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MS 1875 Sixteen Fox stories with translations collected by Truman Michelson

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Creator:
Bullard, Jack  Search this
Kiyana, Alfred, 1877-1918  Search this
Lasley, Lucy  Search this
Sakihtanohkweha, 1875-1957  Search this
Translator:
Poweshiek, Ida  Search this
Extent:
25 Items (0.25 linear feet (approximately 745 pages)
Culture:
Fox Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Place:
Tama (Iowa)
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains stories handwritten in Meskwaki (Fox) syllabary with English translations by Ida Poweshiek. These texts were collected by Truman Michelson in Tama, Iowa. List of titles based on English translations: 1.) The Winter Story of Longhair, by Lucy Lasley and Jack Bullard; text 18 pages, translation 27 pages. 2.) Fasting, by Lucy Lasley; text 7 pages, translation 3 pages. 3.) Fast runner, by Lucy Lasley; text 2 pages, translation 3 pages. 4.) Lost Boy, by Lucy Lasley; text 2 pages, translation 3 pages. 5.) Peace council with Pawnee, by Lucy Lasley; text 2 pages, translation 3 pages. 6.) Hunting, text 2 pages, translation 3 pages. 7.) Wisahkeha, by Sakihtanohkweha (Mrs. Bill Leaf); text 31 pages and translation 30 pages. 8.) The youth who became corn and the Indians of long ago who grew as all different kinds of things, by Alfred Kiyana; text 41 pages, translation 36 pages. 9.) Rooster with feet of money, text 18 pages, translation 20 pages. 10.) Ball-Player, by Jack Bullard and possibly Lucy Lasley; text 51 pages, translation 73 pages. 11.) One who loved her brother, by Alfred Kiyana; text 41 pages, translation 33 pages. 12.) The men who were taken to heaven by a bear, by Alfred Kiyana; text 7 pages, translation 9 pages. 13.) Keshakiwa, by Lucy Lasley and Jack Bullard; text 23 pages, translation 33 pages. 14.) Story about Turtle and Wisahkeha (Race for girl), text 8 pages, translation 11 pages. 15.) "Why men should not go hunting with ther wives" text 13 pages, (English translation only). 16.) Spirit of fire made by gods, by Alfred Kiyana; text 112 pages, translation 80 pages.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1875
Local Note:
Title changed from "Texts and Translations Legends" 3/18/2014.
Other Archival Materials:
See Manuscript 1879 for continuation of Wisahkeha story.
Topic:
Fox language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Meskwaki; Sauk & Fox  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Citation:
Manuscript 1875, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1875
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3bcbf19c0-336c-4b7e-abbb-102589e3a3e1
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1875

MS 2764 Nineteen Fox stories by Alfred Kiyana, Bill Leaf, and Sakihtanohkweha

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Creator:
Leaf, Bill  Search this
Kiyana, Alfred, 1877-1918  Search this
Sakihtanohkweha, 1875-1957  Search this
Extent:
324 Pages
Culture:
Fox Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Nineteen stories handwritten in Meskwaki (Fox) syllabary by Alfred Kiyana, Bill Leaf, and Sakihtanohkweha (Mrs. Bill Leaf). These texts were collected by Truman Michelson in Tama, Iowa. Eight of the stories are by Alfred Kiyana. They are: Red-Leggings; When Bullhead killed two elks; The woman and the toad; The rooster; Turtle; Raccoon, who yelled loud; Kawesakweha and Kochipekwaha; and The man who got lost. Bill Leaf authored 10 of the texts, including: Many men on the warpath, two stories on Fighters, The one who knew how to hunt, This last one is about when Wisahkeha has been seen, Sacred pack, and When I got drunk. Sakihtanohkweha wrote the text on a youth who fasted. No English translations are present.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2764
Local Note:
Title changed from "Legends" 4/28/2014.
Topic:
Fox language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Meskwaki; Sauk & Fox  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Citation:
Manuscript 2764, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2764
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw31fd65e83-0c73-4080-8589-4deaf4ee09fa
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2764

MS 2776 Truman Michelson field notes from the Munsee in Kansas and the Delaware in Oklahoma

Creator:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Informant:
Longbone, Silas  Search this
Elk Hair  Search this
Veix, Mr.  Search this
Veix, Mrs.  Search this
Caleb, Mr  Search this
Plake, Mrs  Search this
Eliot, Mr.  Search this
Caleb, Rufus  Search this
Samuel, Joab  Search this
Spooner, Mrs  Search this
Extent:
170 Pages
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Correspondence
Field notes
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Date:
1912-1913
Scope and Contents:
Ethnological and linguistic notes collected by Truman Michelson during his fieldwork among the Munsee in Kansas and the Delaware in Oklahoma in 1912. Also letters received in 1913 from Silas Longbone, one of the Delaware with whom Michelson worked closely. The majority of the notes are on the Delaware, and include Delaware stories in English. According to Ives Goddard, most of the information was provided by Elk Hair, the last great Delaware ceremonialist. Longbone served as an interpreter.

Contents of Delaware files: F.1) Letters from Silas Longbone, Dewey. Oklahoma, January 10, 1913. 5 pages; F.2) Ethnological notes. Longbone, informant. 3 pages; F.3) Legend. 8 pages; F.4) Doll Dance. 11 pages. Notes on small sheets, 2 pages; F.5 ) Delaware linguistic notes. 4 unnumbered pages. Text with interl. translation. 8 pages. Notes on small sheets, 5 pages. (17 pages total); F.6) Notes from Elk Hair. December 12 [1912] 11 pages; F.7) [Story of Delawares and White People] 10 pages; F.8) "Doctoring. Otter Skin Dance, ritualistic origin." 9 pages. Plus small sheet numbered "2". (10 pages.); F.9) Story of Wehixamokas, "the Delaware Sampson." Possibly from Longbone, with comments at end by Silas and Elkhair. 21 pages; F.10) Delaware Meeting House. Elk Hair, age 62. English text. 18 and 1 page (Also 3 pages notes on small sheets, possibly unrelated.); F.11) Miscellaneous ethnological and linguistic notes, apparently Delaware of Oklahoma. 8 pages.

Contents of Munsee files: F.12) "Munsee notes," ethnological and linguistic. Informants: Mr and Mrs Veix, Mr Caleb, Mrs Plake, Mr Eliot, Rufus Caleb, Joab Samuel, Mrs Spooner. 6 and 6 and 1 plus 3 pages. (16 pages total); F.13) [Munsee. Mrs Plake mentioned as 1 inft.] Text with interlinear English translation. 10 pages. Vocabulary and other linguistic notes, 9 unnumbered pages and pages numbered 2-8. (26 pages, total)
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2776
Topic:
Delaware language  Search this
Munsee language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Field notes
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Citation:
Manuscript 2776, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2776
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw398d8c44c-0a60-4aa5-909a-5d0300f1377c
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2776

MS 2655 Seven Fox stories by Alfred Kiyana, Sakihtanohkweha, and Jack Bullard

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Creator:
Kiyana, Alfred, 1877-1918  Search this
Bullard, Jack  Search this
Sakihtanohkweha, 1875-1957  Search this
Translator:
Poweshiek, Horace  Search this
Extent:
63 Items (0.63 linear feet (638 pages)
Culture:
Fox Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Seven stories handwritten in Meskwaki (Fox) syllabic text by Alfred Kiyana, Sakihtanohkweha (Mrs. Bill Leaf), and Jack Bullard, with English translations by Horace Poweshiek. These were collected by Truman Michelson in Tama, Iowa. The texts by Alfred Kiyana are "The man who married a giant woman," (text 23 pages, translation 18 pages); "When the ghosts cheated the Frenchmen," (text 7 pages, translation 5 pages); "Ten men," (text 13 pages, translation 10 pages); "Ghost, A man who had been a ghost and was a manitou," (text 49 pages, translation 40 pages); and "Wisahkeha dance," (text 197 pages, translation 94 pages). Sakihtanohkweha authored "Turkey-owner" (text 23 pages, translation 22 pages) and Jack Bullard authored "[The one who owned a wooden witch image]" (text 48 pages, translation 48 pages).
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2655
Local Note:
Title updated from "Texts" 3/28/2014.
Topic:
Fox language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Meskwaki; Sauk & Fox  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Citation:
Manuscript 2655, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2655
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw35a34301a-2909-4fec-a685-49113a65b7ae
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2655

