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Leo Castelli Gallery records

Creator:
Leo Castelli Gallery  Search this
Names:
Amsterdam (Netherlands). Stedelijk Museum  Search this
Castelli Graphics (Firm)  Search this
Castelli-Sonnabend Tapes and Films, Inc.  Search this
Dwan Gallery (Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
Dwan Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Ferus Gallery (Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
Ileana Sonnabend (Gallery)  Search this
Jewish Museum (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Multiples, Inc.  Search this
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Sidney Janis Gallery  Search this
Whitney Museum of American Art  Search this
Artschwager, Richard, 1923-  Search this
Barry, Robert, 1936-  Search this
Bloom, Barbara, 1951-  Search this
Castelli, Leo  Search this
Christo, 1935-  Search this
Chryssa, 1933-  Search this
Daphnis, Nassos, 1914-  Search this
Darboven, Hanne  Search this
Epstein, Ethel Steuer  Search this
Flavin, Dan, 1933-  Search this
Gorgoni, Gianfranco  Search this
Heller, Ben, 1925-  Search this
Johns, Jasper, 1930-  Search this
Judd, Donald, 1928-  Search this
Kiesler, Frederick  Search this
Klapheck, Konrad, 1935-  Search this
Koons, Jeff  Search this
Landsman, Stanley, 1930-  Search this
Lichtenstein, Roy, 1923-1997  Search this
Marisol, 1930-2016  Search this
Morris, Robert, 1931-2018  Search this
Namuth, Hans  Search this
Nauman, Bruce, 1941-  Search this
Paik, Nam June, 1932-  Search this
Panza, Giuseppe  Search this
Parker, Raymond, 1922-  Search this
Power, Alan  Search this
Powers, John, 1916-  Search this
Powers, Kimiko  Search this
Rauschenberg, Robert, 1925-2008  Search this
Rosenquist, James, 1933-  Search this
Rowan, Carolyn  Search this
Rowan, Robert  Search this
Ruscha, Edward  Search this
Scarpitta, Salvatore, 1919-2007  Search this
Scull, Ethel  Search this
Scull, Robert C.  Search this
Serra, Richard, 1938-  Search this
Starn, Doug  Search this
Starn, Mike  Search this
Stella, Frank  Search this
Tremaine, Burton  Search this
Tremaine, Emily Hall, 1908-1987  Search this
Twombly, Cy, 1928-  Search this
Tworkov, Jack  Search this
Warhol, Andy, 1928-  Search this
Weiner, Lawrence  Search this
Extent:
215.9 Linear feet
0.001 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Interviews
Video recordings
Sketches
Transcripts
Sound recordings
Notes
Visitors' books
Photographs
Notebooks
Awards
Date:
circa 1880-2000
bulk 1957-1999
Summary:
The Leo Castelli Gallery records measure 215.9 linear feet and 0.001 GB and date from circa 1880-2000, with the bulk of the materials dating from the gallery's founding in 1957 through Leo Castelli's death in 1999. The major influence of dealer Leo Castelli and his gallery on the development of mid-to-late twentieth century modern art in America is well-documented through business and scattered personal correspondence, administrative files, exhibition files, extensive artists' files and printed materials, posters, awards and recognitions, photographs, and sound and video recordings. Also included are records for the subsidiary firms of Castelli Graphics and Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes and Films.
Scope and Content Note:
The Leo Castelli Gallery records measure 215.9 linear feet and 0.001 GB and date from circa 1880-2000, with the bulk of the materials dating from the gallery's founding in 1957 through Leo Castelli's death in 1999. The major influence of dealer Leo Castelli and his gallery on the development of mid-to-late twentieth century modern art in America is well-documented through business and scattered personal correspondence, administrative files, exhibition files, extensive artists' files and printed materials, posters, awards and recognitions, photographs, and audio and video recordings. Also included are records for the subsidiary firms of Castelli Graphics and Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes and Films.

The records document the gallery's daily business operations, exhibitions, spaces/buildings, collaborations and joint ventures with other galleries and museums, and its relationship with many artists, dealers, and clients. Artists particularly well-represented throughout the collection include Hanne Darboven, Dan Flavin, Jasper Johns, Donald Judd, Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Morris, Bruce Nauman, Claes Oldenburg, Robert Rauschenberg, James Rosenquist, Richard Serra, Frank Stella, Andy Warhol, and Lawrence Weiner.

Records pre-dating the gallery's establishment in 1957 are primarily newspaper and magazine clippings related to artists, personal photographs and photographs of works of art, and scattered personal business records of Leo Castelli.

General Correspondence is extensive at circa 25 linear feet and consists primarily of the gallery's and Leo Castelli's named and subject correspondence files concerning the gallery's daily operations, exhibitions, artwork installation and fabrication, appraisals, inquiries, loans, sales, consignments, personal and business relationships with artists, and other topics. The general correspondence is arranged either by name of correspondent or topic, and is with museums and galleries, collectors, business associates, artists, employees, and friends. Notes, scattered photographs and slides, and printed materials are often found as enclosures. Leo Castelli's personal correspondence is also found here and consists primarily of solicitations, requests for advice, notes of thanks, congratulations, and invitations.

Letters written by artists in the gallery's stable are somewhat limited. There are scattered letters from artists Christo, Chryssa, Nassos Daphnis, Hanne Darboven, Marisol, Dan Flavin, Jasper Johns, Frederick Kiesler, Robert Morris, Hans Namuth, Bruce Nauman, Nam June Paik, Ray Parker, James Rosenquist, Edward Ruscha, Salvatore Scarpitta, Frank Stella, Cy Twombly, and Jack Tworkov. There are also letters about artists in this series filed under the artists' name.

Collectors and dealers represented within the correspondence include the De Menil family, Mrs. Henry Epstein, Ben Heller, Giuseppe Panza, Alan Power, John and Kimiko Powers, Robert and Carolyn Rowan, Robert and Ethel Scull, and Burton and Emily Tremaine. Museums and galleries for which there is considerable correspondence includes the Dwan Gallery, Ferus Gallery, the Jewish Museum, Museum of Modern Art, Sidney Janis Gallery, Stedelijk Museum, Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Ileana Sonnabend Galerie.

The materials arranged in General Correspondence were originally marked by the gallery as "correspondence" files upon accessioning, and, are thus arranged into their own series. However, in some cases, there appears to be little difference between the General Correspondence and the Administrative Files. Thus, researchers are encouraged to reference both series.

Administrative Files document a wide variety of the gallery's activities and business. Essentially, these are files that were arranged by the gallery according to subject or topic and cover almost all activities except specific exhibitions. These files include records and correspondence about buildings and space, advertising, appraisals, auctions, consignments, loans, miscellaneous business correspondence, index cards, business arrangements with artists, information about artists, interviews with artists (transcripts), history of the gallery, mailings, photograph requests, shipping, and other topics. Few items are in digital format. There are staff notebooks and files and Leo Castelli's notebooks and notes from the late 1950s through the early 1990s. Extensive outgoing chronological correspondence filed in this series dates from 1964-1977. Also found are transcripts of interviews with Leo Castelli, biographical material, some of it in digital format, and scattered photographs.

Researchers should note that the Administrative Files often overlap and complement the General Correspondence. However, they focus slightly more distinctly on gallery business activities and are arranged mostly by subject or topic, except for the chronological business correspondence. Researchers are encouraged to reference both series. For example, correspondence with and about Jasper Johns may be found in both series, but the administrative files most likely focus on a specific loan, consignment, or business activity or transaction.

Exhibition files provide a thorough history of the gallery's exhibitions, as well as the fabrication and installation of artwork for exhibitions. These files include correspondence, exhibition catalogs, guest books, lists of exhibitions by artist and by year, press releases, sketches and notes, and scattered financial records. Photographs document over 650 exhibitions at Leo Castelli Gallery, including The Ninth Street Show organized by Castelli in 1951, and over 200 exhibitions at other galleries.

Extensive artists' files comprise approximately 40% of the records and are a rich resource of printed and compiled information about the careers of over 120 artists and their relationship with Leo Castelli and the gallery. There are exhibition announcements and catalogs, flyers, invitations, magazine articles and clippings, newspaper clippings, posters, press releases, photographs, and a handful of books. Nearly half of the series is comprised of black and white photographs of artwork, presumably handled by the Leo Castelli Gallery.

Additional printed materials include exhibition announcements, flyers, invitations, magazine articles and clippings, newspaper clippings, press releases, and exhibition posters. Exhibition catalogs are filed with the exhibitions files. The general archives files provide a chronological history of the gallery and its exhibitions. There are also files concerning Leo Castelli and numerous art-related topics. Exhibition posters are found here as well.

Artwork is limited and includes a few works of art and signed posters. Artists represented here include photographer Gianfranco Gorgoni, Robert Morris, Bruce Nauman, Richard Serra and Andy Warhol, as well as others.

The records of the subsidiary Castelli Graphics New York consist of correspondence and administrative files relating to general operations and the sale and loan of prints. Also found are exhibition files, sales records, and scattered financial records. The series provides a wealth of information about Castelli Graphics collaborations with Multiples Inc. in the 1970s.

Also found in the collection are records of Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes and Films, a joint business venture between Leo Castelli Gallery and Sonnabend Gallery from 1974-1985. Records include correspondence, administrative files, exhibition files, artists' files, printed materials, sales and rental records, photographs, and financial records.

The importance and stature of Leo Castelli and the Leo Castelli Gallery to the arts community in New York City and beyond is documented by numerous awards and recognitions, such as framed and unframed certificates, plaques, statues, medals, and scattered photographs.

Nearly seven linear feet of photographs include professional black and white original prints, scattered color photographs, color transparencies, slides and negatives, and disassembled photo albums. The photographs primarily depict social and art events and functions; family and friends of Leo Castelli; and portraits of Leo Castelli and artists and of Leo Castelli with artists, including Richard Artschwager, Jasper Johns, Roy Lichtenstein, Bruce Nauman, Robert Rauschenberg, James Rosenquist, Salvatore Scarpitta, Richard Serra, Frank Stella, and Andy Warhol. Photographs of exhibitions and exhibition installations are filed with the exhibition files.

Sound and video recordings include sound and video art, performances, interviews with artists and Leo Castelli, recordings from and of exhibitions, and television publicity recorded on sound cassettes, phonograph records (vinyl and lacquer), videocassettes (U-matic, VHS, Betamax), and videocartridges. Artists represented include Vito Acconci, Robert Barry, Barbara Bloom, Hannah Collins, Hanne Darboven, Dan Flavin, Laura Grisi, Jasper Johns, Jeff Koons, Roy Lichtenstein, Bruce Nauman, Claes Oldenburg, Robert Rauschenberg, James Rosenquist, Ed Ruscha, Salvatore Scarpitta, Doug and Mike Starn, and Lawrence Weiner, among others.

See Index for list of Exhibitions at the Leo Castelli Gallery and Castelli Graphics
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 11 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Correspondence, 1948-1999, bulk 1957-1997 (24.4 linear feet; Boxes 1-23, 191, OVs 233-236)

Series 2: Administrative Files, 1941-1999, bulk 1970s-1990s (17.3 linear feet; Boxes 24-39, 192-193, OVs 237-238, 0.001 GB; ER01-ER02)

Series 3: Exhibition Files, 1951-1999, bulk 1957-1998 (18.7 linear feet; Boxes 40-56, 192, 194-196, 308-309, OVs 239-241, 280)

Series 4: Artists Files, 1913-1999, bulk 1960s-1990s (80.8 linear feet; Boxes 57-133, 197-208, OVs 242-243)

Series 5: Printed Materials, 1949-1998 (23.5 linear feet; Boxes 134-153, 209-211, OVs 244-274, 276, 300, RDs 301-306)

Series 6: Artwork, circa 1960s-1990s (1.8 linear feet; Boxes 153, 212-213, OVs 275, 277-278, RD 307)

Series 7: Castelli Graphics, circa 1950-1999, bulk mid 1970s-early 1990s (16 linear feet; Boxes 154-169)

Series 8: Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films, 1969-1998 (5.6 linear feet; Boxes 170-174, 214, OVs 279-281)

Series 9: Awards and Recognition, 1962-1998 (6.9 linear feet; Boxes 175-176, 215-228, OVs 282)

Series 10: Photographs, circa 1880-1997, bulk 1960s-1990s (6.6 linear feet; Boxes 177-180, 229-231, OVs 283-299)

Series 11: Sound and Video Recordings, 1959-2000 (9.7 linear feet; Boxes 181-190, 232)
Historical Note:
Leo Castelli (1907-1999) was one of America's most noted contemporary art dealers and opened the Leo Castelli Gallery in New York City in 1957. The gallery showcased cutting edge American contemporary art, including Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Neo-Dada, Pop Art, Op Art, Color Field painting, Hard-edge painting, Lyrical Abstraction, Minimal Art, Conceptual Art, and Neo-expressionism, among other movements.

Leo Castelli was born as Leo Krauss on September 4, 1907 in Trieste, of Italian and Austro-Hungarian Jewish origin. He married art dealer Ileana Sonnabend in 1932 and the couple lived in Paris up until World War II. They had a daughter, Nina Castelli Sundell. In Paris, Castelli opened his first gallery in 1939. At that time, he was interested in the European Surrealists.

For years after Castelli moved to New York, he worked in his father-in-law's garment business. However, he organized his first American exhibition in 1951, the famous Ninth Street Show of 1951, a seminal event of Abstract Expressionism.

In 1957, he opened the Leo Castelli Gallery in his townhome on E. 77th Street between Madison and Fifth Avenues in New York City. Castelli initially featured European Surrealism, but also curated exhibitions of American Abstract painters, including Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Cy Twombly, Friedel Dzubas, and Norman Bluhm.

In 1958, Castelli discovered Pop artists Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns and forged a life-long nurturing relationship with both artists. The gallery then began focusing more on Pop Art, Minimalism and Conceptual Art. Beginning in the early 1960s, Castelli's stable included Richard Artschwager, Lee Bontecou, Chryssa, John Chamberlain, Ronald Davis, Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, Ellsworth Kelly, Joseph Kosuth, Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Morris, Bruce Nauman, Larry Poons, James Rosenquist, Ed Ruscha, Salvatore Scarpitta, Richard Serra, Frank Stella, Andy Warhol, and Lawrence Weiner.

Leo and Ileana divorced in 1959, and Ileana returned to Europe. She later moved back to New York and opened a gallery close to Castelli's. The two remained close and together they established the joint venture of Castelli-Sonnabend Films and Tapes to accommodate artists interested in new media.

In the 1970s Leo Castelli opened a downtown SoHo branch of the Leo Castelli Gallery at 420 West Broadway. In the 1980s he opened a second larger downtown exhibition space on Greene Street also in SoHo.

Leo Castelli's second wife was Antoinette Castelli, with whom he also opened Castelli Graphics, an art gallery devoted to prints and photographs, mostly those by Castelli artists. The couple also had a son together, Jean-Christophe Castelli. In 1995 Leo Castelli married Italian art historian Barbara Bertozzi Castelli. She directs the Leo Castelli Gallery today, showing many of the same artists of the gallery's past.

Leo Castelli's unparalleled eye for quality, combined with his extraordinary skill for nurturing and promoting new art and artists, secured his position as one of the most respected and influential advocates of contemporary art for nearly five decades.
List of Exhibitions:
Below is a chronological listing of over 850 exhibitions and events held at the Leo Castelli Gallery from 1957 to 1999; included are exhibitions at 4 E 77 St (1957-1989), 65 Thompson (1989-1994), 108th St Warehouse (1968-1970), 142 Greene St (1980-1988), 420 W Broadway (1971-1999), and 578 Broadway (1988-1997). Castelli Graphics exhibitions from 1969-1996 and Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes and Films exhibitions from 1974-1984 are also included and are noted when known.

Note that this list is not comprehensive. In particular, Castelli Graphics exhibitions from the 1980s and early 1990s are incomplete. Sources used to compile this index include exhibition schedules and lists, installation photographs, announcements, clippings, and other printed materials from the Leo Castelli Gallery records, and the Leo Castelli Gallery website (www.castelligallery.com).

Exhibitions are listed in chronological order by title, if known, and gallery address.

1957 SeasonFeb. -- First Exhibition: de Kooning, Delaunay, Dubuffet, Giacometti, Hartley, Leger, Mondrian, Picabia, Pollock, David Smith, van Doesburg; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 4-23, 1957 -- Jon Schueler; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 25 - Apr. 13, 1957 -- Viseux; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 15 - May 4, 1957 -- Paul Brach; 4 E 77 St

May 6-25, 1957 -- New Work: Bluhm, Budd, Dzubas, Johns, Leslie, Louis, Marisol, Ortman, Rauschenberg, Savelli; 4 E 77 St

1957-1958 SeasonOct. 1-26, 1957 -- Norman Bluhm; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 28 - Nov. 16, 1957 -- Horia Damian; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 18 - Dec. 14, 1957 -- Marisol; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 17, 1957 - Jan. 18, 1958 -- Collector's Annual; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 20 - Feb. 8, 1958 -- Jasper Johns; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 10 - Mar. 1, 1958 -- Friedel Dzubas; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 4-29, 1958 -- Robert Rauschenberg; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 1-26, 1958 -- Giuseppe Capogrossi; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 29 - May 31, 1958 -- Pioneers 1910-1950: de Kooning, Delaunay, Domela, Dubuffet, Giacometti, Hartley, Kandinsky, Leger, Miro, Picabia, Pollock, Schwitters, Smith, van Doejburg; 4 E 77 St

1958-1959 SeasonSept. 30 - Oct. 25, 1958 -- Angelo Savelli; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 28 - Nov. 22, 1958 -- Group Exhibition: Bluhm, Brach, Dzubas, Johns, Marisol, Rauschenberg, Schueler; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 25 - Dec. 20, 1958 -- Esteban Vicente, Drawings; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 6-24, 1959 -- Nassos Daphnis; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 27 - Feb. 14, 1959 -- Salvatore Scarpitta, Extramurals; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 17 - Mar. 7, 1959 -- Al Newbill; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 10-28, 1959 -- Gabriel Kohn; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 31 - Apr. 18, 1959 -- Norman Bluhm, Jean Dubuffet, and Robert Rauschenberg; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 21 - May 9, 1959 -- Jon Schueler; 4 E 77 St

May 12-30, 1959 -- Group Exhibition: Brach, Dzubas, Johns, Sander, Twombly; 4 E 77 St

1959-1960 SeasonOct. 6-17, 1959 -- Opening Exhibition of the New Gallery: Bluhm, Brach, Daphnis, Johns, Kohn, Rauschenberg, Sander, Scarpitta, Stella, Twombly; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 20 - Nov. 7, 1959 -- Work in Three Dimensions: Chamberlain, Follet, Giles, Johns, Klein, Kohn, Marisol, Nevelson, Ortman, Rauschenberg, Scarpitta; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 10-28, 1959 -- Ludwig Sander; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 1-26, 1959 -- Paul Brach; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 5-23, 1960 -- William Giles; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 26 - Feb. 13, 1960 -- Norman Bluhm; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 15 - Mar. 5, 1960 -- Jasper Johns; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 8-26, 1960 -- Nassos Daphnis; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 29 - Apr. 16, 1960 -- Robert Rauschenberg; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 19 - May 7, 1960 -- Salvatore Scarpitta; 4 E 77 St

May 10-28, 1960 -- Edward Higgins; 4 E 77 St

May 31 - June 25, 1960 -- Summary 1959-1960: Bluhm, Bontecou, Daphnis, Higgins, Johns, Kohn, Langlais, Rauschenberg, Sander, Scarpitta, Stella, Twombly, Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

1960-1961 SeasonSept. 27 - Oct. 15, 1960 -- Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 18 - Nov. 5, 1960 -- Cy Twombly; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 9 - Dec. 3, 1960 -- Lee Bontecou; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 6, 1960 - Jan. 7, 1961 -- Robert Rauschenberg, 34 Illustrations for Dante's Inferno; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 10-28, 1961 -- Frederick Kiesler; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 31 - Feb. 25, 1961 -- Jasper Johns, Drawings and Sculpture; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 28 - Mar. 18, 1961 -- Jack Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 21 - Apr. 8, 1961 -- Bernard Langlais; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 11-29, 1961 -- Yves Klein, Le Monochrome; 4 E 77 St

May 2-20, 1961 -- Ludwig Sander; 4 E 77 St

May 23 - June [10], 1961 -- Sculpture and Relief: Bontecou, Chamberlain, Higgins, Scarpitta; 4 E 77 St

1961-1962 SeasonSept. 22 - Oct. 14, 1961 -- An Exhibition in Progress: Bontecou, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Higgins, Johns, Langlais, Moskowitz, Rauschenberg, Scarpitta, Stella, Twombly, Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 17 - Nov. 4, 1961 -- Nassos Daphnis; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 7 - Dec. 5, 1961 -- Robert Rauschenberg; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 8, 1961 - Jan. 10, 1962 -- Group Exhibition: Bontecou, Johns, Langlais, [Lichtenstein], Scarpitta, Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 13 - Feb. 6, 1962 -- John Chamberlain; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 10 - Mar. 3, 1962 -- Roy Lichtenstein; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 10 - Apr. 5, 1962 -- Robert Moskowitz; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 7-21, 1962 -- Group Exhibition: Bontecou, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Higgins, Rauschenberg, Scarpitta, Stella; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 28 - May 19, 1962 -- Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

May 26 - June 30, 1962 -- Drawings: Bontecou, Johns, Lichtenstein, Moskowitz, Rauschenberg, Stella, Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

1962-1963 SeasonSept. 22 - Oct. 13, 1962 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Higgins, Johns, Klapheck, Rauschenberg, Scarpitta, Stella, Tinguely, Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 16 - Nov. 7, 1962 -- John Chamberlain and Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 10 - Dec. 6, 1962 -- Lee Bontecou; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 8, 1962 - Jan. 9, 1963 -- Gerald van de Wiele; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 12 - Feb. 7, 1963 -- Jasper Johns; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 9 - Mar. 7, 1963 -- Jack Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 9-30, 1963 -- Nassos Daphnis; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 2-25, 1963 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Higgins, Kiesler, Lichtenstein, Moskowitz, Rauschenberg, Stella, Twombly; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 27 - May 16, 1963 -- Salvatore Scarpitta; 4 E 77 St

May 20 - June 30, 1963 -- Group Drawing Exhibition: Bontecou, Daphnis, Johns, Lichtenstein, Moskowitz, Rauschenberg, Stella, Tworkov, van de Wiele; 4 E 77 St

1963-1964 SeasonSept. 28 - Oct. 24, 1963 -- Roy Lichtenstein; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 26 - Nov. 21, 1963 -- Robert Rauschenberg; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 23, 1963 - Jan. 2, 1964 -- Edward Higgins; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 4 - Feb. 6, 1964 -- Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 8 - Mar. 12, 1964 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Johns, Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg, Stella; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 14 - Apr. 9, 1964 -- Cy Twombly; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 11-30, 1964 -- John Chamberlain; 4 E 77 St

May 2 - June 3, 1964 -- Introducing Artschwager, Christo, Hay, Watts; 4 E 77 St

June 6-30, 1964 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg, Scarpitta, Stella, Twombly, Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

1964-1965 SeasonSept. 26 - Oct. 22, 1964 -- Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Lichtenstein, Rosenquist, Stella, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 24 - Nov. 19, 1964 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Landscapes; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 21 - Dec. 28, 1964 -- Andy Warhol, Flower Paintings; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 9-27, 1965 -- John Chamberlain, Paintings; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 30 - Feb. 24, 1965 -- Richard Artschwager; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 27 - Mar. 24, 1965 -- Nassos Daphnis; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 27 - Apr. 14, 1965 -- Salvatore Scarpitta, Racing Cars; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 17 - May 13, 1965 -- James Rosenquist, F-111; 4 E 77 St

