Karl Schrag: Etchings and Lithographs

Jan.-Feb., 1967 -- Leonard DeLonga

Feb.-Mar., 1967 -- Carl Morris

Mar.-Apr., 1967 -- Ainslie Burke

Apr.-May, 1967 -- John Heliker: Paintings, Drawings, and Watercolors

May-June, 1967 -- William Glackens

Oct., 1967 -- Kenneth Callahan

Oct.-Nov., 1967 -- John Laurent

Jan.-Feb., 1968 -- Dennis Leon

Feb.-Mar., 1968 -- Robert La Hotan

Apr., 1968 -- John Guerin

Apr.-May, 1968 -- Leon Goldin

Sept.-Oct., 1968 -- Contemporary Sculpture and Drawings

Oct.-Nov., 1968 -- Karl Schrag

Nov.-Dec., 1968 -- James Lechay: Portraits and Landscapes

Dec., 1968-Jan., 1969 -- Group Exhibition

Jan., 1969 -- Elsie Manville

Mar., 1969 -- Kenneth Evett

Apr.-May, 1969 -- James Penney

Sept.-Oct., 1969 -- New Works by Contemporary Artists

Oct.-Nov., 1969 -- John Hartell: Exhibition

Nov., 1969 -- Peggy Bacon

Dec., 1969 -- Selected Examples by American Artists 1900-1930

Jan., 1970 -- Leonard DeLonga

Feb., 1970 -- Joe Lasker

Mar., 1970 -- Group Exhibition

Mar.-Apr., 1970 -- Dennis Leon

Apr.-May, 1970 -- Jerome Myers

Oct.-Nov., 1970 -- Tom Hardy

Jan.-Feb., 1971 -- Jane Wasey

Mar.-Apr., 1971 -- Kenneth Callahan

Oct., 1971 -- Ainslie Burke

Nov.-Dec., 1971 -- Karl Schrag

Feb.-Mar., 1972 -- John Koch

Mar.-Apr., 1972 -- Robert La Hotan

Apr.-May, 1972 -- Leon Goldin

May-June, 1972 -- Selected Works by 20th Century Americans

Sept.-Oct., 1972 -- Gallery Collection: American Watercolors and Drawings

Oct.-Nov., 1972 -- John Hartell

Nov.-Dec., 1972 -- Peggy Bacon

Dec., 1972 -- 20th Century Americans

Jan., 1973 -- Leonard DeLonga

Feb., 1973 -- Carl Morris

Mar., 1973 -- James Lechay

Mar.-Apr., 1973 -- Russell Cowles: Landscape Paintings

Apr.-May, 1973 -- Jerome Witkin

May-June, 1973 -- Kenneth Evett: Watercolors

Oct.-Nov., 1973 -- Kenneth Callahan

Jan., 1974 -- Joe Lasker

Jan.-Feb., 1974 -- Bernard Arnest

Feb.-Mar., 1974 -- Concetta Scaravaglione

Oct., 1974 -- Ainslie Burke

Oct.-Nov., 1974 -- James Penney

Jan., 1975 -- Tom Hardy

Jan.-Feb., 1975 -- Karl Schrag

Feb.-Mar., 1975 -- Robert La Hotan

Mar.-Apr., 1975 -- William Kienbusch

Apr., 1975 -- Elsie Manville

Apr.-May, 1975 -- Gifford Beal