MS 1879 Nine Fox legends collected by Truman Michelson

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Creator:
Leaf, Bill  Search this
Lincoln, Harry  Search this
Kiyana, Alfred, 1877-1918  Search this
Sakihtanohkweha, 1875-1957  Search this
Translator:
Poweshiek, Ida  Search this
Extent:
25 Items (0.25 linear feet (425 pages)
Culture:
Fox Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Nine stories in Meskwaki (Fox) syllabary by various authors with English translations by Ida Poweshiek. Contents: 1) Wapasaya by Bill Leaf; text 29 pages, translation 34 pages. 2.) When Wisahkeha fed bees to the wolves, by Alfred Kiyana; text 17 pages, translation 14 pages. 3.) Wisake, by Sakihtanohkweha (Mrs. Bill Leaf); text 40 pages, translation 30 pages. 4) Feather, by Harry Lincoln; text 25 pages, translation 34 pages. 5.) The man who made a sacred bundle, by Alfred Kiyana; text 27 pages, translation 18 pages. 6.) Something about Rabbit and Bear, by Harry Lincoln; text 6 pages, translation 9 pages. 7.) The Indian lead miners who mined lead long ago, by Alfred Kiyana; text 32 pages, translation 36 pages. 8.) The Indian who was blessed a an owl long ago, by Alfred Kiyana; text 31 pages, translation 28 pages. 9) When Wisake was almost captured by the manitous by Alfred Kiyana; text 8 pages, translation 13 pages.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1879
Local Note:
Title changed from "8 Legends" 3/19/2014.
Topic:
Fox language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Meskwaki; Sauk & Fox  Search this
Wapasaiya  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Citation:
Manuscript 1879, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1879
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3c8526d16-b9d0-4b75-a18c-6a76792fe94f
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1879

MS 2153 Seven Fox stories by Alfred Kiyana with translations and grammatical notes

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Creator:
Kiyana, Alfred, 1877-1918  Search this
Translator:
Leaf, Bill  Search this
Brown, Thomas, circa 1891-  Search this
Walker, Leo  Search this
Extent:
154 Pages
Culture:
Fox Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Seven stories in Meskwaki (Fox) syllabic text by Alfred Kiyana with English translations and Truman Michelson's grammatical notes. Collected in Tama, Iowa, the following is a list of the stories: 1.) "Owl" text 8 pages, translation from Bill Leaf 3 pages; 2) "The married couple: the man whose wife was wooed by a bear" text 29 pages, translation 18 pages, grammatical questions 6 pages; 3) "When Possum married Woodchuck" text 8 pages, 2 translations from Leo Walker (one incorrectly labelled "When Raccoon married Badger") 6 pages; 4) "When Raccoon was friends with Badger" text 16 pages, translation 13 pages; 5) "When the Fox chiefs were all killed by the Menominee" text 4 pages, translation from Leo Walker 3 pages; 6) "Me so swa" text 22 pages, translation by Michelson and Thomas Brown 18 pages.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2153
Topic:
Fox language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Meskwaki; Sauk & Fox  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Citation:
Manuscript 2153, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2153
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw350ad675f-c01a-495e-9283-75341c3c2544
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2153

MS 2721 Shawnee and Peoria notes and stories collected by Truman Michelson

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Creator:
Finley, George W.  Search this
Skye, Bill  Search this
Stand, Nancy  Search this
Extent:
259 Pages
Culture:
Shawnee  Search this
Peoria  Search this
Miami  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Date:
1916
Scope and Contents:
Shawnee and Peoria linguistic and ethnographic notes and stories collected by Truman Michelson during his fieldwork in Oklahoma. Individuals that Michelson worked with include George Finley, Bill Skye, and Nancy Stand.The stories are primarily in English, but there are some texts in Shawnee and Peoria with interlineal English translations. A couple of the stories are marked Miami.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2721
Local Note:
Title changed from "Linguistic notes; ethnology; legend" 4/17/2014.
Topic:
Shawnee language  Search this
Miami language (Ind. and Okla.)  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Illinois  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Citation:
Manuscript 2721, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2721
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3e51e073d-bb0a-4245-b1f9-5c804b4844c7
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2721

Aleut

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Yatchmeneff, Ivan  Search this
Martin, Fredericka I.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
7.29 Linear feet ((20 boxes))
Culture:
Unangan (Aleut)  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Narratives
Manuscripts
Place:
Saint Paul Island (Alaska)
Date:
1941-1949
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Alaska/Northwest Coast series contains Harrington's Aleut research. The materials primarily consist of vocabulary, texts, and grammar.

Harrington used the dictionary portion of Veniaminov (1846) as the basis for compiling his Aleut vocabulary. Photostatted entries were pasted up, one to a page, and reheard with native speakers. Ivan Yatchmeneff provided retranscriptions in Russian characters and retranslations in English, doing much of the writing himself. Excerpts from Jochelson (1919) and a number of nonlinguistic publications were frequently interspersed with the field data.

A portion of the rechecked vocabulary was arranged numerically by Veniaminov's Aleut entry. The remaining entries were organized semantically and supplemented by original notes. The categories dealing with ethnobotany, ethnozoology, and placenames are particularly extensive and include rough sketches, maps, and references to several collections of specimens.

Most of the texts are native stories in Aleut and English, obtained from Ivan Yatchmeneff and several others on St. Paul Island. The remainder were obtained from Alexandra Gromoff during her stay in New York. She frequently translated English texts written by Fredericka Martin Berenberg, who added marginalia and interlinear notes and forwarded the material on to Harrington.

Harrington began his work on grammar by translating and rehearing Veniaminov (1846) with the aid of Father Baranoff and Ivan Yatchmeneff. Later, in the summer of 1947, he asked Berenberg to work with Alexandra Gromoff in order to clarify certain grammatical points. Because Gromoff was undergoing an operation at the time, he referred to the completed inventory as the "Hosp[ital] Questionnaire. "

Harrington's own grammatical write-up was left in outline form. It consists of handwritten drafts of an introduction and notes for each chapter, many of which cite the published works or manuscripts of other linguists. In 1948 he submitted a typescript titled "Unalaska Aleutian Grammar" [former B.A.E. ms. 4783] for review as a potential publication of the B.A.E. Although it contains an introduction and a detailed table of contents and is supplemented by semantic word lists, this later draft is also far from complete.
Biographical / Historical:
Although very few of John P. Harrington's Aleut field notes are dated, his annual reports and correspondence, particularly that with Fredericka Martin Berenberg, indicate that he worked on St. Paul Island, Alaska, from October through December of 1941, writing up the material at later periods in Washington, D.C. (probably 1943 and again 1947 to 1949). Ivan Alexis Yatchmeneff (abbreviated Я, Yach., Yatch.), a speaker of the Unalaska dialect, was the primary source of linguistic information. A number of nonnatives traveling or living in the Aleutians provided him with cultural and botanical information.

Harrington had several collaborators throughout his work. John Paul Marr (Jackie, Jacq.), his field assistant during the late 1930s and early 1940s, accompanied him to the Aleutians to aid with the collection of plant and animal specimens, the review of secondary source materials, and the preparation of sound recordings. Makary A. Baranoff (Baranov, Fr. B.), a Russian priest on St. Paul Island, collaborated in the translation of Ivan Veniaminov's (1846) Opyt grammatiki and commented upon much of the linguistic data reelicited from Ivan Yatchmeneff. Fredericka Martin Berenberg (Mrs. Ber., Mrs. B., Freddie), who later edited The Aleut Language by Richard H. Geoghegan, shared her knowledge of the inhabitants, local history, and geography during Harrington's stay. After leaving the island, she continued to correspond with him, and in the late 1940s brought Alexandra Gromoff (Alex., Alec., Alice, A.), to live with her and attend college in New York State. Harrington managed to work briefly with Gromoff during several weekends in August and September 1948, although most of his work was done through Berenberg.

Harrington's study of Aleut relied heavily upon the work of the Russians Ivan Veniaminov (Ven.) and Waldemar I. Jochelson (Joch.). He also elaborated upon the historical and placename information obtained from a number of publications pertaining to the islands.

Harrington's only publication on Aleut is a review (1947) of The Aleut Language.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Aleut language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Ethnozoology  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Narratives
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 1.1
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 1: Native American History, Language, and Culture of Alaska and the Northwest Coast
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3d3fee4d8-09ec-4524-a871-a12d9a853e06
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref12321
Online Media:

Karok/Shasta/Konomihu

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Maddux, Phoebe  Search this
Roberts, Helen H. (Helen Heffron), 1888-1985  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
49 Boxes
Culture:
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Karuk (Karok)  Search this
Shasta  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Field notes
Vocabulary
Songs
Narratives
Date:
circa 1925-1933
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Northern and Central California series contains Harrington's research on Karok, Shasta, and Konomihu. Materials include notes on vocabulary, grammar, placenames, and basketry; biographical data on various Karok people; texts consisting of stories, myths, formulas, songs, and ethnographic accounts; notes from rehearings of secondary sources; and notes and drafts of Harrington's writings. There are also notes from his interviews with Sandybar Jim, Francisco Capitan, Fritz Hanson, Mrs. Grant, and Fannie Orcutt.

The section of Karok vocabulary is extensive and includes terms for cosmography/minerals, plants, animals, kinship, geography, material culture, and tribenames. The list of plant names also include information on botanical specimens that Harrington collected in the field. A mixture of Shasta and Karok vocabulary can be found elsewhere in the subseries, covering natural history, material culture, kinship and rank, tribenames, and placenames. Etymologies and ethnographic data can be found in both sections for some of the vocabulary.