May 15 - June 9, 1965 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Oracle; 4 E 77 St

1965-1966 SeasonOct. 2-21, 1965 -- Group Exhibition: [Chamberlain], Johns, Lichtenstein, Poons, Rauschenberg, Stella, [Warhol]; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 23 - Nov. 17, 1965 -- Robert Bart; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 20 - Dec. 11, 1965 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Brushstrokes and Ceramics; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 14, 1965 - Jan. 5, 1966 -- Benefit Drawing Exhibition for the Foundation for the Contemporary Performance Arts; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 14, 1965 - Jan. 5, 1966 -- Group Exhibition; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 8 - Feb. 2, 1966 -- Jasper Johns; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 5 - Mar. 2, 1966 -- Donald Judd; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 12 - Mar. 2, 1966 -- Cy Twombly, Drawings; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 5 - Apr. 2, 1966 -- Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 6-27, 1966 -- Andy Warhol, Wallpaper and Clouds; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 30 - May 25, 1966 -- James Rosenquist; 4 E 77 St

May 28 - June 13, 1966 -- Christo, Storefront; 4 E 77 St

June 14-30, 1966 -- Group Exhibition: Bontecou, Johns, Judd, Lichtenstein, Poons, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Stella, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

1966-1967 SeasonOct. 8 - Nov. 8, 1966 -- Lee Bontecou; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 12 - Dec. 3, 1966 -- Edward Higgins; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 6-10, 1966 -- Benefit Group Exhibition for Experiments in Art and Technology, Inc.; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 7, 1966 - Jan. 5, 1967 -- Stanley Landsman; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 14, 1966 - Jan. 5, 1967 -- Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Lichtenstein, Rosenquist, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 7-31, 1967 -- Larry Poons; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 4-26, 1967 -- Tenth Anniversary Exhibition: Artschwager, Bontecou, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Higgins, Johns, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Poons, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Scarpitta, Stella, Twombly, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 4-28, 1967 -- Robert Morris; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 1967 -- New Work: Chamberlain, Lichtenstein, Stella; 4 E 77 St

May 1967 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Revolvers; 4 E 77 St

1967-1968 SeasonOct. 7-26, 1967 -- Cy Twombly; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 28 - Nov. 18, 1967 -- Roy Lichtenstein; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 25 - Dec. 23, 1967 -- Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 30, 1967 - Jan. 23, 1968 -- Richard Artschwager, Sculptures and Reliefs; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 27 - Feb. 17, 1968 -- Bruce Nauman; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 24 - Mar. 16, 1968 -- Jasper Johns; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 23 - Apr. 11, 1968 -- Ron Davis; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 20 - May 11, 1968 -- Robert Morris; 4 E 77 St

May 18 - June 8, 1968 -- Jack Krueger; 4 E 77 St

1968-1969 SeasonSept. 14-28, 1968 -- Nassos Daphnis; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 12-26, 1968 -- Robert Rauschenberg, White Paintings; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 2-23, 1968 -- Larry Poons; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 30 - Dec. 21, 1968 -- Cy Twombly; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 4-28, 1968 -- 9 at Leo Castelli: Anselmo, Bollinger, Hesse, Kaltenbach, Nauman, Saret, Serra, Sonnier, Zorio; 108th St Warehouse

Jan. 4-25, 1969 -- Donald Judd; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 1-22, 1969 -- John Chamberlain; 108th St Warehouse

Feb. 3-22, 1969 -- David Diao, Richard Pettibone, and Peter Young; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 1-22, 1969 -- Robert Morris; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 1-22, 1969 -- Robert Morris, A Continuous Project Altered Daily; 108th St Warehouse

Mar. 29 - Apr. 19, 1969 -- James Rosenquist, Horseblinders; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 29 - Apr. 19, 1969 -- Salvatore Scarpitta, Racing Cars; 108th St Warehouse

Apr. 26 - May 17, 1969 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Carnal Clocks; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 26 - May 17, 1969 -- Jack Krueger; 108th St Warehouse

May 24 - June 14, 1969 -- Bruce Nauman; 4 E 77 St

May 24 - June 21, 1969 -- 4 Painters for Spring: Bower, Cibula, Kalina, Roth, Yrisarry; 108th St Warehouse

June 21 - July 31, 1969 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Judd, Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg, Serra, Sonnier, Stella, Young; 4 E 77 St

1969-1970 SeasonSept. 20 - Oct. 11, 1969 -- Group Exhibition: Lichtenstein, Serra, Stella, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 18 - Nov. 8, 1969 -- Ron Davis; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 18 - Nov. 8, 1969 -- Ron Davis; 108th St Warehouse

Nov. - Dec., 1969 -- Joseph Kosuth; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 13, 1969 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Moonshot Series (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Nov. 18 - Dec. 6, 1969 -- Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 11-13, 1969 -- Benefit Exhibition, Art for the Moratorium; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 16, 1969 - Jan. 10, 1970 -- Richard Serra; 108th St Warehouse

Jan. 10-31, 1970 -- Jasper Johns, Drawings; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 17-24, 1970 -- Rafael Ferrer; 108th St Warehouse

Feb. 7-28, 1970 -- Dan Flavin, Tatlin Monuments; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 7-28, 1970 -- Robert Morris, Earthwork Projects (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 7-28, 1970 -- Keith Sonnier; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 7-28, 1970 -- Keith Sonnier; 108th St Warehouse

Apr. 11 - May 9, 1970 -- Donald Judd; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 11 - May 9, 1970 -- Donald Judd; 108th St Warehouse

May 16-30, 1970 -- James Rosenquist; 4 E 77 St

June 11-27, 1970 -- Benefit Exhibition for the New York Studio School; 4 E 77 St

June 30 - Aug. 28, 1970 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Johns, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Stella, Twombly, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

1970-1971 SeasonSept. 19-26, 1970 -- Benefit Exhibition for Referendum '70: Daphnis, Flavin, Johns, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Stella, Twombly, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

Sept. 26 - Oct. 24, 1970 -- Roy Lichtenstein, New Editions: Lithographs, Sculpture, Reliefs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 3-18, 1970 -- Group Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg, Stella, Twombly; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 24 - Nov. 14, 1970 -- James Rosenquist; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 21 - Dec. 12, 1970 -- Dan Flavin, Untitled (to Barnett Newman); 4 E 77 St

Dec. 19, 1970 - Jan. 9, 1971 -- Group Graphics Exhibition: Artschwager, Bontecou, Daphnis, Johns, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Schlossberg, Stella, Twombly, Warhol (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 16 - Feb. 6, 1971 -- Ron Davis; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 13 - Mar. 6, 1971 -- Bruce Nauman; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 13 - Apr. 9, 1971 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Mirror Paintings; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 17 - May 8, 1971 -- John Chamberlain; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 27 - May 8, 1971 -- Robert Barry; 4 E 77 St

May 8 - June 5, 1971 -- Douglas Huebler; 4 E 77 St

May 18 - June 12, 1971 -- Lee Bontecou; 4 E 77 St

June 26 - Sept. 24, 1971 -- Group Exhibition: Davis, Flavin, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Rosenquist, Stella, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

1971-1972 SeasonSept. 25 - Oct. 9, 1971 -- Group Film Exhibition: Jonas, Morris, Nauman, Serra, Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 2-16, 1971 -- Joseph Kosuth, The Eighth Investigation, Proposition Three; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 16 - Nov. 6, 1971 -- Robert Rauschenberg; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 23 - Nov. 13, 1971 -- Dan Flavin; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 20 - Dec. 11, 1971 -- Nassos Daphnis; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 20 - Dec. 11, 1971 -- Bruce Nauman; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 18, 1971 - Jan. [2], 1972 -- Group Film Exhibition; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 18, 1971 - Jan. 15, 1972 -- Lewis Baltz (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Dec. 18, 1971 - Jan. 15, 1972 -- Richard Hamilton, Graphics (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 15 - Feb. 5, 1972 -- Cy Twombly; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 22 - Feb. 12, 1972 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Entablature Drawings; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 22 - Feb. 12, 1972 -- Larry Stark (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Feb. 12, 1972 -- Lawrence Weiner; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 19, 1972 -- Richard Landry, Concert; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 19 - Mar. 16, 1972 -- Object Show (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Feb. 19 - Mar. 25, 1972 -- Group Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Morris, Serra, Stella; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 26 - Mar. 18, 1972 -- Keith Sonnier, Films and Videotapes; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 18 - Apr. 13, 1972 -- Andy Warhol, Electric Chairs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 25 - Apr. 15, 1972 -- Michael Balog; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 1-15, 1972 -- Richard Artschwager; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 15-29, 1972 -- Robert Barry, Projections; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 15 - May 6, 1972 -- James Rosenquist (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Apr. 18 - May 6, 1972 -- Robert Morris, Hearing; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 22 - May 13, 1972 -- Robert Morris, Projects; 4 E 77 St

May 6-20, 1972 -- Jasper Johns (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

May 6-20, 1972 -- Douglas Huebler; 420 W Broadway

May 13, 1972 -- Philip Glass, Concert; 420 W Broadway

May 20 - June 10, 1972 -- Frank Owen; 4 E 77 St

May 20 - June 10, 1972 -- Donald Judd and Richard Serra; 420 W Broadway

May 20 - June 12, 1972 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Tares (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

May 27 - June 17, 1972 -- Richard Serra, Drawings; 420 W Broadway

June 17 - Sept. 6, 1972 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Stella, Twombly, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

June 17 - Sept. [23], 1972 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Flavin, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

1972-1973 SeasonSept. 7-23, 1972 -- Furniture Designed by Artists: Chamberlain, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Stella, Twombly, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 11-23, 1972 -- Larry Stark, Fifty States (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Sept. 30 - Oct. 21, 1972 -- Group Drawing Exhibition: Barry, Bontecou, Daphnis, Flavin, Huebler, Johns, Judd, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Owen, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Serra, Sonnier, Stella, Twombly, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

Sept. 30 - Oct. 24, 1972 -- Satirical/Political Cartoons, Benefit for American Peace Action Coalition (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 7-21, 1972 -- New Works: Judd, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Serra, Stella; Videotapes: Jonas, Landry, Mann, Morris, Nauman, Serra, Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 27-28, 1972 -- Benefit Exhibition for the New York Collection for Stockholm; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 28 - Nov. 11, 1972 -- Frank Stella, Race Track (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 28 - Nov. 15, 1972 -- Jasper Johns, From Robert Scull Collection (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Nov. 4-25, 1972 -- Joseph Kosuth, The Ninth Investigation, Proposition One; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 4-25, 1972 -- Dan Flavin, an exposition of cool white and warm white circular fluorescent light; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 9-25, 1972 -- Andy Warhol, Mao Prints [Castelli Graphics]; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 18 - Dec. 9, 1972 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Mirrors (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Dec. 2-23, 1972 -- Joseph Kosuth, Early Works: Protoinvestigations; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 2-24, 1972 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Made in Tampa [Castelli Graphics]; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 9-23, 1972 -- Gianfranco Gorgoni, Photographs from the book "The New Avant-Garde"; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 16-30, 1972 -- Cirrus Editions: Anderson, Balog, Card Celmins, Cooper, Goode, Nauman, Price, Ruscha (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 4-6, 1973 -- Joan Jonas, Performance; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 6-27, 1973 -- Richard Serra, Prints from Gemini (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 6-27, 1973 -- Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 13 - Feb. 3, 1973 -- Donald Judd; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 3-17, 1973 -- Edward Ruscha, Drawings; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 3-24, 1973 -- Group Show (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Feb. 10 - Mar. 3, 1973 -- Jan Dibbets; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 24 - Mar. 10, 1973 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Still Lifes; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 3-23, 1973 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Horsefeathers XIII (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 10-24, 1973 -- Nassos Daphnis, Retrospective 1958-1972; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 14-16, 1973 -- Lawrence Weiner, Film screening "A First Quarter"; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 17-31, 1973 -- Nassos Daphnis, Monoprints; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 17-31, 1973 -- Bruce Nauman, Floating Room; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 24 - Apr. 14, 1973 -- Bruce Nauman (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 31 - Apr. 21, 1973 -- Dan Flavin, 40th Birthday Drawing Exhibition; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 31 - Apr. 21, 1973 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Venetian Series; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 7-28, 1973 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Curved Series; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 27 - May 19, 1973 -- Group Show, Mirrors (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Apr. 28 - May 19, 1973 -- Hanne Darboven; 420 W Broadway

May 5-26, 1973 -- Paul Waldman, Recent Paintings; 4 E 77 St

May 19 - June 6, 1973 -- Laura Grisi, Pebbles; 420 W Broadway

May 26 - June 7, 1973 -- James Rosenquist, Horseblinders (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

May 26 - June 16, 1973 -- James Rosenquist; 420 W Broadway

June [3] - Sept. 15, 1973 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Darboven, Dibbets, Flavin, Huebler, Kosuth, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Stella, Waldman, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

June 8-22, 1973 -- Don Judd, Woodcuts, Silkscreens (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

June 23 - Sept. 9, 1973 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Bulls (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

June 23 - Sept. 22, 1973 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Chamberlain, Davis, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Morris, Owen, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Stella; 420 W Broadway

1973-1974 SeasonSept. 10-28, 1973 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Black and White Prints from Gemini (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Sept. 22 - Oct. 16, 1973 -- Group Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Rosenquist, Stella; 4 E 77 St

Sept. 29 - Oct. 20, 1973 -- Videotapes by Twelve Artists: Benglis, Chamberlain, Freed, Jonas, Kos, Landry, Mann, Morris, Nauman, Serra, Sonnier, Weiner; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 29 - Nov. 16, 1973 -- Stockholm Show (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 18 - Nov. 10, 1973 -- Benefit Exhibition for the Committee to Save Venice: Cornell, Dine, Frankenthaler, Johns, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Louis, Noland, Oldenburg, Olitski, Rauschenberg, Stella; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 1-3, 1973 -- Group Film Exhibition: Chamberlain, Jonas, Ruscha, Weiner; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 1-14, 1973 -- Group Show: Artschwager, Lichtenstein, Rosenquist, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 10 - Dec. 1, 1973 -- Douglas Huebler; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 15 - Dec. 1, 1973 -- Hans Namuth, Photographs; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 17 - Dec. 7, 1973 -- Lewis Baltz, Photographs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Nov. 17 - Dec. 15, 1973 -- Richard Artschwager; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 8, 1973 - Jan. 12, 1974 -- Group Show of New Prints: Balog, Petersen, Rauschenberg, Sonnier (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Dec. 8, 1973 - Jan. 12, 1974 -- John Chamberlain; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 15, 1973 - Jan. 19, 1974 -- Edward Ruscha, Retrospective Show, Graphics from the Collection of Donald Marron (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St (upstairs)

Jan. 12-26, 1974 -- [García] Uriburu (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 19 - Feb. 9, 1974 -- Robert Barry; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 2-16, 1974 -- James Rosenquist (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Feb. 2-23, 1974 -- Ron Davis; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 16 - Mar. 2, 1974 -- Group Drawing Exhibition: Artschwager, Bontecou, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Darboven, Davis, Flavin, Huebler, Johns, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Oldenburg, Owen, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Serra, Stella, Twombly; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 23 - Mar. 9, 1974 -- Keith Sonnier, Video Still Screens (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 2-23, 1974 -- Dan Flavin; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 9-30, 1974 -- Keith Sonnier, Amplified Local Time: Radio Installation; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 16 - Apr. 6, 1974 -- Bruce Nauman (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 30 - Apr. 20, 1974 -- Edward Ruscha; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 6-20, 1974 -- Roy Lichtenstein (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Apr. 6-27, 1974 -- Robert Morris, Voice; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 27 - May 11, 1974 -- Jasper Johns (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Apr. 27 - May 18, 1974 -- Claes Oldenburg; 4 E 77 St

May 4-25, 1974 -- Robert Rauschenberg and Cy Twombly; 420 W Broadway

May 18 - June 1, 1974 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Pages and Fuses (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

May 28 - June 15, 1974 -- Lucia Wilcox; 4 E 77 St

June, 1974 -- Ron Davis (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

June, 1974 -- Richard Landry, Concert; 420 W Broadway

June 1-15, 1974 -- Group Video Exhibition: Acconci, Baldessari, Bell, Benglis, Campus, Gillette, Girouard, Haxton, Holt, Jonas, Kos, Landry, Mann, Morris, Oldenburg, Palestine, Serra, Smithson, Wegman (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway

June 1-15, 1974 -- Richard Landry, Photographs (Castelli Graphics); 420 W Broadway

June 21 - Sept. 14, 1974 -- Group Exhibition: Darboven, Flavin, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Stella, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

June 21 - Sept. 14, 1974 -- Group Graphics Exhibition: Artschwager, Baltz, Bontecou, Daphnis, Huebler, Johns, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Oldenburg, Petersen, Pistoletto, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Serra, Sonnier, Stella, Twombly, Warhol (Castelli Graphics); 420 W Broadway

1974-1975 SeasonSept. 21 - Oct. 4, 1974 -- Frank Stella, Eccentric Polygons (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Sept. 21 - Oct. 5, 1974 -- Jasper Johns, Recent Four Panel Prints (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Sept. 21 - Oct. 12, 1974 -- Group Sculpture Show, In Three Dimensions: Artschwager, Bontecou, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Scarpitta, Serra, Sonnier, Stella, Waldman; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 5-19, 1974 -- Peter Mauss, Recent Photographs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 12-26, 1974 -- Richard Serra, Drawings; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 19 - Nov. 9, 1974 -- Lawrence Weiner; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 26 - Nov. 9, 1974 -- Claes Oldenburg, Selected Show of Prints from 1968-1974 (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Nov. 2 - 30, 1974 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Artist's Studio Paintings; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 12-30, 1974 -- James Rosenquist, Selected Show of Prints from 1965-1974 (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Nov. 16-30, 1974 -- Hanne Darboven, 24 Songs; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 21, 1974 -- Philip Glass, Concert; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 7-21, 1975 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Hoarfrost Series; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 7, 1974 - [Jan. 4], 1974 -- Michelangelo Pistoletto, New Multiples (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Dec. 7, 1974 - Jan. 4, 1975 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Hoarfrost Editions (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Dec. 14, 1974 - Jan. 11, 1975 -- Andy Warhol, Hand Colored Flowers (Castelli Graphics); 420 W Broadway

Jan. 4-18, 1975 -- Bruce Nauman, Cones/Cojones; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 11-25, 1975 -- Edward Ruscha, Domestic Tranquility, Four New Lithographs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 11 - Feb. 2, 1975 -- Salvatore Scarpitta, Sleds; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 15-18, 1975 -- Peter Campus and Paul Kos, Videotapes (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway

Jan. 25 - Feb. 8, 1975 -- Joseph Kosuth, The Tenth Investigation, Proposition Four; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 1-15, 1975 -- Group Show: Huebler, Morris, Nauman, Sonnier (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Feb. 8-22, 1975 -- Keith Sonnier, Air to Air; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 15 - Mar. 8, 1975 -- Nassos Daphnis, A Continuous Painting; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 26 - Mar. 1, 1975 -- Benefit Exhibition for the Merce Cunningham Portfolio: Cage, Johns, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Stella, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 26 - Mar. 1, 1975 -- Joan Jonas and Charlemagne Palestine, Videotapes (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway

Mar. 5-8, 1975 -- Frank Gillette and William Wegman, Videotapes (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway

Mar. 8 - Apr. 5, 1975 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Sculptures; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 15-29, 1975 -- Richard Artschwager, Drawings; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 15-29, 1975 -- Larry Stark, Silkscreens on Canvas; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 15 - [Apr. 5], 1975 -- Richard Landry, "1, 2, 3, 4" from Videotapes (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Apr. 2-5, 1975 -- Benefit Exhibition for the Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 12-26, 1975 -- Ellsworth Kelly, New Prints (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Apr. 12-26, 1975 -- Dan Flavin, Flourescent Light; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 12 - May 3, 1975 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Gray Series Paintings; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 19 - May 3, 1975 -- James Klosty, Around and About Merce Cunningham, Photographs 1968-1972; 420 W Broadway

May 3-17, 1975 -- Richmond Jones, Photographs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

May 3-31, 1975 -- Frank Stella, Metal Reliefs; 420 W Broadway

May 10-31, 1975 -- Ron Davis, Paintings; 4 E 77 St

May 10-31, 1975 -- Laura Grisi, Stripes; 420 W Broadway

May 24 - June 7, 1975 -- Laura Grisi, New Graphics (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

June 7 - Sept. 5, 1975 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Chamberlain, Darboven, Grisi, Huebler, Judd, Kelly, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Owen, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

June 7 - Sept. 20, 1975 -- Summer Group Exhibition, Black and White: Kelly, Rauschenberg, Ad Reinhardt, Serra, Stella; 4 E 77 St

June 14-28, 1975 -- Bruce Nauman, New Graphics (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

July 7-25, 1975 -- Group Exhibition (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

1975-1976 SeasonSept. 13-27, 1975 -- Autumn Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Chamberlain, Davis, Lichtenstein, Nauman, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Scarpitta; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 27 - Oct. 18, 1975 -- James Rosenquist, Drawings; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 4-18, 1975 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Bones and Unions (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 4-25, 1975 -- Jan Dibbets; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 11-25, 1975 -- Frank Owen; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 25 - Nov. 15, 1975 -- Hans Namuth, Photographs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Nov. 1-15, 1975 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Bones and Unions (Castelli Graphics); 420 W Broadway

Nov. 1-22, 1975 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Recent Paintings; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 22 - Dec. 13, 1975 -- Group Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Morris, Stella; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 29 - Dec. 20, 1975 -- Lewis Baltz, The New Industrial Parks Near Irving, CA, 1974 (a portfolio of 51 photographs) (Castelli Graphics); 420 W Broadway

Nov. 29 - Dec. 20, 1975 -- Paul Waldman, Recent Paintings; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 3-17, 1976 -- Ralph Gibson, Photographs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 10-24, 1976 -- Robert Barry, Recent Drawings; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 10-24, 1976 -- Alan Charlton; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 24 - Feb. 14, 1976 -- Jasper Johns; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 31 - Feb. 14, 1976 -- Peter Campus; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 31 - Feb. 14, 1976 -- Peter Campus and Frank Gillette, Videotapes (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway

Feb. 10, 1976 -- Lawrence Weiner, Film screening, "A Second Quarter"; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 21 - Mar. 13, 1976 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Jammers; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 21 - Mar. 13, 1976 -- Keith Sonnier, Abaca Code; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 28 - Mar. 20, 1976 -- Joseph Cornell; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 20 - Apr. 10, 1976 -- Dan Flavin, Colored Fluorescent Light; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 20 - Apr. 10, 1976 -- Donald Judd; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 27 - Apr. 17, 1976 -- John Chamberlain; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 17 - May 8, 1976 -- Robert Morris; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 22-24, 1976 -- Benefit Drawing Exhibition for the New York Studio School; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 24 - May 15, 1976 -- Laura Grisi; 420 W Broadway

May 1-22, 1976 -- Hanne Darboven, For Jean-Paul Sartre; 4 E 77 St

May 15 - June 5, 1976 -- Douglas Huebler; 420 W Broadway

May 22 - June 12, 1976 -- Gianfranco Gorgoni, Photographs; 420 W Broadway

May 29 - June 12, 1976 -- Robert Adams, Photographs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

