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Robert Lemoyne Barrett papers

Creator:
Barrett, Robert LeMoyne, 1871-1969  Search this
Extent:
6.8 Linear feet
Culture:
Ladaki  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Russia
Morocco
Ethiopia
Canada -- Rocky Mountains
Baja California (Mexico : Peninsula)
Norway
Southwest
Siberia
Date:
1892-1909
Summary:
Barrett was a traveler, popular writer, and geographer. The material relates largely to his expeditions to Norway, Russia and Siberia (with Roland B. Dixon), Baja California, Inner Asia, Ethiopia, Morocco, the American Southwest, and the Canadian Rockies. Included is correspondence between Dixon and W. M. Davis and a manuscript by Ghulan Rasul Galwan, Barrett's Ladaki caravan leader.
Scope and Contents:
These papers reflect the early life of Robert LeMoyne Barrett (b. 1871) geographer, traveler, and writer. Included are outgoing correspondence which for the most part was intended for publication, manuscripts on various topics, two published articles on Norway, field notes, sketches, charts, maps, noteslips, photographs and other items relating to his various trips from 1892-1909. The bulk of the material reflects the expeditions of Norway conducted in the summers of 1897-98, the Dixon-Barrett Russia-Siberia Expedition of 1901-02, the Baja Peninsula of 1903-04, the Barrett-Huntington Inner Asia Expedition of 1904-06, and Abyssinia in 1909. There is some material on a trip to Morocco in 1892, the Canadian Rockies in 1893, Colorado-Arizona-New Mexico in 1900. There is only a sketch book for a 1923 journey to the Himalayas.

Also included are class lecture notes from his geography courses at Harvard, some material on Japanese writings, passports, the correspondence of Roland Dixon from Russia to W. M. Davis, and the manuscript of Ghulan Rasul Galwan of Leh, India, Barrett's Ladakhi caravan leader in 1905-06. There is little material that calls attention to his early childhood or later personal life. With one small exception, there is no material on his many journeys after 1909. There is no material on the professional and scientific organizations of which he belonged. There are no incoming letters or any manuscripts of books that were published.

The photograph collection is large with early turn of the century prints and negatives of Norway, Europe, the American Southwest, Baja, California, and Inner Asia. Most of the photographs are of mountainous terrains and geographical features of the various locals of his journeys; however, there are a few pictures of Navajo Indians of the early 1900's and Asians of the same period. The bulk of the photograph collection concerns the Inner Asian Expedition which passed through India, Chinese Turkestan, and China and the many small villages en route with landscape views of the Himalayas predominating. Most of these were taken with a theodolite camera capable of measuring altitude.

A copy of a 1976 biographical sketch of Barrett's life entitled "Robert LeMoyne Barrett, 187101969; Last of the Founding Members of the Association of American Geographers," by Geoffrey J. Martin is also included which lists a bibliography of Barrett's publications.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
Collection is arranged into 6 series: (1) Letters of Robert LeMoyne Barrett, 1892-1909 (most written for publication); (2) manuscripts of writings and publications, 1890s-1920s; (3) materials relating to expeditions, 1897-1923; (4) note slips, 1903-1909; (5) miscellany, undated; (6) photographs, 1897-1906.
Biographical / Historical:
May 28, 1871 -- Born in Chicago, Illinois

1892 -- Made trip to Tangier, Morocco

1893 -- Visited British Columbia and the Canadian Rockies

1894-98 -- Bachelor of Arts degree, Harvard University

1897-98 -- Summers spent in Norway undertaking fieldwork

1900 -- Visited Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado

1901-1902 -- Traveled through Russia with Roland Dixon

1902 -- Became a charter member of the Association of American Geographers

1903-04 -- Roamed the American Southwest and Baja, California

1904-06 -- The Barrett-Huntington Expedition of Inner Asia

1909 -- Journeyed to Abyssinia

June 29, 1913 -- Married Katherine Ruth Ellis, an established writer

1913-14 -- Holland, German, the Tyrol--Italy

1917 -- Special expert on labor conditions for the U.S. Shipping Board in England, wrote British Industrial Experience During the War

1923-24 -- Visited the Himalayas, Servant of Sahibs published

1926 -- Journeyed to El Teide on Tenerife in Canary Islands

1927 -- The Himalayan Letters of Gypsy Davy and Lady Ba

1926-27 -- Traveled to Patagonia

1931 -- A Yankee in Patagonia published

1932 -- Cloudtop Mosaics published

March 5, 1969 -- Died at La Crescenta, California
Provenance:
The papers of Robert LeMoyne Barrett were received by the National Anthropological Archives in 1976 as a donation of Mrs. Marjorie Childs, whose late husband, Herbert Childs, had intended to write a biography of Robert Barrett.
Restrictions:
The Robert LeMoyne Barrett papers are open for research.

Access to the Robert LeMoyne Barrett papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Citation:
Robert Lemoyne Barrett papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.XXXX.0149
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw328e97d17-d77a-455d-8683-47ee8b44e33a
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-xxxx-0149

Barry F. Carlson Salish Notes and Sound Recordings

Collector:
Thompson, Laurence  Search this
Carlson, Barry F.  Search this
Santon, Christine  Search this
Orser, Brenda  Search this
Collaborator:
Sherwood, Margaret  Search this
Flett, Pauline  Search this
Speaker:
Sam, Albert  Search this
Peuse, Lucy  Search this
Extent:
1.7 Linear feet ((1 storage box, 2 document boxes))
147 Sound recordings
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
1969-2013
bulk 1969-1987
Summary:
This collection contains the field work of anthropologist Barry F. Carlson regarding his linguistic study of the Salish dialects spoken by the elders at the Spokane Indian Reservation in Washington State from 1969-1992. Included are 39 notebooks containing vocabularies, grammatical examples, transcripts of native texts, and line-by-line analyses of native texts; six notebooks from native Spokane speaker Pauline Flett; 147 reel tapes of Salish dialects (Spokane, Kalispel, Chewelah, and Flathead/Montana Salish); microfiche; handwritten notes; newspaper clippings; and a tape log. The majority of the notebook contents are direct transcriptions of the recordings. The collection also contains information that Carlson provided to the NAA regarding his primary consultants, Margaret Sherwood and Pauline Flett, as well as Albert Sam and Lucy Peuse, two other Spokane speakers with whom he worked.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection contains the field work of anthropologist Barry F. Carlson regarding his linguistic study of the Salish dialects spoken by the elders at the Spokane Indian Reservation in Washington State. Included are 39 notebooks containing vocabularies, grammatical examples, transcripts of native texts, and line-by-line analyses of native texts; six notebooks from native Spokane speaker Pauline Flett; 147 reel tapes of Salish dialects (Spokane, Kalispel, Chewelah, and Flathead/Montana Salish); microfiche; handwritten notes; newspaper clippings; and a tape log. The majority of the notebook contents are direct transcriptions of the recordings. The collection also contains information that Carlson provided to the NAA regarding his primary consultants, Margaret Sherwood and Pauline Flett, as well as Albert Sam and Lucy Peuse, two other Spokane speakers with whom he worked. The Tape Log in Salish Notes Series, Box 3, contains a list of all the speakers and their dialects that Carlson worked with.

Folders are arranged alphabetically. Reel tapes are arranged in numerical order. The majority of these sound recordings were collected by Barry Carlson during his fieldwork with the Spokane and Chewelah Salish People of Washington State from 1969 to the late 1980s. They contain native texts in Spokane, Kalispel, Chewelah, and Flathead (Montana Salish). They are more than 200, including the traditional 'Coyote Stories' and more recent contact stories called either 'French Stories' or 'Cowboy and Indian Stories'. The narrators include all the fluent Spokane and Chewelah Kalispel storytellers that lived on the Spokane Indian Reservation in Washington State when Carlson did his fieldwork. In addition, there are 4 tapes collected by Carlson's student Christine Santon in 1974, which contain terminology relating to traditional Spokane foods. There are 2 tapes of Spokane collected by Carlson's student Brenda Orser in 1992. There is one tape of the Flathead (Montana Salish) language collected by Carlson's professor, Laurence Thompson in the 1960s.