The section on Karok grammar is also fairly large. The notes include observations he made on the language while working with Fritz Hanson and Sylvester Donohue in 1926. Most of the notes were rechecked with Phoebe Maddus in 1928-1929. There are also miscellaneous vocabulary and short sentences with glosses and translations, elicited to illustrate a variety of phonetic and grammatical principles.

Harrington's notes on placenames include a set of diaries of trips he made throughout Karok territory. He also conducted a detailed study of the Konomihu region of Salmon River. Information that he gathered include etymologies, physical descriptions, locations, and related ethnographic data.

The scope of subjects covered in Harrington's ethnographic notes is broad and mostly reflect his work with Maddux. There are descriptions of life in the living house and sweat house, dress, and food preparation. Various ceremonies, dances, doctoring songs, and formulas are discussed. A wide variety of customs, practices, and beliefs, are mentioned as well as biographical information and anecdotes relating to Maddux and fellow members of her tribe.

Maddux also dictated in Karok stories, myths, formulas, and ethnographic accounts. Some include English translations or summaries. The stories include numerous tales about Coyote and other mythical figures. The formulas include prayers and recitatives, as well as chants used as medicine. The ethnographic texts concern such topics as gathering sugarpine nuts, bear hunting, and marriage customs. Partial transcriptions of Karok and Konomihu songs also form a substantial part of the textual material.
Biographical / Historical:
Much of John P. Harrington's major work of recording Karok vocabulary and ethnographic notes was undertaken during an uninterrupted period of six and one-half weeks from late March to early May 1926. Part of the work was conducted in cooperation with Helen H. Roberts, the ethnomusicologist. The principal Karok speaker that Harrington worked with at the time was Fritz Hanson, a speaker of the Katimin dialect, who was considered to be especially knowledgeable regarding material culture and tribenames. Sylvester Donohue acted as interpreter. Lesser amounts of data were given by Donohue's younger brother, Ben, and a number of other speakers.

Harrington first officially requested permission to work on the ethnology of the Karok in May 1928. In August of that year he returned to the Klamath and Salmon River area. It was at this time that he began working extensively with Phoebe Maddux. Maddux, whose mother was a native doctor, had been raised at Ishipishrihak (Ishi Pishi), a village on the northwest bank of the Klamath River opposite Katimin. While in the region, Harrington obtained sizable vocabularies of the Shasta and Konomihu languages from a Mrs. Grant (further unidentified) and her older sister, Susan Brizelle, both of whom worked with Roland B. Dixon, Jaime de Angulo, and Helen H. Roberts. Daughters of a Konomihu mother and a French father, the women apparently had also learned some Shasta from their maternal grandmother, a Cherokee, who, after her capture, had adopted the "Etna language" (Scotts Valley Shasta).

In October 1928 Harrington brought Phoebe Maddux back with him to Washington, D.C., where she remained until July of the following year when they began the return trip to the west coast via Chaco Canyon, New Mexico. During this lengthy period, Maddux reheard the Karok notes obtained from Hanson, furnished much grammatical information, dictated numerous texts, and examined many artifacts and specimens in the collections of the U. S. National Museum. In addition, she commented upon the Shasta and Konomihu notes, particularly the placename data. In April, Harrington and Maddux were authorized to meet with Franz Boas in New York City for the purpose of making several wax cylinder recordings of the Karok language. En route to Maddux's home in late July 1929, Harrington and Maddux stopped at Eureka, California, to work briefly with Fannie Orcutt, an Orleans Karok woman.

Harrington returned briefly to his study of the Shasta and Konomihu languages in October 1933 when his presence in Takelma territory facilitated a second visit with Brizelle. At that time he "touched up" his earlier notes by adding language identifications and once again rechecked the material. Brizelle's brother, Henry, and her son, Johnny, were also present at these sessions.

Nonlinguistic information was provided by Carl Langford, Harrington's host in the area, and F. B. McCann, as well as by a variety of specialists in the natural sciences. He was assisted in much of the work by George W. Bayley of Santa Barbara, a friend who had helped in the excavation of the Burton Mound some years earlier.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Karok language  Search this
Shasta language  Search this
Konomihu language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnomusicology  Search this
Basket making  Search this
Karuk  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Field notes
Vocabulary
Songs
Narratives
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 2.9
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 2: Papers Relating to the Native American history, language and culture of northern and central California
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3b50a622a-9dd7-4522-86af-da98ecd43cc0
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref13272

Luiseño/Juaneño

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Harrington, Arthur  Search this
Names:
Mission San Juan Capistrano  Search this
Boscana, Gerónimo, 1776-1831  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
37 Boxes
Culture:
Luiseño Indians  Search this
Juaneño Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Songs
Narratives
Maps
Place:
California -- Languages
California -- History
Date:
1919-1947
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southern California/Basin series contains John P. Harrington's research on Luiseno and Juaneno.

The Luiseno linguistic and ethnographic notes consist mainly of notes elicited from Maria Jesusa Omish and Maria Jesusa Soto in 1933 and from Bernardo Cuevas in 1934. The material is a random rehearing of the information which Harrington assembled for Chinigchinich ... with continued refinements of terms from DuBois and Kroeber. Substantial amounts of ethnographic information were recorded. A Gabrielino Indian, Jose Juan Jauro, was credited with an occasional Juaneno and Ventureno term. A group of Sparkman terms was reheard in 1934 with Micaela Calec and with Juan S. Calac, Willie [Calac], and Victor Meza. Jesus Jauro provided a few Gabrielino and Serrano terms.

A large section of the Luiseno vocabulary is arranged semantically; the notes were accumulated between 1932 and 1934 with elicitations from more than fifteen informants. Juaneno, Diegueno, Cahuilla, and Gabrielino terms were also recorded. Animals, ceremonies, placenames, and plant names contain the largest amounts of material. Included among the notes are first-hand recollections of events which the informants witnessed or participated in, bits of local biography, and ethnographic miscellany. There is also an earlier vocabulary, possibly from Cecilia Tortes, dated May 17, 1919.

Records of his placename trips cover information recorded in 1925, 1932, 1933, and 1934 from his trips to Corona, Elsinore, Hemet, Mesa Grande, Murietta rancheria, San Jacinto, San Juan Capistrano, Santa Ana, Soboba, Warner Springs, and many smaller sites between these points. He traveled with many Luiseno speakers and interviewed local residents along the way, noting the mileage between sites, and often sketching rough maps of the area. The result is a journal of linguistic, ethnographic, and geographic material, which is unfortunately somewhat difficult to read. Some Cupeno and Diego terms were recorded.

The Luiseno texts contains Chinigchinich songs composed by Jose Luis Albanez in the 1870s and 1880s. A small group of songs sung by Encarnaciona and Juan Calac were recorded for Harrington by Josephine Porter Cook in 1934 and 1935. No corresponding discs have been located in N.A.A. The related notes comprise linguistic annotations and often an English precis of the song text. A typescript titled "Notes for the Use of Miss Roberts" refers to the ethnomusicologist Helen H. Roberts. The document covers topics of an instructive nature such as the linguistics of song, the ethnography of song, musical accompaniment, dances, etc. Three Luiseno texts from Adan Castillo contain interlinear English or Spanish translations. Also present is the beginning of a possible paper titled "Southern California Indian Legends for Children" and dated 1947. Some of the stories are in English only.

The Juaneno vocabulary is limited to plant names elicited from Anastacia de Majel, with a few Luiseno equivalences from Jose Albanez. There are some incidental ethnographic observations.

The Juaneno linguistic and ethnographic notes section contains notes copied from the notebooks of Father St. John O'Sullivan of the Mission San Juan Capistrano. Most of the information is of an ethnographic nature from a number of informants, although some original linguistic data was supplied to O'Sullivan by Jose de la Gracia Cruz, known as Acu. Acu's reliability, unfortunately, was questionable. There is a mixture of anecdotes, reminiscences, stories, folklore, hymns, ethnohistory, and related miscellany. Some stories may be Luiseno rather than Juaneno.The linguistic content was reheard with Anastacia de Majel. Eustaquio Lugo added some Juaneno and Luiseno terms. There are also notes copied from San Juan Capistrano Mission records. A file of fieldwork with de Majel, which probably took place in 1933, resulted in substantial amounts of both linguistic and ethnographic information, with some Luiseno input from Albanez.

The rehearings of Sparkman data section contains Juaneno and Luiseno data. Some of the rehearings were conducted by Harrington's nephew, Arthur E. Harrington, who worked with de Majel.

Among the drafts and notes for Chingchinich are Luiseno annotations of Robinson's 1846 translation of Boscana's account. There are also incomplete, initial drafts of translations of Boscana's account into Catalonian and literary Spanish by E. Vigo Mestres and into Luiseno by Albanez.

