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MS 1875 Sixteen Fox stories with translations collected by Truman Michelson

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Creator:
Bullard, Jack  Search this
Kiyana, Alfred, 1877-1918  Search this
Lasley, Lucy  Search this
Sakihtanohkweha, 1875-1957  Search this
Translator:
Poweshiek, Ida  Search this
Extent:
25 Items (0.25 linear feet (approximately 745 pages)
Culture:
Fox Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Place:
Tama (Iowa)
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains stories handwritten in Meskwaki (Fox) syllabary with English translations by Ida Poweshiek. These texts were collected by Truman Michelson in Tama, Iowa. List of titles based on English translations: 1.) The Winter Story of Longhair, by Lucy Lasley and Jack Bullard; text 18 pages, translation 27 pages. 2.) Fasting, by Lucy Lasley; text 7 pages, translation 3 pages. 3.) Fast runner, by Lucy Lasley; text 2 pages, translation 3 pages. 4.) Lost Boy, by Lucy Lasley; text 2 pages, translation 3 pages. 5.) Peace council with Pawnee, by Lucy Lasley; text 2 pages, translation 3 pages. 6.) Hunting, text 2 pages, translation 3 pages. 7.) Wisahkeha, by Sakihtanohkweha (Mrs. Bill Leaf); text 31 pages and translation 30 pages. 8.) The youth who became corn and the Indians of long ago who grew as all different kinds of things, by Alfred Kiyana; text 41 pages, translation 36 pages. 9.) Rooster with feet of money, text 18 pages, translation 20 pages. 10.) Ball-Player, by Jack Bullard and possibly Lucy Lasley; text 51 pages, translation 73 pages. 11.) One who loved her brother, by Alfred Kiyana; text 41 pages, translation 33 pages. 12.) The men who were taken to heaven by a bear, by Alfred Kiyana; text 7 pages, translation 9 pages. 13.) Keshakiwa, by Lucy Lasley and Jack Bullard; text 23 pages, translation 33 pages. 14.) Story about Turtle and Wisahkeha (Race for girl), text 8 pages, translation 11 pages. 15.) "Why men should not go hunting with ther wives" text 13 pages, (English translation only). 16.) Spirit of fire made by gods, by Alfred Kiyana; text 112 pages, translation 80 pages.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1875
Local Note:
Title changed from "Texts and Translations Legends" 3/18/2014.
Other Archival Materials:
See Manuscript 1879 for continuation of Wisahkeha story.
Topic:
Fox language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Meskwaki; Sauk & Fox  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Citation:
Manuscript 1875, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1875
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3bcbf19c0-336c-4b7e-abbb-102589e3a3e1
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1875

MS 2764 Nineteen Fox stories by Alfred Kiyana, Bill Leaf, and Sakihtanohkweha

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Creator:
Leaf, Bill  Search this
Kiyana, Alfred, 1877-1918  Search this
Sakihtanohkweha, 1875-1957  Search this
Extent:
324 Pages
Culture:
Fox Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Nineteen stories handwritten in Meskwaki (Fox) syllabary by Alfred Kiyana, Bill Leaf, and Sakihtanohkweha (Mrs. Bill Leaf). These texts were collected by Truman Michelson in Tama, Iowa. Eight of the stories are by Alfred Kiyana. They are: Red-Leggings; When Bullhead killed two elks; The woman and the toad; The rooster; Turtle; Raccoon, who yelled loud; Kawesakweha and Kochipekwaha; and The man who got lost. Bill Leaf authored 10 of the texts, including: Many men on the warpath, two stories on Fighters, The one who knew how to hunt, This last one is about when Wisahkeha has been seen, Sacred pack, and When I got drunk. Sakihtanohkweha wrote the text on a youth who fasted. No English translations are present.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2764
Local Note:
Title changed from "Legends" 4/28/2014.
Topic:
Fox language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Meskwaki; Sauk & Fox  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Citation:
Manuscript 2764, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2764
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw31fd65e83-0c73-4080-8589-4deaf4ee09fa
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2764

MS 2776 Truman Michelson field notes from the Munsee in Kansas and the Delaware in Oklahoma

Creator:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Informant:
Longbone, Silas  Search this
Elk Hair  Search this
Veix, Mr.  Search this
Veix, Mrs.  Search this
Caleb, Mr  Search this
Plake, Mrs  Search this
Eliot, Mr.  Search this
Caleb, Rufus  Search this
Samuel, Joab  Search this
Spooner, Mrs  Search this
Extent:
170 Pages
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Correspondence
Field notes
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Date:
1912-1913
Scope and Contents:
Ethnological and linguistic notes collected by Truman Michelson during his fieldwork among the Munsee in Kansas and the Delaware in Oklahoma in 1912. Also letters received in 1913 from Silas Longbone, one of the Delaware with whom Michelson worked closely. The majority of the notes are on the Delaware, and include Delaware stories in English. According to Ives Goddard, most of the information was provided by Elk Hair, the last great Delaware ceremonialist. Longbone served as an interpreter.

Contents of Delaware files: F.1) Letters from Silas Longbone, Dewey. Oklahoma, January 10, 1913. 5 pages; F.2) Ethnological notes. Longbone, informant. 3 pages; F.3) Legend. 8 pages; F.4) Doll Dance. 11 pages. Notes on small sheets, 2 pages; F.5 ) Delaware linguistic notes. 4 unnumbered pages. Text with interl. translation. 8 pages. Notes on small sheets, 5 pages. (17 pages total); F.6) Notes from Elk Hair. December 12 [1912] 11 pages; F.7) [Story of Delawares and White People] 10 pages; F.8) "Doctoring. Otter Skin Dance, ritualistic origin." 9 pages. Plus small sheet numbered "2". (10 pages.); F.9) Story of Wehixamokas, "the Delaware Sampson." Possibly from Longbone, with comments at end by Silas and Elkhair. 21 pages; F.10) Delaware Meeting House. Elk Hair, age 62. English text. 18 and 1 page (Also 3 pages notes on small sheets, possibly unrelated.); F.11) Miscellaneous ethnological and linguistic notes, apparently Delaware of Oklahoma. 8 pages.

Contents of Munsee files: F.12) "Munsee notes," ethnological and linguistic. Informants: Mr and Mrs Veix, Mr Caleb, Mrs Plake, Mr Eliot, Rufus Caleb, Joab Samuel, Mrs Spooner. 6 and 6 and 1 plus 3 pages. (16 pages total); F.13) [Munsee. Mrs Plake mentioned as 1 inft.] Text with interlinear English translation. 10 pages. Vocabulary and other linguistic notes, 9 unnumbered pages and pages numbered 2-8. (26 pages, total)
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2776
Topic:
Delaware language  Search this
Munsee language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Field notes
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Citation:
Manuscript 2776, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2776
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw398d8c44c-0a60-4aa5-909a-5d0300f1377c
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2776

MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers

Creator:
Dorsey, James Owen, 1848-1895  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology  Search this
Bushotter, George, 1864-1892  Search this
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Mooney, James, 1861-1921  Search this
Powell, John Wesley, 1834-1902  Search this
Riggs, Stephen Return, 1812-1883  Search this
Extent:
30 Linear feet (70 boxes, 1 oversized box, 20 manuscript envelopes, 4 rolled maps, and 23 map folders)
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Athapascan Indians  Search this
Minitari (Hidatsa)  Search this
Numakiki (Mandan)  Search this
Biloxi Indians  Search this
Tutelo  Search this
Iowa  Search this
Chiwere  Search this
Ho-Chunk (Winnebago)  Search this
Oto  Search this
Quapaw Indians  Search this
Osage  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Lakota (Teton/Western Sioux)  Search this
Dhegiha Indians  Search this
Assiniboine (Stoney)  Search this
Ponca  Search this
Omaha  Search this
Tututni (Tutuni)  Search this
Kaw (Kansa)  Search this
Siletz  Search this
Coos (Kusan)  Search this
Yaquina (Yakwina)  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southeast  Search this
Takelma (Rogue River Indians)  Search this
Klikitat  Search this
Chasta Costa (Chastacosta)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Field notes
Drawings
Vocabulary
Folklore
Sermons
Manuscripts
Obituaries
Correspondence
Newspaper clippings
Place:
Siletz Indian Reservation (Or.)
Date:
circa 1870-1956
bulk 1870-1895
Summary:
Reverend James Owen Dorsey (1848-1895) was a missionary and Bureau of American Ethnology ethnologist who conducted extensive research on Siouan tribes and languages.The papers of James Owen Dorsey comprise mostly ethnographic and linguistic materials on various tribes of the Siouan language family as well as tribes from Siletz Reservation in Oregon. These materials include texts and letters with interlineal translations; grammar notes; dictionaries; drawings; and his manuscripts. In addition, the collection contains Dorsey's correspondence, newspaper clippings, his obituaries, and reprints.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains James O. Dorsey's research and writings as a BAE ethnologist, as well as his earlier work as a missionary among the Ponca. The vast majority of the collection pertains to his research on Siouan-Catawban languages, including the Dakota and Dhegiha languages, Chiwere, Winnebago, Mandan, Hidatsa, Tutelo, Biloxi, and Catawba. His research on Athapascan, Kusan, Takilman, and Yakonan languages from his field work at Siletz Reservation are also present, as well as some notes on the Caddoan languages. Dorsey's research files include linguistic and ethnological field notes, reading notes, stories and myths, vocabularies, drawings, and unpublished and published manuscripts. The collection also contains Omaha, Ponca, Quapaw, and Biloxi dictionaries that he compiled and materials relating to his work editing Steven Riggs' Dakota-English Dictionary. Additional noteworthy materials in the collection are Teton texts and drawings from George Bushotter and drawings by Stephen Stubbs (Kansa), Pahaule-gagli (Kansa), and George Miller (Omaha). The collection also contains Dorsey's correspondence, newspaper clippings, obituaries, and his collection of reprints.
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into 6 series: 1) Siouan; 2) Siletz Reservation; 3) Caddoan; 4) General Correspondence; 5) Personal Papers; 6) Miscellaneous & Reprints.
Biographical Note:
Reverend James Owen Dorsey (1848-1895) was a missionary and Bureau of American Ethnology ethnologist who conducted extensive research on Siouan tribes and languages.