Titles for the tapes were taken from Carlson's Tape Log which is in the Salish Notes series, Box 3.
Arrangement:
This collection is organized in 2 series: Series 1. Salish Notes, 1969-2013; Series 2. Sound Recordings, 1969-1992.
Biographical/Historical note:
Barry F. Carlson is an anthropologist known for his linguistic work with the Salish language of Washington State. Born in Evanston, Illinois, Carlson attended the University of Colorado and graduated with a B.A. in English/ Education in 1966. A year later he received a Masters in Linguistics from the same institution.

While a doctoral student at the University of Hawaii, Carlson began to study the Interior Salish languages spoken by the elders residing at the Spokane Indian Reservation, specifically the Spokane, Kalispel, and Chewelah dialects. He eventually wrote his doctoral dissertation on his fieldwork in Washington State. After receiving his Ph.D. in Linguistics in 1972, Carlson joined the Department of Linguistics at the University of Victoria in British Columbia, where he continued to teach until 2007.

Throughout his anthropological career, Carlson continued his work with those fluent in the Salish dialects. From 1969 to the late 1980s Carlson collected over 200 native texts, including both traditional stories and more recent contact narratives. He also worked closely with his fluent narrators to gather vocabularies and grammatical examples of their language. Margaret Sherwood and Pauline Flett were his primary consultants.

Sources Consulted

Carlson, Barry F. Carlson, "Curriculum Vitae," Accession Files, National Anthropological Archives
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Barry F. Carlson in 2012.
Restrictions:
The Salish Notes and Sound Recordings of Barry Carlson are open for research. Access to the Salish Notes and Sound Recordings of Barry Carlson requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Citation:
The Salish Notes and Sound Recordings of Barry F. Carlson, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2012-08
See more items in:
Barry F. Carlson Salish Notes and Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw33c55fed5-d761-4f03-9fa3-8228c4a36261
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2012-08
Online Media:

Ruth Leah Bunzel Papers

Extent:
13 Linear feet (26 boxes, 2 audio reels)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1921-1979
Summary:
The bulk of this collection documents the professional life of Ruth Leah Bunzel from the 1940s to 1970s. The collection contains correspondence, manuscripts, notes, research files, teaching materials, card files, artwork, and sound recordings.
Scope and Contents:
The bulk of this collection documents the professional life of Ruth Leah Bunzel from the 1940s to 1970s. The collection contains correspondence, manuscripts, notes, research files, teaching materials, card files, artwork, and sound recordings. A large portion of the collection is comprised of work from the Chinese project that Bunzel led as part of Columbia University Research in Contemporary Cultures [RCC]. The collection also contains her paper for the Bureau of Applied Social Research, "Interviewing in National Character Research" (in which she analyzes the methods used in RCC), as well as materials from two spin-offs of RCC--Studies in Soviet Culture and Studies in Contemporary Cultures. Bunzel's relationship with Columbia University is also represented in the collection through her notes as lecturer and adjunct professor at Columbia University, correspondence with her students, and her students' papers. Among her students was Ethel Cutler Freeman, whose letters and assignments can be found in the collection. There are also memos and other materials documenting the activities of the anthropology department and university, as well as their responses to the 1968 student uprising at Columbia. In addition, the collection contains notes from courses Bunzel took with Franz Boas and Ruth Benedict as a graduate student at Columbia.

Other items of significance are the drawings of Hopi and Zuni kachinas that Bunzel collected while in the field in the Southwest and a map of a Tewa village sketched in pencil. The collection does not contain any of her field notes from her work in the Southwest nor from her work in Guatemala or Mexico.

Although Bunzel's writings are not well represented in the collection, there are items of interest such as typescript copies of "Tentative Questionnaire for Handbook of Psychological Leads for Ethnological Field Workers: Economics," her handwritten reminiscence of Boas, and drafts of papers she presented at conferences. Also of interest are notes on her memories of the Abram Kardiner psychocultural seminars (in which she was an early participant), notes from various seminars, and two 1963 sound recordings from an Anthropology and World Affairs regional conference.

Among her notable correspondents in the collection are David F. Aberle, Franziska Boas, Steve Boggs, Paul Bohannan, Joseph Casagrande, Vincent Crapanzano, Harold Driver, Abe Edel, Raymond Fogelson,Morton H. Fried, Ethel Cutler Freeman, Alexander Lesser, Oscar Lewis, George Marcus, Catharine McClellan, Margaret Mead, Lita Fejos Osmundson, George Spindler, Leslie White, Helene Boas Yampolsky, and Mark Zborowski.
Arrangement:
Arranged into 9 series: (1) Correspondence, 1957-1977; (2) Research in Contemporary Cultures, 1947-1954; (3) Columbia University, 1925-1941 & 1956-1969; (4) Writings and Projects, 1929-1968 [Bulk 1960-1968]; (5) Associations, Conferences, & Seminars, 1940-1973; (6) Writings by Others, 1921-1979; (7) Card Files; (8) Artwork; (9) Sound Recordings, 1963
Biographical Note:
Ruth Leah Bunzel was born on April 18, 1898 in New York City. Known as "Bunny" by her friends, she attended Barnard College where she received her B.A. in European History in 1918. With no thought of continuing her education, she acquired a job in 1922 as secretary and editorial assistant to Franz Boas at Columbia University. Esther Goldfrank, who had resigned as Boas's secretary to study anthropology at Columbia, was a friend of one of Bunzel's sisters.

By 1924 Bunzel, herself, was considering a career in anthropology and wanted to observe an anthropologist at work in the field. Since Boas traveled to Europe every summer, Bunzel decided to spend her vacation that year in Zuni Pueblo, New Mexico as a secretary to Ruth Benedict, who would be collecting Zuni mythology. When she informed Boas of her plan, Boas encouraged her to work on her own research rather than spending her time on secretarial work. He suggested that she study art, specifically potters and their pottery. Elsie Clews Parsons objected to Bunzel (who lacked formal training) conducting her own research in Zuni and threatened to withdraw her financial support of Benedict's mythology project. With Boas's firm backing, Parsons eventually relented and Bunzel was allowed to go to Zuni.

That summer, Bunzel arrived in Zuni with papier maché pots she had made for her informants to paint designs on. She observed the potters at work and also made pottery alongside them. After five weeks she felt she had gathered enough information on the Zuni and moved on to study Hopi, San Ildefonso, and Acoma potters. The results of her research would later produce her dissertation, The Pueblo Potter, A Study of Creative Imagination in Primitive Art, published in 1929.

When she returned to New York, she began work on a draft of The Pueblo Potter and in 1925 resigned as Boas's secretary to become his student at Columbia University. Although she completed her doctoral work and dissertation in 1927, she was not awarded her PhD until 1929 when the The Pueblo Potter was published. (At the time, the university did not confer doctorates until a student's dissertation had been published.) The Pueblo Potter, a landmark work, was the first anthropological study of art and the individual in culture.

From 1924 to 1929 Bunzel spent several summers and winters in Zuni. Parsons, who had initially opposed her first trip, sponsored Bunzel's second trip, this time to study ceremonialism, and other trips and projects. Bunzel's papers on Zuni ceremonialism as well as creation myths, kachinas, and poetry were published in the 47th Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology (1932). Flora Zuni and her family, with whom Bunzel lived when she was in the field, formally adopted her and initiated her into their clan, the Beaver clan. They gave her the Zuni name Maiatitsa, which means "blue bird," a reference to the blue smock that Bunzel often wore while making pottery. Bunzel's second Zuni name, Tsatitsa, was given to her by her primary informant and former governor of the pueblo, Nick Tumaka. After a decade long absence, Bunzel returned to Zuni for her last time in 1939 to study child development.