Rehearings of notes used for Chinigchinch include information on material culture, names of persons, placenames, and more stories and anecdotes. Vocabulary and especially orthography were accorded detailed attention. Rehearings of terms from DuBois are included and some Luiseno equivalences.

Notes and drafts for Boscana's original manuscript contains the results of his fieldwork among Luiseno and Juaneno speakers in 1934 as part of his plan to publish annotations of the manuscript. Harrington worked with many of the same people, particularly Anastacia de Majel and Jose Olivas Albanez. Adan Castillo gave a number of Luiseno and Cahuilla terms for the phonetic section. Harrington worked from a numbered typescript of the original Spanish manuscript. This triple-spaced material is interfiled with related ethnographic and linguistic handwritten notes. A second complete typed copy of the Spanish manuscript is filed separately.
Biographical / Historical:
Aside from a continuing effort to record the languages of the "Mission Indians of California," John P. Harrington's study of Luiseno and Juaneno sprang from two main roots. The first was his interest in providing a linguistic treatment of Alfred Robinson's 1846 translation of Father Geronimo Boscana's account of the Indians of San Juan Capistrano Mission. The second involved plans for extensive rehearings of Philip Stedman Sparkman's Luiseno vocabulary collected between 1899 and 1906. The Bancroft Library in Berkeley, California, holds this manuscript, the title page of which reads as follows: "The Luiseno Language, Being the language spoken by the San Luis Rey, San Luis, or Luiseno Indians of Southern California. A Shoshonean dialect. Written by P. S. Sparkman, at the Rincon, San Diego County, California, 1899 to 1906." It consists of 713 leaves of typescript, with annotations and revisions by Alfred L. Kroeber.

Harrington began serious and thorough work on the annotations for Boscana's historical account in March of 1932. His interest continued until at least, and probably past, April 1936 and resulted in two publications and extensive notes on a proposed third publication. Harrington was convinced that Boscana's account, probably written between 1820 and 1822, stood alone as an early ethnological document on the Spanish Missionary period in California and was therefore an ideal subject for major ethnographic and linguistic amplifications. The work proceeded in three general phases.

The first phase culminated in the publication early in 1933 of Harrington's book titled Chinigchinich: A Revised and Annotated Version of Alfred Robinson's Translation of Father Geronimo Boscana's Historical Account of the Belief, Usages, Customs and Extravagencies [sic] of the Indians of This Mission of San Juan Capistrano called the Acagchemem Tribe. The linguistic material is chiefly Luiseno.

In 1933 while Chinigchinich ... was still in the printing process, Harrington began a second round of rehearings, this time focusing mainly on the Juaneno language. This period forms the second cohesive phase.

Meanwhile a search initiated in 1932 for Boscana's original manuscript was completed. Abel Doysie wrote from Paris that he had discovered the original document in the Bibliotheque Nationale. M. Doysie photographed the sixty-page manuscript and sent it to Harrington on January 3, 1933. Harrington's translation, A New Original Version of Boscana's Historical Account of the San Juan Capistrano Indians of Southern California, appeared in June 1934. In the introduction, Harrington stated that "it is an 1822 variant of the Historical Account that Robinson translated, each version containing certain important data that the other omits. " The new manuscript contained fifteen chapters; the Robinson translation had sixteen.

On page 3, Harrington mentioned "exhaustive notes" for a later volume of annotations to the translation and although in 1936 he received a {dollar}500 grant from the Social Research Council to carry through this plan, the annotations were not published. Phase three, however, centers around this endeavor. In 1935 and 1936, Harrington copied and reorganized hundreds of pages of notes and added new data preparatory to the proposed third publication.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Luiseño language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
manuscripts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Songs
Narratives
Maps
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 3.8
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 3: Papers relating to the Native American history, language and culture of southern California and Basin
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw34d37f113-9a8f-464c-8e6a-ee8aca796295
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14310

Taos

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Laird, Carobeth, 1895-1983  Search this
Stevenson, Matilda Coxe, 1850-1915  Search this
Stevenson, James, Colonel  Search this
Grant, Blanche C. (Blanche Chloe), 1874-1948  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
22 Boxes
Culture:
Taos Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Narratives
Date:
1909-circa 1944
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southwest series contains Harrington's Taos research. The materials consist of field notes, grammatical and semantic slipfile, grammar, dictionary, linguistic notes, ethnographic and historical notes, and texts.

Among his field notes are slips prepared for semantic arrangement (former B.A.E. MS 2309 and 2290pt.). Many of the terms were used in the draft of an unpublished grammar, with some orthographic variations. The use of "q" for "kw" suggests an early date, possibly 1909-1910 . An early vocabulary is comprised of Harrington's comparative Taos terms used in his article "Notes on the Piro Language" (1909a).

From former B.A.E. manuscripts 2290pt., 2292pt., and 2296 come several categories of miscellaneous field notes. Included are a vocabulary elicited in 1910, typed and annotated notes which collate much of the information written on slips, and miscellaneous slips some dated 1920, some probably earlier-which contain brief Picuris comparisons. Data encompass placenames, tribenames, ethnogeographic terms, and some grammatical elaborations.

Another group of field notes appears to be Taos with Isleta comparisons. This is a tentative identification still subject to the scrutiny of linguists, who are not presently in complete agreement. The physical condition and type of paper used indicate that these notes may have been recorded during the period 1909 to 1911.

A set of slips, formerly cataloged as B.A.E. MS 2318 and 2295pt., fills four boxes. Field notes and reports suggest that this comprehensive body of material may have been accumulated, annotated, and rearranged over a period of time ranging from 1909 to 1928. The largest section of the file was arranged by Harrington according to grammatical categories and is especially substantial on verb and pronoun usage. Another group of slips is semantically arranged; some phonetic, ethnographic, and historical material is interjected.

The grammar section includes tabulations in English of pronoun prefix material which give an excellent indication of Harrington's methodology for accumulating slipfiles. Taos slips deal with pronoun usage, verb paradigms, and sentence structure. These are early notes, probably dating from 1909 to 1911. Mondragon was the principal source of information. The section also includes three drafts of manuscripts on Taos grammar, only of which one was published. "Ambiguity in the Taos Personal Pronoun" (1916) (former B.A.E. MS 2293pt. and 4682pt.) was condensed from another draft of an unpublished, more comprehensive grammar (former B.A.E. MS 4682pt.). A draft of a paper on numerals is filed with some of the original field notes from which it evolved (former B.A.E. MS 4681). Another major subsection consists of a draft of over 500 typed pages of a comprehensive grammar by Carobeth Laird, Harrington's wife at the time. The manuscript (former B.A.E. MS 2307 and 4680), titled "Grammatical Analysis of the Taos Language," is dated 1920. The fieldwork for the paper was done in Taos during July and August of 1918 with Taos speakers Lujan and Mondragon. A partial and preliminary draft and notes reveal some annotations by Harrington, who also was in Taos at the same time working with the same speakers.

This subseries also contains Harrington's Taos dictionary. The Taos-English section is in alphabetical order according to the first sound of the base. Although the English-Taos section gives the English word first, it follows the alphabetical order of the Taos term according to Harrington's list of initial symbols. Some entries in the dictionary are followed by the notes from which they evolved. There is also a file of Taos bird names, apparently intended for incorporation into the dictionary, as well as a small group of plant names. These also are in Taos-English and English-Taos. Filed with this material is a list of the scientific names for Taos birds; annotations were supplied by Florence Merriam Bailey and Vernon Bailey. (See "Studying the Mission Indians of California and the Taos of New Mexico" [1929].)

Harrington's linguistic notes (former B.A.E. MS 2292pt. and 2295pt.) include grammar, vocabulary, and textual material, apparently accumulated in July and August of 1918 from his work with Lujan and Mondragon. At least a portion of the material was collected with the assistance of his wife Carobeth, and a number of pages are in her hand. The pagination evidently underwent several reorganizations and is therefore somewhat chaotic. His other notes consist of comments on George L. Trager's "The Kinship and Status Terms of the Tiwa Languages" (1943) and on Elsie Clews Parsons' Taos Pueblo (1936). Relationship terms, age and sex nouns, personal names, rank nouns, and tribenames are mentioned.

Among his ethnographic and historical notes is his unfinished manuscript, "The Taos Indians" (former B.A.E. MS 3073). He relied heavily on Matilda Coxe Stevenson's field notes for his manuscript; her contribution is mainly ethnographic while a few pages are the work of her husband, James. Taos speaker Tony Romero is the source for the clan names. Harrington also incorporated his notes from 1908, 1909, 1911, 1918, and 1919. For historical data, Harrington relied on published sources, especially early Spanish documents for which he supplied original translations and throughout which some Picuris history is interwoven. The bibliographic information for the historical sources is interspersed throughout the notes.