June 19 - Sept. 10, 1976 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Dibbets, Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Noland, Oldenburg, Owen, Rauschenberg, Serra, Stella, Weiner; 420 W Broadway

June 26 - Sept. 10, 1976 -- Summer Group Drawing Exhibition: Artschwager, Barry, Bontecou, Darboven, Flavin, Morris, Ruscha; 4 E 77 St

1976-1977 SeasonSept. 11 - Oct. 2, 1976 -- Portraits: Cohen, Eggleston, Gibson, Gossage, Kelly, Namuth, Sonneman, Warhol (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Sept. 15 - Oct. 2, 1976 -- Daniel Buren, To Transgress; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 25 - Oct. 16, 1976 -- Cy Twombly, Watercolors; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 9-30, 1976 -- Robert Morris, Black and White Felts; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 9-30, 1976 -- Paul Kos, Tokyo Rose (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Oct. 23 - Nov. 13, 1976 -- Kenneth Noland; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 2-27, 1976 -- Bruce Nauman; 420 W Broadway (back room)

Nov. 6 - Dec. 4, 1976 -- Claes Oldenburg; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 11-18, 1976 -- Poppy Johnson, Performance; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Dec. 11-22, 1976 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Noland, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Stella, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 8-29, 1977 -- Andy Warhol, Still Life Paintings and Drawings; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 5-26, 1977 -- Ellsworth Kelly; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 5-19, 1977 -- Robert Barry, Donald Judd, Robert Morris, and Keith Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 5-26, 1977 -- Hans Namuth and Georg Reisner, Photographs from the Spanish Civil War; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 5-26, 1977 -- Beryl Korot, Text and Commentary (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 5 - Apr. 2, 1977 -- Robert Rauschenberg (Castelli Graphics); [4 E 77 St]

Mar. 26 - Apr. 16, 1977 -- Louis Cane; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 28, 1977 -- Brazos River: Videotape by Viola Farber, Robert Rauschenberg, and David Tudor; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 2-16, 1977 -- Frank Gillette, Mecox (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Apr. 23 - May 21, 1977 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Spreads and Scales; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 30 - May 21, 1977 -- Billy Apple, Extension of the Given; 420 W Broadway

May 7-28, 1977 -- Drawings: Artschwager, Flavin, Johns, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Twombly, Waldman, Warhol (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

May 7-28, 1977 -- Drawings - Castelli Uptown; 420 W Broadway

May 28 - June [18], 1977 -- Mia Westerlund Roosen; 420 W Broadway

May 28 - Sept. 17, 1977 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

1977-1978 SeasonSept. 24 - Oct. 15, 1977 -- James Rosenquist, Recent Paintings; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 15 - Nov. 12, 1977 -- Jasper Johns (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 22 - Nov. 12, 1977 -- Architecture I: Abraham, Ambasz, Meier, Pichler, Rossi, Stirling, Venturi and Rauch; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 19 - Dec. 17, 1977 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Sculptures; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 25 - Dec. 17, 1977 -- William Eggelston, Color Photographs, 1966-1977 (Castelli Graphics); 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Jan. 7-28, 1978 -- Numerals 1924-1977; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 4-25, 1978 -- Bruce Nauman; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Feb. 4-25, 1978 -- Billy Apple, Extension of the Given; 420 W Broadway (front office)

Feb. 4-25, 1978 -- Dan Flavin; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Feb. 4-25, 1978 -- Robert Barry, A Wall Drawing; 420 W Broadway (back room)

Mar. 4-25, 1978 -- Donald Judd; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 4-25, 1978 -- Paul Waldman; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 1-15, 1978 -- Keith Sonnier, Black Ground Series Drawings; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Apr. 1-29, 1978 -- Hanne Darboven, Card-Index, Filing Cabinet; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 22-29, 1978 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, Inside New York's Art World; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

May 6 - June 24, 1978 -- Joseph Cornell, Collages 1931-1972; 420 W Broadway

June 10-24, 1978 -- Alan Sonfist; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

July 5 - Sept. 23, 1978 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Dibbets, Flavin, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Noland, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Serra, Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

1978-1979 SeasonSept. 30 - Oct. 21, 1978 -- Jan Dibbets, Structure Panoramas 1977-78; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Sept. 30 - Oct. 21, 1978 -- Douglas Huebler, Mediations; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Oct. 28 - Nov. 18, 1978 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Johns, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 28 - Nov. 18, 1978 -- Laura Grisi; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Dec. 2-20, 1978 -- Film/Video 1976-78: Baldessari, Benglis, Campus, Downey, Freed, Girouard, Haxton, Holt, Jonas, Kos, Rappaport, Wegman, Wiener (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway

Jan. 6-27, 1979 -- Frank Stella, Indian Birds, Painted Metal Reliefs; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 3-24, 1979 -- Donald Judd, Survey of Work; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 3-24, 1979 -- Robert Morris, 6 Mirror Works; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Mar. 3-24, 1979 -- Robert Barry and Carole Gallagher, Again and Again; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 31 - Apr. 21, 1979 -- Hans Namuth, Todos Santos: Portraits (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 31 - Apr. 21, 1979 -- Lawrence Weiner; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Mar. 31 - Apr. 21, 1979 -- Mia Westerlund Roosen; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Apr. 28 - May 19, 1979 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Recent Paintings; 420 W Broadway

May 26 - June 16, 1979 -- Joseph Kosuth, Text/Context (New York); 420 W Broadway

May 26 - June 16, 1979 -- Keith Sonnier, Expanded Sel Series; 420 W Broadway

June 23 - Sept. 15, 1979 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Andre, Daphnis, Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Morris, Noland, Owen, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Serra, Stella, Twombly; 420 W Broadway

1979-1980 SeasonSept. 22 - Oct. 13, 1979 -- Richard Artschwager; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 20 - Nov. 10, 1979 -- Dan Flavin, 1960's and 1970's Installations; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 17 - Dec. 15, 1979 -- Kenneth Noland; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 5-19, 1980 -- Michele Zaza; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Jan. 5-26, 1980 -- Hanne Darboven; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 19 - Feb. 9, 1980 -- Jasper Johns; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 22-26, 1980 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, Inside New York's Art World (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Feb. 2-23, 1980 -- Salvatore Scarpitta; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 2-23, 1980 -- Charles Gaines, Falling Leaves; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Feb. 19 - [Mar. 15], 1980 -- Leo Castelli: A New Space: Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Serra, Stella; 142 Greene St

Mar. 1-22, 1980 -- Nassos Daphnis, Paintings From the 50's; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 1-22, 1980 -- Robert Barry, Wall Piece; 420 W Broadway (back office)

Mar. 29 - Apr. 19, 1980 -- Robert Rauschenberg; 420 W Broadway

Apr. [5] - May 10, 1980 -- Ellsworth Kelly, "Color Panels for a Large Wall," 1978, from the Central Trust Company, Cincinnati; 142 Greene St

Apr. 12 - May 3, 1980 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Prints 1978-1980 (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Apr. 26 - May 17, 1980 -- Bruce Nauman; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 26 - May 17, 1980 -- Cletus Johnson, Theaters; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

May 17 - June 21, 1980 -- James Rosenquist; 420 W Broadway

May 24 - June 14, 1980 -- Claes Oldenburg; 142 Greene St

May 24 - June 14, 1980 -- Claes Oldenburg; 420 W Broadway

1980-1981 SeasonSept. 13 - Oct. 18, 1980 -- Group Exhibition: Lichtenstein, Nauman, Stella, Judd, Warhol, Kelly; 142 Greene St

Sept. 20 - Oct. 11, 1980 -- Edward Ruscha, New Paintings; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Sept. 20 - Oct. 11, 1980 -- Peter Young, Homage to Agnes Martin; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 27 - Oct. 18, 1980 -- Roy Lichtenstein (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 18 - Nov. 22, 1980 -- Architecture II Houses For Sale: Ambasz, Eisenman, Gregotti, Isozaki, Moore, Pelli, Price, Ungers; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 25 - Nov. 15, 1980 -- Hans Namuth, Pollock Painting, 1950-1951 (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 25 - Nov. 15, 1980 -- Robert Morris; 142 Greene St

Nov. 1980 -- Group Exhibition; 420 W Broadway (rear office)

Nov. 29 - Dec. 6, 1980 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, American Architecture Now (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Nov. 29 - Dec. 13, 1980 -- Benefit Exhibition for Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts, Inc.; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 29 - Dec. 20, 1980 -- James Turrell; 142 Greene St

Dec. 13-20, 1980 -- Group Installation: Huebler, Kosuth, Nauman, Sonnier; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Jan. 10 - Feb. 7, 1981 -- Jasper Johns, Drawings 1970-1980; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 17 - Feb. 21, 1981 -- James Rosenquist, Star Thief; 142 Greene St

Feb. 14-28, 1981 -- Lawrence Weiner; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Feb. 14-28, 1981 -- Edward Ruscha, Drawings; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Feb. 28 - Apr. 4, 1981 -- Richard Serra, Slice; 142 Greene St

Mar. 7-28, 1981 -- Paul Waldman; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 7-28, 1981 -- Laura Grisi; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 12 - Apr. 4, 1981 -- Richard Serra, Film screenings, "Railroad Turnbridge" and "Steelmill/Stahlwerk" (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 142 Greene St

Apr. 4 - May 2, 1981 -- Julian Schnabel; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 4 - May 2, 1981 -- Douglas Huebler, Crocodile Tears; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Apr. 11 - May 9, 1981 -- Ellsworth Kelly; 142 Greene St

Apr. 18 - May 9, 1981 -- Michael Harvey, Film screenings, "Sub Rosa" and "Dead Letter" (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 142 Greene St

May 13, 1981 -- Joan Jonas, Upsidedown and Backwards (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 142 Greene St

May 16-30, 1981 -- Artists' Benefit For the Trisha Brown Dance Company; 142 Greene St

May 16 - Sept. 4, 1981 -- Dan Flavin, Barred Corridors; 420 W Broadway

1981-1982 SeasonSept. 15 - Oct. 31, 1981 -- Donald Judd; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Sept. 19 - Oct. 10, 1981 -- Richard Serra (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Sept. 19 - Oct. 10, 1981 -- Robert Barry and Carole Gallagher, Collaboration; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 17 - Nov. 7, 1981 -- Charles Gaines, Landscape: Assorted Trees with Regressions; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 17 - Nov. 7, 1981 -- Roy Lichtenstein; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 14 - Dec. 19, 1981 -- Richard Artschwager; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 17-21, 1981 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, Visions and Images - American Photographers on Photography (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Nov. 21 - Dec. 12, 1981 -- Hermine Freed, Beads + Marbles [Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films]; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Nov. 21 - Dec. 19, 1981 -- Hanne Darboven; 142 Greene St

Nov. 28 - Dec. 19, 1981 -- Eight Lithographs to Benefit the Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts, Inc.; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Nov. 28 - Dec. 23, 1981 -- Julian Schnabel; 142 Greene St

Jan. 9-30, 1982 -- Bruce Nauman, Violins, Violence, Silence; 142 Greene St

Jan. 9-30, 1982 -- Andy Warhol, Dollar Signs; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Jan. 9-30, 1982 -- Andy Warhol, Reversals; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Jan. 9 - Feb. 13, 1982 -- Hans Namuth, Portraits; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Feb. 6-27, 1982 -- Claude Viallat; 142 Greene St

Feb. 6-27, 1982 -- Louis Cane; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 20 - Mar. 27, 1982 -- Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, Richard Serra; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 6-27, 1982 -- Mia Westerlund Roosen; 142 Greene St

Mar. 6-27, 1982 -- David Salle; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Mar. 20-27, 1982 -- Sandro Chia; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Apr. 3-24, 1982 -- Richard Serra, "Marilyn Monroe-Greta Garbo," 1981,-(A Sculpture for Gallery-Goers.); 142 Greene St

Apr. 3-24, 1982 -- Joseph Kosuth; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 3-24, 1982 -- Richard Serra; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 3 - May 1, 1982 -- Frank Gillette; 142 Greene St

May 1-22, 1982 -- Keith Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

June 1 - Oct. 23, 1982 -- Summer Group Show: Chia, Johns, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Schnabel, Stella, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

Summer 1982 -- Castelli and His Artists 25 Years; 420 W Broadway

1982-1983 SeasonSept. 11 - Oct. 9, 1982 -- 25th Anniversary Exhibition of Leo Castelli, Castelli and His Artists 25 Years: Artschwager, Barry, Bontecou, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Darboven, Dibbets, Flavin, Grisi, Huebler, Johns, Johnson, Judd, Kelly, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Scarpitta, Schnabel, Serra, Sonnier, Stella, Twombly, Waldman, Warhol, Weiner, Westerlund Roosen; 142 Greene St

Oct. 16-23, 1982 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, Interior Design: The New Freedom; 142 Greene St

Oct. 16-23, 1982 -- Architectural Drawings and Models: Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture Charrette Competition Entries; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 16 - Nov. 6, 1982 -- Group Show: Flavin, Nauman, Oldenburg, Serra, Stella; 142 Greene St

Oct. 30 - Nov. 20, 1982 -- Frank Stella; 420 W Broadway

[Nov. 20 - Dec. 12, 1982] -- Salvatore Scarpitta, American Cycle: 1958-1982; 142 Greene St

Nov. 27 - Dec. 18, 1982 -- John Chamberlain; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 31, 1982 - Jan. 29, 1983 -- Robert Rauschenberg; 142 Greene St

Jan. 8-29, 1983 -- Margrete Sørensen; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Jan. 8-29, 1983 -- Robert Morris, Psychomachia; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 3-24, 1983 -- Robert Morris; 142 Greene St

Feb. 3-26, 1983 -- Diane Blell; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Feb. 5-26, 1983 -- Robert Longo; 142 Greene St

Feb. 5-26, 1983 -- Gerard Garouste; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 5-26, 1983 -- Robert Mapplethorpe; 142 Greene St

Mar. 5-26, 1983 -- Douglas Huebler; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Mar. 5-26, 1983 -- Nassos Daphnis; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 5-26, 1983 -- Sandy Skoglund; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Apr. 2-23, 1983 -- Julian Schnabel; 142 Greene St

Apr. 2-23, 1983 -- Jan Dibbets; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 2-23, 1983 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Robert Morris, and Bruce Nauman; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Apr. 30 - June 3, 1983 -- Donald Judd; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 30 - June 4, 1983 -- Sandro Chia; 142 Greene St

Apr. 30 - June 4, 1983 -- Julian Schnabel; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

May 11 - June 30, 1983 -- Michael Smith, Government Approved Home Fallout snack bar (Castelli Graphics); 43 West 61st St

June [11] - Aug. [4], 1983 -- Drawings/Photographs; 420 W Broadway

Summer 1983 -- Summer Show, Sculpture; 142 Greene St

1983-1984 SeasonSept. 17 - Oct. 8, 1983 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Photogravures (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Sept. 24 - Oct. 15, 1983 -- Ken Price; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Sept. 24 - Oct. 15, 1983 -- Robert Barry; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Oct. 1-[22], 1983 -- James Rosenquist; 142 Greene St

Oct. 22 - Nov. 19, 1983 -- Architectural "Follies": Drawings and Models; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 29 - Nov. 5, 1983 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, Handmade in America; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Nov. 12-26, 1983 -- Marvin Torffield, Pandora's Tears; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Dec. 3-17, 1983 -- 8 x 8 to Celebrate the Temporary Contemporary; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Dec. 3, 1983 - Jan. 14, 1984 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Greene St Mural; 142 Greene St

Dec. 3, 1983 - Jan. 14, 1984 -- Roy Lichtenstein; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 21 - Feb. 18, 1984 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Corten Wall Sculptures; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 28 - Feb. 25, 1984 -- Jasper Johns, Paintings; 142 Greene St

Feb. 18 - Mar. 10, 1984 -- Richard Serra; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 3-17, 1984 -- Artists Call Against US Intervention in Central America; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Mar. 3-31, 1984 -- Edward Ruscha; 142 Greene St

Mar. 10-31, 1984 -- Castelli Graphics 15th Anniversary Exhibition: Graphics, Photographs, Drawings, and Multiples (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 17 - Apr. 7, 1984 -- David Salle; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 31 - Apr. 21, 1984 -- Lucio Pozzi; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Apr. 3-28, 1984 -- Dan Flavin; 142 Greene St

Apr. 14 - May 12, 1984 -- Paul Waldman; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 28 - May 19, 1984 -- Eve Sonneman; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

May 19 - June 9, 1984 -- Jean-Charles Blais; 420 W Broadway

June 6, 1984 -- Michael Smith, Video: Go For It Mike (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 142 Greene St

June 15 - July 27, 1984 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Morris, Rauschenberg, Serra, Stella; 142 Greene St

June 23 - Sept. 8, 1984 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Blell, Chia, Johns, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Salle, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

1984-1985 SeasonSept. 15-29, 1984 -- Billy Apple, Survey: 1962-1974; 142 Greene St

Sept. 15 - Oct. 6, 1984 -- Hanne Darboven, Ansichten '82; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 6 - Nov. 3, 1984 -- Bruce Nauman; 142 Greene St

Oct. 13 - Nov. 10, 1984 -- Charles Simonds; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 19, [1984] -- Mitchell Kriegman, Video, "The Effect of Gravity on Dogs" (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 142 Greene St

Nov. 17 - Dec. 15, 1984 -- Donald Judd; 142 Greene St

Nov. 17 - Dec. 15, 1984 -- Keith Sonnier; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Nov. 17 - Dec. 15, 1984 -- Donald Judd; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 29 - Dec. 8, 1984 -- Cunningham Dance Foundation Benefit Art Sale; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 5-26, 1985 -- Sandro Chia; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 12 - Feb. 9, 1985 -- Robert Morris; 142 Greene St

Feb. 2-23, 1985 -- Richard Artschwager; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 16 - Mar. 23, 1985 -- Nassos Daphnis; 142 Greene St

Mar. 2-23, 1985 -- Joseph Kosuth; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 2-23, 1985 -- Ralph Gibson; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 30 - Apr. 13, 1985 -- Group Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Morris, Nauman, Serra, Warhol; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Mar. 30 - Apr. 13, 1985 -- Ellsworth Kelly, New Wall Reliefs; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 30 - Apr. 20, 1985 -- Francesco Clemente; 142 Greene St

Apr. 20 - May 11, 1985 -- Gerard Garouste; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Apr. 20 - May 11, 1985 -- Charles Gaines; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Apr. 27 - May 18, 1985 -- James Rosenquist; 142 Greene St

May 18 - June 15, 1985 -- Dan Flavin; 420 W Broadway (front room)

May 18 - June 15, 1985 -- Dianne Blell; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

June 22 - July 27, 1985 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Chia, Lichtenstein, Rosenquist, Serra, Sonnier, Warhol, Weiner, Westerlund Roosen; 142 Greene St

1985-1986 SeasonSept. 7-21, 1985 -- Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Ruscha, Salle, Scarpitta, Sonnier, Warhol, Weiner; 142 Greene St

Sept. 28 - Oct. 19, 1985 -- Keith Sonnier; 142 Greene St

Sept. 28 - Oct. 19, 1985 -- Jiri Georg Dokoupil; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 26 - Nov. 16, 1985 -- Keith Haring; 142 Greene St

Oct. 26 - Nov. 16, 1985 -- Bruce Nauman; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Oct. 26 - Nov. 16, 1985 -- Judy Tompkins; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Nov. 15 - Dec. 7, 1985 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Landscapes (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Nov. 23 - Dec. 21, 1985 -- Roy Lichtenstein; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Nov. 23 - Dec. 21, 1985 -- Gianfranco Gorgoni; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Nov. 30 - Dec. 21, 1985 -- Mario Merz; 142 Greene St

Jan. 11 - Feb. 1, 1986 -- Hanne Darboven; 142 Greene St

Jan. 11 - Feb. 1, 1986 -- Group Exhibition: Chia, Judd, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Sonnier, Warhol, Westerlund Roosen; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Jan. 11 - Feb. 1, 1986 -- Robert Ryman; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Jan. 11 - Feb. 1, 1986 -- Douglas Huebler; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Feb. 8 - Mar. 1, 1986 -- Laura Grisi; 142 Greene St

Feb. 8 - Mar. 1, 1986 -- Edward Ruscha; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Feb. 8 - Mar. 1, 1986 -- Nassos Daphnis; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 8-29, 1986 -- Robert Combas; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Mar. 8-29, 1986 -- Dan Rodan; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 8 - Apr. 5, 1986 -- Richard Serra, Prints; 142 Greene St

Apr. 5 - May 3, 1986 -- David Salle; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 5 - May 3, 1986 -- Jean Kallina; 420 W Broadway (office)

Apr. 12 - May 3, 1986 -- Miquel Barceló; 142 Greene St

May 10 - June 14, 1986 -- Robert Therrien; 420 W Broadway

May 17 - June 14, 1986 -- Joseph Kosuth, Selected Works, 1965-1986; 142 Greene St

June 14 - Sept. 13, 1986 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Barceló, Dokoupil, Kosuth, Morris, Moskowitz, Nauman, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Scarpitta, Serra, Stella, Warhol; 142 Greene St

June 14 - Sept. 13, 1986 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Blais, Blell, Brown, Chia, Combas, Gibson, Johns, Kelly, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Ryman, Salle, Serra, Therrien; 420 W Broadway

1986-1987 SeasonSept. 19-27, 1986 -- The Law and Order Show; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 20 - Oct. 11, 1986 -- Mia Westerlund Roosen, Sculpture and Drawings, 1983-1986; 142 Greene St

Oct. 4-11, 1986 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, Color Video Selections; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Oct. 4-25, 1986 -- James Brown; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 18-25, 1986 -- Skowhegan: A Ten-Year Retrospective; 142 Greene St

Nov. 1-22, 1986 -- Lawrence Weiner; 142 Greene St

Nov. [1]-22, 1986 -- Robert Therrien, 1st Installation; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Nov. 1-22, 1986 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Gluts; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 13, 1986 - Jan. 24, 1987 -- Claes Oldenburg, Coosje van Bruggen, and Frank Gehry, The Course of the Knife; 142 Greene St

Dec. 13, 1986 - Jan. 24, 1987 -- Claes Oldenburg, Coosje van Bruggen, and Frank Gehry, The Course of the Knife; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 31 - Mar. 7, 1987 -- XXXth Anniversary, the first fifteen years, part 1: Artschwager, Bontecou, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Johns, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Scarpitta, Stella, Twombly, Warhol; 142 Greene St

Jan. 31 - Mar. 7, 1987 -- Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Barceló, Flavin, Grisi, Simonds; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Jan. 31 - Mar. 7, 1987 -- Robert Therrien, 2nd Installation; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Jan. 31 - Mar. 7, 1987 -- Jasper Johns; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 7-28, 1987 -- Charles Gaines, Numbers + Trees; 142 Greene St

Mar. 14 - Apr. 4, 1987 -- XXXth Anniversary, the first fifteen years, part 2: Barry, Darboven, Dibbets, Flavin, Grisi, Huebler, Judd, Kosuth, Morris, Nauman, Serra, Sonnier, Waldman, Weiner; 142 Greene St

Mar. 14 - Apr. 4, 1987 -- Roy Lichtenstein; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 26 - May 2, 1987 -- Group Exhibition: Grisi, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Warhol; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Apr. 18 - May 2, 1987 -- Jean-Charles Blais; 142 Greene St