Dorsey was born on October 31, 1848 in Baltimore, Maryland. He exhibited a talent for languages at an early age. At age 6 he learned the Hebrew alphabet and was able to read the language at age 10. In 1867 Dorsey attended the Theological Seminary of Virginia and was ordained a deacon of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 1871. In May of that year, Dorsey traveled to the Dakota Territory to serve as a missionary among the Ponca. Plagued by ill health, Dorsey was forced to end his missionary work in August 1873. By that time, however, he had learned the Ponca language well enough to converse with members of the tribe without an interpreter.

Dorsey returned to Maryland and engaged in parish work while continuing his studies of Siouan languages. His linguistic talents and knowledge of these languages attracted the attention of Major John Wesley Powell. Powell arranged for Dorsey to work among the Omaha in Nebraska from 1878 to 1880 to collect linguistic and ethnological notes. When the Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE) was established in 1879, Powell recruited Dorsey to join the staff.

As an ethnologist for the BAE, Dorsey continued his research on Siouan tribes. His studies focused on languages but also included Siouan personal names, folklore, social organization, religion, beliefs, and customs. He conducted fieldwork among the Tutelo at Six Nations on Grand River in Upper Canada (1882); the Kansa, Osage, and Quapaw in Indian Territory (1883-1884); the Biloxi at Lecompte, Rapides Parish, Louisiana (1892); and again with the Quapaw at the Quapaw Mission (1894). He also worked with Native Americans that visited DC, including George Bushotter (Teton), Philip Longtail (Winnebago), Samuel Fremont (Omaha), and Little Standing Buffalo (Ponca). He also spent time at Siletz Reservation in 1884 to collect linguistic notes on the Athapascan, Kusan, Takilman, and Yakonan stocks.

In addition to his research, Dorsey helped found the American Folklore Society and served as the first vice-president of the association. He also served as vice-president of Section H of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

At the age of 47, Dorsey died of typhoid fever on February 4, 1895.

Sources Consulted

1st-16th Annual Reports of the Bureau of American Ethnology. 1881-1897.

Hewitt, J.N.B. 1895. "James Owen Dorsey" American Anthropologist A8, 180-183.

McGee, W.J. 1895. "In Memoriam." Journal of American Folklore 8(28): 79-80.

1848 -- Born on October 31 in Baltimore, Maryland.

1871 -- Ordained a deacon of the Protestant Episcopal Church.

1871-1873 -- Served as a missionary among the Ponca in Dakota Territory.

1878-1880 -- Conducted fieldwork among the Omaha in Nebraska.

1879 -- Joined the staff of the Bureau of American Ethnology.

1882 -- Conducted fieldwork among the Tutelo at Six Nations on Grand River in Upper Canada.

1883-1884 -- Conducted fieldwork among the Kansa, Osage, and Quapaw in Indian Territory.

1887 -- Worked with George Bushotter to record information regarding the language and culture of the Dakota.

1884 -- Conducted fieldwork at Siletz Reservation.

1892 -- Conducted fieldwork among the Biloxi at Lecompte, Rapides Parish, Louisiana.

1894 -- Conducted fieldwork among the Quapaw at the Quapaw Mission in Indian Territory.

1895 -- Died of typhoid fever on February 4th at the age of 47.
Restrictions:
The James O. Dorsey Papers are open for research. Access to the James O. Dorsey Papers requires an appointment
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Catawba Indians  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Social structure  Search this
Kinship  Search this
Manners and customs  Search this
Shahaptian languages  Search this
Yakonan languages  Search this
Athapascan languages  Search this
Kusan languages  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Siouan languages  Search this
Dhegiha language  Search this
Siuslaw Indians  Search this
Hidatsa language  Search this
Omaha language  Search this
Dakota language  Search this
Catawba language  Search this
Biloxi language  Search this
Caddoan languages  Search this
Osage language  Search this
Alsea language  Search this
Kansa language  Search this
Mandan language  Search this
Chastacosta language  Search this
Coquille language  Search this
Tutelo language  Search this
Winnebago language  Search this
Siuslaw language  Search this
Takelma language  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Drawings
Vocabulary
Folklore
Sermons
Manuscripts
Obituaries
Correspondence
Newspaper clippings
Citation:
Manuscript 4800 James O. Dorsey papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4800
See more items in:
MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3261ab492-5f9d-4be7-b1f4-c24d3f5da29b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4800
Online Media:

Lakota texts by George Bushotter

Translator:
Dorsey, James Owen, 1848-1895  Search this
Creator:
Bushotter, George, 1864-1892  Search this
Bruyier, John  Search this
Collection Creator:
Dorsey, James Owen, 1848-1895  Search this
Extent:
Pages (ca. 3,500 pages)
Culture:
Lakota (Teton/Western Sioux)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Pages
Folklore
Date:
1887
Scope and Contents:
259 texts; numbers 189 and 253, as well as parts of 223 and 224 are by John Bruyier, 1888. Interlinear translations by Dorsey, aided by Bushotter and Bruyier.

Lakota text contents: 1. Sword Keeper and his brother. The latter meets Two Faces, a mythic giant. 8 pages and 3 pages (notes) and 1 page partial translation. 2. The Mythic Buffalo. 10 pages. 3. Two Faces. Explains the origin of arrows, pipes, axes, knife-sharpeners, beads, etc. 14 pages. 4. Three brothers who had a witch sister. 17 pages. (incomplete) 5. Children, a bad old woman cannibal, and Spider (the Mythic Trickster). 12 pages. 6. Spider, animals, and women. 15 pages and 6 pages. 7. A man and his ghost wife. 9 and 5 pages. 8. Two against one: a ghost story with a song. 10 pages. 9. A man, a female ghost, and a male ghost who wrestled with the man. 15 pages. 10. Ghost on the hill, who could not be hit by arrows. 8 pages. 11. Treatment of the sick, burial customs. 22 pages and 4 pages (notes) and 2 pages and 1 sketch. 12. The man who came to life again. 14 and 2 (translation) pages. Note by Bruyier at end. 13. The man and woman in the moon. 6 pages. 14. Man, two in the lodge, female ghost, and the friendly wolf. 8 pages. 15. The man who spared the wolf cubs. 11 pages. 16. The Thunder Being and the Unkcegila (a mastadon ?) 12 pages. 17. Waziya, the northern giant who brings snow. 4 pages. 18. Buffalo people who attacked the Indian people. 10 pages. 19. Spider and the land turtle. 29 pages. 20. The man and his two sons. 18 pages and 2 pages (notes). 21. The turtle who wished to fly. 10 pages. 22. The man who could become a grizzly bear. 6 pages. 23. How the Indians cured the sun. 3 pages. 24. Spider and the horned water monster. 7 pages. 25. The strange lake with large subaquatic animals. 6 pages. 26. The warrior surrounded by a serpent. 4 pages. 27. The one-eyed serpent with short legs and large body. 3 pages. 28. Why they pray to stones, the sun, etc. 9 pages.

29. The mountain in which was a large serpent.. 6 pages. 30. Adventures of a man and his wife.. 8 pages. 31. Spider and the Prairie Chicken. 6 pages. 32. Adventure of RAbbit Carrier. 6 pages. 33. The woman who turned to a fish from her waist down. 22 pages. 34. Spider and the Rabbit; how the latter made snow. 5 pages. 35. The male ghost and his living wife. 8 pages. 36. The man with the magic sword, and the one with the powerful breath. 6 pages. 37. Swift Runner (he who tied stones to his legs). 10 pages. 38. The man who was rescued by eaglets. 10 pages. 39. The Double-woman. 5 pages. 40. Spider and the mice. 14 pages. 41. Spider and the ducks--how they got red eyes. 13 pages and 1 sketch. 42. Spider and the Rabbit; how the latter lost his long tail. 11 pages. 43. The man who ressembled the man in the moon. 11 pages. 44. The young lover who was rescued by the girl. 12 pages. 45. The warriors who met Heyoka (Sunflower) who was singing and dancing. 2 pages. 46. The flying Santee (a ghoul). 8 pages. 47. How the Santees first saw buffalo. 8 pages. 48. How the Lakotas went against the Rees. 5 pages. 49. Adventures of the Short Man. 8 pages. 50. Smoke Maker's adventures: a war story. 7 pages. 51. Fight between the Lakota and the Blackfeet. 4 pages (incomplete) 52. Fight between two unarmed men and a grizzly bear. 8 pages. 53. Treatment of an Omaha spy caught by the Lakotas. 6 pages. 54. The wild man, a nude cannibal. 4 pages. 55. He who uses the earth as an ear. 7 pages. 56. Why horses are called, in Lakota, "mysterious dogs." 7 ages. 57. The man who could understand ravens. 5 pages. 58. Of the two small stones that were servants of the people. 6 pages. (Brief note at the end appears to be in Swanton's hand.) 59. The Wahanksica, a strange animal. 3 pages. 60. The animal in the Missouri River which breaks up the ice in the spring of the year. 4 pages.