There are also notes and excerpts from Blanche C. Grant's publications and miscellaneous notes on dances (former B.A.E. MS 2292pt.). A few random ethnographic notes on slips are written in English.

Contained in a series of texts are stories of Wolf and Deer and two versions of the Lord's Prayer with grammatical notes. Also included is the Tanoan linguistic diagram (former B.A.E. MS 2292 pt.) used in Harrington's "An Introductory Paper on the Tiwa Language, Dialect of Taos, New Mexico" (191 Oc). Jose Lopez and Santiago Mirabel provided the Taos terms used in this publication.
Biographical / Historical:
The first indication of John P. Harrington's work among the Taos Indians comes from his financial records of September 20, 1909, to January 15, 1910, when he was based in Santa Fe and doing fieldwork in various languages of the Southwest. Peak periods of in-depth work on Taos, sometimes in the field and sometimes in Washington, D.C., appear to be 1909-1911, 1918-1922, 1926-1930, and 1944-1945. He worked primarily with Joe Lujan (abbreviated "L.") and Manuel Mondragon ("M."), with Mondragon helping from 1910 to 1927. There are references to a trip which Harrington made with Margaret Tschirgi and F. E. Betts to the ruins east of Taos on September 30, 1928, but there are no further explanatory notes.

Mutual professional respect had arisen between Harrington and Matilda Coxe Stevenson of the Bureau of American Ethnology, at whose ranch he spent six weeks in the autumn of 1908. He was in possession of a large body of her original notes on south western Indians at the time of her death in 1915 and planned to arrange, annotate, and publish them. Her material on Taos appears in an unpublished historical and ethnographic manuscript titled "The Taos Indians."
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Tiwa language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Dance  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Narratives
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 4.10
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 4: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Southwest
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw312afc488-7d19-481b-9b9b-2beaf8561249
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14679

Yucatec

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
25 Boxes
Culture:
Indians of Mexico  Search this
Mayas  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Correspondence
Narratives
Place:
Yucatán Peninsula
Date:
circa 1920-1960
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Mexico/Central America/South America series contains Harrington's Yucatec research. The materials consist of vocabulary, grammar, texts, writings, and miscellaneous notes.

The Yucatec vocabulary falls into three distinct subsections. The first consists of wordlists from an unidentified informant, supplemented by a little ethnographic and anecdotal material. A second set of vocabulary was recorded from Domingo Canton Aguilar and his wife (abbreviated "Ag. Y Sra."). They contain references to the dialects of Nahuatl spoken by Alfonso Hernandez Catarina (Alf.) and Arcadio Sagahon (Arc.). The third and most extensive section is a file of semantically arranged lexical items. The notes include a mixture of excerpts from secondary sources and original data recorded by Harrington. There are some notes in unidentified handwriting scattered throughout. A number of large subject categories--corporeal, animals, and material culture--are subdivided.

The grammar files consist of extensive notes and a rough draft for a grammar of the Yucatec language. The material is somewhat repetitious due to the presence of variant drafts. The notes contain a mixture of general observations on various points of grammar, extracts from published sources, and original field data. The rough draft and accompanying notes are filed under two headings "Maya Grammar and Lists" and "Maya Language and Semantic Lists." The introduction includes a bibliography of other dictionaries and grammers, a description of the physical features of the Yucatan peninsula, and a discussion of the Maya linguistic stock. The body of the material is divided into categories on phonetics, morphology, verbs, adverbs, particles, nouns, pronouns, conjunctions, interjections, and unsorted topics. The sections dealing with phonetics and verbs (the latter is labeled "Uc. on Lop.") are particularly extensive. A typed manuscript of 308 pages (former B.A.E. ms. 4782) titled "Maya Grammar and Lists" was submitted by Harrington in 1952 for publication as a Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin. The language presented is the ''standard dialect of the states of Yucatan and Campeche." The grammar contains a detailed table of contents, furnishes details on the geographical background and history of the Yucatan peninsula, and discusses Maya grammars and dictionaries.

Yucatec textual material is of three types. The first set consists of myths, the second of records relating to the ''Treaty of Mani," and the third of notes on a Yucatec religious newspaper dating from 1949. Thirty pages of native myth texts contain interlinear translations in a mixture of Spanish and English. The stories include "El Milpero, el Cascabel, el Perro, el Tigre" and "El Zorro y la Esposa del Milpero." The four-page text "Le Ocb Yetel Can" is in the hand of David Arceo H. The "Story of the Blind Hammockmaker" was recorded from Arceo with English and Spanish translation. There is also a summary of the story of venado and tortuga. Material relating to the "Treaty of Mani" includes a word-by-word translation of the treaty, a typed version with free translation and notes, and correspondence with Arthuro Medina and David Arceo H. dating from July 1948 and March 1950. There is also a copy of one issue of the newspaper U Tajil T'au dated November-December 1949. There are a few pages of related notes.

Harrington's writings on Yucatec begins with notes and a rough draft for the article "Original Form and Application of Maya." The paper, which is concerned with the etymology of the name "Maya," discusses the six names by which the Yucatan peninsula is known. There are also notes and drafts for two related articles titled "Egyptian, Chinese and Mayoid Ideographic Writing" and "Reading the Maya Ideograms." This material is followed by a partial rough draft titled "Maya Ideograms Being Read"; it is not clear whether the handwriting, which is not Harrington's, is that of a copyist or a "ghost writer." Dating from June 28, 1950, are extensive notes on the Maya system of counting, arranged behind heading sheets which are labeled "How the Maya Count," "Maya Enumeration," and "V[alladolid] Maya Counting." It appears that Harrington originally worked on several drafts of an article with these different titles; the material is now inextricably mixed. The subtopics covered are arithmetical processes, systems of measures, and time reckoning (including discussion of the twenty-day month). Also filed here is a rough draft labeled "Draft for the Ag. typewritten paper on May[a] Numeration" and a typed draft titled "The Maya Count." "The Maya Count" discusses the system of counting used in the northern part of the Yucatan peninsula by speakers whose language was probably a direct descendent of the language in which the Maya hieroglyphics and codices were written. There are also notes and drafts of reviews which he drafted from 1948 through 1960. The file of writings ends with rough notes for proposed papers on "Maya Hieroglyphic Writing," "Maya Linguistic Stock," and "Influence of Maya and Yucatan Spanish on Each Other."

The section of miscellaneous notes on Yucatec includes a small file of correspondence. There is a letter from Isaias Uc C., Campeche, Mexico, in 1950; a carbon copy of a letter to Jesse Shaw dated April 14, 1952, regarding arrangements for Domingo Aguilar's travel to the United States; handwritten drafts of two letters to John Linkins; and a typed copy of a lengthy letter to Dr. Tozzer from an unidentified writer. Also included is a section labeled "Persons & Addresses," as well as some notes on the sound recordings which Harrington made during fieldwork in Mexico in 1950. The file concludes with what appear to be drafts of annual reports. There is the first page only of a typed statement titled "Maya Language Studies." This is followed by ten handwritten pages of notes which refer to three papers on Maya ideograms and numerals.
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington's study of the Yucatec language of Mexico was undertaken in at least five distinct phases. Both in correspondence and in a draft of a Quiche grammar, Harrington claimed that his first study of the Maya stock was conducted with Eduardo Caceres, a fluent speaker of Maya proper from Merida in the state of Yucatan. They evidently worked together in National City and San Diego, California, around 1914.

In the Sixty-fifth Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology for 1947-1948, Harrington reported that he had recently completed a grammar of the Maya language as well as an article comparing the ideographic writing systems of the Maya, Egyptians, and Chinese. In the following year he continued his revision of these two works and studied the etymology of the word "Maya." His work on the grammar was evidently made possible through studies undertaken with two Yucatec speakers residing in New York City.

Notes indicate that Harrington was in contact with Arthuro Medina (abbreviated "Med.") by at least September 1948. Medina was from Tikul, near the ruins of Uxmal, a few miles south of Merida, and his wife was also from the Yucatan. Through them Harrington learned of a second Maya speaker, Castulo Ucan. Evidently beginning in mid-November 1949, Harrington made a number of trips of several days duration to New York to work with Ucan. Letters which he wrote to bureau chief Matthew W. Stirling in November and December describe Ucan (abbreviated "U.") as a good informant and make mention of the "Motul dictionary" which he used as a questionnaire during their work together.

Although he felt that his work with these informants had been satisfactory, Harrington still wished to travel to Merida to conduct fieldwork with additional informants. He arrived in Merida on Saturday, February 11 and returned to Washington, D.C., on April 11 "bringing a large quantity of linguistic material" as well as "ten half-hour recordings of stories in the Maya language" which he had recorded on tape.