Having studied the Southwest, Bunzel felt it was natural to also study Mexico. During her interview for a Guggenheim Fellowship, however, the chairman of the foundation persuaded her to study Guatemala, instead, as no American anthropologist had done much work in the area. As a result, from 1930 to 1932 she studied the Highland Mayan village of Santo Tomas Chichicastenango. Her work there resulted in Chichicastenango, A Guatemalan Village, published in 1952. From 1936 to 1937 she also did fieldwork in the village of Chamula in Chiapas, Mexico. Her 1940 article "The Role of Alcoholism in Two Central American Communities" was a comparative study of Chichicastenango and Chamula. During World War II, Bunzel worked in England for the U.S. Government Office of War Information from 1942 to 1945. Having spent some time in Spain during the late 1930s improving her Spanish, she translated broadcasts for Spain as well as incoming broadcasts.

When she returned to New York after the war, she became involved in the Columbia University Research in Contemporary Cultures project [RCC]. Directed by Ruth Benedict and funded by the Office of Naval Research, RCC was composed of research groups, each studying a different culture. From 1947 to 1951, Bunzel led the group studying China, which involved interviewing Chinese immigrants in New York City. The project produced several papers, including her unpublished manuscripts, Explorations in Chinese Culture and An Anthropological Approach to Chinese Communism, which she co-authored with John Hast Weakland.

Early in her career, Bunzel was a lecturer at Barnard College (1929-1930) and at Columbia University (1933-1935, 1937-1940). It was not until 1953 that she was hired as an Adjunct Professor at Columbia. Although the university's official appointment card lists Bunzel as having retired in 1966, she continued to teach at Columbia University after her retirement.

On January 14, 1990, Bunzel passed away at the age of 91.

Sources Consulted

Babcock, Barbara A. and Nancy Parezo. "Ruth Bunzel." Daughters of the Desert. University of New Mexico. 1988.

Fawcett, David M. and Teri McLuhan. "Ruth Leah Bunzel." Women Anthropologists: Selected Biographies. Ed. Ute Gacs, et al. Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 1989.

Chronology

1898 -- Born April 18 in New York, New York

1918 -- Earns B.A. from Barnard College in European History

1922-1924 -- Secretary and editorial assistant to Franz Boas

1924 -- First trip to Zuni, New Mexico

1925 -- Enrolls in Columbia University's graduate program in anthropology

1925-1929 -- Spends summers and winters conducting fieldwork among the Zuni

1927-1928 -- Studies at University of Chicago

1928-1943 -- Executive Committee Board of AAA

1929 -- Studies at the National University of Mexico Publication of dissertation, The Pueblo Potter, A Study of Creative Imagination in Primitive Art Receives Ph.D. in Anthropology from Columbia University

1929-1930 -- Lecturer at Barnard College

1930-1932 -- Fieldwork in Chichicastenango, Guatemala

1933-1935 -- Lecturer, General Studies and Summer Session, Columbia University

1936-1937 -- Lecturer, General Studies and Summer Session, Columbia University

1939 -- Fieldwork in Zuni studying child development

1942-1945 -- Social Scientist U.S. Government Office of War Information, Propoganda Analysis

1947-1951 -- Director of Chinese Project of Columbia University Research in Contemporary Cultures

1951-1952 -- Works on Bureau of Applied Social Research project on techniques of interviewing

1953 -- Adjunct Professor of Anthropology, Columbia University

1955 -- Research Associate, Institute of Intercultural Studies

1962 -- Teaching-consultant, Columbia University School of Nursing

1969-1987 -- Senior Research Associate, Columbia University

1974-1976 -- Chair, Section H, AAAS

1990 -- Dies January 14 in New York City at the age of 91

Selected Bibliography

1929 -- The Pueblo Potter, A Study of Creative Imagination in Primitive Art. New York: Columbia University Press.

1932 -- "Zuni Ritual Poetry." Ibid. "Introduction to Zuni Ceremonialism." 47th Annual Report, Bureau of American Ethnology, Smithsonian Institution. Washington: Government Printing Office. "Zuni Creation Myths." Ibid. "Zuni Katchinas." Ibid.

1933 -- Zuni Texts. Publications of the American Ethnological Society, Vol. 15. New York: G.E. Stechert and Company.

1938 -- "Zuni Grammar." Handbook of American Indian Languages, Vol. 3. New York: Columbia University Press. "The Economic Organization of Primitive People." Ibid. "Primitive Art." General Anthropology. Boston: D.C. Heath .

1940 -- "The Role of Alcoholism in Two Central American Communities." Psychiatry, Vol 33, pp. 361-387.

1950 -- Explorations in Chinese Culture. Research in Contemporary Cultures, Columbia University. (unpublished report)

1952 -- Chichicastenango, A Guatemalan Village. Publications of the American Ethnological Society, Vol 22. Locust Valley, New York: J. J. Auigustin. with John Weakland. An Anthropological Approach to Chinese Communism. Research in Contemporary Cultures, Columbia University. (unpublished report)

1960 -- edited with Margaret Mead. The Golden Age of American Anthropology. New York: George Braziller.

1966 -- "May Mandelbaum Edel 1909-1964." American Anthropologist, Vol 68, No. 4, pp. 986-989.

1976 -- "Chamula and Chichicastenango: A Reexamination." Cross-Cultural Approaches to the Study of Alcohol. The Hague: Mouton.
Related Collections:
Other materials relating to Ruth Bunzel at the National Anthropological Archives include kachina drawings in MS 4609; correspondence with the Bureau of American Ethnology in MS 4846 and the Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology; and a photograph of Bunzel in Photographic Lot 92-35. The Human Studies Film Archive has a video oral history of Bunzel (HSFA 89.10.8) which was created as part of the "History of Anthropology Series" produced by the University of Florida's Department of Anthropology.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Columbia University's Department of Anthropology.
Restrictions:
Materials with student grades were separated and have been restricted. Most of the restricted materials are not open for access until 2030.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Identifier:
NAA.2006-22
See more items in:
Ruth Leah Bunzel Papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw34e2f32aa-f779-467d-97b8-590122f214fd
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2006-22

Leonard Bloomfield papers

Creator:
Bloomfield, Leonard, 1887-1949  Search this
Extent:
8 Linear feet (6 document boxes and 13 card file boxes)
Culture:
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Cree  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Algonquin (Algonkin)  Search this
Shawnee  Search this
Mahican  Search this
Menominee (Menomini)  Search this
Sac and Fox (Sauk & Fox)  Search this
Meskwaki (Fox)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Summary:
Bloomfield was one of America's foremost scientific linguists, concerned with theoretical, descriptive, and applied aspects of his field. A teacher of German and an accomplished Indo-European scholar, he also carried out reserch on the languages of non-literated peoples on Algonquian languages.
Scope and Contents:
The collection concerns Bloomfield's work and the work of his students and colleagues--Charles Frederick Voegelin, Morris Swadesh, and Bernard Bloch--on Algonquian languages, particularly Menoninee, Chippewa, Shawnee, Delaware, Fox, Mahican, and Cree. Included are manuscript word lists, grammar notes, and texts together with some related printed and processed materials. In addition, the collection contains weekly summaries used in a Linguistic Institute course on (Oklahoma) Delaware, dated July-August, 1939. Voegelin was the linguist while the speaker was Willie Longbone. There are also a few letters of colleagues and informants (Ruth Landes, Joe Satterlee, Amos Striker, and Voegelin); an early draft of the 1946 publication Algonquian, Viking Fund Publications in Anthroplogy Number 6, pages 85-129; and other writings. Also included, sometimes as waste materials on the backs of newer manuscripts, are materials relating to Bloomfield's work on European languages and on Turkish.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Related Materials:
The Yale University Library and the Hanna Holborn Gray Special Collections Research Center at the University of Chicago Library hold additional Leonard Bloomfield papers.
Restrictions:
The Leonard Bloomfield papers are open for research.