Apr. 18 - May 9, 1987 -- Dan Flavin, A New Work; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 18 - May 9, 1987 -- Ti Shan Hsu; 420 W Broadway

May [9]-30, 1987 -- Group Show: Kosuth, Morris, Oldenburg, Serra, Stella, Therrien; 142 Greene St

May 12 - June 27, 1987 -- Robert Therrien, 3rd Installation; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

May 16 - June 6, 1987 -- Richard Artschwager, Bruce Nauman, and Frank Stella; 420 W Broadway

June 4-13, 1987 -- Art Against Aids; 142 Greene St

June 20 - July 31, 1987 -- Andy Warhol; 142 Greene St

1987-1988 SeasonSept. 26 - Oct. 17, 1987 -- Richard Serra, Three Sculptures; 142 Greene St

Oct. 3-31, 1987 -- Miquel Barceló; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 24 - Nov. 14, 1987 -- Peter Schuyff; 142 Greene St

Nov. 7-28, 1987 -- Meyer Vaisman; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 21 - Dec. 19, 1987 -- Edward Ruscha; 142 Greene St

Nov. 21 - Dec. 19, 1987 -- Edward Ruscha; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 5-22, 1987 -- Similia/Dissimilia; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 9-30, 1988 -- Robert Morris; 142 Greene St

Jan. 9-30, 1988 -- Mike Bidlo, Picasso's Women; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Jan. 9-30, 1988 -- Richard Artschwager, Drawings; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 9-30, 1988 -- Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 6-27, 1988 -- Hanne Darboven; 142 Greene St

Feb. 6-27, 1988 -- Paul Waldman; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Feb. 6-27, 1988 -- Cletus Johnson; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 5-12, 1988 -- School of Visual Arts Alumni Show, 1977-87; 142 Greene St

Mar. 5-26, 1988 -- Nassos Daphnis; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 26 - Apr. 16, 1988 -- Chryssa, Cityscapes 1980-88; 142 Greene St

Apr. 2-23, 1988 -- Gerard Garouste; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 23 - May 14, 1988 -- James Rosenquist; 142 Greene St

Apr. 30 - May 21, 1988 -- Robert Therrien; 420 W Broadway

May [28] - June 18, 1988 -- Richard Artschwager, His Peers and Persuasions, 1963-1988; 142 Greene St

May 28 - July 31, 1988 -- Frank O. Gehry, Furniture; 420 W Broadway

May 28 - July 31, 1988 -- Edward Ruscha, Drawings; 420 W Broadway

1988-1989 SeasonSept. 17 - Oct. 15, 1988 -- Joseph Kosuth; 578 Broadway

Sept. 17 - Oct. 22, 1988 -- The Last Show: Kelly, Lichtenstein, Serra, Stella; 142 Greene St

Sept. 24 - Oct. 15, 1988 -- Mike and Doug Starn; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 5 - Nov. 12, 1988 -- Jasper Johns, Bruce Nauman, and David Salle; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 22 - Nov. 19, 1988 -- Robert Cumming (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Oct. 22 - Nov. 19, 1988 -- Bruce Nauman and Richard Serra; 578 Broadway

Nov. 19 - Dec. 22, 1988 -- Robert Therrien; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 8-30, 1988 -- Benefit for Foundation for Contemporary Performing Arts, Inc.; 420 W Broadway

Circa 1989 -- Castelli Graphics 1969-1989 (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 7-28, 1989 -- Keith Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 7-28, 1989 -- Robert Barry; 578 Broadway

Feb. 4-25, 1989 -- Richard Artschwager; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 4-25, 1989 -- David Lynch; 578 Broadway

Mar. 4-25, 1989 -- James Rosenquist, Joseph Kosuth, and Meyer Vaisman; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 4-25, 1989 -- Dianne Blell; 578 Broadway

Apr. 1-22, 1989 -- James Brown; 578 Broadway

Apr. 1-29, 1989 -- Dan Flavin, To the Citizens of the Republic of France on the 200th Anniversary of their Revolution; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 8 - May 13, 1989 -- Walter De Maria; 65 Thompson

May 6-27, 1989 -- Edward Ruscha; 420 W Broadway (front room)

May 6-27, 1989 -- Charles Simonds, Wall Smears and Rocks; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

May 19 - July 1, 1989 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Bronze Sculpture 1976-1989; 65 Thompson

May 20 - June 10, 1989 -- Dan Flavin; 578 Broadway

June 3-24, 1989 -- Summer Group Show: Artschwager, Johns, Kosuth, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Sonnier, Starn Twins; 420 W Broadway (front room)

June 3-24, 1989 -- Mike and Doug Starn; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

1989-1990 SeasonSept. 16 - Oct. 14, 1989 -- Lewis Baltz (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Sept. 23 - Oct. 14, 1989 -- Richard Serra, 8 Drawings: Weights and Measures; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 14 - Nov. 30, 1989 -- Dan Flavin, (To Sabine) Fall, 1989; 65 Thompson

Oct. 21 - Nov. 11, 1989 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Reflections; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 21 - Nov. 11, 1989 -- Group Drawing Show: Artschwager, Barry, Brown, Flavin, Johns, Kelly, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Starn Twins, Therrien, Vaisman, Weiner; 578 Broadway

Nov. 18 - Dec. 21, 1989 -- Miquel Barceló, Paintings; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 18 - Dec. 21, 1989 -- Miquel Barceló, Drawings from Mali; 578 Broadway

Nov. 18 - Dec. 21, 1989 -- Recent Prints (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Dec. 1, 1989 - Feb. 24, 1990 -- Dan Flavin, (To Sabine) Winter, 1989; 65 Thompson

Jan. 6-27, 1990 -- Roni Horn, Thicket No. 1; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 6-27, 1990 -- Hanne Darboven, Requiem For M. Oppenheimer; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Jan. 6-27, 1990 -- The 60's Revisited: New Concepts/New Materials; 578 Broadway

Jan. 6-27, 1990 -- Edward Ruscha, Selected Portfolios (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Feb. 3-24, 1990 -- Nassos Daphnis, Thirty Years With Leo Castelli; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Feb. 3-24, 1990 -- Robert Therrien; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Feb. 3-24, 1990 -- Douglas Huebler; 578 Broadway

Feb. 3-24, 1990 -- Robert Petersen, Selected Works (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Mar. 3-24, 1990 -- Bruce Nauman; 65 Thompson

Mar. 3-31, 1990 -- Bruce Nauman; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 3-31, 1990 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Portraits: Recent Prints from Gemini G.E.L. (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Mar. 3-31, 1990 -- Bernar Venet, Drawings Scale: 1 (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Apr. 1990 -- John Gutmann, Talking Picture; 578 Broadway

Apr. 7-28, 1990 -- Robert Morris; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 7-28, 1990 -- Taking the Picture: Photography and Appropriation; 578 Broadway

Apr. 7 - May 12, 1990 -- Hiroshi Teshigahara, Echizen Ware; 65 Thompson

May 5-26, 1990 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Currents '70 (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

May 5 - June 2, 1990 -- Jan Dibbets; 420 W Broadway

May 12 - July 28, 1990 -- Ellsworth Kelly; 65 Thompson

June 9 - Sept. 15, 1990 -- Group Exhibition of Gallery Artists: Artschwager, Johns, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Sonnier, Starn Twins, Stella, Vaisman, van Bruggen, Weiner; 420 W Broadway

1990-1991 SeasonSept. 22 - Oct. 13, 1990 -- Robert Barry; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 22 - Oct. 13, 1990 -- David Salle, Recent Prints (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Oct. 20 - Nov. 17, 1990 -- James Rosenquist; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 20 - Nov. 17, 1990 -- Cletus Johnson; 578 Broadway

Oct. 20 - Nov. 17, 1990 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Reflections Series (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Nov. 27, 1990 - Jan. 12, 1991 -- Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 27, 1990 - Jan. 12, 1991 -- Claes Oldenburg, Works from Gemini G.E.L., 1988-1990 (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Nov. 27, 1990 - Jan. 12, 1991 -- Robert Watts; 578 Broadway

Dec. 8, 1990 - Feb. 9, 1991 -- Frank Stella, New Work; 65 Thompson

Jan. 19 - Feb. 9, 1991 -- Lawrence Weiner; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 19 - Feb. 9, 1991 -- Chryssa; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Jan. 19 - Feb. 9, 1991 -- Lewis Baltz, Rule without Exception (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Jan. 19 - Feb. 9, 1991 -- Hanne Darboven, Urzeit; 578 Broadway

Feb. 16 - Mar. 9, 1991 -- Jasper Johns; 420 W Broadway

[Feb. 16 - Mar. 9, 1991] -- [Robert Cumming; 578 Broadway]

Mar. 9 - Apr. 6, 1991 -- Robert Morris; 65 Thompson

Mar. 16 - Apr. 6, 1991 -- Richard Artschwager; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 16 - Apr. 6, 1991 -- James Brown, Prints (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Apr. 13 - May 4, 1991 -- Bertrand Lavier; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 13 - May 4, 1991 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Interior Series (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Apr. 13 - May 11, 1991 -- Group Drawing Show: Janie Lee Master Drawings; 65 Thompson

May 11-25, 1991 -- Edward Ruscha, Prints; 578 Broadway

May 11 - June 1, 1991 -- Edward Ruscha; 420 W Broadway

[May 11 - June 1, 1991] -- [Charles Simonds; 420 W Broadway (middle room)]

May 21 - [June 22], 1991 -- Robert Therrien; 65 Thompson

June 1-22, 1991 -- Charles Gaines; 578 Broadway

June 5-22, 1991 -- Group Drawings Exhibition; 578 Broadway

[July 16 - Nov. 9], 1991 -- Frank Stella; 65 Thompson

Summer 1991 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Flavin, Johns, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Nauman, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Starn Twins, Stella, Therrien, Vaisman, Warhol, Weiner; 420 W Broadway

1991-1992 SeasonSept. 21 - Oct. 12, 1991 -- Dianne Blell, Wild Lives, Photographic Portraits Documenting Africa's Vanishing Wildlife; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 21 - Oct. 12, 1991 -- Group Exhibition: Johns, Kelly, Lavier, Lichtenstein, Starn Twins, Stella, Ruscha; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Oct. 19 - Nov. 16, 1991 -- Paul Waldman; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 26 - Nov. 30, 1991 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Print Survey in Themes, 1952-1992; 578 Broadway

Nov. 23 - Dec. 14, 1991 -- Jean-Pierre Raynaud; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 14, 1991 - Feb. 1, 1992 -- Group Exhibition, Large Scale Prints: Kosuth, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Serra, Starn Twins; 578 Broadway

Jan. 4-25, 1992 -- Pruitt-Early; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 1-29, 1992 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Interiors; 65 Thompson

Feb. 1-29, 1992 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Interiors; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 1-29, 1992 -- Leo Castelli XXXV Anniversary, Installation; 578 Broadway

Feb. 8-29, 1992 -- Salvatore Scarpitta, Early Works; 578 Broadway

Mar. 7-28, 1992 -- Laura Grisi; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 7-28, 1992 -- Hans Namuth; 578 Broadway

[Apr. - July], 1992 -- Elyn Zimmerman, Portals and Passages; 65 Thompson

Apr. 4-25, 1992 -- Keith Sonnier; 65 Thompson

Apr. 4-25, 1992 -- Charles Simonds, Stugg. Thebb?The Singing Monkey, 1992; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 4-25, 1992 -- Keith Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 4-25, 1992 -- Keith Sonnier, Prints, Drawings and Multiples 1990-1992; 578 Broadway

May 2-23, 1992 -- Mike and Doug Starn; 420 W Broadway

May 9 - June 6, 1992 -- James Brown, Survey of Work 1986-1992; 578 Broadway

May 30 - June 13, 1992 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Flavin, Lichtenstein, Kosuth, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Warhol, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Starn Twins, Therrien; 420 W Broadway

June 6 - July 31, 1992 -- Group Exhibition, Drawings, Prints, Multiples, Photographs; 578 Broadway

June 23 - July 31, 1992 -- The Guggenheim in Europe: Architectural Models and Drawings; 420 W Broadway

Aug. 17 - Sept. 19, 1992 -- Summer Group Exhibition 1992, Part II: Artshwager, Lichtenstein, Kosuth, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Starn Twins, Therrien, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

1992-1993 SeasonSept. 19 - Oct. 24, 1992 -- Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, Robert Morris, Minimalist Works; 578 Broadway

Sept. 26 - Oct. 17, 1992 -- Meyer Vaisman, Turkey; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 26 - Nov. 7, 1992 -- Group Architecture Exhibition, Angels and Franciscans: Innovative Architecture from Los Angeles and San Francisco; 65 Thompson

Oct. 24 - Nov. 14, 1992 -- Miquel Barceló; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 31 - Dec. 5, 1992 -- Bruce Nauman, Richard Serra, Keith Sonnier, Post-Minimal Works; 578 Broadway

Nov. 14, 1992 - Jan. 9, 1993 -- Andrew Lord, Modelling: A Sculpture of 27 Pieces and Related Works; 65 Thompson

Nov. 21 - Dec. 19, 1992 -- Ellsworth Kelly; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Nov. 21 - Dec. 19, 1992 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Waterlilies; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Dec. 12, 1992 - Jan. 30, 1993 -- Group Sculpture Exhibit, Object Lessons; 578 Broadway

Jan. 9 - Feb. 6, 1993 -- Jasper Johns, 35 Years with Leo Castelli; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 16-23, 1993 -- Benefit for Cunningham Dance Foundation; 65 Thompson

Jan. 30 - Mar. 13, 1993 -- Richard Long; 65 Thompson

Feb. 6 - Mar. 6, 1993 -- Word Play: Darboven, Kosuth, Ruscha, Weiner; 578 Broadway

Feb. 13 - Mar. 13, 1993 -- Blind Color: Calle, Charlton, Klein, Manzoni, Rauschenberg, Richter, Rinehardt; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 13 - Mar. 13, 1993 -- Sophie Calle, Last Seen; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 20 - Apr. 17, 1993 -- Frank Stella and James Rosenquist, New Prints; 65 Thompson

Mar. 20 - Apr. 17, 1993 -- James Rosenquist; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 20 - Apr. 17, 1993 -- James Rosenquist, Prints from "Welcome to the Water Planet" and "House of Fire"; 578 Broadway

Mar. 20 - Apr. 17, 1993 -- Keith Sonnier, Robert Morris, and Robert Rauschenberg, Soft Ware; 578 Broadway

Apr. 24 - May 22, 1993 -- Hanne Darboven; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 24 - May 29, 1993 -- Group Exhibition, Graphic Works; 578 Broadway

May 15 - July 31, 1993 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Long, Lord, Morris, Rauschenberg, Sonnier, Stella; 65 Thompson

May 29 - Oct. 2, 1993 -- British and American Sculpture: Cragg, Deacon, Kapoor, Long, Kelly, Nauman, Serra, Stella; 420 W Broadway

June 5 - July 24, 1993 -- Group Exhibition, Faces and Figures; 578 Broadway

1993-1994 SeasonSept. 25 - Oct. 23, 1993 -- Robert Morris; 65 Thompson

Sept. 25 - Oct. 23, 1993 -- Robert Morris, Blind Time Drawings; 578 Broadway

Sept. 25 - Nov. 27, 1993 -- Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Kosuth, Morris, Ruscha, Starn Twins, Vaisman; 578 Broadway

Oct. 16 - Nov. 6, 1993 -- Joseph Kosuth, The Thing-in-itself is found in its Truth through the loss of its immediacy; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 30 - Nov. 27, 1993 -- Charles Simonds, Retrospective; 578 Broadway

Nov. 12 - Dec. 4, 1993 -- Robert Therrien; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 3, 1993 - Jan. 15, 1994 -- Frank Stella, Moby Dick Deckle Edges (New Prints from Tyler Graphics); 578 Broadway

Dec. 4, 1993 - Jan. 15, 1994 -- Andrew Lord; 578 Broadway

Dec. 9, 1993 - Jan. 8, 1994 -- Benefit for Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 22 - Feb. 19, 1994 -- Bruce Nauman, Falls, Pratfalls, and Sleights of Hand; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 22 - Mar. 5, 1994 -- Robert Morris; 578 Broadway

Jan. 22 - Mar. 5, 1994 -- Bruce Nauman, Prints and Drawings; 578 Broadway

Feb. 26 - Apr. 2, 1994 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Scores (Off Kilter Keys); 65 Thompson

Feb. 26 - Apr. 2, 1994 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Scores (Off Kilter Keys); 420 W Broadway

Mar. 12 - Apr. 2, 1994 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, Inside the New York Art World; 578 Broadway

Mar. 12 - Apr. 2, 1994 -- Group Exhibition: Lord, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Starn Twins, Stella, Therrien; 578 Broadway

Apr. 9 - May 7, 1994 -- Mike and Doug Starn, Spectroheliographs; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 9 - May 14, 1994 -- Lee Bontecou, Edward Higgins, and Robert Moskowitz, Sculpture and Painting from the Early 1960's; 578 Broadway

Apr. 30 - June 18, 1994 -- Sandro Chia, New Paintings; 65 Thompson

May 17 - June 11, 1994 -- Hannah Collins, Signs of Life; 420 W Broadway

May 21 - June 25, 1994 -- Jasper Johns, The Prints of Jasper John 1960-1993; 578 Broadway

June 18 - Sept. 10, 1994 -- Summer Group Exhibition; 420 W Broadway

July 5 - Oct. 8, 1994 -- Group Sculpture Exhibition, Major Works: Artschwager, Judd, Flavin, Lichtenstein, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Starn, Therrien; 578 Broadway

1994-1995 SeasonSept. 17 - Oct. 8, 1994 -- Richard Meier, Sculpture; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 8 - Nov. 12, 1994 -- Dan Flavin, Selected Works 1969-1990; 578 Broadway

Oct. 15 - Nov. 12, 1994 -- James Rosenquist; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 19 - Dec. 17, 1994 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Nudes; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 19 - Dec. 23, 1994 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Nudes: 9 Color Relief Prints; PACT 95 International America's Cup Class Yacht; 578 Broadway

Jan. 7-28, 1995 -- Lawrence Wiener, Stones + Stones + Stones; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 14 - Feb. 11, 1995 -- Robert Morris, Malaprops; The Fallen and the Saved; 578 Broadway

Feb. 4-25, 1995 -- James Brown; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 18 - Mar. 18, 1995 -- Richard Artshwager, Robert Therrien, and Edward Ruscha; 578 Broadway

Mar. 4-25, 1995 -- Kenneth Noland; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 25 - Apr. 29, 1995 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Tribute 21; 578 Broadway

Apr. 1-22, 1995 -- Hannah Collins; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 1-22, 1995 -- Edward Ruscha, Anamorphic Paintings; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 29 - May 20, 1995 -- Miquel Barceló; 420 W Broadway

May 6 - June 2, 1995 -- New Editions: Johns, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Ruscha; 578 Broadway

May 31 - June 30, 1995 -- Barbara Bloom, Pictures from the Floating World; 420 W Broadway

June 10 - July 8, 1995 -- Frank Stella, Imaginary Places (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

June 10 - July 8, 1995 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Collins, Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Vaisman; 578 Broadway

July 11 - Sept. 1, 1995 -- Summer Group Exhibition; 420 W Broadway

1995-1996 SeasonSept. 16 - Oct. 14, 1995 -- Group Sculpture Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Serra; 578 Broadway

Sept. 16 - Oct. 14, 1995 -- Edward Ruscha, Sayings, Puddinhead Wilson; 578 Broadway

Sept. 18 - Oct. 7, 1995 -- Hanne Darboven, South Korean Calendar; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 14 - Nov. 4, 1995 -- Nassos Daphnis, Energies in Outer Space; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 21 - Nov. 18, 1995 -- Joseph Kosuth, Editions The Past 10 Years; 578 Broadway

Nov. 11 - Dec. 16, 1995 -- Frank Stella, Free Standing Murals; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 2, 1995 - Jan. 13, 1996 -- Frank Stella, Editions; 578 Broadway

Jan. 13 - Feb. 3, 1996 -- Paul Waldman; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 30 - Feb. 10, 1996 -- Bailey House Auction; 578 Broadway

Feb. 10 - Mar. 9, 1996 -- Group Exhibition, New Works by Gallery Artists: Johns, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Sonnier, Stella, Therrien; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 17 - Mar. 16, 1996 -- Collage - Gallery Artists: Brown, Darboven, Lichtenstein, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Starn Twins, Therrien, Vaisman; 578 Broadway

Mar. 16 - Apr. 13, 1996 -- Robert Therrien; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 23 - Apr. 20, 1996 -- Photography: Calle, Collins, Kosuth, Ruscha, Starn Twins, Therrien; 578 Broadway

Apr. 20 - May 18, 1996 -- James Rosenquist, Horizon Home Sweet Home; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 20 - May 24, 1996 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Eight New Prints; 578 Broadway

May 28 - July 26, 1996 -- Ralph Gibson, Infanta; 420 W Broadway

May 28 - July 26, 1996 -- Group Drawing Exhibition, Works on Paper: Chryssa, Daphnis, Darboven, Johns, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Serra, Stella, Sonnier, Therrien, Weiner; 420 W Broadway

June 1 - July 26, 1996 -- Summer Group Show: Johns, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Ruscha, Stella, Therrien; 578 Broadway

1996-1997 SeasonSept. 14 - Oct. 12, 1996 -- Gianfranco Gorgoni, 25 Years of Artists Portraits; 578 Broadway

Sept. 14 - Oct. 12, 1996 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Prints; 578 Broadway

Sept. 28 - Oct. 26, 1996 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Landscapes in the Chinese Style; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 19 - Dec. 14, 1996 -- Jasper Johns, Prints 1960-1996 (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Nov. 2 - Dec. 14, 1996 -- Bruce Nauman, Bronze Heads and End of the World; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 11 - Feb. 8, 1997 -- Robert Morris, Horizons Cut Between Clio and Mnemosyne; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 18 - Feb. 22, 1997 -- Robert Therrien, Drawings; 578 Broadway

Jan. 18 - Feb. 22, 1997 -- Andy Warhol, Prints; 578 Broadway

Feb. 15 - Mar. 15, 1997 -- Lawrence Weiner, Then Now + Then; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 1-22, 1997 -- Dan Flavin; 578 Broadway

Mar. 22 - Apr. 26, 1997 -- Keith Sonnier, Alternating Currents; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 29 - Apr. 5, 1997 -- The Printmaking Workshop Benefit Exhibition and Auction; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 17 - May 17, 1997 -- Columbia University MFA Exhibition; 420 W Broadway

May 3 - June 7, 1997 -- Edward Ruscha, Cityscapes and "O" Books; 420 W Broadway

July - Sept., 1997 -- Summer Group Show: Kosuth, Morris, Serra; 420 W Broadway

1997-1998 SeasonSept. 27 - Oct. 18, 1997 -- Joseph Kosuth; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 25 - Nov. 15, 1997 -- 40 Years of Exploration and Innovation Part 1: Bontecou, Chryssa, Cornell, Johns, Lichtenstein, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Twombly, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 22 - Dec. 13, 1997 -- 40 Years of Exploration and Innovation Part 2: Daphnis, Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Morris, Serra, Stella, Therrien, Waldman; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 10-31, 1998 -- 40 Years of Exploration and Innovation Part 3: Barry, Darboven, Dibbets, Grisi, Huebler, Kosuth, Nauman, Scarpitta, Sonnier, Starn Twins, Weiner; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 7 - Mar. 14, 1998 -- Dan Flavin, Some Drawings and Installations of Fluorescent Light; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 28 - Apr. 25, 1998 -- Hannah Collins, True Stories; 420 W Broadway

May 2 - June 6, 1998 -- Mike and Doug Starn, Black Hole Sun Burned; 420 W Broadway

June 24 - Aug. 29, 1998 -- Summer Show; 420 W Broadway

1998-1999 SeasonSept. 26 - Oct. 31, 1998 -- Robert Morris, The Rationed Years; 420 W Broadway

Nov. - Dec., 1998 -- Joseph Kosuth, Richard Serra, Keith Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

Jan. - Feb. 1999 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Arcadian Survey; 420 W Broadway
Related Material:
Available in the Archives of America Art are three oral history interviews with Leo Castelli. Paul Cummings interviewed Castelli between May 14, 1969 and June 8, 1973; Barbara Rose in July, 1969; and Andrew Decker on May 22, 1997.
Separated Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds items lent for microfilming (reel N68) including printed material. Lent material was returned to the lender and is not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
Leo Castelli loaned printed material for microfilming in 1968. Leo Castelli's wife, Barbara Bortuzzo Castelli, and his children, Nina Castelli Sundell and Jean-Christophe Castelli, donated the Leo Castelli Gallery records to the Archives of American Art in 2007.
Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- History -- New York (State)New York  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- History -- New York (State)New York  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State)
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Video recordings
Sketches
Transcripts
Sound recordings
Notes
Visitors' books
Photographs
Notebooks
Awards
Citation:
Leo Castelli Gallery records, circa 1880-2000, bulk 1957-1999. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.leocast
See more items in:
Leo Castelli Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9a74e5e8f-9538-4152-8f10-6561763eb241
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-leocast
Online Media:

Western Union Telegraph Company Records

Creator:
United Telegraph Workers.  Search this
Western Union Telegraph Company  Search this
Extent:
452 Cubic feet (871 boxes and 23 map folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Administrative records
Articles
Books
Clippings
Contracts
Drawings
Photographs
Patents
Newsletters
Photograph albums
Scrapbooks
Specifications
Technical documents
Date:
circa 1820-1995
Summary:
The collection documents in photographs, scrapbooks, notebooks, correspondence, stock ledgers, annual reports, and financial records, the evolution of the telegraph, the development of the Western Union Telegraph Company, and the beginning of the communications revolution. The collection materials describe both the history of the company and of the telegraph industry in general, particularly its importance to the development of the technology in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The collection is useful for researchers interested in the development of technology, economic history, and the impact of technology on American social and cultural life.
Scope and Contents:
The collection is divided into twenty-six (26) series and consists of approximately 400 cubic feet. The collection documents in photographs, scrapbooks, notebooks, correspondence, stock ledgers, annual reports, and financial records, the evolution of the telegraph, the development of the Western Union Telegraph Company, and the beginning of the communications revolution. The collection materials describe both the history of the company and of the telegraph industry in general, particularly its importance to the development of the technology in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The collection is useful for researchers interested in the development of technology, economic history, and the impact of technology on American social and cultural life.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into twenty-seven series.