Harrington's first Mexican informant was Isaias Uc whom he described to Stirling as "a treasure," someone who spoke Spanish as a professor, with "a wonderful vocabulary for grammatical terms." Their work included a review of the grammar by Daniel Lopez Otero. He also worked with David Arceo H. (evidently abbreviated "A."), whom he described as "an unsurpassed teacher of Maya," with a knowledge of proverbs and traditional Maya history. From Arceo he was able to obtain a handwritten translation of the Treaty of Mani, from Maya to Spanish, as well as tape recordings of the same.

Other informants with whom Harrington evidently worked during this same period include Pascual Ayora Taliaferro (also spelled "Talavera" and abbreviated "P.") and Geronimo Pacheco. He also received nonlinguistic information from Dr. Solis, Mr. Romero M., Mr. Nichols, Willey (possibly Gordon R. Willey), and Harry, among others.

On March 9, 1951, Harrington had the opportunity to return to Mexico to pursue studies of the classical Aztec, or Nahuatl, language. During the approximately six months he spent there he also worked with another Yucatec speaker, Domingo Canton Aguilar (abbreviated "Ag.") and his wife, who were from Xochimilco in the Distrito Federal. Harrington referred to the latter as Maria Pura Aguilar de C.

Aguilar accompanied Harrington back to Washington, D.C., to assist in the preparation of a grammar and a dictionary of the Maya language. In the same fiscal year (1951 -1952) Harrington completed a monograph on the numeration system of the Valladolid Maya Indians of Yucatan.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Maya language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Toponymy  Search this
Grammar, Comparative and general  Search this
Maya numeration  Search this
Maya calendar  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Correspondence
Narratives
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 7.5
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 7: Mexico/Central America/South America
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3fdc9de07-66ca-43ac-93ec-9e8a72b7dfe3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15127

John Peabody Harrington papers: Costanoan (part 1)

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Names:
Mission San Carlos Borromeo (Carmel, Calif.)  Search this
San Juan Bautista (Mission : San Juan Bautista, Calif.)  Search this
Santa Barbara Mission  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
149 Boxes
Culture:
Ohlone (Costano)  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Songs
Narratives
Place:
California -- History
Date:
1921-1939
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Northern and Central California series contains Harrington's research on Costanoan (Ohlone) languages, particularly Chocheno, Mutsun, and Rumsen. Materials include linguistic, ethnographic, and historical notes.

Harrington obtained a large amount of vocabulary during his fieldwork. Harrington organized the Mutsun vocabulary into a dictionary of sorts, and also compiled a rudimentary Rumsen dictionary. The bulk of the subseries, however, consist of his notes from rehearings of vocabulary recorded by Felipe Arroyo de la Cuesta, C. Hart Merriam, Henry W. Henshaw, Alfred Kroeber, Alexander S. Taylor, Alphonse Pinart, R.G. Latham, Adam John (an Indian agent), Reverend Professor Gregory Mengarini, Eugene Duflot de Mofras, Father Juan Comelias, and Horatio Hale. Harrington reviewed their data, some of which include ethnographic material, with various Costanoan speakers. He also reviewed with them some Esselen, Chumash, and Yokut vocabulary to elicit Costanoan equivalences. In addition, Harrington conducted rehearings of the records of San Juan Bautista Mission, Carmel Mission, and Santa Barbara Mission.

Harrington also collected Costanoan tribenames and placenames. There is a list of ranches and, in some cases, brief notes on the location and approximate number of Indian residents. There are also diaries of placename trips which Harrington made with Isabelle Meadows in 1932 and his travel from Berkeley to San Juan Capistrano with Henry Cervantes and Marta Herrera in 1932. The notes include sketch maps, records of mileage, and notes on photographs taken. In addition, Harrington formulated a questionnaire on Rumsen tribenames and placenames.

Another portion of the subseries consists of Harrington's notes for a proposed monograph on the native people brought together at Mission San Juan Bautista from various parts of San Benito County and the adjacent region. There are ethnographic, historical, and biographical notes from Ascencion Solosano and others as well as excerpts from a letter written by C. Hart Merriam, mission records, and notes from placename trips. The sections on Indian and Spanish cooking and on clothing are particularly extensive, as are the files on historical anecdotes and the mission itself.

Other materials in the subseries include notes on Chocheno and Mutsun song texts; information from Ascencion Solorsano regarding the use of herbs and native wild plants in the treatment of various diseases; myths and songs, anecdotes and historical accounts, and translations; and a miscellany of notes from interviews with various Costanoan speakers. Among his miscellaneous notes are comments on photographs taken by Harrington and information about his sound recordings.
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington recorded three Costanoan dialects in three separate, primary periods: Chocheno (1921), Mutsun (mostly 1929), and Rumsen (mostly 1932-1939).

During the month of August 1921, prompted, no doubt, by suggestions from C. Hart Merriam, Harrington worked in the area of Pleasanton, California, gathering data on Chocheno, which he sometimes referred to as "the Nepeno language." His principal informant in the work was Maria de los Angeles Colas, usually called "Angela." A man named José, presumably Angela's husband José Guzmán, also provided information.

In January 1922 Harrington had his first opportunity to record basic vocabularies of the Mutsun and Rumsen dialects of Costanoan. Early in the month he worked briefly with an eighty-seven year-old Mutsun speaker, Ascencion Solorsano of Gilroy. Seven years later Harrington reestablished contact with Solorsano. He found Solorsano to be an excellent source of linguistic information. Much of his work with her was devoted to reviewing all historical and contemporary recordings of Mutsun. Although Solorsano was not a speaker of any other Costanoan dialect, Harrington felt that her Mutsun data were fundamental to his understanding of the other languages. For this reason he asked her to rehear a number of vocabularies in Rumsen, Santa Cruz, and Soledad. Harrington deemed as "astonishing" Solorsano's knowledge of Mutsun material culture, myths, native plants, ceremonies, customs, and life at the mission. She had intimate personal knowledge of missionary influences and a secondhand knowledge dating from pre-mission days. She had also lived with her parents on a ranch near the Pinnacles, where she learned the practice of herbal medicine.

During the period 1929-1930, Harrington also resumed fieldwork on Chocheno and Rumsen. In March 1930 he interviewed and recorded Chocheno songs from Jose Guzman. Another person involved in the later "San Jose mission" work was Susana Nicolas. Harrington evidently read various Chocheno forms to her but she responded in Rumsen. Laura Ramirez (nee Escobar), the older sister of Tomasa Cantua, was his major source of Rumsen informantion. She gave him a sizable vocabulary as well as a significant amount of ethnographic data.

On March 28, 1932, Harrington returned to Monterey to work with Isabelle Meadows, who learned Rumsen as a child from an elderly Wacharon woman, Maria Omesia. Throughout the spring of 1932, Harrington roomed with Solorsano's family in New Monterey and drove to Meadows' house in Carmel each day. By utilizing his earlier field notes as well as various primary and secondary sources, Harrington began to elicit a "big, thorough vocabulary of the Carmel-Monterey language." During automobile and walking trips, which took them as far as Salinas, he recorded some Indian names of sites as well as many old Spanish placenames. He scheduled other trips for collecting flowering plants with Claudia Corona.

In the summer of 1932, Harrington's interest turned to the study of Uto-Aztecan languages (Gabrielino, Luiseno, and Juaneno) and the annotation of Geronimo Boscana's writings. Meadows accompanied him to the San Juan Capistrano area to pursue this fieldwork. In 1933 she also traveled with him to Santa Ana, where he worked out the details for the publication of Chinigchinich. Harrington brought her back with him to Washington for several months in 1934. The following year they again returned to the capital, where she continued working intermittently with him until her death in 1939. During this later phase, their interviews consisted of repetitive reviews of all of the Costanoan notes which Harrington had compiled to date. He was attempting to refine his orthography and to check on detailed points of Rumsen grammar. Simultaneously he amassed voluminous notes of ethnographic and biographical interest and recorded a wealth of data relating to California Spanish.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Local Note:
This subseries was broken up into three catalog records to facilitate viewing of digital surrogates. See the catalog record for John Peabody Harrington papers: Costanoan (part 2) and (part 3) to view surrogates for the rest of Harrington's Costanoan files.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Ohlone language  Search this
Mutsun dialect  Search this
Esselen language  Search this
Chumash language  Search this
Yokuts language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Songs
Narratives
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 2: Papers Relating to the Native American history, language and culture of northern and central California / 2.13: Costanoan
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3251d030c-1b89-42cb-a003-668f97a38d00
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref17247

John Peabody Harrington papers: Costanoan (part 2)

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Names:
Mission San Carlos Borromeo (Carmel, Calif.)  Search this
San Juan Bautista (Mission : San Juan Bautista, Calif.)  Search this
Santa Barbara Mission  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
149 Boxes
Culture:
Ohlone (Costano)  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Songs
Narratives
Place:
California -- History
Date:
1921-1939
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Northern and Central California series contains Harrington's research on Costanoan (Ohlone) languages, particularly Chocheno, Mutsun, and Rumsen. Materials include linguistic, ethnographic, and historical notes.