Access to the Leonard Bloomfield papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Citation:
Leonard Bloomfield papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.1981-04
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw34004f1af-9dcc-41af-84d8-722ebea6ef32
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1981-04

Francis P. Conant Papers

Creator:
Conant, Francis  Search this
Names:
Hunter College. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Goldschmidt, Walter, 1913-2010  Search this
Naguib, Mohammed, 1901-  Search this
Extent:
20 Linear feet ((43 boxes) plus 25 digital storage media and 5 map folders )
Culture:
Southern Bauchi languages  Search this
Suk (African people)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Field recordings
Maps
Field notes
Manuscripts
Electronic records
Correspondence
Sound recordings
Photographs
Place:
Africa, French-speaking West
Sahara
Egypt
Ethiopia
Uganda
West Pokot District (Kenya)
Bauchi Province (Nigeria)
Belgian Congo
Finland
Morocco
Sudan
Date:
1946-2011
bulk 1953-2008
Summary:
The papers of Francis P. Conant document his anthropological work and, to a lesser extent, his previous career as a journalist and photographer. Francis Paine Conant was a cultural anthropologist who pioneered the use of satellite data in anthropology. He conducted fieldwork in Nigeria and Kenya, and his research interests spanned cultural ecology, AIDS, malaria, and sex and gender studies. He was also Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at Hunter College, where he taught from 1962 to 1995.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Francis P. Conant document his anthropological work and, to a lesser extent, his previous career as a journalist and photographer. The bulk of the collection consists of his field work in Africa, specifically his doctoral research among the Barawa in Nigeria during the 1950s; his work among the Pokot in Kenya for Walter Goldschimdt's Culture and Ecology in East Africa Project during the 1960s; and his later research among the Pokot during the 1970s incorporating remote sensing tools. These materials include his dissertation, field notes, kinship charts, maps, correspondence, photographs, and sound recordings. The collection also contains photographs, correspondence, and writings relating to the Bernheim-Conant expedition through Africa. Among the photos are Polaroids of Mohammad Naguib, first president of Egypt. Also present in the collection are his published and unpublished academic writings, his writings and correspondence as a news correspondent in Finland, and files from courses that he taught. In addition, the collection contains some of Conant's digital files, which have not yet been examined. Overall there is little correspondence in the collection, aside from some letters scattered throughout the collection relating to his research and writings (both as an academic and a journalist).
Arrangement:
Collection is organized into 9 series: 1) Nigeria, 1956-1960, undated; 2) Kenya, 1961-1974, undated; 3) Remote Sensing, 1967, 1971, 1976-1984, 1991-1992, 2002; 4) Bernheim-Conant Expedition, 1953-1956; 5) Writings, 1960-1966, 1974-1995, 2000-2006, undated; 6) University Files, 1956-1957, 1961, 1970, 1972, 1982-1995, undated; 7) Biographical Files and Letters, circa 1940, CIRCA 1946-1947, 1951, 1955, 1979, 1989-1991, 1996-2000, 2007-2011, undated; 8) Sound Recordings, 1956-1965, 1971, 1977-1978, undated; 9) Digital Files
Biographical / Historical:
Francis Paine Conant was a cultural anthropologist who pioneered the use of satellite data in anthropology. He conducted fieldwork in Nigeria and Kenya, and his research interests spanned cultural ecology, AIDS, malaria, and sex and gender studies. He was also Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at Hunter College, where he taught from 1962 to 1995.

Conant was born on February 27, 1926 in New York City. After graduating from Phillips Exeter Academy, he deferred college to enlist in the U.S. Army in 1944. He served as a field artillery observer for the 294th Field Artillery Battalion and helped liberate two concentration camps during World War II. After he was honorably discharged in 1946, he attended Cornell University, where he obtained his B.A. in 1950. While at Cornell, a Finnish student invited Conant to Finland to help relocate families, farms, and livestock further from the Russian border, a protective measure against another Russian invasion. Conant accepted his invitation and took time off from his academic studies to spend several months in Finland in 1947, as well as a summer in 1949.

After graduating from Cornell, Conant attended University of Iowa's graduate writing program for a short time. Dissatisfied with the program, he worked briefly for the Carnegie Endowment, during which time he occasionally served as a personal driver for Alger Hiss. In 1951, he returned to Finland to pursue a career in journalism. He worked for United Press International until 1953.

From December 5, 1953 to May 26, 1954, Conant traveled throughout Africa as part of the Bernheim-Conant Expedition for the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH). The expedition was led by Claude Bernheim, the father of his first wife, Miriam. They traveled 16,000 miles through Northern Central and Eastern Africa, collecting film footage and material culture for the museum. Conant served as the writer and photographer for the expedition, publishing illustrated articles in the New York Times and Natural History Magazine.

He later returned to Africa as a doctoral student at Columbia University, where he earned his PhD in Anthropology in 1960. After studying the Hausa language at the International African Institute in London, he traveled to Nigeria as a Fellow of the Ford Foundation to carry out his fieldwork in Dass Independent District, Bauchi Province. Working among the Barawa that live in the mountains of Dass, he focused on their religion and its impact on the technology, social and political organization, and structure of their society. His dissertation was titled "Dodo of Dass: A Study of a Pagan Religion of Northern Nigeria." During his fieldwork, he also collected data on rock gongs, which were first identified and written about by Bernard Fagg in 1955.

In 1961 to 1962, Conant was a research associate for Walter Goldschmidt's Culture and Ecology in East Africa Project. The purpose of the project was to conduct a controlled comparison of four different East African societies and the farmers and pastoralists within each tribe. Conant was assigned to conduct ethnographic research among the Pokot in West Pokot District in Kenya. This research would form the basis of his remote sensing work in the same area more than a decade later. Conant was first introduced to remote sensing data in 1974 when his colleague Priscilla Reining showed him Landsat imagery of one his former fieldwork sites. He was inspired by the potential applications of satellite data to study cultural and ecological relationships. In 1975, he and Reining organized a workshop on "Satellite Potentials for Anthropological Studies of Subsistence Activities and Population Change." He incorporated remote sensing tools in his 1977 to 1980 study of the changing cultivation patterns and management of livestock in West Pokot District. His research combined traditional fieldwork (which included data he had collected in the 1960s), LANDSAT data, and geospatial data collected from the ground.

Later in his career, Conant's research interests expanded to include the spread of diseases, specifically AIDS and malaria. He, along with Priscilla Reining, John Bongaarts, and Peter Way found that uncircumcised men were 86% more likely to contract HIV than circumcised men. Their findings were published in their paper "The Relationship Between Male Circumcision and HIV Infection in African Populations" (1989). His research on malaria focused on the spread of the disease during African prehistory.

Conant taught briefly at Columbia University and was an Assistant Professor at University of Massachusetts, at Amherst in 1960-1961. Most of his academic career was spent at Hunter College, where he served as Chair of the Anthropology Department several times. He also founded and headed the college's Research Institute in Aruba.

Conant was a Fulbright Senior Research Fellow at Oxford University's Pitts Rivers Museum in 1968-1969. He was also a fellow of the American Anthropological Association, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the International African Institute, the New York Academy of Sciences, and the Royal Anthropological Institute. In addition, he was actively involved with the Human Ecology: An Interdisciplinary Journal.

Conant died at the age of 84 on January 29, 2011.

Sources Consulted

Bates, Daniel G. 2011. Francis P. Conant: A Tribute to a Friend of Human Ecology. Human Ecology 39(2): 115.

Bates, Daniel and Oliver Conant. Francis P. Conant. Anthropology News. 52(5): 25.

Conant, Veronika. Email message to Lorain Wang, October 22, 2013.

[Curriculum Vitae], Series 7. Biographical Files and Letters, Francis Conant Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution

Francis P. Conant. http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/anthropology/faculty-staff/in-remembrance/francis-p.-conant [accessed August 23, 2013].

1926 -- Born February 27 in New York City, New York

1944-1946 -- Enlists in Army and serves in World War II as a flash ranger in 294th Field Artillery Battalion

1950 -- Earns B.A. from Cornell University in English and Russian, minor in Engineering

1953-1954 -- AMNH Bernheim-Conant Expedition to northern Africa

1957 -- Conducts language studies at the International African Institute

1957-1959 -- Conducts fieldwork in northern Nigeria

1960 -- Earns PhD in Cultural Anthropology from Columbia University

1960-1961 -- Assistant Professor, Anthropology, University of Massachusetts at Amherst

1961-1962 -- Research Associate for Culture and Ecology in East Africa Project directed by Walter Goldschimdt

1962 -- Joins faculty at Hunter College

1968-1969 -- Fulbright Senior Research Fellow, Oxford University, Pitt-Rivers Museum

1977-1980 -- Sets up remote sensing monitoring area in West Pokot district in Kenya. Studies changing cultivation patterns and management of livestock

1995 -- Retires from Hunter College; Emeritus Professor

2011 -- Dies on January 29 at the age of 84
Related Materials:
For additional materials at the National Anthropological Archives relating to Francis Conant, see the papers of Priscilla Reining and John Lawrence Angel. His film collection is at the Human Studies Film Archives.