61. How thw wind brought sickness to Medicine Butte Creek. 6 pages. 62. Beliefs about day and night. 6 pages. 63. The man in the forest and his contest with ghosts. 8 pages. 64. The feast in honor of the Anti-Natural God. 18 pages. 65. Of the Heyoka man who dreamed of his death by lightening. 13 pages. 66. Fight between the Lakota and the Blackfeet. 6 pages. 67. Of the mysteriousman who knew about the distant war party, 5 pages. 68. Of the wise man who caught his eloping wife. 8 pages. 69. How the Rees or Blackfeet came against the Lakotas. 5 pages. 70. Origin of the buffalo. 5 pages. 71. The Sun Dance. A. 98 pages and 3 figures. B. 9 pages. C. 4 pages. D. 7 pages and 1 diagram. E. 6 pages. F. 4 pages. G. 14 pages. H. 3 pages and 2 diagrams. I. 3 pages. 72. The man who could lengthen his arm at will. 7 pages. 73. What a young man must do before he can marry. 11 pages. 74. How the Crows surrounded some Lakotas. 12 pages. 75. A raid on a Lakota camp. 4 pages. 76. Story of a warrior who was not wounded. 9 pages. 77. Fight between the Lakota and white soldiers. 20 pages. 78. Of the Santees, and their fondness for certain foods. 4 pages. 79. What the Lakota thought of the first white people whom they saw. 13 pages. 80. Belief respecting lakes. 6 pages. 81. Belief about this world. 7 pages. 82. The calumet dance. 39 pages and 2 diagrams. 83. How they honor the dead (the Ghost Feast). 15 and 2 and 18 pages. 84. Men who are arrow and bullet proof. 8 pages. 85. Of love potions, etc. 5 pages. 86. The acts of a wounded warrior. 7 pages. 87. Actors clothed in buffalo robes with the hair out detect wrongdoers. 11 pages. 88. Those who imitate the elk. 14 pages. 89. Why a man may not speak to his mother in law. 11 pages. 90. Rules for feasting, smoking, and visiting. 11 pages. 91. Of certain boyish customs. 8 pages. 92. A ghost story. 7 pages. 93. Origin of the white people. 10 pages. 94. Games and their seasons. 10 pages. 95. Education of a boy. 10 pages. 96. Of youth killed in battle, and of his faithful horse. 12 pages. 97. The people who lived in the north. 7 pages and 2 sketches. 98. The ghost woman and the robin. 9 pages. Note at end by Bruyier. 99. The Flying serpent whose touch was fatal. 5 pages. 100. Origin of twins. 5 pages. 101. George Bushotter's autobiography. 117 pages. 102. Belief concerning a loved one who has been called by a ghost. 7 pages. 103. Fight between two gamblers near Chamberlain, Dakota. 7 pages.

104. The singing elk. 7 pages. 105. Belief about Spider. 9 pages. 106. War of the Lakota against the Omaha. 7 pages. 107. Narrow escape of Bark Bird's Tail (a Lakota). 5 pages. 108. Busnotter's cousin's war adventure. 11 pages. 109. How certain men (doctors, priests, etc.) have become mysterious. 16 pages. 110. How the Lakota fought the Cheyennes and Black Men (Commanches ?). 22 pages. 111. Rules of etiquette for brothers, sisters, cousins. 21 pages. 112. Ghost story. 5 pages. 113. The habits of beavers. 8 pages. 114. Spider and the old woman who fed all the animals. 24 pages. 115. The handsome man who was rescued from a pit by a wolf. 32 pages. 116. Trick of a myth-teller. 9 pages. 117. Of thistles. 4 pages. 118. How Indians regard the past and their ancestors. 22 pages. 119. The grass dance. 12 pages. 120. The Big Belly Society. 6 pages. 121. The Mandan Society. 10 pages. 122. "Following one another," a Lakota game. 7 pages. 123. "They make it run by pushing," a Lakota game. 46 pages and 2 (colored) diagrams. 124. Horse racing. 5 pages. 125. Hitting the moccasin, a game. 9 pages. 126. Shooting at the cactus, a gane. 5 pages. 127. Hitting the bow, a game. 5 pages. 128. Shooting at bunches of grass, a game. 5 pages. 129. Shooting at the lights of an animal, a game. 6 pages. 130. Taking captives from one another, a game. 9 pages. 131. Trampling on the beaver, a game. 6 pages. 132. "Howi ! Howi !" a ring game for boys or youths. 12 pages. 133. "They touch not one another," a game. 6 pages. 134. Game with a long grass which has a long, sharp beard. 6 pages. 135. The old woman accuses them," a game. 8 pages. 136. A game with slings. 5 pages. 137. "Goose and her children," a game. 10 pages. 138. Buffalo horn game. 7 and 1 page. 139. A stick which is hurled. 5 and 1 page and 2 figures. 140. "Making the wood dance by hitting it," a game. 8 pages. 41. "Making the wood jump by hitting it," a game. 8 pages. 142. "Making the bow glide by throwing," a game. 6 pages. 143. Coasting. 8 pages. 144. Game of ball. 12 pages. 145. "Shotting at an arrow set up," a game. 7 pages. 146. Grizzly bear game. 12 pages. 147. Deer game. 10 pages. 148. "Running towards one another," a game. 9 pages. 149. "They cause one another to carry packs on their backs," a game. 10 pages. 150. "They hit one another with mud," a game. 10 pages. 151. Hitting the ball, a game. 11 pages. 152. A game with a rawhide hoop. 43 pages and 2 figures. 153. Game of earthen horses. 8 pages. 154. "They slide by pushing," a game. 14 pages. 155. "They kick at one another," a game. 14 pages.

156. "The hoop is made to roll in the wind," a game. 9 pages. 157. [Popgun game.] Missing July, 1966. (not on microfilm made 1958) 1 page illustration found July, 1968. 158. Wrestling. 8 pages. 159. Courting the girls. 9 pages. 160. Game with bow and small wood-pointed arrows. 10 pages. 161. Swinging. 10 pages. 162. "Taking Places from one another," a game. 9 pages. 163. "Playing with small things," a game. 18 pages. 164. Pinching the backs of hands, a game. 11 pages. 165. "Scattering them," a game. 9 pages. 166. "Who shall get threr first," a game. 10 pages. 167. Hopping. 9 pages. 168. Throwing arrows by hand, at a target. 6 pages. 169. Ghost game. 21 pages. 170. Hide and seek. 13 pages. 171. Jumping down from a high object. 12 pages. 172. Plumstone game. 18 pages. 173. Odd or even ? A game with sticks. 12 pages. 174. Throwing chewed leaves into the eyes, a game. 7 pages. 175. Game with the ankle-bones of a deer. 12 pages. 176. Native wooden harminicon, played by boys. 14 pages and 5 figures. 177. Mysterious game. 17 pages. 178. Playing doctor. 10 pages. 179. Pretending to be dead, a game. 10 pages. 180. Hunting young birds in summer. 12 pages. 181. Hunting eggs in spring. 10 pages. 182. Going to make a grass lodge. 11 pages. 183. Scrambling for presents. 11 pages. 184. Sitting on wooden horses, a game. 8 pages. 185. Making a bone turn and hum by twisting a cord. 15 pages and 2 figures. 186. "String twisted in and out among the fingers." 8 pages. 187. Tumbling and somersault. 7 pages. 188. "Game with large things." 17 pages. 189. About two young men who were friends. 51 pages. By Bruyier. 190. A bird that foretells cold weather. 14 pages. 191. Cause of scrofulous sore on the neck. 10 pages. 192. Meaning of ringing sounds in the ears. 10 pages. 193. The Brave and Fox societies. 18 pages and 4 sketches. 194. Dog Society. 31 pages and 2 sketches and 1 page drawing.

195. "Killing by Hitting," or "Taking the Buffalo paunch," a society of women. 12 pages. 196. Scalpdance society. 16 pages and 1 sketch. 197. Night dance. 18 pages. 198. Mysterious society. 16 pages. 199. Grizzly Bear dance. 19 pages. 200. Belief about the Kildeer. 13 pages. 201. The acts of a leader. 17 pages. 202. Return of the night hawk in the spring. 7 pages. 203. Belief concerning the Ski-bi-bi-la, a small grey bird which says Gli Hunwo ?" ("Coming home ?). 16 pages. Also earlier version of the same, with mistakes. 10 pages. 204. About hanging the "tablo" ("shoulder blade") at the door of the lodge. 7 pages. 205. Trying to excell others. 12 pages. 206. Scolding or whipping a woman. 12 pages. 207. How Indian paints are made. 18 pagrs. 208. Acting like the buffalo bull. 9 pages and 1 page drawing. 209. Law about bowls. 9 pages. 210. Meaning of a rooster's crowing. 8 pages. 211. The taking apart of fetishes. 24 pages. 212. How one man drowned another. 21 pages. 213. Concerning warts. 8 pages. 214. Of a woman who qas killed by mosquitoes. 32 pages. 215. Concerning hermaphrodites. 22 pages. 216. Belief concerning the grebe or dabchick. 10 pages. 217. Rules for eating dogs. 8 pages. 218. Bushotter's recollections of a certain famine. 219. Why Lakota men should not wear women's moccasins. 16 pages. 220. Customs relating to bowls. 10 pages. 221. Meanings of various kinds of twitchings. 10 pages. 222. "Kicking out his elder brother's teeth." 10 pages. 223. How a boy wounded his grandfather in the scrotum. 13 pages. Bruyier's revision of the same. 13 pages. 224. Legend of the nude Spider woman. 12 pages. About the woman who was deceived by the grizzly bear, with an account of the prairie hen. 20 pages. By Bruyier. 225. "Punishment of the prairie." 19 pages.