Series 1: Historical and Background Information, 1851-1994

Series 2: Subsidiaries of Western Union, 1844-1986

Series 3: Executive Records, 1848-1987

Series 4: Presidential Letterbooks and Writings, 1865-1911

Series 5: Correspondence, 1837-1985

Series 6: Cyrus W. Field Papers, 1840-1892

Series 7: Secretary's Files, 1844-1987

Series 8: Financial Records, 1859-1995

Series 9: Legal Records, 1867-1968

Series 10: Railroad Records, 1854-1945

Series 11: Law Department Records, 1868-1979

Series 12: Patent Materials, 1840-1970

Series 13: Operating Records, 1868-1970s

Series 14: Westar VI-S, 1974, 1983-1986

Series 15: Engineering Department Records, 1874-1970

Series 16: Plant Department Records, 1867-1937, 1963

Series 17: Superintendent of Supplies Records, 1888-1948

Series 18: Employee/Personnel Records 1852-1985

Series 19: Public Relations Department Records, 1858-1980

Series 20: Western Union Museum, 1913-1971

Series 21: Maps, 1820-1964

Series 22: Telegrams, 1852-1960s

Series 23: Photographs, circa 1870-1980

Series 24: Scrapbooks, 1835-1956

Series 25: Notebooks, 1880-1942

Series 26: Audio Visual Materials, 1925-1994

Series 27: Addenda
Biographical / Historical:
In 1832 Samuel F. B. Morse, assisted by Alfred Vail, conceived of the idea for an electromechanical telegraph, which he called the "Recording Telegraph." This commercial application of electricity was made tangible by their construction of a crude working model in 1835-36. This instrument probably was never used outside of Professor Morse's rooms where it was, however, operated in a number of demonstrations. This original telegraph instrument was in the hands of the Western Union Telegraph Company and had been kept carefully over the years in a glass case. It was moved several times in New York as the Western Union headquarters building changed location over the years. The company presented it to the Smithsonian Institution in 1950.

The telegraph was further refined by Morse, Vail, and a colleague, Leonard Gale, into working mechanical form in 1837. In this year Morse filed a caveat for it at the U.S. Patent Office. Electricity, provided by Joseph Henry's 1836 "intensity batteries", was sent over a wire. The flow of electricity through the wire was interrupted for shorter or longer periods by holding down the key of the device. The resulting dots or dashes were recorded on a printer or could be interpreted orally. In 1838 Morse perfected his sending and receiving code and organized a corporation, making Vail and Gale his partners.

In 1843 Morse received funds from Congress to set-up a demonstration line between Washington and Baltimore. Unfortunately, Morse was not an astute businessman and had no practical plan for constructing a line. After an unsuccessful attempt at laying underground cables with Ezra Cornell, the inventor of a trench digger, Morse switched to the erection of telegraph poles and was more successful. On May 24, 1844, Morse, in the U.S. Supreme Court Chambers in Washington, sent by telegraph the oft-quoted message to his colleague Vail in Baltimore, "What hath God wrought!"

In 1845 Morse hired Andrew Jackson's former postmaster general, Amos Kendall, as his agent in locating potential buyers of the telegraph. Kendall realized the value of the device, and had little trouble convincing others of its potential for profit. By the spring he had attracted a small group of investors. They subscribed $15,000 and formed the Magnetic Telegraph Company. Many new telegraph companies were formed as Morse sold licenses wherever he could.

The first commercial telegraph line was completed between Washington, D.C., and New York City in the spring of 1846 by the Magnetic Telegraph Company. Shortly thereafter, F. O. J. Smith, one of the patent owners, built a line between New York City and Boston. Most of these early companies were licensed by owners of Samuel Morse patents. The Morse messages were sent and received in a code of dots and dashes.

At this time other telegraph systems based on rival technologies were being built. Some companies used the printing telegraph, a device invented by a Vermonter, Royal E. House, whose messages were printed on paper or tape in Roman letters. In 1848 a Scotch scientist, Alexander Bain, received his patents on a telegraph. These were but two of many competing and incompatible technologies that had developed. The result was confusion, inefficiency, and a rash of suits and counter suits.

By 1851 there were over fifty separate telegraph companies operating in the United States. This corporate cornucopia developed because the owners of the telegraph patents had been unsuccessful in convincing the United States and other governments of the invention's potential usefulness. In the private sector, the owners had difficulty convincing capitalists of the commercial value of the invention. This led to the owners' willingness to sell licenses to many purchasers who organized separate companies and then built independent telegraph lines in various sections of the country.

Hiram Sibley moved to Rochester, New York, in 1838 to pursue banking and real estate. Later he was elected sheriff of Monroe County. In Rochester he was introduced to Judge Samuel L. Selden who held the House Telegraph patent rights. In 1849 Selden and Sibley organized the New York State Printing Telegraph Company, but they found it hard to compete with the existing New York, Albany, and Buffalo Telegraph Company.

After this experience Selden suggested that instead of creating a new line, the two should try to acquire all the companies west of Buffalo and unite them into a single unified system. Selden secured an agency for the extension throughout the United States of the House system. In an effort to expand this line west, Judge Selden called on friends and the people in Rochester. This led, in April 1851, to the organization of a company and the filing in Albany of the Articles of Association for the "New York and Mississippi Valley Printing Telegraph Company" (NYMVPTC), a company which later evolved into the Western Union Telegraph Company.

In 1854 there were two rival systems of the NYMVPTC in the West. These two systems consisted of thirteen separate companies. All the companies were using Morse patents in the five states north of the Ohio River. This created a struggle between three separate entities, leading to an unreliable and inefficient telegraph service. The owners of these rival companies eventually decided to invest their money elsewhere and arrangements were made for the NYMVPTC to purchase their interests.

Hiram Sibley recapitalized the company in 1854 under the same name and began a program of construction and acquisition. The most important takeover was carried out by Sibley when he negotiated the purchase of the Morse patent rights for the Midwest for $50,000 from Jeptha H. Wade and John J. Speed, without the knowledge of Ezra Cornell, their partner in the Erie and Michigan Telegraph Company (EMTC). With this acquisition Sibley proceeded to switch to the superior Morse system. He also hired Wade, a very capable manager, who became his protege and later his successor. After a bitter struggle Morse and Wade obtained the EMTC from Cornell in 1855, thus assuring dominance by the NYMVPTC in the Midwest. In 1856 the company name was changed to the "Western Union Telegraph Company," indicating the union of the Western lines into one compact system. In December, 1857, the Company paid stockholders their first dividend.

Between 1857 and 1861 similar consolidations of telegraph companies took place in other areas of the country so that most of the telegraph interests of the United States had merged into six systems. These were the American Telegraph Company (covering the Atlantic and some Gulf states), The Western Union Telegraph Company (covering states North of the Ohio River and parts of Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, and Minnesota), the New York Albany and Buffalo Electro-Magnetic Telegraph Company (covering New York State), the Atlantic and Ohio Telegraph Company (covering Pennsylvania), the Illinois & Mississippi Telegraph Company (covering sections of Missouri, Iowa, and Illinois), and the New Orleans & Ohio Telegraph Company (covering the southern Mississippi Valley and the Southwest). All these companies worked together in a mutually friendly alliance, and other small companies cooperated with the six systems, particularly some on the West Coast.

By the time of the Civil War, there was a strong commercial incentive to construct a telegraph line across the western plains to link the two coasts of America. Many companies, however, believed the line would be impossible to build and maintain.

In 1860 Congress passed, and President James Buchanan signed, the Pacific Telegraph Act, which authorized the Secretary of the Treasury to seek bids for a project to construct a transcontinental line. When two bidders dropped out, Hiram Sibley, representing Western Union, was the only bidder left. By default Sibley won the contract. The Pacific Telegraph Company was organized for the purpose of building the eastern section of the line. Sibley sent Wade to California, where he consolidated the small local companies into the California State Telegraph Company. This entity then organized the Overland Telegraph Company, which handled construction eastward from Carson City, Nevada, joining the existing California lines, to Salt Lake City, Utah. Sibley's Pacific Telegraph Company built westward from Omaha, Nebraska. Sibley put most of his resources into the venture. The line was completed in October, 1861. Both companies were soon merged into Western Union. This accomplishment made Hiram Sibley leader of the telegraph industry.

Further consolidations took place over the next several years. Many companies merged into the American Telegraph Company. With the expiration of the Morse patents, several organizations were combined in 1864 under the name of "The U.S. Telegraph Company." In 1866 the final consolidation took place, with Western Union exchanging stock for the stock of the other two organizations. The general office of Western Union moved at this time from Rochester to 145 Broadway, New York City. In 1875 the main office moved to 195 Broadway, where it remained until 1930 when it relocated to 60 Hudson Street.

In 1873 Western Union purchased a majority of shares in the International Ocean Telegraph Company. This was an important move because it marked Western Union's entry into the foreign telegraph market. Having previously worked with foreign companies, Western Union now began competing for overseas business.

In the late 1870s Western Union, led by William H. Vanderbilt, attempted to wrest control of the major telephone patents, and the new telephone industry, away from the Bell Telephone Company. But due to new Bell leadership and a subsequent hostile takeover attempt of Western Union by Jay Gould, Western Union discontinued its fight and Bell Telephone prevailed.

Despite these corporate calisthenics, Western Union remained in the public eye. The sight of a uniformed Western Union messenger boy was familiar in small towns and big cities all over the country for many years. Some of Western Union's top officials in fact began their careers as messenger boys.

Throughout the remainder of the nineteenth century the telegraph became one of the most important factors in the development of social and commercial life of America. In spite of improvements to the telegraph, however, two new inventions--the telephone (nineteenth century) and the radio (twentieth century)--eventually replaced the telegraph as the leaders of the communication revolution for most Americans.

At the turn of the century, Bell abandoned its struggles to maintain a monopoly through patent suits, and entered into direct competition with the many independent telephone companies. Around this time, the company adopted its new name, the American Telephone and Telegraph Company (AT&T).

In 1908 AT&T gained control of Western Union. This proved beneficial to Western Union, because the companies were able to share lines when needed, and it became possible to order telegrams by telephone. However, it was only possible to order Western Union telegrams, and this hurt the business of Western Union's main competitor, the Postal Telegraph Company. In 1913, however, as part of a move to prevent the government from invoking antitrust laws, AT&T completely separated itself from Western Union.

Western Union continued to prosper and it received commendations from the U.S. armed forces for service during both world wars. In 1945 Western Union finally merged with its longtime rival, the Postal Telegraph Company. As part of that merger, Western Union agreed to separate domestic and foreign business. In 1963 Western Union International Incorporated, a private company completely separate from the Western Union Telegraph Company, was formed and an agreement with the Postal Telegraph Company was completed. In 1994, Western Union Financial Services, Inc. was acquired by First Financial Management Corporation. In 1995, First Financial Management Corporation merged with First Data Corporation making Western Union a First Data subsidiary.

Many technological advancements followed the telegraph's development. The following are among the more important:

The first advancement of the telegraph occurred around 1850 when operators realized that the clicks of the recording instrument portrayed a sound pattern, understandable by the operators as dots and dashes. This allowed the operator to hear the message by ear and simultaneously write it down. This ability transformed the telegraph into a versatile and speedy system.

Duplex Telegraphy, 1871-72, was invented by the president of the Franklin Telegraph Company. Unable to sell his invention to his own company, he found a willing buyer in Western Union. Utilizing this invention, two messages were sent over the wire simultaneously, one in each direction.

As business blossomed and demand surged, new devices appeared. Thomas Edison's Quadruplex allowed four messages to be sent over the same wire simultaneously, two in one direction and two in the other.

An English automatic signaling arrangement, Wheatstone's Automatic Telegraph, 1883, allowed larger numbers of words to be transmitted over a wire at once. It could only be used advantageously, however, on circuits where there was a heavy volume of business.

Buckingham's Machine Telegraph was an improvement on the House system. It printed received messages in plain Roman letters quickly and legibly on a message blank, ready for delivery.

Vibroplex, c. 1890, a semi-automatic key sometimes called a "bug key," made the dots automatically. This relieved the operator of much physical strain.
Related Materials:
Materials in the Archives Center

Additional moving image about Western Union Telegraph Company can be found in the Industry on Parade Collection (AC0507). This includes Cable to Cuba! by Bell Laboratory, AT & T, featuring the cable ship, the C.S. Lord Kelvin, and Communications Centennial! by the Western Union Company.

Materials at Other Organizations

Hagley Museum and Library, Wilmington, Delaware.

Western Union International Records form part of the MCI International, Inc. Records at the First Data Corporation, Greenwood Village, Colorado.

Records of First Data Corporation and its predecessors, including Western Union, First Financial Management Corporation (Atlanta) and First Data Resources (Omaha). Western Union collection supports research of telegraphy and related technologies, and includes company records, annual reports, photographs, print and broadcast advertising, telegraph equipment, and messenger uniforms.

Smithsonian Institution Archives

Western Union Telegraph Expedition, 1865-1867

This collection includes correspondence, mostly to Spencer F. Baird, from members of the Scientific Corps of the Western Union Telegraph Expedition, including Kennicott, Dall, Bannister, and Elliott; copies of reports submitted to divisional chiefs from expedition staff members; newspaper clippings concerning the expedition; copies of notes on natural history taken by Robert Kennicott; and a journal containing meteorological data recorded by Henry M. Bannister from March to August, 1866.
Separated Materials:
Artifacts (apparatus and equipment) were donated to the Division of Information Technology and Society, now known as the Division of Work & Industry, National Museum of American History.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Western Union in September of 1971.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but Series 11 and films are stored off-site. Special arrangements must be made to view some of the audiovisual materials. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Communications equipment  Search this
Communication -- International cooperation  Search this
Electric engineering  Search this
Electric engineers  Search this
Electrical equipment  Search this
Electrical science and technology  Search this
Telegraphers  Search this
Telegraph  Search this
Genre/Form:
Administrative records
Articles
Books
Clippings
Contracts
Drawings
Photographs -- 19th century
Patents
Photographs -- 20th century
Newsletters
Photograph albums
Scrapbooks -- 19th century
Scrapbooks -- 20th century
Specifications
Technical documents
Citation:
Western Union Telegraph Company Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0205
See more items in:
Western Union Telegraph Company Records
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8b72e8493-288c-4bd0-84d5-011155da30a7
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0205
Online Media:

George H. Clark Radioana Collection

Creator:
Clark, George Howard, 1881-1956  Search this
Names:
American Marconi Company.  Search this
Radio Corporation of America.  Search this
Former owner:
National Museum of American History (U.S.). Division of Electricity and Modern Physics  Search this
Extent:
220 Cubic feet (534 boxes, 25 map-folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Technical manuals
Clippings
Patents
Correspondence
Blueprints
Letters patent
Photographs
Sale catalogs
Technical drawings
Date:
circa 1880-1950
Summary:
The collection forms a documentary record of over half a century of the history of radio, with the greatest emphasis on the period 1900-1935. The collection includes materials that span the entire history of the growth of the radio industry. It is useful for those historians and other researchers interested in technological development, economic history, and the impact of applications of technology on American life.
Scope and Contents:
The materials accumulated in this collection represent the overriding collecting passion of one individual, George H. Clark. The collection forms a documentary record of over half a century of the history of radio, with the greatest emphasis on the period 1900-1935.

The collection includes materials that span the entire history of the growth of the radio industry. It is useful for those historians and other researchers interested in technological development, economic history, and the impact of applications of technology on American life.

In particular, the collection is rich in biographical information on the men who developed the technical aspects of radio and the industry; information on the inception, growth, and activities of radio companies, most notably the National Electric Signaling Company and RCA; and in photographs of all aspects of Radioana.

While most materials document technical aspects of radio, there is much information (e.g. Series 109, 134) on broadcasting and on the early history of television.

The collection, housed in over 700 boxes (about 276 linear feet), was organized into 259 numbered "classes" or series by Clark. Sixty series numbers were never used or were eliminated by Clark and combined with other series. The unused numbers are scattered throughout the filing system. The collection also includes material from series that were eliminated. These materials were never reclassified and are included as an unprocessed series at the end of the series descriptions. The collection also contains material that was never assigned a "class" designation by Clark (Lettered Series: D, E, F, G, H).

The arrangement of the collection is Clark's own; his adaptation of the Navy filing system he helped devise in 1915. Clark periodically revised the filing system and reclassified items within it.

Clark assigned class numbers to types of equipment (e.g. broadcast receivers), systems (impulse-excited transmitters and systems), scientific theories (circuit theory), and topics (company history, biography). Box 1 contains descriptions of the classification system.

When Clark classified an item and filed it he also assigned a serial number. This classification begins with 1 (or 1A) for the first item in the class and continues with successive numbers as items were added. As a consequence, the order of individual items within a series reflects the order in which Clark filed them, not any logical relationship between the items. Clark created cross references for items dealing with more than one subject by making notations on blank sheets of paper placed in related series.

Clark made cross references between series when there was no logical relationship between them; that is, when a person using the collection would not normally look in the series. For example no cross reference would be made of an engineer from series 87 (portraits) to series 4 (biography), but one would be made from series 87 to series 142 (history of television) if the item showed the engineer, say, working on a television installation.

Clark created the insignia "SRM" as the sign on the bottom of all sheets of paper numbered by him for binding. SRM stood for Smithsonian Radio Museum. This replaced the earlier though not greatly used sign "CGM." For a time about 1930, the class number on each sheet was preceded by these: "C.G.M.", for Clark, Martin, and Goldsmith, the earliest contributors to what would become the Clark Radioana Collection. After about 1933-34 Clark used C.W.C. for Clark Wireless Collection.

There are many photographs located in most series throughout the collection. But there are also three exclusive photographic series. Lettered series A, B, C. See index; and also series descriptions under lettered series.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into 223 series.