Artifacts and film collected during the Bernheim-Conant Expedition, his doctoral research in Nigeria, and his fieldwork in Kenya during the 1960s and 70s are at the American Museum of Natural History. He also deposited collections at the Pitts River Museum at the University of Oxford.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Francis Conant's widow Veronika Conant in 2012.
Restrictions:
The Francis P. Conant Papers are open for research. Access to the Francis P. Conant Papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Remote sensing  Search this
Journalism  Search this
Musical instruments -- Nigeria  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Subsistence farming -- Kenya  Search this
Subsistence herding -- Kenya  Search this
Human ecology  Search this
Landsat satellites  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field recordings
Maps
Field notes
Manuscripts
Electronic records
Correspondence
Sound recordings
Photographs
Citation:
Francis P. Conant Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2012-13
See more items in:
Francis P. Conant Papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw353adee01-90b3-4434-ace0-16b4f5ce003f
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2012-13
Online Media:

William Henry Crocker papers

Creator:
Crocker, William H. (William Henry), 1924-  Search this
Names:
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.). Department of Anthropology  Search this
Extent:
30 Linear feet
Culture:
Canela  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Brazil
Date:
circa 1950 - circa 1990
Summary:
This collection documents the research and professional activities of William Henry Crocker, an anthropologist and Latin American specialist who worked at the National Museum of Natural History. The materials largely relate to his ethnological research among the Canela Indians of Brazil and includes correspondence, field notes, diaries of informants, research notes, weather records, pamphlets, journals, bibliographies, receipts, photographs and sound recordings.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by William Henry Crocker.
Restrictions:
Access to the Wiliam Henry Crocker papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Citation:
William Henry Crocker Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.1975-15
See more items in:
William Henry Crocker papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw397e773fb-e85f-491d-ae07-975afecc7da5
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1975-15

Amy Zaharlick, George L. Trager, and Felicia H. Trager sound recordings and papers on Picuris language

Creator:
Trager, Felicia Harben, 1930-  Search this
Zaharlick, Ann Marie, 1947-  Search this
Trager, George L.  Search this
Extent:
130 Sound recordings
4 Linear feet
Culture:
Picuris Pueblo  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Tiwa Pueblos  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Field recordings
Field notes
Date:
1952 - 1990
Summary:
This collection consists of Amy Zaharlick's research and sound recordings on Picuris and other Pubeloan languages as well as the field recordings and notes given to Zaharlick by anthropologist and fellow Picuris specialist, George L. Trager.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains sound recordings and notes relating to the Picuris language research of Ann Marie (Amy) Zaharlick and her colleagues George L. and Felicia H. Trager, from 1962-1990. Most of the papers consist of Zaharlick's notes and transcripts from the Kiowa-Tanoan conferences which she organized and chaired, and handouts relating to Zaharlick's bilingual education consultant work. Small portions of the Tragers' field notes on Taos which were copied by Zaharlick, presumably for her own research, are also included. The bulk of the collection consists of 130 sound recordings of songs and stories in Picuris and other Puebloan languages made between 1963-1989. There are few earlier recordings which may be copies of material in Trager's papes at the University of California, Irvine. The titles of the tapes have been transcribed from information on the tape boxes. The content of recordings has not been verified.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 2 series: (1) Papers (1965-1990); (2) Sound Recordings (1952-1989).
Biographical / Historical:
Amy Zaharlick received her Ph.D. in linguistic anthropology from the American University in 1977. Prior to joining the staff at Ohio State University in XXX, she served as director of the Native American Teacher Education Program and as Associate Director of the Multicultural Education Program at the University of Albuquerque in New Mexico. Zaharlick was a professor in the Department of Anthropology at Ohio State University until her retirement in 2012.

George Leonard Trager was born on March 22, 1906 in Newark, New Jersey. He earned a bachelor's degree at Rutgers University and did his graduate work in Slavic and Romance Philology at Columbia University. He received his doctorate in 1932 with the dissertation The use of the Latin demonstratives (especially ille and ipse) up to 600 A.D., as the source of the Romance article. Trager's first teaching position was at Adams State College in Alamosa, Colorado, and it was from here that he begin his fieldwork on Tanoan languages. In 1936 Trager took a position at Yale, joining such influential linguists and Edward Sapir and Benjamin Whorf. From 1956 through 1967 Trager taught at the University of Buffalo (later SUNY-Buffalo). In the late 1960s he left Buffalo for Southern Methodist University and became more involved in Taonoan lanugauge field research. Trager married three times. His second and third wives, Edith Crowell Trager-Johnson and Felicia Harben Trager worked with him in American Indian lingistics and Kiowa-Tanoan Studies. Trager died in 1992.

Felicia Harben Trager graduated from Wayne State University in 1957 and received a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship. She received her M.A. in 1959 from the Department of Anthroplogy and Lingustics at the University of Buffalo where she did graduate work under George Trager. She worked in Washington D.C. as a project associate at the Washington Center for Applied Linguistics and taught English as a foreign language. in 1961 she married George Trager and returned with him to Buffalo where in 1968 she earned a Ph.D. for her dissertation Picuris Pueblo, New Mexico: An Ethnologuistic Salvage Study. In 1967 she moved with George Trager to Dallas where she was a lecturer at Southerm Methodist University's University College. She assisted her husband as a researcher and editor for three of his books, and was the co-author with him in several articles on Tanoan languages. Felicia Trager died in 1972 at the age of 42.

Sources Consulted: Golla, Victor 1993 Obituary George L. Trager (1906-1992). Newsletter of the Society for theh Study of Indigenous Languages of the Americas 2-3.

Smith, Henry Lee 1974 Obituary Felicia Harben Trager 1930-1972. American Anthropologist 76(1)78-79.
Related Materials:
Correspondence of George L. Trager can be found in the Esther Schiff Goldfrank papers, John P. Harrington papers, and Anthropological Society of Washington records. NAA Manuscript 4540-a-b contains some of Trager's notes and correspondence. The George L. Trager papers can be found at the University of California Irvine Library, Department of Special Collections (MS-M005).
Provenance:
Received from Ann Marie (Amy) Zaharlick in 2012. The Trager's original sound recordings were given to Zaharlick by George L. Trager in 1974.
Restrictions:
The Zaharlick and Trager sound recordings and papers are open for research.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Field recordings
Field notes
Citation:
Amy Zaharlick, George L. Trager, and Felicia H. Trager sound recordings and papers on Picuris language, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2012-14
See more items in:
Amy Zaharlick, George L. Trager, and Felicia H. Trager sound recordings and papers on Picuris language
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw37ff47594-356b-4f7d-9f62-c05c8092621d
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2012-14
Online Media:

Arthur C. Ballard photographs relating to the Muckleshoot Tribe submitted to the Indian Claims Commission