226. Part of the punishment of a murderer. 12 pages. 227. About a foolish wife. 42 pages. 228. How a ghost stunned Bushotter's father. 21 pages. 229. Occasions for scolding wives. 12 pages. Half-page corrected sentence at end by Buyier. 230. Setting out food, etc. for ghosts. 16 pages. 231. Concerning widows and widowers. 30 pages. 232. About a newborn child. 9 pages. 233. Tatala, a humorist. 6 pages. 234. Vegetal lore. 16 pages. 235. About the year when the stars fell (1833). 18 pages. 236. Concerning shells used as necklaces. 8 pages and 2 sketches. 237. Game with a ball of mud. 8 pages. 238. "Throwing fire at one another." 11 pages. 239. Punishment of a liar. 8 pages. 240. Invocation of the Thunder. 13 pages. 241. About spiders. 15 pages. 242. The mysterious imitation of ghosts. 14 pages. 243. What they carry when they migrate. 20 pages. 244. What happened when the Lower Brules went to a mountain. 24 pages. 245. Concerning guardian spirits. 16 pages. 246. About the Thunderers (People dwelling in the clouds.) 25 pages. 247. About lizards, frogs, etc. rained from the sky. 11 pages. 248. Deer Women. 28 pages. 249. Bird societies. 31 pages. 250. Ways od dancing. 26 pages. 251. About gashing the limbs when mourning. 7 pages. 252. On Fellowhood. 16 pages. 253. Ceremonies at birth. 8 pages. Bruyier's revision. 5 pages. 254. Bushotter's stepfather's prophetic gifts. 15 pages. 255. The recovery of Bushotter's younger brother. 14 pages. 256. Why a son or daughter acts in a childish manner. 9 pages. 257. Giving birth to one child while still nursing another. 13 pages. 258. Courting. 48 pages and 3 page color folding drawing and 1 page drawing. 259. Heyoka woman. 8 pages.
Biographical / Historical:
Historical data on the Bushotter texts. 1927: May 24. Stories 102-189 sent to Franz Boas, at Columbia. 1928: March 15. Stories 137-189 returned. April 17. 16 miscellaneous sheets sent to Boas. May 14. All the remaining Bushotter material returned. 1936: June 26. All the Bushotter texts sent to Boas. 1939: July 11. Stories 102-259 returned. 1942: April 16. Stories 1-101 returned. 1966: Survey by R. J. DeMallie showed all stories present with the exception of last part of Number 4, last part of Number 51, and all of Number 157. A few illustrations are also missing.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS.4800: (3.1.1.3) [103]
Local Note:
Old number 2632 (Parts 1-3)
autograph document signed
Collection Restrictions:
The James O. Dorsey Papers are open for research. Access to the James O. Dorsey Papers requires an appointment
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Lakota dialect  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Collection Citation:
Manuscript 4800 James O. Dorsey papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers
MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers / Series 1: Siouan-Catawban / 1.2: Dakota
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3a9ec836e-eaf4-41da-8dc1-8cc89ae21490
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-ms4800-ref1779

Lakota texts by George Bushotter, Stories 1-55

Creator:
Bushotter, George, 1864-1892  Search this
Dorsey, James Owen, 1848-1895  Search this
Bruyier, John  Search this
Collection Creator:
Dorsey, James Owen, 1848-1895  Search this
Extent:
555 Pages ((10 folders))
Culture:
Lakota (Teton/Western Sioux)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Pages
Manuscripts
Folklore
Date:
1887
Scope and Contents:
These 55 stories form a portion of Lakota texts by George Bushotter collected by James Dorsey in Manuscript 4800: (3.1.1.3) [103]. Interlinear translations are by Dorsey, aided by Bushotter and Bruyier. Each story is numbered. 1.) Sword Keeper and his brother. The latter meets Two Faces, a mythic giant. Includes 1 page partial translation. 2.) The Mythic Buffalo. 3.) Two Faces. Explains the origin of arrows, pipes, axes, knife-sharpeners, beads, etc. 4.) Three brothers who had a witch sister. (incomplete) 5.) Children, a bad old woman cannibal, and Spider (the Mythic Trickster). 6.) Spider, animals, and women. 7.) A man and his ghost wife. 8.) Two against one: a ghost story with a song. 9.) A man, a female ghost, and a male ghost who wrestled with the man. 10.) Ghost on the hill, who could not be hit by arrows. 11.) Treatment of the sick, burial customs. Includes a sketch. 12.) The man who came to life again. Includes translation and note by Bruyier at end. 13.) The man and woman in the moon. 14.) Man, two in the lodge, female ghost, and the friendly wolf. 15.) The man who spared the wolf cubs. 16.) The Thunder Being and the Unkcegila (a mastadon ?) 17.) Waziya, the northern giant who brings snow. 18.) Buffalo people who attacked the Indian people. 19.) Spider and the land turtle. 20.) The man and his two sons. 21.) The turtle who wished to fly. 22.) The man who could become a grizzly bear. 23.) How the Indians cured the sun. 24.) Spider and the horned water monster. 25.) The strange lake with large subaquatic animals. 26.) The warrior surrounded by a serpent. 27.) The one-eyed serpent with short legs and large body. 28.) Why they pray to stones, the sun, etc. 29.) The mountain in which was a large serpent. 30.) Adventures of a man and his wife. 31.) Spider and the Prairie Chicken. 32.) Adventure of Rabbit Carrier. 33.) The woman who turned to a fish from her waist down. 34.) Spider and the Rabbit; how the latter made snow. 35.) The male ghost and his living wife. 36.) The man with the magic sword, and the one with the powerful breath. 37.) Swift Runner (he who tied stones to his legs). 38.) The man who was rescued by eaglets. 39.) The Double-woman. 40.) Spider and the mice. 41.) Spider and the ducks--how they got red eyes. Includes a sketch. 42.) Spider and the Rabbit; how the latter lost his long tail. 43.) The man who ressembled the man in the moon. 44.) The young lover who was rescued by the girl. 45.) The warriors who met Heyoka (Sunflower) who was singing and dancing. 46.) The flying Santee (a ghoul). 47.) How the Santees first saw buffalo. 48.) How the Lakotas went against the Rees. 49.) Adventures of the Short Man. 50.) Smoke Maker's adventures: a war story. 51.) Fight between the Lakota and the Blackfeet. (incomplete) 52.) Fight between two unarmed men and a grizzly bear. 53.) Treatment of an Omaha spy caught by the Lakotas. 54.) The wild man, a nude cannibal. 55.) He who uses the earth as an ear.
Arrangement:
The stories are organized in folders in the following manner: 1-5; 6-10; 11-15; 16-20; 21-30; 31-35; 36-40; 41-45; 46-50; 51-55.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS.4800: (3.1.1.3) [103, 1-55]
Local Note:
MS 4800: (3.1.1.3) [103] was arbitrarily broken up into multiple records to facilitate accessibility of digital slideshows.
Collection Restrictions:
The James O. Dorsey Papers are open for research. Access to the James O. Dorsey Papers requires an appointment
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Lakota dialect  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Folklore
Collection Citation:
Manuscript 4800 James O. Dorsey papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers
MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers / Series 1: Siouan-Catawban / 1.2: Dakota / Lakota texts by George Bushotter
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3c9e516ee-3460-4e6c-a50d-04ae9da21916
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-ms4800-ref2264

Lakota texts by George Bushotter, Stories 56-110 and 1513

Creator:
Bushotter, George, 1864-1892  Search this
Dorsey, James Owen, 1848-1895  Search this
Bruyier, John  Search this
Collection Creator:
Dorsey, James Owen, 1848-1895  Search this
Extent:
793 Pages ((11 folders))
Culture:
Lakota (Teton/Western Sioux)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Pages
Manuscripts
Folklore
Date:
1887
Scope and Contents:
These 55 stories form a portion of Lakota texts by George Bushotter collected by James Dorsey in Manuscript 4800: (3.1.1.3) [103]. Interlinear translations are by Dorsey, aided by Bushotter and Bruyier. Each story is numbered. 56.) Why horses are called, in Lakota, "mysterious dogs." 57.) The man who could understand ravens. 58.) Of the two small stones that were servants of the people. (Brief note at the end appears to be in Swanton's hand.) 59.) The Wahanksica, a strange animal. 60.) The animal in the Missouri River which breaks up the ice in the spring of the year. 61.) How the wind brought sickness to Medicine Butte Creek. 62.) Beliefs about day and night. 63.) The man in the forest and his contest with ghosts. 64.) The feast in honor of the Anti-Natural God. 65.) Of the Heyoka man who dreamed of his death by lightening. 66.) Fight between the Lakota and the Blackfeet. 67.) Of the mysteriousman who knew about the distant war party. 68.) Of the wise man who caught his eloping wife. 69.) How the Rees or Blackfeet came against the Lakotas. 70.) Origin of the buffalo. 71.) The Sun Dance. Includes figures and diagrams. 72.) The man who could lengthen his arm at will. 73.) What a young man must do before he can marry. 74.) How the Crows surrounded some Lakotas. 75.) A raid on a Lakota camp. 76.) Story of a warrior who was not wounded. 77.) Fight between the Lakota and white soldiers. 78.) Of the Santees, and their fondness for certain foods. 79.) What the Lakota thought of the first white people whom they saw. 80.) Belief respecting lakes. 81.) Belief about this world. 82.) The calumet dance. Includes 2 diagrams. 83. How they honor the dead (the Ghost Feast). 84.) Men who are arrow and bullet proof. 85.) Of love potions, etc. 86.) The acts of a wounded warrior. 87.) Actors clothed in buffalo robes with the hair out detect wrongdoers. 88.) Those who imitate the elk. 89.) Why a man may not speak to his mother in law. 90.) Rules for feasting, smoking, and visiting. 91.) Of certain boyish customs. 92.) A ghost story. 93.) Origin of the white people. 94.) Games and their seasons. 95.) Education of a boy. 96.) Of youth killed in battle, and of his faithful horse. 97.) The people who lived in the north. Includes 2 sketches. 98.) The ghost woman and the robin. 9 pages. Note at end by Bruyier. 99.) The Flying serpent whose touch was fatal. 100.) Origin of twins. 101.) George Bushotter's autobiography. 102.) Belief concerning a loved one who has been called by a ghost. 103.) Fight between two gamblers near Chamberlain, Dakota. 104.) The singing elk. 105.) Belief about Spider. 106.) War of the Lakota against the Omaha. 107.) Narrow escape of Bark Bird's Tail (a Lakota). 108.) Busnotter's cousin's war adventure. 109.) How certain men (doctors, priests, etc.) have become mysterious. 110.) How the Lakota fought the Cheyennes and Black Men (Commanches ?). 1513) Transcription of beginning of text 109. Also note from W. H. Holmes to J. N. B. Hewitt requesting the latter to identify the manuscript. Formerly MS 1513.
Arrangement:
The stories are organized in folders in the following manner: 56-60; 61-65; 66-70; 71; 72-79; 80-84; 85-91; 92-100; 101; 102-110.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS.4800: (3.1.1.3) [103, 56-110 & 1513]
Local Note:
MS 4800: (3.1.1.3) [103] was arbitrarily broken up into multiple records to facilitate accessibility of digital slideshows.
Collection Restrictions:
The James O. Dorsey Papers are open for research. Access to the James O. Dorsey Papers requires an appointment
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Lakota dialect  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Folklore
Collection Citation:
Manuscript 4800 James O. Dorsey papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers
MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers / Series 1: Siouan-Catawban / 1.2: Dakota / Lakota texts by George Bushotter
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3b1b1f7d2-f591-4693-b75a-357cbc9cea01
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-ms4800-ref2265