Oct.-Nov., 1975 -- John Hartell

Nov., 1975 -- Daniel O'Sullivan

Mar., 1976 -- Jerome Witkin

May, 1976 -- Linda Sokolowski

Sept.-Oct., 1976 -- Joe Lasker, Illustrations from Merry Ever After

Oct., 1976 -- Leonard DeLonga

Nov.-Dec., 1976 -- Kenneth Callahan

Jan., 1977 -- James Lechay

Mar., 1977 -- Karl Schrag

Mar.-Apr., 1977 -- David Cantine

Oct.-Nov., 1977 -- John Hartell

Nov.-Dec., 1977 -- Ainslie Burke

Feb., 1978 -- Robert La Hotan

Apr., 1978 -- Elsie Manville

Oct., 1978 -- Tom Hardy

Oct.-Nov., 1978 -- Jerome Witkin

Jan.-Feb., 1979 -- Joe Lasker

Feb., 1979 -- Kenneth Evett

Feb.-Mar., 1979 -- Karl Schrag

Mar.-Apr., 1979 -- Carl Morris

Apr.-May, 1979 -- Linda Sokolowski

Oct.-Nov., 1979 -- Daniel O'Sullivan

Feb.-Mar., 1980 -- Kenneth Callahan

Mar., 1980 -- Ainslie Burke

Oct., 1980 -- John Hartell

Jan., 1981 -- Leonard DeLonga

Feb., 1981 -- James Lechay

Feb.-Mar., 1981 -- Robert La Hotan

Mar.-Apr., 1981 -- Jerry Atkins

Apr.-May, 1981 -- Ben Frank Moss

Jan.-Feb., 1982 -- Jerome Witkin

Feb.-Mar., 1982 -- Elsie Manville

Mar.-Apr., 1982 -- Karl Schrag

Apr.-May, 1982 -- Linda Sokolowski

May-June, 1982 -- David Cantine

Sept.-Oct., 1982 -- Kenneth Callahan

Oct.-Nov., 1982 -- Joe Lasker

Nov.-Dec., 1982 -- Daniel O'Sullivan

Jan.-Feb., 1983 -- William Kienbusch: Memorial Exhibition

Feb.-Mar., 1983 -- Jerry Atkins

Mar.-Apr., 1983 -- John Hartell

Apr.-May, 1983 -- John Heliker

May-June, 1983 -- Kenneth Evett

Oct., 1983 -- Concetta Scaravaglione

Oct.-Nov., 1983 -- Ben Frank Moss

Nov.-Dec., 1983 -- Russell Cowles

Dec., 1983-Jan., 1984 -- 20th Century Americans

Jan.-Feb., 1984 -- Marguerite Zorach: Paintings at Home and Abroad

Feb.-Mar., 1984 -- Robert La Hotan

Mar., 1984 -- David Smalley

Apr., 1984 -- Carl Morris

May, 1984 -- Karl Schrag

July, 1984 -- Drawings by 20th Century Americans

July-Aug., 1984 -- Collages and Drawings by Joseph Heil

Aug.-Sept., 1984 -- Drawings and Prints by Tom Hardy

Sept.-Oct., 1984 -- James Penney: Memorial Exhibition

Oct.-Nov., 1984 -- Paintings and Drawings by Leon Goldin

Nov.-Dec., 1984 -- Isabelle Siegel

Dec., 1984-Jan., 1985 -- Group Exhibition: Contemporary American Paintings and Sculpture