Photographer:
Ballard, Arthur C. (Arthur Condit), 1876-  Search this
Extent:
60 Prints (Album :, silver gelatin)
7 Prints (silver gelatin)
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Nisqually  Search this
Muckleshoot  Search this
Snoqualmie  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Photographs
Place:
Muckleshoot Reservation (Wash.)
Date:
1902-1936
Scope and Contents note:
Photograph album prepared by Arthur C. Ballard circa 1950-1956 and submitted to the Indian Claims Commission in connection with the Mucklesoot claim. It includes images of Muckleshoot people, artifacts relating to salmon catching and preparation, dwellings, textiles, and ceremonial objects. Also included in the collection are Ballard's manuscript of "The Salmon Weir on the Green River in Western Washington,"Davidson Journal of Anthropology 3: no. 1, 1957, and seven snapshot prints of the salmon weir, received from A. C. Ballard March 25, 1958.
Biographical/Historical note:
Arthur Condit Ballard (1876-1962) collected and translated legends and linguistic material belonging to people from the Puget Sound region in Western Washington. Raised near the White River, Ballard attended Whitworth College and graduated from the University of Washington in 1899, before the establishment of an anthropology department. He worked as a schoolteacher, post office worker, and City Clerk for the City of Auburn, as well as secretary for the Azurite Gold Company and the Auburn Investment Company. He made depositions to the Indian Claims Commission for both the Muckleshoot and Puyallup tribes and was a founder of the White River Valley Historical Society.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 4527
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Correspondence from Arthur C. Ballard held in National Anthropological Archives MS 2352.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Ceremonial objects  Search this
Dwellings  Search this
Textile fabrics  Search this
Fishing  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 4527, Arthur C. Ballard photographs relating to the Muckleshoot Tribe submitted to the Indian Claims Commission, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.4527
See more items in:
Arthur C. Ballard photographs relating to the Muckleshoot Tribe submitted to the Indian Claims Commission
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw387f68968-679a-4390-b091-23294f26985c
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-4527
Online Media:

MS 4408 Jesse Walter Fewkes papers

Creator:
Fewkes, Jesse Walter, 1850-1930  Search this
Extent:
13 Boxes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1873-1927
Summary:
This collection consists principally of Fewkes's archeological and ethnological field notebooks, 1890-1927. It also includes correspondence, 1873-1927; lectures, circa 1907-1926; and unpublished manuscripts by Fewkes and others, circa 1893-1923.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists principally of Fewkes's archeological and ethnological field notebooks, 1890-1927; and includes correspondence, 1873-1927; lectures, circa 1907-1926; and unpublished manuscripts by Fewkes and others, circa 1893-1923.

In the accompanying inventory, the catalog numbers under which each volume or part was originally catalogued is shown in brackets.
Arrangement:
Series 1: Correspondence, 1873-1927

Series 2: Field Diaries, Notebooks, and Maps, 1873-1927

Series 3: Lectures and Articles, mostly unpublished, circa 1907-1926, undated

Series 4: Manuscripts by Other Authors, collected by Fewkes, circa 1893-1923
Biographical / Historical:
Jesse Walter Fewkes (1850‐1930) was a naturalist, anthropologist, and archeologist who served as chief of the Bureau of American Ethnology (B.A.E.) from 1918 to 1928. Fewkes received a Ph.D. in marine zoology from Harvard in 1877 and was curator of lower invertebrates at the Museum of Comparative Zoology until 1887. He became deeply interested in the culture and history of the Pueblo Indians while on a collecting trip in the western United States. In 1891, Fewkes became director of the Hemenway Southwestern Archeological Expedition and editor of the Journal of American Archeology and Ethnology. In 1895 he began working for the B.A.E., during which he conducted archaeological excavations in the Southwest, the West Indies, and Florida. During the summers of 1908-1909, 1915-1916, and 1918-1922, Fewkes worked almost exclusively on excavations and repair of ruins in Mesa Verde National Park. He was appointed chief of the B.A.E. in 1918 and played an important role in the creation of Hovenweep National Monument in Colorado and Wupatki National Monument in Arizona. He retired in 1928, after which he continued research for the B.A.E. under the title of Associate Anthropologist.
Related Materials:
Additional records created by and about Fewkes are contained in the records of the Bureau of American Ethnology.

Fewkes correspondence held in the National Anthropological Archives is contained in the George L. Beam papers (MS 4517), the Henry Bascom Collins, Jr. papers, the Anthropological Society of Washington records (MS 4821), the Herbert William Krieger papers, the J.C. Pilling papers, the Walter Hough Papers (in the records of the Department of Anthropology), and the records of the Bureau of American Ethnology.

Fewkes photographs held in National Anthropological Archives are contained in in Photo Lot 1, Photo Lot 30, Photo Lot 86 (his negatives), Photo Lot 73-43B, and Photo Lot 4321.

Fewkes drawings held in the National Anthropological Archives are contained in MS 3427 Drawings of specimens, Heshota Uthla.

The Smithsonian Institution Archives also holds a field notebook by Fewkes, Record Unit 7350.

The Department of Anthropology collections holds several accessions of artifacts collected by Fewkes, including USNM ACC 048761 (relating to Casa Grande excavations) and USNM ACC 050765 (relating to Mesa Verde excavations).

Collection supplement files relating to the life and published work of J. Walter Fewkes are on file in the NAA Reading Room.
Provenance:
The original accession of Fewkes's papers was selected by Matthew W. Stirling at Fewkes's home after Fewkes's death in 1930. This accession consisted largely of archeological and ethnological field notebooks, correspondence, lectures, and unpublished manuscripts. These materials were originally cataloged in unrelated lots. NAA archivist Margaret C. Blaker brought these materials together in 1956 and cataloged them under MS 4408.

In March 1976, the Smithsonian Libraries transferred to the NAA papers largely concerning Fewkes's other scientific work. These were accessioned under the number NAA ACC 76-133. Another group of materials consisting of three volumes recording trip to the American West were transferred from the Smithsonian Institution Archives in December 1979.

Another acquisition to the Fewkes papers, consisting of a volume of photographs, a volume of correspondence, and another volume concerning Betatakin, were acquired from aņ unknown source. These materials appeared in James R. Glenn's office in the Department of Anthropology in April 1986. A notebook of graphite drawings of Taino culture was donated by Jordan Belfort of Old Brookville, New York via Alvin Abrams.
Restrictions:
The Jesse Walter Fewkes papers are open for research.

Access to the Jesse Walter Fewkes papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 4408 Jesse Walter Fewkes papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4408
See more items in:
MS 4408 Jesse Walter Fewkes papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3505e09a3-abe0-41a5-98e5-06d63e0c5c31
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4408
Online Media:

Willis G. Tilton collection of photographs of Native Americans

Collector:
Tilton, Willis G.  Search this
Names:
Field Museum of Natural History  Search this
Big Foot, -1890  Search this
Geronimo, 1829-1909  Search this
Photographer:
Dorsey, George A. (George Amos), 1868-1931  Search this
Gutekunst, Frederick, 1831-1917  Search this
Hall, E. E.  Search this
James, George Wharton, 1858-1923  Search this
Maude, F. H. (Frederic Hamer)  Search this
Nelson, Edward William, 1855-1934  Search this
Thompson, J. Eric S. (John Eric Sidney), 1898-1975  Search this
Voth, H. R. (Henry R.), 1855-1931  Search this
Winternitz, Ludwig (Louis)  Search this
Extent:
685 Negatives (circa, glass and nitrate)
Culture:
Pueblo  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Inunaina (Arapaho)  Search this
Apache  Search this
Sicangu Lakota (Brulé Sioux)  Search this
Assiniboine (Stoney)  Search this
Jicarilla Apache  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Kootenai (Kutenai)  Search this
Kickapoo  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Kwakwaka'wakw (Kwakiutl)  Search this
Chaticks Si Chaticks (Pawnee)  Search this
Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux)  Search this
Ponca  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Pikuni Blackfeet (Piegan)  Search this
Potawatomi  Search this
Northwest Coast  Search this
Sauk  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Taos Indians  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Umatilla  Search this
White Mountain Apache  Search this
Wichita  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Basin  Search this
Mayas  Search this
Patagonia  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Fox Indians  Search this
Eskimos  Search this
Haida  Search this
A'aninin (Gros Ventre)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Hunkpapa Lakota (Hunkpapa Sioux)  Search this
Chiricahua Apache  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Coast Salish  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives
Place:
Belize
Fort Belknap Indian Reservation (Mont.)
Oraibi (Ariz.)
Date:
circa 1880-1930
bulk 1899-1904
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs collected by Willis G. Tilton, a dealer in artifacts and photographs relating to Native Americans. Many of the photographs were made by Field Columbian Museum photographer Charles Carpenter at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in 1904; many others were created by various photographers for Field Museum publications. Notable subjects include Big Foot, dead in the snow at the Wounded Knee battlefield; Arapaho and Cheyenne social dances; Hopi ceremonies; a reenactment of the shooting of Sitting Bull; Sun Dances (Arapaho, Assiniboin, Gros Ventre, Blackfoot, Cheyenne, Ponca); and views of the United States Indian School Building and Pawnee people at the the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis, Missouri. Other photographs include portraits and images of artifacts, basket weaving, cradles, dress, dwelling, tipis and other dwellings, and tree burials. There are also some photographs of Henry Field's expedition to Iraq in 1934 (Field museum anthropological expedition to the Near East), work elephants in Burma, Pipestone Quarry in Minnesota, a church in the Yucatan, and a rickshaw and cart in Ceylon.
Biographical/Historical note:
Willis G. Tilton was a dealer and owner of the store, Tilton Indian Relics, in Topeka, Kansas.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 89-8, NAA Photo Lot 135
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Photographs in the Tilton Collection, previously filed in Photo Lot 135, have been relocated and merged with Photo Lot 89-8. These photographs were also purchased by the Bureau of American Ethnology from Willis G. Tilton and form part of this collection.
Associated photographs still held in the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago.
Most photographs included in the card catalog of copy negatives and in the reference file prints by tribe.
Additional photographs by Dorsey held in the National Anthropological Archives in MS 4721 and Photo Lot 24.
Correspondence from Dorsey held in the National Anthropological Archives in MS 4821, records of the Bureau of American Ethnology, the J.C. Pilling Papers, and the Ales Hrdlicka Papers.
Additional photographs by Nelson held in National Anthropological Archives Photo Lot 171, Photo Lot 133, Photo Lot 24, and the BAE historical negatives.
Additional Maude photographs held in National Anthropological Archives Photo Lot 90-1 and Photo Lot 24.
Additional E. E. Hall photographs held in National Anthropological Archives MS 4978 and Photo Lot 24.
The Smithsonian Institution Archives holds Nelson's field reports (SIA Acc. 97-123) and the Edward William Nelson and Edward Alphonso Goldman Collection (SIA RU007364).
See others in:
Willis G. Tilton photograph collection of American Indians, circa 1880-1930 (bulk 1899-1904)
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies  Search this
Wounded Knee Massacre, S.D., 1890  Search this
Sun Dance  Search this
Citation:
Photo Lot 89-8, Willis G. Tilton collection of photographs of Native Americans, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.89-8
See more items in:
Willis G. Tilton collection of photographs of Native Americans
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3754be8a9-31b2-4b22-9fbb-dc5b7dadb75f
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-89-8
Online Media:

James E. Taylor scrapbook of the American West

Creator:
Taylor, James E., 1839-1901 (artist and collector)  Search this
Names:
Geological Survey (U.S.)  Search this
United States. Army  Search this
Buffalo Bill, 1846-1917  Search this
Crook, George, 1829-1890  Search this
Custer, George Armstrong, 1839-1876  Search this
Hickok, Wild Bill, 1837-1876  Search this
Juárez, Benito, 1806-1872  Search this
Kinman, Seth  Search this
Miles, Nelson Appleton, 1839-1925  Search this
Powell, John Wesley, 1834-1902  Search this
Red Cloud, 1822-1909  Search this
Richard, Louis  Search this
Sheridan, Philip Henry, 1831-1888  Search this
Sitting Bull, 1831-1890  Search this
Spotted Tail, 1823-1881  Search this
Photographer:
Barry, D. F. (David Francis), 1854-1934  Search this
Easterly, Thomas M. (Thomas Martin), 1809-1882  Search this
Eaton, E. L. (Edric L.), b. ca. 1836  Search this
Ebell, Adrian J. (Adrian John), 1840-1877  Search this
Gardner, Alexander, 1821-1882  Search this
Hillers, John K., 1843-1925  Search this
Jackson, William Henry, 1843-1942  Search this
M'Clees, Jas. E. (James E.)  Search this
O'Sullivan, Timothy H., 1840-1882  Search this
Pywell, Wm. R. (William Redish), 1843-1886  Search this
Vannerson, Julian, 1827-  Search this
Whitney, Joel E. (Joel Emmons), 1822-1886  Search this
Extent:
4 Tintypes
3 Chromolithographs
3 Lithographs (3 chalk-manner lithographs)
1 Print (photogravure)
118 Pages (Scrapbook)
685 Prints (circa, albumen)
80 Items (circa 80 relief prints (including woodcuts and wood engraving))
30 Items (circa 30 intaglio prints (including etchings and engravings))
Culture:
Apache  Search this
Pueblo  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Cherokee  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Muskogee (Creek)  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Fox Indians  Search this
A'aninin (Gros Ventre)  Search this
Kiowa  Search this
Modoc  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux)  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Omaha  Search this
Chaticks Si Chaticks (Pawnee)  Search this
Potawatomi  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Basin  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Ho-Chunk (Winnebago)  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Sauk  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Ute  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Tintypes
Chromolithographs
Lithographs
Prints
Pages
Photographs
Newspapers
Woodcuts
Place:
Mexico
Taos Pueblo (N.M.)
California
Oregon
Fort Davis (Tex.)
New Mexico
Fort Snelling (Minn.)
Arizona
Texas
San Juan Pueblo (N.M.)
Zuni (N.M.)
Kansas
Colorado
Date:
circa 1863-1900
Summary:
Scrapbook entitled "Our Wild Indians in Peace and War: Surveys, Expeditions, Mining and Scenery of the Great West," compiled by James E. Taylor, possibly as a source for his own illustrations.
Scope and Contents:
Scrapbook entitled "Our Wild Indians in Peace and War: Surveys, Expeditions, Mining and Scenery of the Great West," compiled by James E. Taylor, possibly as a source for his own illustrations. The album includes photographs (mostly albumen with three tintypes), newsclippings, wood engravings, and lithographs, some of which are reproductions of Taylor's own illustrations and paintings. Photographs depict American Indians, US Army soldiers and scouts, historical sites, forts, and scenery. Some were made on expeditions, including the Hayden and Powell surveys, and created from published stereographs. Many of Taylor's illustrations are signed, and some are inscribed with dates and "N. Y." The scrapbook also includes clippings from newspapers and other written sources relating to illustrations and photographs in the album.
Biographical Note:
James E. Taylor (1839-1901) was an artist-correspondent for Leslie's Illustrated Weekly Newspaper from 1863-1883. Born in Cincinatti, Ohio, he graduated from Notre Dame University by the age of sixteen. Taylor enlisted in the 10th New York Infantry in 1861 and the next year was hired by Leslie's Illustrated newspaper as a "Special Artist" and war correspondent. In 1864 he covered the Shenandoah Valley campaign, and was later one of the illustrator-correspondents at the 1867 treaty negotiations at Medicine Lodge, Kansas. He soon earned the moniker "Indian Artist" because of his vast number of drawings of American Indians. In 1883 Taylor retired from Leslie's to work as a freelance illustrator. Colonel Richard Irving Dodge used Taylor's drawings to illustrate his memoir, "Our Wild Indians: Thirty-three Years' Personal Experience among the Red Men of the Great West" (1882).
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 4605
Related Materials:
The National Anthropolgical Archives holds additional photographs by photographers represented in this collection (including original negatives for some of these prints), particularly in Photo Lot 24, Photo Lot 37, Photo Lot 60, Photo Lot 87.

Additional photographs by Whitney, Gardner, and Barry held in National Anthropological Archives Photo Lot 80-18.

Julian Vannerson and James E. McClees photographs held in National Anthropological Archives Photo Lot 4286.

Pywell photographs held in National Anthropological Archives Photo Lot 4498.

O'Sullivan photographs held in National Anthropological Archives Photo lot 4501.