Lakota texts by George Bushotter, Stories 111-189

Creator:
Bushotter, George, 1864-1892  Search this
Dorsey, James Owen, 1848-1895  Search this
Bruyier, John  Search this
Collection Creator:
Dorsey, James Owen, 1848-1895  Search this
Extent:
880 Pages ((10 folders))
Culture:
Lakota (Teton/Western Sioux)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Pages
Manuscripts
Folklore
Date:
1887
Scope and Contents:
These 79 stories form a portion of Lakota texts by George Bushotter collected by James Dorsey in Manuscript 4800: (3.1.1.3) [103]. Interlinear translations are by Dorsey, aided by Bushotter and Bruyier. Each story is numbered. 111.) Rules of etiquette for brothers, sisters, cousins. 112.) Ghost story. 113.) The habits of beavers. 114.) Spider and the old woman who fed all the animals. 115.) The handsome man who was rescued from a pit by a wolf. 116.) Trick of a myth-teller. 117.) Of thistles. 118.) How Indians regard the past and their ancestors. 119.) The grass dance. 120.) The Big Belly Society. 121.) The Mandan Society. 122.) "Following one another," a Lakota game. 123.) "They make it run by pushing," a Lakota game. Includes 2 (colored) diagrams. 124.) Horse racing. 125.) Hitting the moccasin, a game. 9 pages. 126. Shooting at the cactus, a gane. 5 pages. 127. Hitting the bow, a game. 5 pages. 128. Shooting at bunches of grass, a game. 129.) Shooting at the lights of an animal, a game. 130.) Taking captives from one another, a game. 131.) Trampling on the beaver, a game. 132.) "Howi ! Howi !" a ring game for boys or youths. 133.) "They touch not one another," a game. 134.) Game with a long grass which has a long, sharp beard. 135.) The old woman accuses them," a game. 136.) A game with slings. 5 pages. 137.) "Goose and her children," a game. 138.) Buffalo horn game. 139.) A stick which is hurled. Includes 2 figures. 140.) "Making the wood dance by hitting it," a game. 141.) "Making the wood jump by hitting it," a game. 142.) "Making the bow glide by throwing," a game. 143.) Coasting. 144.) Game of ball. 145.) "Shotting at an arrow set up," a game. 146.) Grizzly bear game. 147.) Deer game. 148.) "Running towards one another," a game. 149.) "They cause one another to carry packs on their backs," a game. 150.) "They hit one another with mud," a game. =151.) Hitting the ball, a game. 152.) A game with a rawhide hoop. Includes 2 figures. 153.) Game of earthen horses. 154.) "They slide by pushing," a game. 155.) "They kick at one another," a game. 156.) "The hoop is made to roll in the wind," a game. 9 pages. 157. [Popgun game.] Missing July, 1966. (not on microfilm made 1958) 1 page illustration found July, 1968. 158. Wrestling. 159.) Courting the girls. 160.) Game with bow and small wood-pointed arrows. 161.) Swinging. 162.) "Taking Places from one another," a game. 163.) "Playing with small things," a game. 164.) Pinching the backs of hands, a game. 165.) "Scattering them," a game. 166.) "Who shall get threr first," a game. 167.) Hopping. 168.) Throwing arrows by hand, at a target. 169.) Ghost game. 170.) Hide and seek. 171.)Jumping down from a high object. 172.) Plumstone game. 173. Odd or even ? A game with sticks. 174.) Throwing chewed leaves into the eyes, a game. 175.) Game with the ankle-bones of a deer. 176.) Native wooden harminicon, played by boys. Includes 5 figures. 177.) Mysterious game. 178.) Playing doctor. 179.) Pretending to be dead, a game. 180.) Hunting young birds in summer. 181.) Hunting eggs in spring. 182.) Going to make a grass lodge. 183.) Scrambling for presents. 184.) Sitting on wooden horses, a game. 185.) Making a bone turn and hum by twisting a cord. Includes 2 figures. 186.) "String twisted in and out among the fingers." 187.) Tumbling and somersault. 188.) "Game with large things." 189.) About two young men who were friends. By Bruyier.
Arrangement:
The stories are organized in folders in the following manner: 111-115; 116-123; 124-133; 134-145; 146-152; 153-163; 164-172; 173-179; 180-185; 186-189.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS.4800: (3.1.1.3) [103, 111-189]
Local Note:
MS 4800: (3.1.1.3) [103] was arbitrarily broken up into multiple records to facilitate accessibility of digital slideshows.
Collection Restrictions:
The James O. Dorsey Papers are open for research. Access to the James O. Dorsey Papers requires an appointment
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Lakota dialect  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Folklore
Collection Citation:
Manuscript 4800 James O. Dorsey papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers
MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers / Series 1: Siouan-Catawban / 1.2: Dakota / Lakota texts by George Bushotter
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3c0dfec78-6bc9-4070-91eb-987ef5977703
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-ms4800-ref2266

Lakota texts by George Bushotter, Stories 190-240

Creator:
Bushotter, George, 1864-1892  Search this
Dorsey, James Owen, 1848-1895  Search this
Collection Creator:
Dorsey, James Owen, 1848-1895  Search this
Extent:
798 Pages ((10 folders))
Culture:
Lakota (Teton/Western Sioux)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Pages
Folklore
Manuscripts
Date:
1887
Scope and Contents:
These 51 stories form a portion of Lakota texts by George Bushotter collected by James Dorsey in Manuscript 4800: (3.1.1.3) [103]. Interlinear translations are by Dorsey, aided by Bushotter and Bruyier. Each story is numbered. 190.) A bird that foretells cold weather. 191.) Cause of scrofulous sore on the neck. 192.) Meaning of ringing sounds in the ears. 193.) The Brave and Fox societies. Includes 4 sketches. 194.) Dog Society. Includes 2 sketches and 1 page drawing. 195.) "Killing by Hitting," or "Taking the Buffalo paunch," a society of women. 196.) Scalpdance society. Includes 1 sketch. 197.) Night dance. 198.) Mysterious society. 199.) Grizzly Bear dance. 200.) Belief about the Kildeer. 201.) The acts of a leader. 202.) Return of the night hawk in the spring. 203.) Belief concerning the Ski-bi-bi-la, a small grey bird which says Gli Hunwo ?" ("Coming home ?). Also earlier version of the same, with mistakes. 204.) About hanging the "tablo" ("shoulder blade") at the door of the lodge. 205.) Trying to excell others. 206.) Scolding or whipping a woman. 207.) How Indian paints are made. 208.) Acting like the buffalo bull. Includes 1 drawing. 209.) Law about bowls. 210.) Meaning of a rooster's crowing. 211.) The taking apart of fetishes. 212.) How one man drowned another. 213.) Concerning warts. 214.) Of a woman who was killed by mosquitoes. 215.) Concerning hermaphrodites. 216.) Belief concerning the grebe or dabchick. 217.) Rules for eating dogs. 218.) Bushotter's recollections of a certain famine. 219.) Why Lakota men should not wear women's moccasins. 220.) Customs relating to bowls. 221.) Meanings of various kinds of twitchings. 222.) "Kicking out his elder brother's teeth." 223.) How a boy wounded his grandfather in the scrotum. Bruyier's revision of the same. 224.) Legend of the nude Spider woman. 12 pages. About the woman who was deceived by the grizzly bear, with an account of the prairie hen. 20 pages. By Bruyier. 225.) "Punishment of the prairie." 226.) Part of the punishment of a murderer. 227.) About a foolish wife. 228.) How a ghost stunned Bushotter's father. 229.) Occasions for scolding wives. Half-page corrected sentence at end by Buyier. 230.) Setting out food, etc. for ghosts. 231.) Concerning widows and widowers. 232.) About a newborn child. 233.) Tatala, a humorist. 234.) Vegetal lore. 235.) About the year when the stars fell (1833). 236.) Concerning shells used as necklaces. Includes 2 sketches. 237.) Game with a ball of mud. 238.) "Throwing fire at one another." 239.) Punishment of a liar. 240.) Invocation of the Thunder.
Arrangement:
The stories are organized in folders in the following manner: 190-194; 195-199; 200-205; 206-211; 212-215; 216-222; 223-225; 226-229; 230-235; 236-240.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS.4800: (3.1.1.3) [130, 190-240]
Local Note:
MS 4800: (3.1.1.3) [103, 190-240] was arbitrarily broken up into multiple records to facilitate accessibility of digital slideshows.
Collection Restrictions:
The James O. Dorsey Papers are open for research. Access to the James O. Dorsey Papers requires an appointment
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Lakota dialect  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
Manuscript 4800 James O. Dorsey papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers
MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers / Series 1: Siouan-Catawban / 1.2: Dakota / Lakota texts by George Bushotter
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3b055c1b3-92e5-4194-a8a5-8098b23398d3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-ms4800-ref2267