Jan.-Feb., 1985 -- James Lechay

Feb.-Mar., 1985 -- Ainslie Burke

Mar., 1985 -- Karen Breunig

Apr., 1985 -- Kenneth Callahan

Oct., 1985 -- Elsie Manville

Oct.-Nov., 1985 -- William Glackens

Jan.-Feb., 1986 -- Linda Sokolowski

Feb.-Mar., 1986 -- Jerry Atkins

Apr.-May, 1986 -- Jane Wasey

Oct.-Nov., 1986 -- John Hartell

Nov.-Dec., 1986 -- Karl Schrag

Feb.-Mar., 1987 -- Kenneth Evett

Apr.-May, 1987 -- Ben Frank Moss

May-June, 1987 -- David Smalley

Oct.-Nov., 1987 -- Isabelle Siegel

Feb.-Mar., 1988 -- Karen Breunig

Mar.-Apr., 1988 -- Leon Goldin

Sept.-Oct., 1988 -- Elsie Manville

Oct.-Nov., 1988 -- James Lechay

Jan.-Feb., 1989 -- Karl Schrag

Feb.-Mar., 1989 -- Linda Sokolowski

Jan.-Feb., 1990 -- Kenneth Callahan: Works of the Fifties

Jan.-Feb., 1990 -- Gifford Beal: Watercolors

Mar., 1990 -- Robert La Hotan: Recent Paintings

Mar.-Apr., 1990 -- Sonia Gechtoff: New Paintings

May-June, 1990 -- David Smalley: Recent Sculpture

May-June, 1990 -- Andrée Ruellan: Sixty Years of Drawing...

Oct., 1990 -- Isabelle Siegel

Nov., 1990 -- Leon Goldin

Jan.-Feb., 1991 -- Karl Schrag

Feb.-Mar., 1991 -- Joe Lasker

Apr., 1991 -- Ainslie Burke

Nov.-Dec., 1991 -- Linda Sokolowski: Oils, Collages, Monotypes

Dec., 1991-Jan., 1992 -- Elsie Manville: Small Works on Paper

Mar., 1992 -- Tabitha Vevers

May-June, 1992 -- Sonia Gechtoff

Oct.-Nov., 1992 -- James Lechay

Nov.-Dec., 1992 -- Karl Schrag

Mar., 1993 -- Leon Goldin: Works on Paper

Apr.-May, 1993 -- Robert La Hotan

Oct., 1993 -- David Smalley: Sculpture Inside and Out

Oct., 1993 -- Andrée Ruellan: Works on Paper 1920-1980

Mar.-Apr., 1994 -- Kenneth Evett: Travels: Themes and Variations (Watercolors of Italy, Greece, Arizona, Maine and California)

Mar.-Apr., 1994 -- Tabitha Vevers

Oct.-Nov., 1994 -- Linda Sokolowski

Nov.-Dec., 1994 -- Karl Schrag

Jan.-Feb., 1995 -- Langdon Quin

Mar.-Apr., 1995 -- Robert La Hotan

Sept.-Oct., 1995 -- Sonia Gechtoff

Jan.-Feb., 1996 -- Elsie Manville: Paintings and Works on Paper

Oct.-Nov., 1996 -- Karl Schrag: A Self Portrait Retrospective, 1940-1995

Jan.-Feb., 1997 -- Joe Lasker: Paintings and Watercolors

Mar.-Apr., 1997 -- Tabitha Vevers

Oct.-Nov., 1997 -- James Lechay

Feb.-Mar., 1998 -- Linda Sokolowski: Canyon Suite: Works from the Southwest

Mar.-Apr., 1998 -- Leon Goldin: Paintings on Paper

Sept.-Oct., 1998 -- Sonia Gechtoff: Mysteries in the Sphere

Oct.-Nov., 1998 -- Langdon Quin: Recent Paintings

Nov.-Dec., 1998 -- John Gill

Jan.-Feb., 1999 -- Robert La Hotan

Feb.-Mar., 1999 -- Ann Sperry: Where Is Your Heart

Nov.-Dec., 1999 -- Kathryn Wall

Jan.-Feb., 2000 -- Elsie Manville

Sept.-Oct., 2000 -- Joe Lasker

Oct.-Nov., 2000 -- James Lechay

Oct.-Nov., 2000 -- Tabitha Vevers

May-June, 2001 -- Kenneth Callahan: Drawings

Dec., 2001-Jan., 2002 -- Sur La Table: A Selection of Paintings and Works on Paper