Harrington obtained a large amount of vocabulary during his fieldwork. Harrington organized the Mutsun vocabulary into a dictionary of sorts, and also compiled a rudimentary Rumsen dictionary. The bulk of the subseries, however, consist of his notes from rehearings of vocabulary recorded by Felipe Arroyo de la Cuesta, C. Hart Merriam, Henry W. Henshaw, Alfred Kroeber, Alexander S. Taylor, Alphonse Pinart, R.G. Latham, Adam John (an Indian agent), Reverend Professor Gregory Mengarini, Eugene Duflot de Mofras, Father Juan Comelias, and Horatio Hale. Harrington reviewed their data, some of which include ethnographic material, with various Costanoan speakers. He also reviewed with them some Esselen, Chumash, and Yokut vocabulary to elicit Costanoan equivalences. In addition, Harrington conducted rehearings of the records of San Juan Bautista Mission, Carmel Mission, and Santa Barbara Mission.

Harrington also collected Costanoan tribenames and placenames. There is a list of ranches and, in some cases, brief notes on the location and approximate number of Indian residents. There are also diaries of placename trips which Harrington made with Isabelle Meadows in 1932 and his travel from Berkeley to San Juan Capistrano with Henry Cervantes and Marta Herrera in 1932. The notes include sketch maps, records of mileage, and notes on photographs taken. In addition, Harrington formulated a questionnaire on Rumsen tribenames and placenames.

Another portion of the subseries consists of Harrington's notes for a proposed monograph on the native people brought together at Mission San Juan Bautista from various parts of San Benito County and the adjacent region. There are ethnographic, historical, and biographical notes from Ascencion Solosano and others as well as excerpts from a letter written by C. Hart Merriam, mission records, and notes from placename trips. The sections on Indian and Spanish cooking and on clothing are particularly extensive, as are the files on historical anecdotes and the mission itself.

Other materials in the subseries include notes on Chocheno and Mutsun song texts; information from Ascencion Solorsano regarding the use of herbs and native wild plants in the treatment of various diseases; myths and songs, anecdotes and historical accounts, and translations; and a miscellany of notes from interviews with various Costanoan speakers. Among his miscellaneous notes are comments on photographs taken by Harrington and information about his sound recordings.
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington recorded three Costanoan dialects in three separate, primary periods: Chocheno (1921), Mutsun (mostly 1929), and Rumsen (mostly 1932-1939).

During the month of August 1921, prompted, no doubt, by suggestions from C. Hart Merriam, Harrington worked in the area of Pleasanton, California, gathering data on Chocheno, which he sometimes referred to as "the Nepeno language." His principal informant in the work was Maria de los Angeles Colas, usually called "Angela." A man named José, presumably Angela's husband José Guzmán, also provided information.

In January 1922 Harrington had his first opportunity to record basic vocabularies of the Mutsun and Rumsen dialects of Costanoan. Early in the month he worked briefly with an eighty-seven year-old Mutsun speaker, Ascencion Solorsano of Gilroy. Seven years later Harrington reestablished contact with Solorsano. He found Solorsano to be an excellent source of linguistic information. Much of his work with her was devoted to reviewing all historical and contemporary recordings of Mutsun. Although Solorsano was not a speaker of any other Costanoan dialect, Harrington felt that her Mutsun data were fundamental to his understanding of the other languages. For this reason he asked her to rehear a number of vocabularies in Rumsen, Santa Cruz, and Soledad. Harrington deemed as "astonishing" Solorsano's knowledge of Mutsun material culture, myths, native plants, ceremonies, customs, and life at the mission. She had intimate personal knowledge of missionary influences and a secondhand knowledge dating from pre-mission days. She had also lived with her parents on a ranch near the Pinnacles, where she learned the practice of herbal medicine.

During the period 1929-1930, Harrington also resumed fieldwork on Chocheno and Rumsen. In March 1930 he interviewed and recorded Chocheno songs from Jose Guzman. Another person involved in the later "San Jose mission" work was Susana Nicolas. Harrington evidently read various Chocheno forms to her but she responded in Rumsen. Laura Ramirez (nee Escobar), the older sister of Tomasa Cantua, was his major source of Rumsen informantion. She gave him a sizable vocabulary as well as a significant amount of ethnographic data.

On March 28, 1932, Harrington returned to Monterey to work with Isabelle Meadows, who learned Rumsen as a child from an elderly Wacharon woman, Maria Omesia. Throughout the spring of 1932, Harrington roomed with Solorsano's family in New Monterey and drove to Meadows' house in Carmel each day. By utilizing his earlier field notes as well as various primary and secondary sources, Harrington began to elicit a "big, thorough vocabulary of the Carmel-Monterey language." During automobile and walking trips, which took them as far as Salinas, he recorded some Indian names of sites as well as many old Spanish placenames. He scheduled other trips for collecting flowering plants with Claudia Corona.

In the summer of 1932, Harrington's interest turned to the study of Uto-Aztecan languages (Gabrielino, Luiseno, and Juaneno) and the annotation of Geronimo Boscana's writings. Meadows accompanied him to the San Juan Capistrano area to pursue this fieldwork. In 1933 she also traveled with him to Santa Ana, where he worked out the details for the publication of Chinigchinich. Harrington brought her back with him to Washington for several months in 1934. The following year they again returned to the capital, where she continued working intermittently with him until her death in 1939. During this later phase, their interviews consisted of repetitive reviews of all of the Costanoan notes which Harrington had compiled to date. He was attempting to refine his orthography and to check on detailed points of Rumsen grammar. Simultaneously he amassed voluminous notes of ethnographic and biographical interest and recorded a wealth of data relating to California Spanish.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Local Note:
This subseries was broken up into three catalog records to facilitate viewing of digital surrogates. See the catalog record for John Peabody Harrington papers: Costanoan (part 2) and (part 3) to view surrogates for the rest of Harrington's Costanoan files.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Ohlone language  Search this
Mutsun dialect  Search this
Esselen language  Search this
Chumash language  Search this
Yokuts language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Songs
Narratives
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 2: Papers Relating to the Native American history, language and culture of northern and central California / 2.13: Costanoan
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw39cd23197-d0a9-4b0c-90db-071591869a31
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref17248

John Peabody Harrington papers: Costanoan (part 3)

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Names:
Mission San Carlos Borromeo (Carmel, Calif.)  Search this
San Juan Bautista (Mission : San Juan Bautista, Calif.)  Search this
Santa Barbara Mission  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
149 Boxes
Culture:
Ohlone (Costano)  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Songs
Narratives
Place:
California -- History
Date:
1921-1939
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Northern and Central California series contains Harrington's research on Costanoan (Ohlone) languages, particularly Chocheno, Mutsun, and Rumsen. Materials include linguistic, ethnographic, and historical notes.

Harrington obtained a large amount of vocabulary during his fieldwork. Harrington organized the Mutsun vocabulary into a dictionary of sorts, and also compiled a rudimentary Rumsen dictionary. The bulk of the subseries, however, consist of his notes from rehearings of vocabulary recorded by Felipe Arroyo de la Cuesta, C. Hart Merriam, Henry W. Henshaw, Alfred Kroeber, Alexander S. Taylor, Alphonse Pinart, R.G. Latham, Adam John (an Indian agent), Reverend Professor Gregory Mengarini, Eugene Duflot de Mofras, Father Juan Comelias, and Horatio Hale. Harrington reviewed their data, some of which include ethnographic material, with various Costanoan speakers. He also reviewed with them some Esselen, Chumash, and Yokut vocabulary to elicit Costanoan equivalences. In addition, Harrington conducted rehearings of the records of San Juan Bautista Mission, Carmel Mission, and Santa Barbara Mission.

Harrington also collected Costanoan tribenames and placenames. There is a list of ranches and, in some cases, brief notes on the location and approximate number of Indian residents. There are also diaries of placename trips which Harrington made with Isabelle Meadows in 1932 and his travel from Berkeley to San Juan Capistrano with Henry Cervantes and Marta Herrera in 1932. The notes include sketch maps, records of mileage, and notes on photographs taken. In addition, Harrington formulated a questionnaire on Rumsen tribenames and placenames.

Another portion of the subseries consists of Harrington's notes for a proposed monograph on the native people brought together at Mission San Juan Bautista from various parts of San Benito County and the adjacent region. There are ethnographic, historical, and biographical notes from Ascencion Solosano and others as well as excerpts from a letter written by C. Hart Merriam, mission records, and notes from placename trips. The sections on Indian and Spanish cooking and on clothing are particularly extensive, as are the files on historical anecdotes and the mission itself.

Other materials in the subseries include notes on Chocheno and Mutsun song texts; information from Ascencion Solorsano regarding the use of herbs and native wild plants in the treatment of various diseases; myths and songs, anecdotes and historical accounts, and translations; and a miscellany of notes from interviews with various Costanoan speakers. Among his miscellaneous notes are comments on photographs taken by Harrington and information about his sound recordings.
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington recorded three Costanoan dialects in three separate, primary periods: Chocheno (1921), Mutsun (mostly 1929), and Rumsen (mostly 1932-1939).