Lakota texts by George Bushotter, Stories 241-259

Creator:
Bushotter, George, 1864-1892  Search this
Dorsey, James Owen, 1848-1895  Search this
Bruyier, John  Search this
Collection Creator:
Dorsey, James Owen, 1848-1895  Search this
Extent:
376 Pages ((5 folders))
Culture:
Lakota (Teton/Western Sioux)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Pages
Folklore
Manuscripts
Date:
1887
Scope and Contents:
These 30 stories form a portion of Lakota texts by George Bushotter collected by James Dorsey in Manuscript 4800: (3.1.1.3) [103]. Interlinear translations are by Dorsey, aided by Bushotter and Bruyier. Each story is numbered. 241.) About spiders. 242.) The mysterious imitation of ghosts. 243.) What they carry when they migrate. 244.) What happened when the Lower Brules went to a mountain. 245.) Concerning guardian spirits. 246.) About the Thunderers (People dwelling in the clouds.) 247.) About lizards, frogs, etc. rained from the sky. 248.) Deer Women. 249.) Bird societies. 250.) Ways of dancing. 251.) About gashing the limbs when mourning. 252.) On Fellowhood. 253.) Ceremonies at birth. Bruyier's revision. 254.) Bushotter's stepfather's prophetic gifts. 255.) The recovery of Bushotter's younger brother. 256.) Why a son or daughter acts in a childish manner. 257.) Giving birth to one child while still nursing another. 258.) Courting. Includes 3 page color folding drawing and 1 page drawing. 259.) Heyoka woman.
Arrangement:
The stories are organized in folders in the following manner: 241-244; 245-249; 250-254; 255-259.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS.4800: (3.1.1.3) [103, 241-259]
Local Note:
MS 4800: (3.1.1.3) [103] was arbitrarily broken up into multiple records to facilitate accessibility of digital slideshows.
Collection Restrictions:
The James O. Dorsey Papers are open for research. Access to the James O. Dorsey Papers requires an appointment
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Lakota dialect  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
Manuscript 4800 James O. Dorsey papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers
MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers / Series 1: Siouan-Catawban / 1.2: Dakota / Lakota texts by George Bushotter
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3560c6285-a8d5-481b-82a2-fc5531ede1cd
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-ms4800-ref2268
Online Media:

Fragments of Lakota texts by George Bushotter

Creator:
Bushotter, George, 1864-1892  Search this
Dorsey, James Owen, 1848-1895  Search this
Collection Creator:
Dorsey, James Owen, 1848-1895  Search this
Extent:
17 Pages ((1 folders))
Culture:
Lakota (Teton/Western Sioux)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Pages
Folklore
Manuscripts
Date:
1887
Scope and Contents:
These materials form a portion of Lakota texts by George Bushotter collected by James Dorsey in Manuscript 4800: (3.1.1.3) [103]. They consist of typescript fragments of the following stories: 258.) Courting, 231.) Concerning widows and widowers, 209.) Law about bowls, 208.) Acting like the buffalo bull, and 111.) Rules of etiquette for brothers, sisters, cousins in Lakota with handwritten interlineal translations in English. Includes two pages of sketches.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS.4800: (3.1.1.3) [103, 2632]
Local Note:
MS 4800: (3.1.1.3) [103] was arbitrarily broken up into multiple records to facilitate accessibility of digital slideshows.
These files appear to have once been filed with Manuscript 2632, which contains copies of some of Bushotter's texts made at Rosebud Reservation, South Dakota, by John R. Swanton in 1899-1900.
Collection Restrictions:
The James O. Dorsey Papers are open for research. Access to the James O. Dorsey Papers requires an appointment
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Lakota dialect  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
Manuscript 4800 James O. Dorsey papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers
MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers / Series 1: Siouan-Catawban / 1.2: Dakota / Lakota texts by George Bushotter
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw366caa721-262d-4cef-ae93-6744847c5521
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-ms4800-ref2269

MS 2655 Seven Fox stories by Alfred Kiyana, Sakihtanohkweha, and Jack Bullard

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Creator:
Kiyana, Alfred, 1877-1918  Search this
Bullard, Jack  Search this
Sakihtanohkweha, 1875-1957  Search this
Translator:
Poweshiek, Horace  Search this
Extent:
63 Items (0.63 linear feet (638 pages)
Culture:
Fox Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Seven stories handwritten in Meskwaki (Fox) syllabic text by Alfred Kiyana, Sakihtanohkweha (Mrs. Bill Leaf), and Jack Bullard, with English translations by Horace Poweshiek. These were collected by Truman Michelson in Tama, Iowa. The texts by Alfred Kiyana are "The man who married a giant woman," (text 23 pages, translation 18 pages); "When the ghosts cheated the Frenchmen," (text 7 pages, translation 5 pages); "Ten men," (text 13 pages, translation 10 pages); "Ghost, A man who had been a ghost and was a manitou," (text 49 pages, translation 40 pages); and "Wisahkeha dance," (text 197 pages, translation 94 pages). Sakihtanohkweha authored "Turkey-owner" (text 23 pages, translation 22 pages) and Jack Bullard authored "[The one who owned a wooden witch image]" (text 48 pages, translation 48 pages).
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2655
Local Note:
Title updated from "Texts" 3/28/2014.
Topic:
Fox language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Meskwaki; Sauk & Fox  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Citation:
Manuscript 2655, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2655
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw35a34301a-2909-4fec-a685-49113a65b7ae
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2655

MS 1879 Nine Fox legends collected by Truman Michelson

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Creator:
Leaf, Bill  Search this
Lincoln, Harry  Search this
Kiyana, Alfred, 1877-1918  Search this
Sakihtanohkweha, 1875-1957  Search this
Translator:
Poweshiek, Ida  Search this
Extent:
25 Items (0.25 linear feet (425 pages)
Culture:
Fox Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Nine stories in Meskwaki (Fox) syllabary by various authors with English translations by Ida Poweshiek. Contents: 1) Wapasaya by Bill Leaf; text 29 pages, translation 34 pages. 2.) When Wisahkeha fed bees to the wolves, by Alfred Kiyana; text 17 pages, translation 14 pages. 3.) Wisake, by Sakihtanohkweha (Mrs. Bill Leaf); text 40 pages, translation 30 pages. 4) Feather, by Harry Lincoln; text 25 pages, translation 34 pages. 5.) The man who made a sacred bundle, by Alfred Kiyana; text 27 pages, translation 18 pages. 6.) Something about Rabbit and Bear, by Harry Lincoln; text 6 pages, translation 9 pages. 7.) The Indian lead miners who mined lead long ago, by Alfred Kiyana; text 32 pages, translation 36 pages. 8.) The Indian who was blessed a an owl long ago, by Alfred Kiyana; text 31 pages, translation 28 pages. 9) When Wisake was almost captured by the manitous by Alfred Kiyana; text 8 pages, translation 13 pages.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1879
Local Note:
Title changed from "8 Legends" 3/19/2014.
Topic:
Fox language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Meskwaki; Sauk & Fox  Search this
Wapasaiya  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Citation:
Manuscript 1879, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1879
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3c8526d16-b9d0-4b75-a18c-6a76792fe94f
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1879

MS 2153 Seven Fox stories by Alfred Kiyana with translations and grammatical notes

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Creator:
Kiyana, Alfred, 1877-1918  Search this
Translator:
Leaf, Bill  Search this
Brown, Thomas, circa 1891-  Search this
Walker, Leo  Search this
Extent:
154 Pages
Culture:
Fox Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Seven stories in Meskwaki (Fox) syllabic text by Alfred Kiyana with English translations and Truman Michelson's grammatical notes. Collected in Tama, Iowa, the following is a list of the stories: 1.) "Owl" text 8 pages, translation from Bill Leaf 3 pages; 2) "The married couple: the man whose wife was wooed by a bear" text 29 pages, translation 18 pages, grammatical questions 6 pages; 3) "When Possum married Woodchuck" text 8 pages, 2 translations from Leo Walker (one incorrectly labelled "When Raccoon married Badger") 6 pages; 4) "When Raccoon was friends with Badger" text 16 pages, translation 13 pages; 5) "When the Fox chiefs were all killed by the Menominee" text 4 pages, translation from Leo Walker 3 pages; 6) "Me so swa" text 22 pages, translation by Michelson and Thomas Brown 18 pages.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2153
Topic:
Fox language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Meskwaki; Sauk & Fox  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Citation:
Manuscript 2153, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2153
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw350ad675f-c01a-495e-9283-75341c3c2544
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2153

MS 2721 Shawnee and Peoria notes and stories collected by Truman Michelson

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Creator:
Finley, George W.  Search this
Skye, Bill  Search this
Stand, Nancy  Search this
Extent:
259 Pages
Culture:
Shawnee  Search this
Peoria  Search this
Miami  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Date:
1916
Scope and Contents:
Shawnee and Peoria linguistic and ethnographic notes and stories collected by Truman Michelson during his fieldwork in Oklahoma. Individuals that Michelson worked with include George Finley, Bill Skye, and Nancy Stand.The stories are primarily in English, but there are some texts in Shawnee and Peoria with interlineal English translations. A couple of the stories are marked Miami.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2721
Local Note:
Title changed from "Linguistic notes; ethnology; legend" 4/17/2014.
Topic:
Shawnee language  Search this
Miami language (Ind. and Okla.)  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Illinois  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Citation:
Manuscript 2721, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2721
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3e51e073d-bb0a-4245-b1f9-5c804b4844c7
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2721

Nahuatl

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
14 Boxes
Culture:
Nahua  Search this
Indians of Mexico  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Folklore
Narratives
Date:
1951
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Mexico/Central America/South America series contains Harrington's Nahuatl research. The materials consist of linguistic notes, grammar, texts, and miscellaneous notes.

His linguistic notes form the largest section of this subseries. A semantically arranged vocabulary was elicited from Alfonso Hernandez Catarina. The categories of lexical items include phenomena, directions, seasons, astronomy, time, plant parts, plants, animal parts, animals, age-sex, rank, relationship, material culture, religion, tribenames, and placenames. A "Flood Story" in English is also included. In addition, there are some phrases, information on phonetics and grammar, and a little ethnographic data. There are references to secondary sources such as Simeon, Carochi ("Car."), and "Gar."

Arcadio Sagahon was also a major contributor. Harrington recorded eighteen pages of basic vocabulary with him. There is also a section of randomly arranged vocabulary based on an examination of rock and plant specimens, with occasional references to "Arc's book" (not further identified). Some equivalent terms were provided by Tiburcio Jaimez.