Jan.-Feb., 2002 -- Karl Schrag: Theme and Variations II: The Meadow

undated, 2003 -- Ann Sperry

Jan.-Feb., 2003 -- Andrée Ruellan: Works on Paper from the 1920s and 1930s

Oct.-Nov., 2003 -- Joe Lasker: Muses and Amusements

Nov.-Dec., 2003 -- Tabitha Vevers

Mar.-Apr., 2004 -- Leon Goldin: Five Decades of Works on Paper

May-July, 2004 -- Anne Frank: A Private Photo Album

Jan.-Feb., 2005 -- John Gill: Ceramics

Sept.-Oct., 2005 -- Karl Schrag: The Painter of Bright Nights
Related Material:
An untranscribed oral history interview with Antoinette Kraushaar was conducted for the Archives of American Art by Avis Berman in 1982, and is available on five audio cassettes at the Archives' Washington D.C. research facility.
Separated Material:
In addition to the records described in this finding aid, the following materials were lent to the Archives for filming in 1956 and are available on microfilm reels NKR1-NKR3 and for interlibrary loan: a book of clippings from 1907 to 1930, primarily of exhibition reviews; loose clippings and catalogs of exhibitions from 1930 to 1946; and a group of photographs and clippings relating to George Luks and other artists. These materials were returned to Kraushaar Galleries after microfilming.
Provenance:
53.5 linear feet of records were donated to the Archives of American Art by Kraushaar Galleries in three separate accessions in 1959, 1994, and 1996. Katherine Kaplan of Kraushaar Galleries donated an additional 38.4 linear feet in 2008-2009 and an additional 8.4 linear feet in 2012-2017 and 6.0 linear feet in 2022.
Restrictions:
Use of originals requires an appointment. A fragile original scrapbook is restricted. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
Authorization to publish, quote or reproduce requires written permission from Katherine Kaplan Degn, Kraushaar Galleries. Contact Reference Services for more information.
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Works of art  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Artists -- United States  Search this
Depressions -- 1929  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State)
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Sketches
Drawings
Exhibition catalogs
Financial records
Notes
Sketchbooks
Citation:
Kraushaar Galleries records, 1877-2006. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.kraugall
See more items in:
Kraushaar Galleries records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9507d7d92-d503-4ed4-9ed6-12975adb8473
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-kraugall

Jacques Seligmann & Co. records, 1904-1978, bulk 1913-1974

Creator:
Jacques Seligmann & Co.  Search this
Subject:
Hauke, Cesar M. de (Cesar Mange)  Search this
Glaenzer, Eugene  Search this
Haardt, Georges  Search this
Seligman, Germain  Search this
Seligmann, Arnold  Search this
Parker, Theresa D.  Search this
Waegen, Rolf Hans  Search this
Trevor, Clyfford  Search this
Seligmann, René  Search this
Seligmann, Jacques  Search this
De Hauke & Co., Inc.  Search this
Jacques Seligmann & Co  Search this
Eugene Glaenzer & Co.  Search this
Germain Seligmann & Co.  Search this
Gersel  Search this
Type:
Gallery records
Topic:
Mackay, Clarence Hungerford, 1874-1938 -- Art collections  Search this
Schiff, Mortimer L. -- Art collections  Search this
Arenberg, duc d' -- Art collections  Search this
Liechtenstein, House of -- Art collections  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- France -- Paris  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Art and the war  Search this
La Fresnaye, Roger de, 1885-1925  Search this
Art, Renaissance  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Art treasures in war  Search this
Art, European  Search this
Theme:
Art Market  Search this
Art Gallery Records  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)9936
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)212486
AAA_collcode_jacqself
Theme:
Art Market
Art Gallery Records
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_212486
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Jacques Seligmann & Co. records, 1904-1978, bulk 1913-1974 digital asset number 1
Online Media:

Barack Obama

Artist:
Kehinde Wiley, born 1977  Search this
Sitter:
Barack Hussein Obama, born 4 Aug 1961  Search this
Medium:
Oil on canvas
Dimensions:
Frame: 234.3 × 167.2 × 13.7 cm, 170lb. (92 1/4 × 65 13/16 × 5 3/8")
Stretcher: 213.7 × 147 × 3.2 cm (84 1/8 × 57 7/8 × 1 1/4")
Type:
Painting
Date:
2018
Topic:
Home Furnishings\Furniture  Search this
Nature & Environment\Plant\Flower\Flowers  Search this
Costume\Jewelry\Ring  Search this
Costume\Jewelry\Watch  Search this
Imaginary  Search this
Barack Hussein Obama: Male  Search this
Barack Hussein Obama: Law and Law Enforcement\Lawyer  Search this
Barack Hussein Obama: Politics and Government\President of US  Search this
Barack Hussein Obama: Politics and Government\US Senator\Illinois  Search this
Barack Hussein Obama: Politics and Government\State Senator\Illinois  Search this
Barack Hussein Obama: Nobel Prize  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Kate Capshaw and Steven Spielberg; Judith Kern and Kent Whealy; Tommie L. Pegues and Donald A. Capoccia; Clarence, DeLoise, and Brenda Gaines; The Stoneridge Fund of Amy and Marc Meadows; Robert E. Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker; Catherine and Michael Podell; Mark and Cindy Aron; Lyndon J. Barrois and Janine Sherman Barrois; The Honorable John and Louise Bryson; Paul and Rose Carter; Bob and Jane Clark; Lisa R. Davis; Shirley Ross Davis and Family; Alan and Lois Fern; Conrad and Constance Hipkins; Sharon and John Hoffman; Daniel and Kimberly Johnson; John Legend and Chrissy Teigen; Eileen Harris Norton; Helen Hilton Raiser; Philip and Elizabeth Ryan; Roselyne Chroman Swig; Josef Vascovitz and Lisa Goodman; Michele J. Hooper and Lemuel Seabrook III; The Skylark Foundation; Cleveland and Harriette Chambliss; Anna Chavez and Eugene Eidenberg; Carla Diggs & Stephen M. Smith; Danny First; Peggy Woodford Forbes and Harry Bremond; Stephen Friedman Gallery; Sean and Mary Kelly, Sean Kelly Gallery; Jamie Lunder; Joff Masukawa and Noëlle Kennedy Masukawa; Derek McGinty and Cheryl Cooper; Robert and Jan Newman; The Raymond L. Ocampo Jr. and Sandra O. Ocampo Family Trust; Julie and Bennett Roberts; Paul Sack; Gertrude Dixon Sherman; Michael and Mary Silver; V. Joy Simmons, MD; Andrea Lavin Solow and Alan P. Solow; John Sykes; Galerie Templon; Henry L. Thaggert III
Object number:
NPG.2018.16
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Copyright:
© 2018 Kehinde Wiley
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm421d9c892-da07-495f-99cf-b8506e1b845f
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.2018.16

The National interests of the United States in foreign policy seven discussions at the Wilson Center, December, 1980, February 1981 edited by Prosser Gifford

Author:
Gifford, Prosser  Search this
Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars  Search this
Physical description:
188 pages 28 cm
Type:
Books
Congresses
Congrès
Government publications
Conference papers and proceedings
Place:
United States
États-Unis - Relations extérieures - 1981-1989 - Congrès
États-Unis
Date:
1981
1981-1989
Topic:
Diplomatic relations  Search this
Foreign relations  Search this
Relations extérieures  Search this
Call number:
E876.N37X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_189646

Sisters in science conversations with black women scientists about race, gender, and their passion for science [interviews by] Diann Jordan

Author:
Jordan, Diann 1958-  Search this
Physical description:
xv, 240 pages illustrations 24 cm
Type:
Biography
Biographies
Biografie
Interview
Place:
USA
Schwarze
Date:
2006
Topic:
African American women scientists  Search this
Scientists, Black  Search this
Women scientists  Search this
Naturwissenschaftlerin  Search this
Wetenschapsbeoefenaars  Search this
Vrouwen  Search this
Vrouwenemancipatie  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1153533

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