Numbered Series 1-233:

Series 1, Library Operating System, 1915-1950

Series 2, Apparatus Type Numbers, 1916-1931

Series 3, Photographic Lists, 1925-1928

Series 4, Biographies of Radio Personages, Technical Index to Correspondents in Series 4

Series 5, History of Radio Companies, 1895-1950

De Forest Radio Company, 1905-1930s

Jenkins Televsion Corporation, 1924-1931

Marconi Wireless Telegraph Company, 1908-1929

National Electric Signaling Company, 1896-1941

Wireless Specialty Apparatus Company, 1906-1929

Radio Corporation of America, 1895-1950

Series 6, Shore Stations, 1900-1940

Series 7, Marine Stations, 1900-1930s

Series 8, Broadcasting Stations, 1910s-1940s

Series 9, Amateur Stations, 1910s-1940s

Series 10, Miscellaneous Information, 1911-1914

Series 11, Radio Antiques, 1921-1938

Series 13, Specifications of Radio Apparatus, 1910s-1930s

Series 14, General History, 1899-1950s

Series 15, Radio Companies Catalogues & Bound Advertisements, 1873-1941

Series 16, Log Books, 1902-1923

Series 17, Radio Companies' House Organs, 1896-1942

Series 18, Prime Movers, 1904-1911

Series 19, Batteries, 1898-1934

Series 20, Rectifiers, 1875-1935

Series 21, Motor Generators, 1898-1936

Series 22, Nameplates of Apparatus, 1928

Series 23, Switchboards and Switchboard Instruments, 1910-1935

Series 24, Radio Frequency Switches, 1905-1905-1933

Series 25, Transmitter Transformers, 1893-1949

Series 26, Operating Keys, 1843-1949

Series 27, Power Type Interrupters, 1902-1938

Series 28, Protective Devices, 1910-1925

Series 30, Message Blanks, 1908-1938

Series 31, Transmitter Condensers, 1849-1943

Series 32, Spark Gaps, 1905-1913

Series 33, Transmitter Inductances, 1907-1922

Series 34, Transmitter Wave Changers, 1907-1924

Series 37, ARC Transmitters, 1907-1940

Series 38, Vacuum Tube Type of Radio Transmitter, 1914-1947

Series 39, Radio Transmitter, Radio-Frequency, Alternator Type, 1894-1940

Series 41, Vacuum Tubes, Transmitting Type, 1905-1948

Series 43, Receiving Systems, 1904-1934

Series 45, Broadcast Receivers, 1907-1948

Series 46, Code Receivers, 1902-1948

Series 47, Receiving Inductances, 1898-1944

Series 48, Receiving Condensers, 1871-1946

Series 49, Audio Signal Devices, 1876-1947

Series 50, Detectors, 1878-1944

Series 51, Amplifiers, 1903-1949

Series 52, Receiving Vacuum Tubes, 1905-1949

Series 53, Television Receivers, 1928-1948

Series 54, Photo-Radio Apparatus, 1910-1947

Series 59, Radio Schools, 1902-1945

Series 60, Loudspeakers, 1896-1946

Series 61, Insulators, 1844-1943

Series 62, Wires, 1906-1945

Series 63, Microphones, 1911-1947

Series 64, Biography, 1925-1948

Series 66, Antennas, 1877-1949

Series 67, Telautomatics, 1912-1944

Series 69, Direction Finding Equipment, Radio Compasses, 1885-1948

Series 71, Aircraft Transmitters, 1908-1947

Series 72, Field or Portables Transmitters, 1901-1941

Series 73, Mobile Radio Systems, 1884-1946

Series 74, Radio Frequency Measuring Instruments, 1903-1946

Series 75, Laboratory Testing Methods and Systems, 1891-1945

Series 76, Aircraft Receivers, 1917-1941

Series 77, Field Portable Receivers, 1906-1922

Series 78, Spark Transmitter Assembly, 1909-1940

Series 79, Spark Transmitter System, 1900-1945

Series 82, Firsts in Radio, undated

Series 85: Distance Records and Tests, 1898-1940

Series 87, Photographs of Radio Executives, and Technical Types, 1857-1952

Series 90, Radio Terms, 1857-1939

Series 92, Static Patents and Static Reducing Systems, 1891-1946

Series 93, Low Frequency Indicating Devices, 1904-1946

Series 95, Articles on Radio Subjects, 1891-1945

Series 96, Radio in Education, 1922-1939

Series 98, Special Forms of Broadcasting, 1921-1943

Series 99, History of Lifesaving at Sea by Radio, 1902-1949

Series 100, History of Naval Radio, 1888-1948

Series 101, Military Radio, 1898-1946

Series 102, Transmitting & Receiving Systems, 1902-1935

Series 103, Receiving Methods, 1905-1935

Series 108, Codes and Ciphers, 1894-1947

Series 109, Schedules of Broadcasting & TV Stations, 1905-1940

Series 112, Radio Shows and Displays, 1922-1947

Series 114, Centralized Radio Systems, 1929-1935

Series 116, United States Government Activities in Radio, 1906-1949

Series 117, Technical Tables, 1903-1932

Series 120, Litigation on Radio Subjects, 1914-1947

Series 121, Legislation, 1914-1947

Series 122, History of Radio Clubs, 1907-1946

Series 123, Special Applications of Radio Frequency, 1924-1949

Series 124, Chronology, 1926-1937

Series 125, Radio Patents & Patent Practices, 1861-1949

Series 126, Phonographs, 1894-1949

Series 127, Piezo Electric Effect, 1914-1947

Series 128, ARC Transmitting & Reciving Systems, 1904-1922

Series 129, Spark Systems, 1898-1941

Series 130, Vacuum Tubes Systems, 1902-1939

Series 132, Radiophone Transmitting & Receiving System, 1906-1947

Series 133, Photo-Radio, 1899-1947

Series 134, History of Radio Broadcasting, 1908-

Series 135, History of Radiotelephony, Other Than Broadcasting

Series 136, History of Amateur Radio

Series 138, Transoceanic Communication

Series 139, Television Transmitting Stations

Series 140, Radio Theory

Series 142, History of Television

Series 143, Photographs

Series 144, Radio Publications

Series 145, Proceedings of Radio Societies

Series 146: Radio Museums

Series 147, Bibliography of Radio Subjects and Apparatus

Series 148, Aircraft Guidance Apparatus

Series 150, Audio Frequency Instruments

Series 151, History of Radio for Aircrafts

Series 152, Circuit Theory

Series 154, Static Elimination

Series 161, Radio in Medicine

Series 162, Lighting

Series 163, Police Radio

Series 169, Cartoons

Series 173, Communications, Exclusive of Radio (after 1895)

Series 174, Television Methods and Systems

Series 182, Military Portable Sets

Series 189, Humor in Radio (see Series 169)

Series 209, Short Waves

Series 226, Radar

Series 233, Television Transmitter

Lettered Series

Series A, Thomas Coke Knight RCA Photographs, circa 1902-1950

Series B, George H. Clark Collection of Photographs by ClassSeries C, Clark Unorganized and/or Duplicate Photographs

Series D, Miscellaneous

Series E, News Clippings Series F: Radio Publications

Series G, Patent Files of Darby and Darby, Attorneys, circa 1914-1935

Series H, Blank Telegram Forms from many Companies and Countries Throughout the World

Series I (eye), Miscellaneous Series

Series J, Research and Laboratory Notebooks

Series K, Index to Photographs of Radio Executives and Technical Types

Series L, Index to Bound Volumes of Photos in Various Series

Series M, Index to David Sarnoff Photographs

Series N, Federal Government Personnel Files

Series O, Addenda Materials
Biographical / Historical:
George Howard Clark, born February 15, 1881, at Alberton, Prince Edward Island, Canada, emigrated to the United States at the age of fourteen. He worked as a railroad telegraph operator for the Boston and Maine Railroad during high school and college. In his unpublished autobiography he wrote:

In 1888, when I was a lad of seven, I suddenly blossomed out as a scrapbook addict, and for years I gave up boyhood games for the pleasure of sitting in a lonely attic and 'pasting up' my books ... By 1897, in high school, I graduated to beautiful pictures, and made many large size scrapbooks ... Around that time, too, I became infatuated with things electrical, and spent many evenings copying in pen and ink the various electrical text books in the Everett, Mass., Public Library. Clark began collecting material pertaining to wireless or radio in 1902. In 1903 he graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering. During his last year of college he specialized in radio work under the instruction of Professor John Stone Stone and after graduation went to work for Stone's radio company, the Stone Telegraph and Telephone Company, of Boston.

In 1908 Clark took a competitive examination open to all wireless engineers in the United States and entered the civilian service of the Navy. He was stationed at the Washington Navy Yard, with special additional duty at the Navy's Bureau of Steam Engineering and at the National Bureau of Standards.

In 1915 Clark helped devise a classification system for Navy equipment, assigning a code number to each item. This system of classification for blueprints, photographs, reports, and general data, was prepared by Arthur Trogner, Guy Hill, and Clark, all civilian radio experts with the US Navy Department in Washington. In 1918 Clark adopted the 1915 Navy classification system for organizing the radio data he was accumulating. Clark created the term "Radioana" at this time. He began spending his evenings and weekends pasting up his collection and numbering pages. At this time he bound the accumulated material. It totaled 100 volumes.

In July 1919, after resigning from the Navy, Clark joined the engineering staff of the Marconi Telegraph Company of America, which became part of the Radio Corporation of America (RCA) later the same year. His first work was at Belmar and Lakewood, New Jersey, assisting the chief engineer, Roy A. Weagant, in his development of circuits to reduce the interference caused by static (static reduction). Clark and his wife were assigned to the unheated Engineer's Cottage. His wife decided not to stay and left for Florida. Clark moved his trunks of wireless material to the heated RCA hotel at Belmar and spent most of the winter "pasting." As Clark mentions, "From that time on I was wedded to scraps."

After a year of work in New Jersey, Clark was assigned to the sales department in New York, where he devised the "type number system" used by RCA. This type number system, for example, gave the designation UV 201 to the company's first amplifier tube.

From 1922 to 1934 Clark was in charge of RCA's newly created Show Division, which held exhibits of new and old radio apparatus at state fairs, department stores, and radio shows. About 1928 Clark started an antique radio apparatus museum for RCA. RCA's board of directors announced:

Recognizing the importance of providing a Museum for the Radio Art to house the rapidly disappearing relics of earlier days, and the desirability of collecting for it without further delay examples of apparatus in use since the inception of radio, the Board of Directors of RCA has made an initial appropriation of $100,000, as the nucleus of a fund for the establishment of a National Radio Museum. A plan for ultimately placing the museum under the wing of the Smithsonian Institution was coupled with the goal of the Institution's gathering the largest possible library of wireless data.

Around 1933 the RCA traveling exhibition program ended and Clark started classifying his collected "radioana" material. The objects of the museum were eventually turned over for exhibit purposes to the Rosenwald Museum in Chicago and the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan, when space was not forthcoming at the Smithsonian. A list of objects sent to the two museums (with tag and case numbers) is in Series 1, Box A. The "radioana" collection remained under Clark's care during the 1930s, and became of increasing use to RCA. Clark continued to add to the material.

Between 1934 and 1942 Clark was in court many times regarding patent infringements. Clark's wireless data was useful and he testified frequently, for example, in RCA's suit against the United States in the Court of Claims over the Marconi tuning patents and in the Westinghouse Company's suit against the United States over the heterodyne. Patent specifications and material regarding these and other radio industry suits are found throughout this collection.

In 1946 RCA retired George Clark and denied him space to house his "radioana" collection. Clark wished to remain in New York and house the collection somewhere in the city where it would be open at all times to the public and where it would be maintained. He hoped to continue cataloguing the collection and writing books from its information. He wanted to keep the collection under his control for as long as he was capable of using it.

George H. Clark died in 1956 and his collection was subsequently given to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In 1959 the collection was given to the Smithsonian's new Museum of History and Technology, where space was available to house it. The collection remained in the Division of Electricity until the spring of 1983 when it was transferred to the Archives Center.
Brief Company Histories From The Radio Industry, 1900-1930s:
Introduction

At the end of the nineteenth century, when Guglielmo Marconi began his first wireless company, Western Union, Postal Telegraph, and the American Telephone and Telegraph Company (AT&T) were the major enterprises in electrical communications. General Electric, Western Electric, and Westinghouse were the major producers of electrical equipment. All these earlier developments set the stage for the expansion of the radio industry.

General Electric, which dominated the lighting industry, was formed in 1892 as a merger of the Edison and Thomson-Houston companies. It was active in building central power station equipment; controlled nearly all the important early patents in electric railways; took a leading part in the introduction of trolley systems; and was the principal supplier of electric motors. Westinghouse promoted the alternating current system and installed the first AC central station in Buffalo, NY, during the winter of 1866-1867. After years of patent litigation, in 1896 GE and Westinghouse agreed to share their patents on electrical apparatus.

American Bell Telephone Company purchased Western Electric in 1881. Western Electric had a strong patent position in telephone equipment and in industrial power apparatus, such as arc lamps, generators, motors, and switchboard equipment.

Until RCA was formed in 1919, these established electrical companies played no active part in the early development of the American radio industry. They were in difficult financial positions, reorganizing, or concentrating their efforts and resources on improving their existing products.

The revolution in "wireless" technology, which began in earnest after 1900, centered in New York City, home of the Lee de Forest and American Marconi companies, and in Boston, headquarters of John Stone Stone and Reginald Fessenden.

Information in this section was compiled from the Clark Collection; the Invention and Innovation in the Radio Industry by W. Rupert Maclaurin, Macmillan Company, New York, 1949; and Radio Pioneers, Institute of Radio Engineers, Commemorating the Radio Pioneers Dinner, Hotel Commodore, New York, NY, November 8, 1945.

The De Forest Companies

Lee De Forest (1873-1961), inventor of the three-element vacuum tube or triode (1906) and the feedback circuit, was one of the first Americans to write a doctoral thesis on wireless telegraphy: "The Reflection of Short Hertzian Waves from the Ends of Parallel Wires," Yale University, 1899. The grid-controlled tube or audion of De Forest was first a radio detector, 1906-1907; in 1912 was adapted to an amplifier; and later to an oscillator. When it was perfected as a high vacuum tube, it became the great electronic instrument of electrical communications.

De Forest began work in the Dynamo Department at the Western Electric Company in 1899. Six months later he was promoted to the telephone laboratory. In 1900 De Forest went to work for the American Wireless Telegraph Company where he was able to carry out work on his "responder." However, after three months when De Forest refused to turn over the responder to the company, he was fired.

In the following year De Forest had a number of jobs, was active as an inventor, and created numerous firms to manufacture his inventions. In 1901 De Forest joined with Ed Smythe, a former Western Electric colleague and a collaborator in his research, to found the firm of De Forest, Smythe, and Freeman. Between 1902 and 1906 De Forest took out thirty-four patents on all phases of wireless telegraphy. The responder that he had been working on for so long never proved satisfactory.

The numerous De Forest companies, reflected his many interests and his inability to carry one project through to a conclusion. Unlike Marconi, but similar to Fessenden, De Forest had great inventive skill which resulted in a great number of companies; but none lasted long. The original partnership of 1901 led to the Wireless Telegraph Co. of America (1901), the De Forest Wireless Telegraph Company (Maine) (1902), and the American De Forest Wireless Telegraph Company (1903), to name a few.

The American De Forest Wireless Telegraph Company was incorporated after De Forest met a stock promoter, Abraham White. While many stations were built by this company, many never sent a message due to static interference. In 1907 two speculators from Denver with large holdings of company stock put the company out of business. The assets were sold to a new company that these speculators organized, the United Wireless Telephone Company. De Forest was forced to resign. He took the triode patents with him.

De Forest joined with one of White's stock salesmen, James Dunlop Smith, and together with De Forest's patent attorney, Samuel E. Darby, they formed a new corporation, the De Forest Radio Telephone Company in 1907. This company set out to develop wireless communication by means of the radio telephone.

In January 1910 De Forest staged the first opera broadcast, with Enrico Caruso singing. The Radio Telephone Company went bankrupt in 1911 following an aborted merger with North American Wireless Corporation. In 1913 he reorganized the company as the Radio Telephone and Telegraph Company and began producing the triode.

The Marconi Company brought a patent suit, claiming the triode infringed on the Fleming valve to which it had rights. In 1916 the court decided that Marconi had infringed the three element De Forest patent and that De Forest had infringed the two element Fleming valve. The result was that neither company could manufacture the triode.

In 1920 RCA acquired the De Forest triode rights through cross-licensing agreements with AT&T which had recently purchased the rights to it. De Forest's company was no match for GE, Westinghouse, and RCA. The De Forest Radio Company (1923) went bankrupt in 1928, was reorganized in 1930, and went into receivership in 1933. RCA eventually purchased its assets.

Marconi Companies

Guglielmo Marconi (1874-1937) came from a wealthy and well connected Italian family. He was able to spend his time developing his inventions and following his own course of action. Marconi spent his entire life developing wireless communication into a "practical" reality. In 1905 Marconi invented a directional antenna. In 1909 he shared with Karl Ferdinand Braun the Nobel prize in physics. And in 1912 he invented the time spark system for the generation of continuous waves. The principal patents in his name were improved types of vertical antennas; improved coherer; magnetic detector for the detection of wireless signals; and improvements on methods of selective tuning. Two other inventions of great importance to the Marconi companies' patent structure were the Oliver Lodge tuning patent and the Ambrose Fleming valve.

In 1895 Marconi made the first successful transmission of long wave signals. The following year he met William Preece, engineer-in-chief of the British Post Office, who was interested in inductive wireless telegraphy. This meeting led to the formation in 1897 of the Marconi Wireless Telegraph Company Ltd. In 1898 he transmitted signals across the English Channel. In 1899 an American subsidiary was formed. The various Marconi companies were the dominant enterprises in both British and American wireless until 1919 when RCA was formed.

From a business standpoint, wireless did not become profitable until long distance communications were accomplished. On December 12, 1901 in St. John's, Newfoundland, Marconi received a telegraph signal in the form of repetitions of the Morse telegraphic letter "S" transmitted from the Marconi station at Poldhu, Cornwall, England. This success, however, was met by opposition from vested interests, particularly the Anglo-American Telegraph Company whose cables terminated in Newfoundland.

So as not to restrict his company's future to one front alone, Marconi decided to exploit the field of communication with ships at sea. In order to control this field he decided in 1900 to lease his apparatus rather than sell it outright. This strategy did not work. Competition developed in Germany (Telefunken Corporation) and the United States (American De Forest and its successor, United Wireless) and Marconi was forced to sell rather than lease apparatus to the navies of various countries. He nevertheless retained numerous restrictions. This led to further friction. At the height of this debacle English stations worldwide refused to communicate with ships without Marconi equipment. This absurd and dangerous situation had to change and coastal stations opened up to all senders in 1908.

Marconi's system was based on spark technology. He saw no need for voice transmission. He felt the Morse code adequate for communication between ships and across oceans. He, along with most others, did not foresee the development of the radio and the broadcasting industry. He was a pragmatist and uninterested in scientific inquiry in a field where commercial viability was unknown.

For these reasons Marconi left the early experimentation with the radio telephone to others, particularly Lee De Forest and Reginald Fessenden.

National Electric Signaling Company

Canadian-born Reginald Fessenden (1866-1932), one of the principal early radio inventors and the first important inventor to experiment with wireless, left the University of Pittsburgh in 1900 to work for the U.S. Weather Bureau. There he invented the liquid barretter, an early radio receiver, and attempted to work out a means for wireless transmission of weather forecasts. After a squabble over patent rights, Fessenden resigned in 1902.

The National Electric Signaling Company (NESCO), primarily intended to support Fessenden's work on wireless, telegraphy, and telephony, was formed by Fessenden and two Pittsburgh capitalists, Hay Walker, Jr. and Thomas H. Given. It began as an inventor's laboratory and never proved successful as a business venture.

Fessenden recognized that a continuous wave transmission was required for speech and he continued the work of Nikola Tesla, John Stone Stone, and Elihu Thomson on this subject. Fessenden felt he could also transmit and receive Morse code better by the continuous wave method than with a spark-apparatus as Marconi was using.

In 1903 Fessenden's first high-frequency alternator needed for continuous wave transmission was built to his specifications by Charles Steinmetz of GE. In 1906 Fessenden obtained a second alternator of greater power from GE and on Christmas Eve broadcast a program of speech and music. The work on this alternator was given to Ernst F. W. Alexanderson. It took years for Alexanderson to develop an alternator capable of transmitting regular voice transmissions over the Atlantic. But by 1916 the Fessenden-Alexanderson alternator was more reliable for transatlantic communication than the spark apparatus.

Fessenden also worked on continuous-wave reception. This work arose out of his desire for a more effective type of receiver than the coherer, a delicate device that was limited by its sensitivity on a rolling ship at sea. In 1903 he developed a new receiving mechanism - the electrolytic detector.

As his work progressed Fessenden evolved the heterodyne system. However, due to faulty construction and the fact that it was ahead of its time, heterodyne reception was not fully appreciated until the oscillating triode was devised, thus allowing a practical means of generating the local frequency.

Between 1905 and 1913 Fessenden developed a completely self-sustaining wireless system. However, constant quarrels between Fessenden, Walker, and Given culminated in Fessenden's forming the Fessenden Wireless Company of Canada. He felt a Canadian company could better compete with British Marconi. As a result, his backers dismissed Fessenden from NESCO in January of 1911. Fessenden brought suit, won, and was awarded damages. To conserve assets pending appeal, NESCO went into receivership in 1912, and Samuel Kintner was appointed general manager of the company.

In 1917 Given and Walker formed International Signal Company (ISC) and transferred NESCO's patent assets to the new company. Westinghouse obtained majority control of ISC through the purchase of $2,500,000 worth of stock. The company was then reincorporated as The International Radio Telegraph Company. The Westinghouse-RCA agreements were signed in 1921 and International's assets were transferred to RCA.

RCA

The development of the radio industry accelerated after 1912. This was due to several factors, the most important of which was the passage of legislation by the US government requiring ships at sea to carry wireless. This created a market incentive and spurred the growth of the industry. Also, with the outbreak of World War I, the larger electrical companies turned their manufacturing output to radio apparatus, supporting the war effort. Three firms were prominent in this industrial endeavor: AT&T, GE, and Westinghouse.

AT&T's early contributions to this effort centered on their improvements of De Forest's triode, particularly in the evolution of circuits, the redesign of the mechanical structure, and an increase in the plate design. The importation of the Gaede molecular pump from Germany created a very high vacuum. The resulting high-vacuum tube brought the practical aspects of the wireless telephone closer to reality. By August 1915 speech had been sent by land wire to Arlington, Va., automatically picked up there via a newly developed vacuum-tube transmitter, and subsequently received at Darien, Canal Zone. By 1920 AT&T had purchased the rights to the De Forest triode and feedback circuit, and had placed itself in a strong position in the evolution of radio technology.

GE centered its efforts on the alternator, assigning Ernst F. W. Alexanderson to its design, and on further development of vacuum tube equipment for continuous wave telegraph transmission. By 1915 Alexanderson, Irving Langmuir, William D. Coolidge, and others had developed a complete system of continuous wave transmission and reception for GE.

As can be seen, both AT&T and GE were diverting major time and expenditures on vacuum tube research. This inevitably led to patent interferences and consequently, to cross-licensing arrangements.

Westinghouse was not in the strategic position of GE and AT&T. Nevertheless, during the war it did manufacture large quantities of radio apparatus, motors, generators, and rectifiers for the European and American governments. Postwar moves led Westinghouse into full partnership with the other two companies.

By the end of the war, all three companies had committed significant resources to wireless. They were hampered internationally, however, by the Marconi Company's dominant status, and in the United States they were blocked by opposing interests with control of key patents.

The US government also was concerned with this lack of solidarity in the wireless industry and over the British domination of the field worldwide. This impasse set a fascinating and complicated stage for the formation of the RCA.

Owen D. Young, legal counselor for GE, was instrumental in breaking the impasse. Through an innovative and far-reaching organizational consolidation, Young was able to persuade British Marconi that persistence in monopoly was a fruitless exercise, because of the strong US government feelings. Marconi, realizing the harm of a potential American boycott, finally agreed to terms. GE purchased the controlling interest in American Marconi, and RCA was formed. Young was made chairman of the board of RCA, while Edwin J. Nally and David Sarnoff of the old American Marconi were appointed president and commercial manager respectively.

On July 1, 1920, RCA signed a cross-licensing agreement with AT&T. The telephone company purchased one half million shares of RCA common and preferred stock for several considerations -- the most important being that all current and future radio patents of the two companies were available to each other royalty-free for ten years. Many provisions of these agreements were ambiguous and led to later squabbles between the RCA partners.

In May 1920 Westinghouse, which had an efficient radio manufacturing organization, formed an alliance with the International Radio and Telegraph Company (NESCO's successor). Westinghouse's part ownership gave them control of Fessenden's patents, particularly continuous-wave transmission and heterodyne transmission. Westinghouse also wisely purchased in October of 1920 Armstrong's patents on the regenerative and superheterodyne circuits -- which also included some of Columbia University professor Michael Pupin's patents. This placed Westinghouse in a strong bargaining position vis-à-vis RCA and in their new consolidated corporation. Westinghouse joined the growing group of radio companies on June 30, 1921. With these mergers, RCA agreed to purchase forty percent of its radio apparatus from Westinghouse and sixty percent from GE.

Through these and other legal arrangements, RCA obtained the rights to over 2,000 patents. These amounted to practically all the patents of importance in the radio science of that day. As a result, other firms in the radio industry, for example, the United Fruit Company and the Wireless Specialty Apparatus Company, entered into cross-licensing arrangements with RCA.

RCA also made arrangements internationally with the three dominant companies in radio communication in their respective countries. British Marconi, Compagnie Generale de Telegraphie sans fil, and Telefunken. Each corporation was given exclusive rights to use the other companies' patents within their own territories.