During the month of August 1921, prompted, no doubt, by suggestions from C. Hart Merriam, Harrington worked in the area of Pleasanton, California, gathering data on Chocheno, which he sometimes referred to as "the Nepeno language." His principal informant in the work was Maria de los Angeles Colas, usually called "Angela." A man named José, presumably Angela's husband José Guzmán, also provided information.

In January 1922 Harrington had his first opportunity to record basic vocabularies of the Mutsun and Rumsen dialects of Costanoan. Early in the month he worked briefly with an eighty-seven year-old Mutsun speaker, Ascencion Solorsano of Gilroy. Seven years later Harrington reestablished contact with Solorsano. He found Solorsano to be an excellent source of linguistic information. Much of his work with her was devoted to reviewing all historical and contemporary recordings of Mutsun. Although Solorsano was not a speaker of any other Costanoan dialect, Harrington felt that her Mutsun data were fundamental to his understanding of the other languages. For this reason he asked her to rehear a number of vocabularies in Rumsen, Santa Cruz, and Soledad. Harrington deemed as "astonishing" Solorsano's knowledge of Mutsun material culture, myths, native plants, ceremonies, customs, and life at the mission. She had intimate personal knowledge of missionary influences and a secondhand knowledge dating from pre-mission days. She had also lived with her parents on a ranch near the Pinnacles, where she learned the practice of herbal medicine.

During the period 1929-1930, Harrington also resumed fieldwork on Chocheno and Rumsen. In March 1930 he interviewed and recorded Chocheno songs from Jose Guzman. Another person involved in the later "San Jose mission" work was Susana Nicolas. Harrington evidently read various Chocheno forms to her but she responded in Rumsen. Laura Ramirez (nee Escobar), the older sister of Tomasa Cantua, was his major source of Rumsen informantion. She gave him a sizable vocabulary as well as a significant amount of ethnographic data.

On March 28, 1932, Harrington returned to Monterey to work with Isabelle Meadows, who learned Rumsen as a child from an elderly Wacharon woman, Maria Omesia. Throughout the spring of 1932, Harrington roomed with Solorsano's family in New Monterey and drove to Meadows' house in Carmel each day. By utilizing his earlier field notes as well as various primary and secondary sources, Harrington began to elicit a "big, thorough vocabulary of the Carmel-Monterey language." During automobile and walking trips, which took them as far as Salinas, he recorded some Indian names of sites as well as many old Spanish placenames. He scheduled other trips for collecting flowering plants with Claudia Corona.

In the summer of 1932, Harrington's interest turned to the study of Uto-Aztecan languages (Gabrielino, Luiseno, and Juaneno) and the annotation of Geronimo Boscana's writings. Meadows accompanied him to the San Juan Capistrano area to pursue this fieldwork. In 1933 she also traveled with him to Santa Ana, where he worked out the details for the publication of Chinigchinich. Harrington brought her back with him to Washington for several months in 1934. The following year they again returned to the capital, where she continued working intermittently with him until her death in 1939. During this later phase, their interviews consisted of repetitive reviews of all of the Costanoan notes which Harrington had compiled to date. He was attempting to refine his orthography and to check on detailed points of Rumsen grammar. Simultaneously he amassed voluminous notes of ethnographic and biographical interest and recorded a wealth of data relating to California Spanish.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Local Note:
This subseries was broken up into three catalog records to facilitate viewing of digital surrogates. See the catalog record for John Peabody Harrington papers: Costanoan (part 2) and (part 3) to view surrogates for the rest of Harrington's Costanoan files.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Ohlone language  Search this
Mutsun dialect  Search this
Esselen language  Search this
Chumash language  Search this
Yokuts language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Songs
Narratives
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 2: Papers Relating to the Native American history, language and culture of northern and central California / 2.13: Costanoan
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw302f03cb6-a86a-4d2e-b358-4a59db54a02e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref17249

John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash (part 1)

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Laird, Carobeth, 1895-1983  Search this
Names:
Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa (San Luis Obispo, Calif.)  Search this
San Buenaventura Mission  Search this
Santa Barbara Mission  Search this
Santa Inés Mission (Solvang, Calif.)  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
169 Boxes
Culture:
Chumash  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
Narratives
Manuscripts
Place:
California -- Languages
California -- History
San Luis Obispo (Calif.)
Santa Barbara (Calif.)
Ventura County (Calif.)
San Nicolas Island (Calif.)
Date:
1912-1961
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Local Note:
This subseries was broken up into six catalog records to facilitate viewing of digital surrogates. See the other catalog records for John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash to view surrogates for the rest of Harrington's Chumash files.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Chumash language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Grammar, Comparative and general  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Ynezeno  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
Narratives
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 3: Papers relating to the Native American history, language and culture of southern California and Basin / 3.1: Chumash
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw38b5feed3-416f-4fec-b289-64b9a2be9728
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref17251

John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash (part 2)

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Laird, Carobeth, 1895-1983  Search this
Names:
Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa (San Luis Obispo, Calif.)  Search this
San Buenaventura Mission  Search this
Santa Barbara Mission  Search this
Santa Inés Mission (Solvang, Calif.)  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
169 Boxes
Culture:
Chumash  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
Narratives
Manuscripts
Place:
California -- Languages
California -- History
San Luis Obispo (Calif.)
Santa Barbara (Calif.)
Ventura County (Calif.)
San Nicolas Island (Calif.)
Date:
1912-1961
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Local Note:
This subseries was broken up into seven catalog records to facilitate viewing of digital surrogates. See the other catalog records for John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash to view surrogates for the rest of Harrington's Costanoan files.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Chumash language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Ynezeno  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
Narratives
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 3: Papers relating to the Native American history, language and culture of southern California and Basin / 3.1: Chumash
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3d042bff1-17b0-4cf9-99e0-57a28a3d6027
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref17252

John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash (part 3)

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Laird, Carobeth, 1895-1983  Search this
Names:
Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa (San Luis Obispo, Calif.)  Search this
San Buenaventura Mission  Search this
Santa Barbara Mission  Search this
Santa Inés Mission (Solvang, Calif.)  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
169 Boxes
Culture:
Chumash  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
Narratives
Manuscripts
Place:
California -- Languages
California -- History
San Luis Obispo (Calif.)
Santa Barbara (Calif.)
Ventura County (Calif.)
San Nicolas Island (Calif.)
Date:
1912-1961
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Local Note:
This subseries was broken up into six catalog records to facilitate viewing of digital surrogates. See the other catalog records for John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash to view surrogates for the rest of Harrington's Costanoan files.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Chumash language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Ynezeno  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
Narratives
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 3: Papers relating to the Native American history, language and culture of southern California and Basin / 3.1: Chumash
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3b2b70b0f-b5e5-41a2-a177-859b5bf3bb40
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref17253

John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash (part 4)

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Laird, Carobeth, 1895-1983  Search this
Names:
Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa (San Luis Obispo, Calif.)  Search this
San Buenaventura Mission  Search this
Santa Barbara Mission  Search this
Santa Inés Mission (Solvang, Calif.)  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
169 Boxes
Culture:
Chumash  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
Narratives
Manuscripts
Place:
California -- Languages
California -- History
San Luis Obispo (Calif.)
Santa Barbara (Calif.)
Ventura County (Calif.)
San Nicolas Island (Calif.)
Date:
1912-1961
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Local Note:
This subseries was broken up into six catalog records to facilitate viewing of digital surrogates. See the other catalog records for John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash to view surrogates for the rest of Harrington's Costanoan files.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Chumash language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Ynezeno  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
Narratives
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 3: Papers relating to the Native American history, language and culture of southern California and Basin / 3.1: Chumash
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw371bb700c-5d1e-43de-864d-b0b3833ce6fc
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref17254

John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash (part 5)

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Laird, Carobeth, 1895-1983  Search this
Names:
Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa (San Luis Obispo, Calif.)  Search this
San Buenaventura Mission  Search this
Santa Barbara Mission  Search this
Santa Inés Mission (Solvang, Calif.)  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
169 Boxes
Culture:
Chumash  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
Narratives
Manuscripts
Place:
California -- Languages
California -- History
San Luis Obispo (Calif.)
Santa Barbara (Calif.)
Ventura County (Calif.)
San Nicolas Island (Calif.)
Date:
1912-1961
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Local Note:
This subseries was broken up into six catalog records to facilitate viewing of digital surrogates. See the other catalog records for John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash to view surrogates for the rest of Harrington's Costanoan files.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Chumash language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Ynezeno  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
Narratives
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 3: Papers relating to the Native American history, language and culture of southern California and Basin / 3.1: Chumash
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3213fab47-745e-4fbd-8ed1-b971b4ce466d
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref17255

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