A compilation of several sets of word lists on numbered pages resulted from a number of linguistic sessions with Tiburcio Jaimez. These include commentary on a book by Cardenas (abbreviated "Card.") which is not further identified. Harrington also elicited Jaimez's aid in rehearing the source referred to as "Gar." They developed fairly extensive annotations to pages 40 to 51 of that work, and the section on verbs. In addition, Jaimez provided commentary on the book Raices etimologicas del idioma nahuatl by Pedro Barra y Valenzuela.

Additional linguistic data were furnished by Tomas Perez Escobar and Jose Farias Galindo. A general, unsorted vocabulary which Harrington recorded from Escobar, with a few comments from Arcadio Sagahon, is supplemented by a sizable section of notes in his own hand. Sentences in Nahuatl are each followed by a Spanish translation. Farias provided vocabulary during a number of sessions in which he was accompanied by Captain Santos Acevedo Lopez. There is also a small file of miscellaneous vocabulary given together by Farias and Arcadio Sagahon.

Many of the data from the preceding groups of field notes were brought together in a comprehensive semantic arrangement. In addition, Harrington compiled lists of words in English and Spanish as a questionnaire for eliciting Maya words. (In fact, this section is headed by a sheet with the label "Questionnaire for Az[tec].")

A final section of linguistic notes includes miscellaneous shorter vocabularies, a four-page word list, and Harrington's questionnaire. A "Coyotepec Vocabulary" of nineteen pages was recorded from Francisco Pinera Martinez. It includes Xochimilco equivalences, commentary by Jose Farias Galindo, and a reference to Mr. Sanchez. Notes from a "Cuautla Trip" include a short vocabulary (seven pages) from an unidentified informant and miscellaneous notes on people and places. A twenty-three page basic vocabulary and a few phrases were recorded from Jose Fortino. Harrington later obtained a few Xochimilco glosses and a little commentary by Arcadio Sagahon. The sixteen pages of notes, resulting from a trip Harrington took to Tepotzotlan with Farias and "Arc," contain miscellaneous data and references to an unnamed informant. A basic vocabulary and some short sentences were elicited from Jose Barreraon May 2, 1951, under the heading "Tete. Voc." It is unclear whether the language referred to is Tetelcingo or Tetela but it was presumably related to the language of Tezcoco. The seventy pages of data, which include some Xochimilco terms and information on the country, are supplemented by two pages obtained from "Juan while waiting for the bus." The material was reheard with Farias, Perez, and Sagahon at a later date. There are nine pages of data from an interview with Albino (Alvino) Cortes. There is a mention of Frederico Hernandez, and Miguel Romero was also present during the recording of the "Aztec vocabulary." Lexical items were recorded from Munoz (alternate spelling Munos), Romero, and Juan Ramos of Puebla, near Vera Cruz City. There are also four pages of notes in an unidentified hand and a questionnaire used by Harrington in his linguistic work. It includes a little data from "Alf." and "Arc."

Notes on Nahuatl grammar include excerpts from a number of published sources, primarily Whorf, Simeon, and Carochi. The topics covered include phonetics (one section is labeled "Phonetics Tibd"), syntax, verb, noun, pronoun, numeral, adjective, adverb, postposition, conjunction, and interjection. The principal informants cited are Arcadio Sagahon and Tomas Perez Escobar. Additional information was provided by Alfonso Hernandez Catarina, Tiburcio Jaimez, Tomas Perez Escobar, Jose Farias Galindo, and Captain Acevedo. One page of the grammar is in Farias' handwriting. Several pages are marked "Tete."

The major sets of Nahuatl texts which Harrington recorded were assigned by him to one of two categories: "Finished" or "Not yet gone over." The first designation indicates that the Nahuatl phonetic transcription of a given text was refined with the original speaker--and sometimes reheard by others--and that it was accompanied by a complete Spanish translation and possibly notes. There are references to Matlapa and Jalpilla forms. The predominant contributor was Arcadio Sagahon. Alternate versions of each text were also given by Tiburcio Jaimez and Alfonso Hernandez. All of the stories have to do with animals and many appear to be translations of fables rather than native texts: "The Sky Is Falling" (Chicken Little), "La Zorra y el Queso" (The Fox and the Cheese). The texts labeled "Not gone over" appear to have been recorded from Hernandez and Jaimez but not reviewed with Sagahon. The stories include "The Girl and the Head of the Birds," "The Queen Bee and the Drone," and the lengthy "La Vida de un Indigena." A miscellaneous set of texts at the end of the series represents an attempt at a translation of the Lord's Prayer by Hernandez and Sagahon and a poem evidently written by the latter.

Harrington also compiled several miscellaneous files of data on Nahuatl. The first, consisting of notes from the period 1922 to 1927, includes bibliographic references, a list of "Aztek" words from Ben Elson in Vera Cruz, and a partial English translation of Carochi's grammar by Paul Vogenitz. Other files -which contain some typed and handwritten notes prepared by others-include background notes on the geography, history, and language of the Nahuatl; bibliographic references; maps; and a list of "persons and addresses." The latter contains some biographical data on Harrington's informants. There are also reports from Carlos Morales and copies of letters which reflect Harrington's efforts to contact Nahuatl speakers.
Biographical / Historical:
Harrington conducted fieldwork on Nahuatl--also referred to as Aztec--during a six-month period in 1951. In March he left Washington, D.C., arriving at the Hotel Fornos in Mexico City on March 25. He remained there until early September. Most of his informants were found locally, although he did make a number of side trips into the surrounding regions.

During the course of his study he worked with speakers of a number of dialects. He distinguished between the various forms he recorded by the use of abbreviations: "Az." or "Cl. Az." referred to Classical Aztec and "Naw." to Nahuatl. "Fed. Dist." was used for Federal District, "Xoch." for Xochimilco, "MA" for Milpa Alta, "V.C." for Vera Cruz, and "Mat(l)." for Matlapa. Terms from the Valley of Mexico were noted variously by the markers "Valle de Mex.," "V de M.," or "V of M." Some comparisons were occasionally made with Cahuilla (Cah.) words.

Harrington made use of a number of secondary sources throughout his study. The primary works which he consulted included the Dictionnaire de La langue nahuatl ou mexicaine by Remi Simeon, Arte de La lengua mexicana by Horacio Carochi, and a source referred to as "Gar."--possibly by Angel Maria Garibay Kintana or Jose I. Davila Garibi. He evidently had plans to prepare an annotated version of Simeon's Nahuatl-French dictionary. An assistant aided him in photostatting and pasting each entry on a separate card. Preliminary steps were taken to provide English glosses but no new Nahuatl data were appended to them.

The first informant whom Harrington contacted was Miguel Romero. They worked together on March 26 and 27 and April 1. He spoke with Salome Perez on March 27 and interviewed Tomas Perez Escobar on an almost daily basis from March 28 through April 28. The latter, referred to variously as "Professor Perez," "Perez," and "Tomas," was from the Valley of Mexico. Sessions were conducted intermittently with Frederico Hernandez Mota and Professor Jose Farias Galindo in April and May. Farias (Far.) was a Nahuatl speaker teaching elementary school in Mexico City and Xochimilco. Harrington also noted that he was the translator of the Mexican national anthem into Nahuatl and that he published poetry. In several sessions he was accompanied by Santos Acevedo Lopez, a captain in the Mexican army, who also typed a number of sheets for Harrington.

Harrington's financial records for May 22 mention receipts for payment signed by Tiburcio Jaimez and Arcadio Sagahon, indicating that he probably worked with them at least during the latter part of May. Jaimez, usually referred to by the abbreviation "Tib.," was born and raised in the pueblo of San Francisco Calixtlahuacan.

The field notes indicate that Harrington worked with another major informant, Professor Alfonso Hernandez Catarina, beginning in July. Born at Coxcatlan, "Alf." had been living for some nine years at Ciudad Santos, San Luis Potosi.

Among secondary informants with whom Harrington consulted were Professor Gregorio Cruz (Cruz, Ruz), of the Colegio Administrativo at Toluco, who was teaching school in Tenango;Jose Fortino, a resident of Teskitote Ranch; and Professor Camarena of Toluca. Others mentioned were Francisco Pinera Martinez (middle name alternately spelled Pireda), E[fraim] Sanchez, Pablo Yadieis, and Juan Baloria.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Nahuatl language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Zoology -- nomenclature  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Folklore
Narratives
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 7.2
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 7: Mexico/Central America/South America
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw31da33128-08f5-4876-b6e0-b2b194ae05c9
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15100
Online Media:

Quiche

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Gates, William, 1863-1940  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
12 Boxes
Culture:
Quiché Indians  Search this
Indians of Central America -- Guatemala  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
Folklore
Date:
1922-1948
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Mexico/Central America/South America series contains Harrington's Quiche research. The materials consist of linguistic notes, documents from the files of William Gates, grammar, records relating to the "Popul Vuh," and miscellaneous notes.

The linguistic notes contains material elicited from Cipriano Alvaredo. The contents include Quiche (Q.) vocabulary as well as phrases and short texts, including a Quiche poem. Some terms were evidently elicited as a rehearing of Cakchiquel words (labeled "Cak.") excerpted from Brinton's published version of the "Annals of Cakchiquel" and lexical items extracted from Brasseur de Bourbourg's version of the "Popul Vuh." There is extensive commentary on the phonetics of the language, much of which makes reference to kymograph tracings (abbreviated "Tr.;" see "Documents from the Files of William Gates," Items 1 and 2), to the alphabet pronounced into the pallophotophone, and to vowels pronounced for the motion picture footage. Many notes deal with regressive assimilation and diphthongs. Pages 21 to 24 contain notes in the hand of William Gates and sheets 58 and 59 provide a summary by him of the work which he undertook with Harrington and Alvaredo. Also included are a few miscellaneous notes on early English and the science of language. A portion of the notes, dated December 24, 1922 and labeled "Esselen," may be a rehearing of the Esselen vocabulary compiled and published by A. L. Kroeber. It is not clear whether Harrington was utilizing this source merely as an aid to elicitation or for comparative purposes.