The rise of amateur radio in the 1920s and, to a greater extent, the demand for new products by the general public contributed to the rise of the broadcasting industry. This put a strain on the earlier agreements between the major radio corporations and between 1921 and 1928 there was a struggle over patents for control of the evolving medium.

An initial attempt by AT&T to control the broadcasting industry -- using its earlier cross-licensing agreements to manufacture radio telephone transmitting equipment -- began with AT&T's disposal of RCA stock holdings in 1922-1923. It ended in 1926 with a new cross-licensing agreement which gave AT&T exclusive patent rights in the field of public service telephony and gave GE, RCA, and Westinghouse exclusive patent rights in the areas covered by wireless telegraphy, entertainment broadcasting, and the manufacture of radio sets and receiving tubes for public sale.

In 1926 after the agreements were finalized, RCA, GE, and Westinghouse joined forces and established the National Broadcasting Company (NBC). Fifty percent of the stock went to RCA, thirty percent to GE, and twenty percent to Westinghouse. The new company was divided into three divisions: the Red, Blue, and Pacific Networks. Independent, competing networks soon emerged. William S. Paley and his family formed the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS) in 1927. The Mutual Broadcasting System was formed in 1934.

By 1928 RCA had strong patent positions in all major areas of the radio industry, including the research, development and manufacture of vacuum tubes and speakers. Most small companies entering the industry in the 1920s produced their products based on prior research by others and on expired patents. An RCA license, therefore, was essential for the manufacture of any modern radio set or vacuum tube.

In the late 1920s new developments in the reproduction of sound, produced significant changes in the phonograph industry. Among those new developments were the introduction of the electronic record, and the marketing of the Radiola 104 Loudspeaker in 1926. In 1929 RCA purchased the Victor Talking Machine Company. This changed not only the quality but the sales of the phonograph and the phonograph record. A new entertainment industry was born and an ever-expanding market for consumer products was created with cultural implications that continue today.

Telefunken

German industrialists were eager to break the Marconi Company's monopoly. Although Marconi had patents on his inventions in Germany, the Germans developed a rival system through the Telefunken Corporation, incorporated in 1903, based on the inventions of Professor Ferdinand Braun, Dr. Rudolf Slaby, and Count George von Arco.

Before 1903 the Braun-Siemens and Halske system had been developed by Gesellschaft fur Drahtlose Telegraphie (GFDT). The Slaby-Arco system had been developed by Allgemeine Electrizitats-Gesellschaft. After litigation over patents, the German court handed down a decision in favor of the GFDT. The Kaiser, with national interests in mind, ordered that the rivalry cease. The two systems were amalgamated under GFDT, and became known as the Telefunken.

Chronology of Some Significant Events In The History of The Radio Industry

1895 -- Marconi experiments with Hertz's oscillator and Branley's coherer.

1897 -- In March Marconi demonstrates his wireless system on Salisbury Plain, near London, and files a complete patent specification. In May trials of Marconi's system are made over water between Lavernock and Flatholm, a distance of three miles. On May 13, communication is established between Lavernock Point and Brean Down, a distance of eight miles. German scientist Professor Slaby is present. The first Marconi station is erected at the Needles, Isle of Wight. A distance of fourteen and one-half miles is bridged by wireless. In December the Marconi station at the Needles communicates with a ship eighteen miles at sea.

1898 -- In England Oliver Lodge files a complete specification covering inventions in wireless telegraphy.

1899 -- The New York Herald uses Marconi's wireless telegraphy to report the progress of the International Yacht races between the Columbia and the Shamrock off New York harbor in September. US. Navy vessels make trials of Marconi's wireless telegraph system. The cruiser New York and the battleship Massachusetts are equipped with apparatus. Fessenden develops improvements in methods of wireless telegraph signaling.

1900 -- The Marconi International Marine Communication Company is organized on April 25th in London. Reginald Aubrey Fessenden begins work at the United States Weather Bureau. Over the next two years he invents the liquid barretter, an improved radio receiver.

1901 -- In February on board the SS Philadelphia, Marconi receives wireless signals over a distance of 1,551 miles. In March Marconi wireless telegraph service begins between islands of the Hawaiian group. On December 12, Marconi receives transatlantic signal at St. John's, Newfoundland from Poldhu, Cornwall, England. The Canadian government orders two Marconi telegraph sets for use at coastal points along the Strait of Belle Isle.

1901 -- Fessenden procures US patent no. 706737 for a system of radio signaling employing long waves (low frequency). De Forest develops a system of wireless telegraphy in Chicago. 1903-06 10,000 to 50,000 cycle machines, 1 kW, are developed by Steinmetz and by Alexanderson of GE for Fessenden. 1905 Marconi procures patent number 14788 in England, covering the invention of the horizontal directional antenna.

1906 -- At Brant Rock, Massachusetts, Fessenden employs a generator of one-half kW capacity, operating at 75,000 cycles, for radio purposes. He succeeds in telephoning a distance of eleven miles by means of wireless telephone apparatus.

1907 -- De Forest procures a U. S. patent for an audion amplifier of pulsating or alternating current.

1908 -- Marconi stations in Canada and England are opened for radio telegraph service across the Atlantic. Fessenden constructs a 70,000-cycle alternator with an output of 2.5 kW. at 225 volts, for radio signaling purposes. He reports successful radio telephone tests between Brant Rock and Washington, DC, a distance of 600 miles.

1909 -- US House of Representatives passes the Burke Bill for the compulsory use of radio telegraphy on certain classes of vessels. The United Wireless Telegraph Company and the Radio Telephone Company of New York (De Forest and Stone systems) begin the erection of radio stations in the Central and Western states. Marconi shares with Ferdinand Braun of Germany the Nobel prize in recognition of contributions in wireless telegraphy.

1910 -- An act of the US government requires radio equipment and operators on certain types of passenger ships. The Glace Bay, Nova Scotia, Marconi station is opened in September. This station communicates with Clifden, Ireland. The transatlantic tariff is seventeen cents a word.

1911 -- A radio section is organized by the US Department of Commerce to enforce the provisions of national radio legislation. Marconi Wireless Telegraph Company acquires the Lodge-Muirhead patents.

1912 -- Rotary gap is used with Fessenden 100 kW 500 cycle spark set at NAA, the Navy's first high-power station at Arlington, Virginia. Marconi Wireless of America acquires property of the United Wireless Telegraph Company. British Marconi secures the important radio patents of Bellini and Tosi, Italian inventors. Wreck of the SS Titanic on April 15th. The act of 1910 is extended on July 23 to cover cargo vessels. requires an auxiliary source of power on ships and two or more skilled radio apparatus operators on certain types of passenger ships. On August 13, an act provides for licensing radio operators and transmitting stations.

1912-1913 -- High vacuum amplifying tubes (an improvement on De Forest's), using the findings of pure science, are produced almost simultaneously in two great industrial laboratories, by Dr. H. D. Arnold of AT&T and Irving Langmuir of GE.

1915 -- De Forest Ultra-audion three-step (cascade) audio amplifier is announced and introduced into practice.

1916 -- GE and the Western Electric Company develop the first experimental vacuum tube radiotelephone systems for the Navy.

1917-1918 -- First production of vacuum tubes in quantity, both coated filament and tungsten filament types, by Western Electric Company and GE.

1918 -- Lloyd Espenschied procures US patent number 1,256,889 for the invention of a duplex radio telegraph system. (See Lloyd Espenschied Papers, Archives Center, NMAH, Collection #13.) The House of Representatives passes a resolution on July 5, authorizing the President to take over management of telegraph and telephone systems due to war conditions.

1919 -- Bills are introduced in Congress for permanent government control of radio stations. The widespread resentment of amateurs has more to do with the defeat of these bills than the objections of commercial companies. Roy Alexander Weagant, New York, reports having developed means of reducing disturbances to radio reception caused by atmospherics or static. This is the first successful static-reducing system. GE purchases the holdings of the British Marconi Company in the Marconi Wireless Telegraph Company of America, the name of the latter company being changed to Radio Corporation of America (RCA) in October. Edward J. Nally is elected president of the new company.

1920 -- E. F. W. Alexanderson is appointed Chief Engineer of RCA. RCA begins the installation of 200-kW Alexanderson alternators at Bolinas, California, and Marion, Massachusetts. The Tropical Radio Telegraph Company, a subsidiary of the United Fruit Company, New York, operates ten long-distance radio stations at points in Central and South Americirca RCA purchases 6,000 acres at Rocky Point, Long Island, New York, and begins erection of a Radio Central station, comprising a number of operating units for communication with European stations and stations in South Americirca On May 15, RCA inaugurates radio telegraph services between installations at Chatham and Marion, Massachusetts, and stations at Stavanger and Jaerobe, Norway. Westinghouse Company's radio station KDKA, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, broadcasts returns of the national elections, November 2. Development, design, and manufacture by GE of the early receiving and transmitting tubes made available to the public by RCA (UV-200,201,202). Radio telegraph stations and properties taken over by the government under war time powers are returned to their owners at midnight, February 29. The government calls for bids for the sale of large quantities of surplus radio and telegraph and telephone apparatus purchased for war needs and not used.

1921 -- RCA develops Vacuum tubes UV-200(detector) and UV-201(amplifier) -- both triodes with brass shells known as the UV base, and incorporating a filament that required 1 ampere at 5 volts for operation -- for storage battery operation; and at the same time also released to the public the WD-11 for dry cell operation, which employed an oxide-coated tungsten filament. RCA station at Rocky Point, Long Island, opens on November 5. WJZ station established by the Westinghouse Company in Newark, NJ. RCA broadcast station at Roselle Park, NJ (WDY) opens on December 15. It continues operation until February 15, 1922, when its operation is transferred to WJZ, Newark, previously owned by Westinghouse. RCA installs 200-kW alternator at Tuckerton, NJ.

1922 -- First use of tube transmitters by RCA for service from the United States to England and Germany. RCA begins substitution of tube transmitters on ships to replace spark sets. RCA begins replacement of crystal receivers by tube receivers on ships.

1923 -- Broadcast stations WJZ and WJY opened in New York in May by RCA. WRC opens in Washington on August 1. The UV-201A, receiving tubes developed by GE and consuming only 1/4 of an ampere are introduced by RCA. Tungsten filaments coated and impregnated with thorium were employed.

1924 -- Edwin H. Armstrong, demonstrates the superheterodyne receiver on March 6th. In November RCA experiments with radio photographs across the Atlantic. RCA markets the superheterodyne receivers for broadcast reception.

1925-26 -- Dynamic loudspeakers introduced. Magnetic pick-up phonograph recording and reproduction developed. RCA opens radio circuit to Dutch East Indies. Direction-finders introduced on ships.

1927 -- Fully self-contained AC radio receivers introduced.
Provenance:
The collection was donated to the Smithsonian in 1959.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but a portion of the collection remains unprocessed and is stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.

Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs, negatives, and slides.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Radio engineers -- 1880-1950  Search this
Electric engineers -- 1880-1950  Search this
Radio -- History  Search this
Electricity -- 1880-1950  Search this
Communication -- 1880-1950  Search this
Genre/Form:
Technical manuals -- Electrical equipment
Clippings
Patents
Correspondence -- 1930-1950
Blueprints
Letters patent
Photographs -- 1850-1900
Sale catalogs -- Electrical equipment -- 1880-1950
Technical drawings
Photographs -- 1900-1950
Citation:
George H. Clark Radioana Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0055
See more items in:
George H. Clark Radioana Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep833dbe2b0-891b-4411-a413-3b4b1e3306ad
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0055
Online Media:

Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology  Search this
Extent:
245 Linear feet ((375 boxes and 10 map drawers))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1878-1965
Summary:
The records in this collection embody the administrative functions of the Bureau of American Ethnology from 1879 to 1965. The collection consists of correspondence, card files, registers, official notices, annual and monthly work reports, research statements, research proposals, grant applications, personnel action requests, notices of personnel action, meeting minutes, purchase orders and requisitions, property records, biographical sketches, resolutions, newspaper clippings, reviews of publications, drafts of publications, circulars, programs, pamphlets, announcements, illustrations, cartographic materials, photographic prints, photographic negatives, bibliographies, and reprinted publications.
Scope and Contents:
The records in this collection embody the administrative functions of the Bureau of American Ethnology from 1879 to 1965. The collection consists of correspondence, card files, registers, official notices, annual and monthly work reports, research statements, research proposals, grant applications, personnel action requests, notices of personnel action, meeting minutes, purchase orders and requisitions, property records, biographical sketches, resolutions, newspaper clippings, reviews of publications, drafts of publications, circulars, programs, pamphlets, announcements, illustrations, cartographic materials, photographic prints, photographic negatives, bibliographies, and reprinted publications.

Correspondence comprises the bulk of this collection. A significant portion of this correspondence originates from the Bureau's duty to field inquiries regarding North American aboriginal cultures and respond to requests relating to the duplication of BAE library and archival materials. Inquiries and requests, received from all parts of the world, were submitted by colleagues, museum curators and directors, students, professors, amateur archaeologists, government agents, military officials, Smithsonian Institution officials, artists, and members of the general public. Other correspondence reflects the Bureau's day-to-day operations and internal affairs. Subjects discussed in this correspondence include research projects, field expeditions, annual budgets, personnel matters, the acquisition of manuscripts, the disbursement of specimens, and production of BAE publications. Correspondence is occasionally accompanied by announcements, circulars, programs, pamphlets, photographs, drawings, diagrams, bibliographies, lists, newspaper clippings, and maps. Also among these records are the card files and registers of incoming and outgoing correspondence maintained by early BAE administrative staff. For a list of correspondents, see the appendix to this finding aid, available in the NAA reading room.

The majority of illustrations, artwork, and photographs that appear in this collection are associated with BAE publications, including BAE Annual Reports, BAE Bulletins, Contributions to North American Ethnology and Smithsonian Institution, Miscellaneous Collection. Maps located among the collection originate, by and large, from BAE field expeditions and research projects. BAE staff also amassed great quantities of newspaper clippings that concerned BAE research or points of interest. Of particular note are three scrapbooks comprised of clippings that relate to "mound builders" and the work of the BAE's Division of Mound Explorations.

Also worthy of note are the various records relating to the 1903 investigation of the BAE. Records related to the investigation highlight the Smithsonian Institution's longstanding dissatisfaction with the internal management of the BAE, its concerns over the BAE's loose relationship with the parent organization, and displeasure with the manner in which BAE scientific research was developing. Other materials of special interest are the various administrative records covering the period 1929 to 1946 and 1949 to 1965. The majority cover personnel matters; however, others justify the work of the BAE and bear witness to growing concerns that the BAE would eventually be absorbed by the Department of Anthropology within the United States National Museum.
Arrangement:
The collection has been arranged into the following 12 series: (1) Correspondence, 1897-1965; (2) Cooperative Ethnological Investigations, 1928-1935; (3) Miscellaneous Administrative Files, 1929-1946; (4) Miscellaneous Administrative Files, 1949-1965; (5) Records Concerning the Photographic Print Collection, 1899-1919; (6) Records Concerning Employees; (7) Fiscal Records, 1901-1902 and 1945-1968; (8) Records Relating to the 1903 Investigation of the BAE; (9) Property Records and Requisitions; (10) Clippings; (11) Publications; (12) BAE Library Materials, Pamphlets and Reprints
Administrative History:
The Bureau of Ethnology was established by an act of the United States Congress on March 3, 1879, but it was largely the personal creation of the geologist and explorer Major John Wesley Powell. His earlier explorations of the Colorado River and Grand Canyon formed the basis of the Geographical and Geological Survey of the Rocky Mountain Region. While exploring the area, Powell became alarmed at what he perceived to be the decline of the aboriginal way of life due to rapid depopulation. In a letter to the Secretary of the Interior, he warned that "in a few years, it will be impossible to study…Indians in their primitive condition, except from recorded history" (Hinsley). He urged swift government action; the result of which was the appropriation of $20,000 (20 Stat. 397) to transfer all documents relating to North American Indians from the Department of Interior to the Smithsonian Institution and its Secretary's appointment of Powell as director of the newly established Bureau of Ethnology, a position he held until his death in 1902. In 1897, its name was changed to the Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE) to underscore the limits of its geographical reaches.

Under Powell, the BAE organized the nation's earliest anthropological field expeditions, in which the characteristics and customs of native North Americans were observed firsthand and documented in official reports. Images of Indian life were captured on photographic glass plate negatives, and their songs on wax cylinder recordings. Histories, vocabularies and myths were gathered, along with material objects excavated from archaeological sites, and brought back to Washington for inclusion in the BAE manuscript library or the United States National Museum.

The fruits of these investigations were disseminated via a series of highly regarded and widely distributed publications, most notably BAE Annual Reports, BAE Bulletins, and Contributions to North American Ethnology. BAE research staff also responded routinely to inquiries posed by colleagues, government agencies, and the general public on matters ranging from artwork to warfare. Moreover, the BAE prepared exhibits on the various cultural groups it studied not only for the Smithsonian Institution, but also for large expositions held nationwide.

In 1882 Powell, under instruction of Congress, established the Division of Mound Explorations for the purpose of discovering the true origin of earthen mounds found predominately throughout the eastern United States. It was the first of three temporary, yet significant, subunits supported by the Bureau. Cyrus Thomas, head of the Division, published his conclusions in the Bureau's Annual Report of 1894, which is considered to be the last word in the controversy over the mounds' origins. With the publication of Thomas' findings, the Division's work came to a close.

The course of BAE operations remained largely the same under Powell's successors: W.J. McGee (acting director) 1902; William Henry Holmes, 1902-1910; Frederick W. Hodge, 1910-1918; J. Walter Fewkes, 1918-1928; Matthew W. Stirling, 1928-1957; Frank H.H. Roberts, Jr., 1957-1964; and Henry B. Collins (acting director), 1964-1965. However, following a 1903 internal investigation of the Bureau's administrative activities, Smithsonian officials called for a broader scope of ethnological inquiry and greater application of anthropological research methodologies. The BAE responded in 1904 by expanding agency activities to include investigations in Hawaii, the Philippines, and the Caribbean.

The BAE extended its geographical reaches once again, in the 1940s, to include Central and South America. In 1943, the Institute of Social Anthropology (ISA) was established as an independent subunit of the Bureau for the purpose of developing and promoting ethnological research throughout the American Republics. The findings of ISA-sponsored investigations were published in the six volume series, Handbook of South American Indians (BAE Bulletin 143). Julian H. Steward, editor of the Handbook, was appointed director of ISA operations and held the position until 1946 when George M. Foster assumed responsibility. The ISA was absorbed by the Institute of Inter-American Affairs in 1952, thus terminating its relationship with the BAE.

In 1946 the BAE assumed partial administrative control of the recently established River Basin Surveys (RBS), its third and final autonomous subunit. The purpose of the RBS was to salvage and preserve archaeological evidence threatened by post-World War II public works programs, more specifically the rapid construction of dams and reservoirs occurring throughout the country. Excavations conducted under the RBS yielded considerable data on early North American Indian settlements, and subsequent deliberations on this data were published as reports in various BAE Bulletins.

In 1965, the BAE merged administratively with the Smithsonian Institution's Department of Anthropology to form the Office of Anthropology within the United States National Museum (now the Department of Anthropology within the National Museum of Natural History). The BAE manuscript library, also absorbed by the Department of Anthropology, became the foundation of what is today the National Anthropological Archives (NAA).

In its 86 year existence, the BAE played a significant role in the advancement of American anthropology. Its staff included some of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries' most distinguished anthropologists, including Jeremiah Curtain, Frank Hamilton Cushing, J.O. Dorsey, Jesse Walter Fewkes, Alice Cunningham Fletcher, Albert H. Gatschet, John Peabody Harrington, John N.B. Hewitt, William Henry Holmes, Ales Hrdlicka, Neil Judd, Francis LaFlesche, Victor and Cosmo Mindeleff, James Mooney, James Pilling, Matilda Coxe Stevenson, Matthew Williams Stirling, William Duncan Strong, and William Sturtevant. The BAE also collaborated with and supported the work of many non-Smithsonian researchers, most notably Franz Boas, Frances Densmore, Gerard Fowke, Garrick Mallery, Washington Matthews, Paul Radin, John Swanton, Cyrus Thomas, and T.T. Waterman, as well as America's earliest field photographers such as Charles Bell, John K. Hillers, Timothy O'Sullivan, and William Dinwiddie. Several of its staff founded the Anthropological Society of Washington in 1880, which later became the American Anthropological Association in 1899. What is more, its seminal research continues to be drawn upon by contemporary anthropologists and government agents through the use of BAE manuscripts now housed in the NAA.

Sources Consulted:

Hinsley, Curtis. Savages and Scientists: The Smithsonian Institution and the Development of American Anthropology, 1846-1910. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1981.

McGee, WJ. "Bureau of American Ethnology." The Smithsonian Institution, 1846-1896, The History of its First Half-Century, pp. 367-396. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1897.

Sturtevant, William. "Why a Bureau of American Ethnology?" Box 286, Functions of the BAE, Series IV: Miscellaneous Administrative Files, 1948-1965, Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology, National Anthropological Archives.
Related Materials:
Additional material relating to BAE administrative affairs and research projects can be found among the National Anthropological Archives' vast collection of numbered manuscripts. Too numerous to list in this space, these include official correspondence, monthly and annual work reports, fiscal records, field notes, personal diaries, expedition logs, catalogues of specimens, vocabularies, historical sketches, maps, diagrams, drawings, bibliographies, working papers and published writings, among various other material. Most of these documents are dispersed throughout the numbered manuscript collection as single items; however, some have been culled and unified into larger units (e.g., MS 2400 is comprised of documents relating to the Division of Mound Explorations). Artwork and illustrations produced for BAE publications are also located among the NAA's numbered manuscript collection as well as its photograph collection (e.g., Photo Lot 78-51 and Photo Lot 80-6).

Photographs concerning BAE research interests can be found among the following NAA photographic lots: Photo Lot 14, Bureau of American Ethnology Subject and Geographic File ca. 1870s-1930s; Photo Lot 24, BAE Photographs of American Indians 1840s to 1960s (also known as the Source Print Collection); Photo Lot 60, BAE Reference Albums 1858-1905; and Photo Lot 85, BAE Miscellaneous Photographs 1895 to 1930. Other photographic lots include portraits of BAE staff and collaborators, namely Photo Lot 33, Portraits of Anthropologists and others 1860s-1960s; Photo Lot 68, Portraits of John Wesley Powell ca. 1890 and 1898; and Photo Lot 70, Department of Anthropology Portrait File ca. 1864-1921.

Additional materials in the NAA relating to the work of the BAE can be found among the professional papers of its staff, collaborators and USNM anthropologists. These include the papers of Ales Hrdlicka, John Peabody Harrington, Otis Mason, J.C. Pilling, Matthew Williams Stirling, and William Duncan Strong. Documents relating to the work of the BAE can be found among the records of the River Basin Surveys (1928-1969) and the Institute of Social Anthropology (1941-1952).

Records related to this collection can also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives (SIA). SIA accession 05-124 includes information regarding the 1942 transfer of six audio recordings related to the Chumash Indian language from the Bureau of American Ethnology to the National Archives, nine pages of Chumash translations, and "The Story of Candalaria, the Old Indian Basket-Maker." The Fiscal and Payroll Records of the Office of the Secretary, 1847 to 1942 (Record Unit 93), includes voucher logs, disbursement journals and daybooks of money paid out to the BAE from 1890 to 1910. BAE correspondence can also be found among the Records of the Office of the Secretary (Record Unit 776, accession 05-162). The Papers of William Henry Holmes, second director of the BAE, are also located among the SIA (Record Unit 7084).

Accession records concerning artifacts and specimens collected by the BAE are located in the registrar's office of the National Museum of Natural History.

Related collections can also be found at the National Archives and Records Administration. RG 57.3.1, the Administrative Records of the United States Geological Survey, includes register of applications for BAE ethnological expositions conducted between 1879-1882. RG 75.29, Still Pictures among the Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, includes 22 photographs of Arapaho, Cheyenne, Kiowa, Comanche, Navajo, and Apache Indians taken by William S. Soule for the BAE during 1868-1875. RG 106, Records of the Smithsonian Institution, includes cartographic records (106.2) relating to Indian land cessions in Indiana created for the First Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology, 1881 (1 item); a distribution of American Indian linguistic stock in North America and Greenland, by John Wesley Powell, for the Seventh Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology, ca. 1887 (1 item); a distribution of Indian tribal and linguistic groups in South America, 1950 (1 item); the Indian tribes in North America, for Bulletin 145, Bureau of American Ethnology, 1952 (4 items). Sound Recordings (106.4) include songs and linguistic material relating to the Aleut, Mission, Chumash, and Creek, gather by the BAE in 1912, 1914, 1930-41. Some include translations (122 items).
Provenance:
The Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology were transferred to the Smithsonian Office of Anthropology Archives with the merger of the BAE and the Department of Anthropology of the National Museum of Natural History in 1965. The Smithsonian Office of Anthropology Archives was renamed the National Anthropological Archives in 1968.
Restrictions:
The Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology are open for research.

Access to the Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Citation:
Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.XXXX.0155
See more items in:
Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw391046c25-21e2-4334-a01f-9a6f734ae9cd
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-xxxx-0155
Online Media:

John Peabody Harrington papers

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Names:
Geronimo, 1829-1909  Search this
Extent:
683 Linear feet
Culture:
Indians of Central America  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Indians of South America  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Maps
Stats (copies)
Newspaper clippings
Printed material
Photographs
Botanical specimens
Field notes
Correspondence
Financial records
Personal records
Poetry
Writings
Date:
1907-1959 (some earlier)
Summary:
Harrington was a Bureau of American Ethnology ethnologist involved in the study of over one hundred American tribes. His speciality was linguistics. Most of the material concerns California, southwestern, northwestern tribes and includes ethnological, archeological, historical notes; writings, correspondence, photographs, sound recordings, biological specimens, and other types of documents. Also of concern are general linguistics, sign language, writing systems, writing machines, and sound recordings machines. There is also some material on New World Spanish, Old World languages. In addition, there are many manuscripts of writings that Harrington sketched, partially completed, or even completed but never published. The latter group includes not only writings about anthropological subjects but also histories, ranging from a biography of Geronimo to material on the history of the typewriter. The collection incorporates material of Richard Lynch Garner, Matilda Coxe Stevenson, and others. In his field work, Harrington seems sometimes to have worked within fairly firm formats, this especially being true when he was "rehearing" material, that is in using an informant to verify and correct the work of other researchers. Often, however, the interviews with informants (and this seems to have been the case even with some "rehearings") seem to have been rather free form, for there is a considerable intertwining of subjects. Nevertheless, certain themes frequently appear in his work, including annotated vocabularies concerning flora and fauna and their use, topography, history and biography, kinship, cosmology (including tribal astronomy), religion and philosophy, names and observations concerning neighboring tribes, sex and age division, material culture, legends, and songs. The fullness of such materials seems to have been limited only by the time Harrington had to spend with a goup and the knowledge of his informants.
Arrangement:
(Some of the titles are tentative). Papers relating to Alaska/Northwest Coast, including (1) Aleut; (2) Tlingit/Eyak; (3) Northern Athapascan (Beaver, Carrier, Chipewyan, Sarsi, Sekani, Cree); (4) Nicola/Thompson; (5) Lummi/Nespelem; (6) Duwamish; (7) Chimakum/Clallam; (8) Makah/Quileute; (9) Quinault/Chehalis/Cowlit; (10) Chinook/Chinook Jargon; (11) "Kwalhioqua-Tlatskanai"; (12) Tillamook, (13) Alsea/Siuslaw/Coos; (14) Southwest Oregon Athapascan (Chasta Costa, Chetco, Upper Coquille, "Gold Beach", Smith River, Tolowa, Tutini, Upper Umpqua), (14) Galice/Applegate; (15) Takelma, general and miscellaneous; (16) Klamath; (17) Wiyot/Yurok/Mattole; (18) Coast Yuki/Northern and Central Pomo/Kato; (19) Coast Miwok; (20) Lake and Coast Miwok/Southeastern Pomo/Wappo; (21) Nisenan/Northern Sierra Miwok; (22) Southern Pomo/Central Sierra Miwok; (23) Karok/Shasta/Konomihu; (24) Chimariko/Hupo; (25) Achomawi/Atsugewi/Wintu/Yana; (26) Chamariko/Achomawi/Atsugewi/Wintu/Yana; (27) Costanoan (Chocheno, Mutsun, Tumsen); (28) Salinan (Antoinano, Migueleno); (29) Yokuts (Chunut, Tachi, Wikchamni, Yawdanchi, Yawelmani, Koyeti); (30) general and miscellaneous; papers relating to southern California and the Basin area,

including (31) Chumash (Barbareno, Cruzeno, Ineseno, Obispeno, Purisimeno, Ventureno); (32) Chauilla; (33) Chemehuevi; (34) Gabrielino; (35) Juaneno; (36) Kitanemuk; (37) Luiseno; (38) Serrano; (39) Tubatulabal; (40) Diegueno; (41) Mohave/Yuma; (42) general and miscellaneous; papers relating to the Southwest, including (43) Apache; (44) Hopi; (45) Jemez; (46) Acoma/Laguna; (47) Cochiti; (48) Navaho; (49) Pima/Papago; (50) Illeta; (51) Taos; (52) Picuris; (53) Tewa; (54) Zuni; (55) general and miscellaneous; papers relating to the Plains, including (56) Comanche; (57) Caddo/Pawnee/Wichita; (58) Dakota/Lakota; (59) Hidatso/Mandan/Crow;

(92) general and miscellaneous; notes and writings on special linguistic studies, including (93) correspondence; (94) financial records; (95) personal records; (96) poetry; (97) newspaper clippings; (98) printed material/reprints/photostats/microfilm; (99) maps; (100) photographs (101) sound recordings; (102) botanical specimens

Joseph S. Danner, Edward S. Davis, Ella C. Deloria, Frances Densmore, Paul Desiardins, Lydia Dornherr, Harry W. Dorsey, Frederick Huntington Douglas, David C. Dozi, Edward P. Dozi, Robert Drak Aitken), Rose S. Gaffney, David E. Gales, S. H. Gapp, Clark M. Garber, Lucrlson Fenton, Jesse Walter Fewkes, Reginald G. Fisher, Barbara Freire-Marreco (see also Barbara Aitken), Rose S. Gaffney, David E. Gales, S. H. Gapp, Clark M. Garber, Lucretia Garcia, Maria Garcia, Paul Garcia, Walter C. Garwick, William Gates, Ja Gapp, Clark M. Garber, Lucretia Garcia, Maria Garcia, Paul Garcia, Walter C. Garwick, William Gates, James A Geary, Otto William Geist,

Richard H. Geoghegan, Harold S. Gladwin, Pliny Earle Goddard, T. R. Goodwin, Howard W. Gorman, Blanche C. Grant, George Grasty, Louis H. Gray, Alexander Grigolia, Alexandra Gromoff, F. A. Gross, Ruther Gruber, Erwin G. Gudde, Grace Guest, Ralph Gustafson, Berard Haile, Alfred Irving Hallowell, Howard M. Hamblin, Lucile Hamner, Adelaide Harrington, Arthur Harrington, Awona Harrington, Edmund Ross Harrington, Elliot Harrington, Mark Raymond Harrington, Robert Fleming Heizer, Marta Herrera (Orozoco), Melville Jean Herskovits, Edgar Lee Hewett, George Gustave Heye,

Thomas Willing Hicks, Willard Williams Hill, William B. Hill, Philip K. Hitti, Hulda R. Hobbs (Heidel), Frederick Webb Hodge, Robert Hofsinde, W. C. Holden, Nils Homer, R. B. Horsefield, James Hovey, Grace Hudson, John W. Hudson, William Hughes, Edward P. Hunt, George Hunt, Wayne Henry (Wolf Robe) Hunt, Arnold J. Jacobins, Jean Allard Jge, George M. Lamsa, William T. Linkins, Ralph Linton, Alan Lomax, Theodore R. Lonewolf, uis Kroeber, Benjamin T. Kurtz, Walter and Hilda Kurze, Oliver LaFarge, George M. Lamsa, William T. Linkins, Ralph Linton, Alan Lomax, Theodore R. Lonewolf,

Boas Long, Ivan Alexis Lopatin, Robert Harry Lowie, Charles F. Lummis, Phoebe Maddux, Frank Marashulo, Frank Marr, John Marr, Edna P. Marsh, Gordon H. Marsh, William B. Marye, Elizabeth Mason, John Alden Mason, Anna P. Mattinger, Wayne L. Mauzy, William Ralph Maxon, Parker McKenzie, F. Romero Mendez, Clinton Hart Merriam, E. Vigo Mestres, Truman Michelson, Harry E. Miller, Ralph L. Milliken, William S. Mills, Willie Miranda, Albert Mohr, Dionisia Mondragon, Manuel Mondragon, Lucy Montgomery, Harriet Moore, Mildred C. Moore, R. E. Moore, Rosalind Moore, Carlos Morales, Marion Moreno, Sylvanus Griswold Morley, Philip A. Munz, O. J. Murie,

Roy Nash, Mrs. W. J. Nichols, Eugene A. Nida, Frans M. Olbrechts, Cornelius Osgood, Asbjorn P. Ousdal, Charles F. Outland, Henry E. Parmenter, Elsie Clews Parsons, A. W. Payne, Ellen Peace, Elizabeth Wells Pearce, Arthur B. Perkins, Mrs. Rodolphe Petter, Kenneth L. Pike, Arnold R. Pilling, Nellie B. Pipes, I. J. Pitman, J. O. Prescott, Erik Kellerman Reed, Nathaniel Julius Reich, Jane Richardson, Arthur Stanley Riggs, Frank Harold Hanna Roberts, Jr., Helen H. Roberts, Clarence M. Ruth, Everett Sanders, Edward Sapir, Charles F. Saunders, F. H. Saville, Paul Schumacher, Donald Scott, Blanche Seeley, Ettie Seeley, Elizabeth Shepley Sergeant,

A. W. Setychell, Jessie Shaw, Anna O. Shepard, Frank T. Siebert, Rita Siedenberg, Albion M. Sitton, Nich Sivonen, H. D. Skinner, Mrs. N. P. Sloan, Clement Smith, Stella Smith, Jack Snow, Maria Soto, Frank Gouldsmith Speck, Robert F. Spencer, Marjorie Spinks, Waldo C. Spraque, Winifred Stamm, Moses Steinberg Marian Stirling, Matthew Williams Stirling, William Duncan Strong, Edgar Howard Sturtevant, Georgianna Barbara Such, John R. Swanton, Turkey Tayac, Douglass Taylor, Lincoln Thompson, Morjorie L. Tichy, Janet Tietjins, Bennie Tilden, J. R. R. Tolkien, W. Cameron Townsend, George L. Trager, Lovell B. Triggs, Edwin H. Tuttle,

Ruth Underhill, Richard Fowler Van Valkenburgh, Rosendo Vargas, Charles Frederick Voegelin, Paul Vogenitz, James W. Waldo, Paul A. F. Walter, Althea Warren, Fred Washington, Thomas Talbot Waterman, Edith White, Joseph J. White, Leslie A. White, Grace T. Whiting, Robert B. Whitsett, Benjamin Lee Whorf, H. E. Williams, William L. Wonderly, Arthur Woodward, Robert W. Young, and Father Zephyrin of the Santa Barbara Mission.
Restrictions:
The John Peabody Harrington papers are open for research

Access to the John Peabody Harrington papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Linguistics  Search this
Indians of North America -- Languages  Search this
Ethnomusicology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Toponymy  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Maps
Stats (copies)
Newspaper clippings
Printed material
Photographs
Botanical specimens
Field notes
Correspondence -- 1930-1950
Financial records
Personal records
Poetry
Writings
Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw31fe9575b-f7aa-4286-9787-0cfc495ab461
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1976-95
Online Media:

Sound recording

Collector:
Harrington, Arthur  Search this
Morris, Leonard  Search this
Performer:
Justo, Juan de Jesus  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Item
Culture:
Chumash -- Mythology  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
04 August 1936
Local Numbers:
NAA INV.00000884
Local Note:
Disc note;AEH list
See CHU 0184-0187, 0189 + CHU CT63:CHU CT64, 7.50 IPS, NARS
Disc, aluminum, 12 in.
Other Title:
166 Continuation El Coyote y La Churrea
168 Continuation El Coyote y la Churrea
Place:
California -- Santa Barbara Hospital
Collection Restrictions:
The John Peabody Harrington papers are open for research

Access to the John Peabody Harrington papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / John Peabody Harrington Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3f7e096c1-96ea-494a-bec1-37fbea2d00dd
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref16085

Sound recording

Collector:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Informant:
Librado, Fernando  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (cylinder, 04in)
Culture:
Chumash -- Music, Songs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
1913
Local Numbers:
NAA INV.00000697
Local Note:
Tegler Catalog, Cyl 01
SEE CHU CT94, 7.50IPS, LOC
Wax cylinder
Other Title:
No Description
Place:
California -- Ventura
Collection Restrictions:
The John Peabody Harrington papers are open for research

Access to the John Peabody Harrington papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / John Peabody Harrington Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3e98b72aa-9ab5-44d5-9812-a9fefb1c57f8
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref16257

Sound recording

Collector:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Informant:
Librado, Fernando  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (cylinder, 04in)
Culture:
Chumash -- Music, Songs -- Mythology  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
DEC 1913
Local Numbers:
NAA INV.00000698
Local Note:
Tegler Catalog Cyl 02
SEE CHU 0007, 0009, 0010, 0012, 0017 CHU CT94, 7.50IPS, LOC
Wax cylinder
Other Title:
Elewehuja, Chiknekch Myth
Place:
California -- Ventura
Collection Restrictions:
The John Peabody Harrington papers are open for research

Access to the John Peabody Harrington papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / John Peabody Harrington Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3477a2626-8180-423e-8028-a5c7979dd2fe
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref16258

Sound recording

Collector:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Informant:
Valenzuela, Candelaria  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (cylinder, 04in)
Culture:
Chumash -- Music, Songs -- Mythology  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
1914
Local Numbers:
NAA INV.00000699
Local Note:
Tegler Catalog, Cyl 03
SEE CHU CT94, 7.50IPS, LOC
Wax cylinder
Other Title:
1 Momojoka
2 Tapakulu
Place:
California -- Ventura
Collection Restrictions:
The John Peabody Harrington papers are open for research

Access to the John Peabody Harrington papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / John Peabody Harrington Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw383a99918-de5f-4758-babb-d7feb3a53450
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref16259

Sound recording

Collector:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Informant:
Librado, Fernando  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (cylinder, 04in)
Culture:
Chumash -- Historical Narrative -- San Nicholas Island, 1837 -- Music, Songs  Search this
Gabrielino -- Historical Narrative -- San Nicholas Island, 1837 -- Music, Songs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
DEC 1913
Local Numbers:
NAA INV.00000700
Local Note:
Tegler Catalog, Cyl 4
SEE CHU 0004 CHU CT94, 7.50IPS, LOC
Wax cylinder
Other Title:
Toki Toki, Song of the Old Woman of San Nicholas Island
Place:
California -- Ventura
Collection Restrictions:
The John Peabody Harrington papers are open for research

Access to the John Peabody Harrington papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / John Peabody Harrington Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3b9757b10-28db-4dd3-b2e8-f619f52a1f74
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref16260

Sound recording

Collector:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Informant:
Librado, Fernando  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (cylinder, 04in)
Culture:
Chumash -- Music, Songs -- Historical, Narrative -- San Nicholas Island, 1837  Search this
Gabrielino -- Music, Songs -- Historical, Narrative -- San Nicholas Island, 1837  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
DEC 1913
Local Numbers:
NAA INV.00000701
Local Note:
Tegler Catalog, Cyl 05
SEE CHU 0003 CHU CT94, 7.50IPS, LOC
Wax cylinder
Other Title:
1 Continuation Toki Toki, Song of the Old Woman of San Nicholas
Island
2 Hihi'ihijuhu
Place:
California -- Ventura
Collection Restrictions:
The John Peabody Harrington papers are open for research

Access to the John Peabody Harrington papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / John Peabody Harrington Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw36c98fabd-3116-46fb-a3e6-6c9963182e58
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref16261

Sound recording

Collector:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Informant:
Librado, Fernando  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (cylinder, 04in)
Culture:
Chumash -- Music, Songs -- Mythology  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
21 DEC 1913
Local Numbers:
NAA INV.00000702
Local Note:
Tegler Catalog, Cyl 06
SEE CHU CT94, 7.50IPS, LOC
Wax cylinder
Other Title:
1 Jum Jum Kitwo Kitwo 4 Jam Xundes
2 Ha Paxutikotsit, Coyote Myth
3 Shepeshiwash Mish
Place:
California -- Ventura
Collection Restrictions:
The John Peabody Harrington papers are open for research

Access to the John Peabody Harrington papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / John Peabody Harrington Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw37a5d4c25-8630-4b01-ba10-2c5648f9b907
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref16262

Sound recording

Collector:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Informant:
Librado, Fernando  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (cylinder, 04in)
Culture:
Chumash -- Music, Songs -- Mythology  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
21 DEC 1913
Local Numbers:
NAA INV.00000703
Local Note:
Tegler Catalog, Cyl 07
SEE CHU 0002, 0009, 0010, 0012, 0017 CHU CT94, 7.50IPS, LOC
Wax cylinder
Other Title:
Continuation Elewehuja, Chiknekch Myth
Place:
California -- Ventura
Collection Restrictions:
The John Peabody Harrington papers are open for research

Access to the John Peabody Harrington papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / John Peabody Harrington Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw35fa49795-f39c-4578-a3c8-8c31e5ef964e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref16263

Sound recording

Collector:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Informant:
Olivas, Jose Juan  Search this
Librado, Fernando  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (cylinder, 04in)
Culture:
Chumash -- Music, Songs -- Medicine  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
1915
Local Numbers:
NAA INV.00000704
Local Note:
Tegler Catalog, Cyl 08
SEE CHU CT94, 7.50IPS, LOC
Wax cylinder
Other Title:
Humaliwo Jahajaha, Med Song
2 Humaliwo Jahajahaha, Med. Song
3 a Waj Pure
Place:
California -- Ventura
Collection Restrictions:
The John Peabody Harrington papers are open for research

Access to the John Peabody Harrington papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / John Peabody Harrington Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw313098654-f5e1-4e32-a4b2-4cbf02aeffbe
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref16264

Sound recording

Collector:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Informant:
Librado, Fernando  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (cylinder, 04in)
Culture:
Chumash -- Music, Songs -- Mythology  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
1912
Local Numbers:
NAA INV.00000705
Local Note:
Tegler Catalog, Cyl 09
SEE CHU 0002, 0007, 0010, 0012, 0017 CHU CT95, 7.50IPS, LOC
Wax cylinder
Other Title:
1 'ananaitseta
2 Continuation Elewehuja, Chiknekch Myth
3 Hanak Panati
Place:
California -- Ventura
Collection Restrictions:
The John Peabody Harrington papers are open for research

Access to the John Peabody Harrington papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / John Peabody Harrington Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw365490aa7-5b3c-4a8a-aba1-3232513f2c1f
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref16265

Sound recording

Collector:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Informant:
Librado, Fernando  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (cylinder, 04in)
Culture:
Chumash -- Music, Songs -- Mythology  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
1912
Local Numbers:
NAA INV.00000706
Local Note:
Tegler Catalog, Cyl 10
SEE CHU 0002, 0007, 0009, 0012, 0017 CHU CT95, 7.50IPS, LOC
Wax cylinder
Other Title:
1 'ananaitseta
2 Continuation Elewehuja, Chiknekch Myth
Place:
California -- Ventura
Collection Restrictions:
The John Peabody Harrington papers are open for research

Access to the John Peabody Harrington papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / John Peabody Harrington Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3d6a696f4-fd3c-4f77-971b-e3f3d36a15ea
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref16266

Sound recording

Collector:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Informant:
Valenzuela, Candelaria  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (cylinder, 04in)
Culture:
Chumash -- Music, Songs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
1913
Local Numbers:
NAA INV.00000707
Local Note:
Tegler Catalog, Cyl 11
SEE CHU CT95, 7.50IPS, LOC
Wax cylinder
Other Title:
No Description
Place:
California -- Ventura
Collection Restrictions:
The John Peabody Harrington papers are open for research

Access to the John Peabody Harrington papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / John Peabody Harrington Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3fa38fb6d-92ab-41c5-a38c-26ad5c0905fd
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref16267

Sound recording

Collector:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Informant:
Librado, Fernando  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (cylinder, 04in)
Culture:
Chumash -- Music, Songs -- Mythology  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
1912
Local Numbers:
NAA INV.00000708
Local Note:
Tegler Catalog, Cyl 12
SEE CHU 0002, 0007, 0009, 0010, 0017 CHU CT95, 7.50IPS, LOC
Wax cylinder
Other Title:
1 Wenaminami P'tanem
2 Nowijakinohonwija
3 Continuation Elewehuja, Chiknekch Myth
Place:
California -- Ventura
Collection Restrictions:
The John Peabody Harrington papers are open for research

Access to the John Peabody Harrington papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / John Peabody Harrington Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3bf97ec39-1a20-4507-a266-cec3bb96e56b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref16268

Sound recording

Collector:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Informant:
Valenzuela, Candelaria  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (cylinder, 04in)
Culture:
Chumash -- Music, Songs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
04 JAN 1914
Local Numbers:
NAA INV.00000709
Local Note:
Tegler Catalog, Cyl 13
SEE CHU CT95, 7.50IPS, LOC CYLINDER RECORDED TWICE ON TAPE IN ERROR JPH IDENTIFIED CANDELARIA, 74 YRS. OLD, SOLE SURVIVOR SESPE INDIAN TRIBE, ON ORIGINAL
Wax cylinder
Other Title:
No Description
Place:
California -- Ventura
Collection Restrictions:
The John Peabody Harrington papers are open for research

Access to the John Peabody Harrington papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / John Peabody Harrington Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw319898605-ea91-4d18-9d87-68ada5f5bbb9
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref16269

Sound recording

Collector:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (cylinder, 04in)
Culture:
Chumash -- Music, Songs -- Zoology  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Local Numbers:
NAA INV.00000710
Local Note:
Tegler Catalog, Cyl 14
SEE CHU CT95, 7.50IPS, LOC
Wax cylinder
Other Title:
1 Bird Songs
2 Same
3 Same
Place:
California
Collection Restrictions:
The John Peabody Harrington papers are open for research

Access to the John Peabody Harrington papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / John Peabody Harrington Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3137c7bc5-79e7-4153-941d-acbb9a787e8c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref16270

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