The files of William Gates is comprised of numbered documents based on the work which Gates undertook with Harrington and Alvaredo. Each subsection is preceded by an index card drafted by Gates. Section 1, consisting of twelve pages of kymographic tracings of Quiche words, is followed by 210 pages of photostatic copies of mounted tracings, which are arranged in book form. These are followed by India ink copies of the tracings. Part 3 contains field notes recorded by Harrington; some of these notes duplicate material filed under "Linguistic Notes." Section 4 is a bound checklist (nineteen pages) by Gates of kymographic cylinders made at Auburn Hill. Section 5 is a bound typescript (220 pages) of Vocabulario de lengua quiche, by Domingo Basseta. Gates recorded commentary which he obtained from Alvaredo in the margins in pencil. He recorded any annotations provided by Harrington in ink and labeled them "JPH." A related typescript, labeled as item 6, presents Harrington's transcription of the Basseta vocabulary. There is no item number 7. Section 8 is a five-page typed carbon of an article by Gates titled "Modern Linguistic Apparatus." It includes a discussion of the work undertaken with Harrington and Alvaredo using the kymograph and the pallophotophone. Additional notes on the second device are filed as item 9. Also in Gates' hand is a "list of words for study of accent," classified as item 10. Sections 11 and 12 consist of correspondence. The first concerns work with Alvaredo on the kymograph and the pallophotophone. The second contains letters exchanged between Alvaredo and Gates in Quiche, Spanish, and English. The final numbered section, part 13, includes photographs and a newspaper article from the Washington Star, January 1923. Also from Gates' files are several unnumbered items: a letter to Harrington from E. B. Allen regarding a plan to publish Maya material; notes on phonetics, presumably taken from a notebook by Gates, and interleaved with heading sheets by Harrington; and a brochure on the Gates Collection which was to be put up for sale in New York.

Grammatical notes on the Quiche language are arranged in four sections. The first part consists of a draft of a grammar under the heading "Quiche Grammar and Restored Popul Yuh Text wIth Translation." Material on hand includes notes and an outline for the proposed paper, interspersed with slips from Harrington's early fieldwork. Topics covered encompass phonetics, interjections, verbs, numerals, adjectives, adverbs, and prepositions. A great deal of data were excerpted from the works of Brasseur de Bourbourg (abbreviated "Bras.") and Basseta, as well as from the Diccionario cakchiquel-espanol (abbreviated "Cak-dict."), compiled by Carmelo Saenz de Santa Maria. A second rough draft for a grammar of Quiche comprises the second section. A typed manuscript of 421 pages (former B.A.E. ms. 4781) titled "Quiche Grammar" was submitted to the bureau on March 25, 1948. Although it was prepared for publication as B.A.E. Bulletin 167, it was never released by the editor's office. This version of the grammar consists of textual descriptions and illustrative examples covering phonetics and morphology. A selection from the first part of the "Popul Vuh" is appended at the end of the grammar. Interlinear translations and notes accompany the native text. The two remaining sections of grammatical material consist of slipfiles, which Harrington compiled during the course of his fieldwork in 1922. The first set of slips, labeled "Quiche appendix -not yet put into typewriting," was to be the source of the semantic vocabulary for the first draft of the grammar. The second group, termed by Harrington "Rejects 1947 & Jan. 1948," constitutes the residue of his files after he had removed all slips which he intended to use in the body of his grammar or the appendix.

Harrington considered the "Popul Vuh" to be "the most remarkable manuscript survival . . . from ancient times in all the Maya area." The records he accumulated which relate to this literary work are of several types. The first is a file of a 491-page transcription of the text as dictated by Cipriano Alvaredo in December 1922. It contains occasional interlinear translations in a mixture of Spanish and English with some annotations on orthography. A second set of notes consists of copies of the text which Harrington and his associate John T. Linkins made from January to March in 1948. Quiche, French, and Spanish versions of the text are interfiled: they continue only through chapter five. The Quiche text and French translation were extracted from Brasseur de Bourbourg and the two Spanish translations and some additional notes from Adrian Recinos and Villacorta and Rodas. Related documents include commentary from Brasseur de Bourbourg and Villacorta and Rodas which was not incorporated into the previous file. There are also miscellaneous notes on various secondary sources.

The remaining material in this subseries include a typed vocabulary from an unidentified written source, excerpts from Aleman's Quiche grammar, and notes on a meeting which Harrington had with William Gates on September 13, 1935.
Biographical / Historical:
For approximately eighteen days from late November to mid-December 1922, Harrington interviewed Cipriano Alvaredo (abbreviated "Cip."), a native of Guatemala. This study was undertaken with the close cooperation of William Gates, founder of The Maya Society, at his home in Charlottesville, Virginia. Gates had brought the "peasant farmer" to the United States the preceding July and prepared for their joint sessions by reviewing Domingo Basseta's Vocabulario de lengua quiche with Alvaredo shortly before Harrington's arrival.

Together they reexamined the dictionary, word by word with Harrington recording Alvaredo's commentary in phonetic script. Alvaredo then dictated the entire "Popul Vuh" (P.V.), a Quiche text which deals with the mythology and historical traditions of the ancient Maya tribe. They also recorded some seventy pages of another native text, the "Annals of Cakchiquel." In addition, some grammatical work was undertaken based on Brasseur de Bourbourg's Grammaire de la langue quichee.

Four days were spent making phonetic tracings on the Rousselot kymograph, which Harrington had brought with him. Under the direction of Professor Charles A. Hoxie of the General Electric Company, pitch studies were made using the pallophotophone, an instrument which records vibrations on film. A series of motion pictures was also taken.

Harrington had intermittent plans to return to his early study of Quiche. In 1937 and 1938 he proposed that Edgar L. Hewett publish a new edition of the "Popul Vuh" text to be coauthored by himself and Robert W. Young. In 1943, 1944, and 1947 he corresponded with Dr. Henry McComas, brother-in-law of William Gates; Edward Brown Allen; and M. Wells Jakeman of Brigham Young University regarding publication of the text, this time in mimeograph format. None of these proposals resulted in the preparation of a new manuscript. It appears that all publication plans were abandoned for lack of funds.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Quiché language  Search this
Cakchikel language  Search this
Esselen language  Search this
Mayan languages  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Phonetics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
Folklore
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 7.3
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 7: Mexico/Central America/South America
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw325893d1a-68f1-40b6-9827-48904a31fdc6
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15109
Online Media:

MS 2671 Four versions of the Fox story of Apaiyashihagi and an untitled text collected by Truman Michelson

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Creator:
Kiyana, Alfred, 1877-1918  Search this
Leaf, Bill  Search this
Shapochiwa  Search this
Sakihtanohkweha, 1875-1957  Search this
Extent:
225 Pages
Culture:
Fox Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Date:
1912-1913, undated
Scope and Contents:
Four versions of the story of Apaiyashihagi handwritten in Meskwaki (Fox) syllabic text by Alfred Kiyana, Shapochiwa (Mrs. Harry Lincoln), and Sakihtanohkweha (Mrs. Bill Leaf), with English translations by Truman Michelson. Sakihtanohkweha authored two versions, dated 1912 and 1913; only the 1912 version is translated. A note regarding "clans known to Harry Lincoln" can be found at the end of that translation. On the first page of Sakihtanohkweha's 1913 text Michelson notes, "This is a version of lodge-boy thrown away. The first part is nearly identical with the version written by her in the fall of 1912." On page 42-61 of the same text is a different story by Bill Leaf.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2671
Local Note:
Title changed from "Apaiyashihagi Legend" 4/4/2014.
Topic:
Fox language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Meskwaki; Sauk & Fox  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Citation:
Manuscript 2671, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2671
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3ddd22c1f-da81-4c73-ae14-cdedaa749e03
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2671
Online Media:

MS 2024 Fifteen Fox stories by various authors collected by Truman Michelson

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Creator:
Peters, Jim, 1866-  Search this
Peters, Sam, 1885-  Search this
Pearl Leaf  Search this
Translator:
Poweshiek, Horace  Search this
Extent:
461 Pages
Culture:
Fox Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Fifteen Meskwaki (Fox) syllabic texts by various authors with English translations by Horace Poweshiek. The authors of the Meskwaki texts include Jim Peters, Sam Peters, and Pearl Leaf; the other writers are unidentified. Among the stories are Red leggins (two versions); Wapasaiya; Turtle brings ruin on himself; and Kottilega.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2024
Topic:
Fox language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Meskwaki; Sauk & Fox  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Citation:
Manuscript 2024, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2024
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3000930f1-9f94-433c-8292-c61ec6305866
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2024
Online Media:

MS 2501 Ten Fox stories by Alfred Kiyana, Bill Leaf, and unidentified writers

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Creator:
Kiyana, Alfred, 1877-1918  Search this
Leaf, Bill  Search this
Translator:
Lincoln, Harry  Search this
Extent:
199 Pages
Culture:
Fox Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Stories handwritten in Meskwaki (Fox) syllabary by Alfred Kiyana, Bill Leaf, and two unidentified writers, with English translations from Harry Lincoln in Truman Michelson's hand. These were collected by Michelson in Tama, Iowa. One text, titled "The buffalo who lived with an Indian woman," is by Alfred Kiyana. Bill Leaf authored "Two men, one became a fish," "Indian Baseball Wisahkeha and Turtle," and "Indian cowboy Wisahkeha." There is an English translation of a fourth text by Leaf, "Bill Leaf's French," but the original Meskwaki text is not present. The authors of the other 5 stories are unidentified. The titles are "A man who was torn to pieces," "The last time the Meskwakis had a war," "The Indian that came to be a manitou," "The person who was blessed by a hawk(?)," and "The man who was blessed by the Apayashihaki brothers."
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2501
Local Note:
Jack Bullard was originally identified as one of the writers, but his handwriting does not match of any of the texts. Title changed from "Legends" 3/27/2014.
Topic:
Fox language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Meskwaki; Sauk & Fox  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Citation:
Manuscript 2501, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2501
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3df5e86b6-211b-4888-af82-ce35ea0500b1
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2501
Online Media:

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