Additional Hillers photographs held in National Anthropological Archives Photo Lot 83-18 and Photo Lot 87-2N.
Provenance:
Donated or transferred by John Witthoft from the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, April 14, 1961.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Church buildings  Search this
Mines and mineral resources  Search this
Dance  Search this
White River Massacre, Colo., 1879  Search this
Painting  Search this
Washita Campaign, 1868-1869  Search this
Mormon Church -- History  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Newspapers
Woodcuts
Tintypes
Citation:
MS 4605, James E. Taylor scrapbook of the American West, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4605
See more items in:
James E. Taylor scrapbook of the American West
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw33fa281bf-1e72-4f26-ae86-8c8389244b4e
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4605
Online Media:

Carol Laderman Papers

Creator:
Laderman, Carol  Search this
Extent:
6 Linear feet ((15 boxes and 1 manuscript envelope) and 154 cassette tapes)
Culture:
Malays (Asian people)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Field notes
Sound recordings
Photographs
Place:
Kampong Merchang (Terengganu)
Malaysia
Date:
1970-2009
Summary:
Carol Laderman was a medical anthropologist best known for her research on Malay traditional medicine. Her work focused on beliefs and practices regarding childbirth and nutrition as well as shamanic healing practices in rural Malaysia. This collection consists of the professional papers of Carol Laderman, medical anthropologist and university professor. The bulk of the collection pertains to her research on childbirth, nutrition, and shamanic healing practices in rural Malaysia. These materials include field notes, surveys, transcripts of Main Peteri ceremonies, grant applications, photographs, and sound recordings. Of special interest are her photographs of midwives and shamans treating patients, including Main Peteri ceremonies, as well as traditional Malay weddings and festivals. Also noteworthy are her recordings of Main Peteri ceremonies and her interviews with midwives and shamans. The collection also contains her unpublished and published writings; her dissertation; a report on her undergraduate fieldwork with pregnant Puerto Rican teenagers; her lecture notes and files as a university professor; files documenting her involvement in professional associations; and correspondence with colleagues.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of the professional papers of Carol Laderman, medical anthropologist and university professor. The bulk of the collection pertains to her research on childbirth, nutrition, and shamanic healing practices in rural Malaysia. These materials include field notes, surveys, transcripts of Main Peteri ceremonies, grant applications, photographs, and sound recordings. Of special interest are her photographs of midwives and shamans treating patients, including Main Peteri ceremonies, as well as traditional Malay weddings and festivals. Also noteworthy are her recordings of Main Peteri ceremonies and her interviews with midwives and shamans. The collection also contains her unpublished and published writings; her dissertation; a report on her undergraduate fieldwork with pregnant Puerto Rican teenagers; her lecture notes and files as a university professor; files documenting her involvement in professional associations; and correspondence with colleagues.
Arrangement:
This collection is organized in 8 series: Series 1. Research, 1972, 1975-1977, 1981, 1985, 1987, 2000-2003, undated; Series 2. Writings, 1970, 1975, 1978-2001, 2004, undated; Series 3. Student Files, 1972, 1975, 1979, undated; Series 4. Teacher Files, 1977, 1979-1982, 2001-2002, 2007, undated; Series 5. Correspondence, 1974-1981, 1985-2005, 2009, undated; Series 6. Professional Activities, circa 1981, 1989-1990, 1994, 2004, undated; Series 7. Photographs, circa 1975-1977, circa 1982, undated; Series 8. Sound Recordings, 1976-1977, 1982, 2003, undated.
Biographical/Historical note:
Carol Laderman was a medical anthropologist best known for her research on Malay traditional medicine. Her work focused on beliefs and practices regarding childbirth and nutrition as well as shamanic healing practices in rural Malaysia.

Laderman (née Cohen) was born on October 25, 1932 in Brooklyn, New York. When she was 6, her father changed their family's surname to Ciavati due to his difficulty as a Jew finding an engineering job. Laderman grew up with musical aspirations, intending to become a concert pianist. She attended the High School of Music and Art in Manhattan and majored in music at Brooklyn College. In 1953, she married Gabriel Laderman, a painter and later an art professor. She took a leave from college to follow her husband after he was drafted into the U.S. Army five months following their wedding. Her hiatus from college spanned fifteen years, during which time she had two sons (1958, 1965). She also worked as a legal secretary in Ithaca, New York, and as a social secretary and translator for an opera singer when she and her family lived in Italy.

After returning to New York City, she enrolled in evening classes at Hunter College. Although she planned to resume her studies in music, her academic focus changed after taking an anthropology course taught by medical anthropologist Rena Gropper. In 1972, she earned her B.A. in Anthropology, and with the assistance of a Danforth Foundation Fellowship, she attended graduate school at Columbia University, where she earned her Ph.D. in Anthropology in 1979.

As an undergraduate student, Laderman conducted fieldwork at Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York City (1972-1973), assisting in a project on pregnant teenagers and nutritional health. She was assigned to collect data on Puerto Rican adolescent mothers, which exposed her to humoral beliefs in food, medicine, and people. This experience would later inspire her to conduct her graduate fieldwork on nutrition and childbirth in Malaysia, where humoral beliefs were also held but not well-explored by researchers.

From 1975 to 1977, Laderman and her family lived in Merchang, in Trengganu (now Terengganu), Malaysia. Working under the auspices of the Malaysian Ministry of Health of the Institute for Medical Research, Laderman studied both traditional and hospital-based medicine. As part of her fieldwork, she received training from a hospital to collect blood samples to study the effects of birthing and dietary practices on women's health. She also apprenticed herself to a traditional midwife (bidan kampung), whom she assisted in a number of births. By comparing food ideologies and actual food intake of pregnant and postpartum women, Laderman was able to refute the prevailing view of scholars that malnutrition among rural Malays was largely due to dietary restrictions based on the humoral system. In her dissertation, "Conceptions and Preconceptions: Childbirth and Nutrition in Rural Malaysia," Laderman describes how Malay women adapt their diets to their needs and that their customs allow for interpretation and manipulation. In 1983, a revised version of her dissertation was published as Wives and Midwives: Childbirth and Nutrition in Rural Malaysia.

While seeking to gain an understanding of traditional Malay medicine in its entirety, Laderman also became exposed to theatrical spirit séances known as Main Peteri (also Puteri or Teri). At that time Main Peteri was no longer performed in most Malaysian states but was still thriving in Trengganu and nearby Kelantan. Performed primarily as healing ceremonies by shamans (bomoh), Main Peteri was a last resort for the afflicted. These performances were characterized by entranced patients, spirit possessions, singing, music, dancing, and an audience. Laderman attended and participated in a number of these ceremonies and became a student and adopted daughter to a shaman. She recorded and transcribed several Main Peteri performances and received an NEH grant (1981-1985) to translate the texts. She also returned to Merchang in 1982 to conduct further research on traditional healing ceremonies. In her monograph Taming the Wind of Desire (1991), she discusses Main Peteri and its relationship to the Malay concept of Inner Winds (angin), which determine a person's personality, talents, and drives. In 1987 to 1990, she returned to her musical roots to collaborate with ethnomusicologist Marina Roseman to transcribe, analyze, and interpret the music of Main Peteri. Together, she and Roseman also edited The Performance of Healing (1996). In addition, Laderman became interested in the effects of urbanization and globalization on traditional Malay healing practices, a topic which she addressed in a collection of her writings, The Life and Death of Traditional Malay Medicine (in press).

Laderman was a professor at the Department of Anthropology at City University of New York City College (1990-2010). She was also an associate professor at Fordham University (1982-1990) and taught briefly at Hunter College (1978-1980), Brooklyn College (1979-1980), and Yale University (1980-1982).

She died on July 6, 2010 at the age of 77.

Sources Consulted

[Autobiographical statement], Series 2. Writings, Carol Laderman Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution

1972. Carol Laderman, SGS Student, Wins Danforth Fellowship. SGS Newsletter 2(7): 1.

Laderman, Carol. 1983. Wives and Midwives: Childbirth and Nutrition in Rural Malaysia. Berkeley, California: University of California Press.

Laderman, Carol. 1991. Taming the Wind of Desire: Psychology, Medicine, and Aesthetics in Malay Shamanistic Performance. Berkeley, California: University of California Press.

Maizura, Intan. 2003, September 28. A bidan, a bomoh & a New Yorker. Nuance: 16-18.

Roseman, Marina, Laurel Kendall and Robert Knox Dentan. 2011. Obituaries: Carol Laderman (1932-2010). American Anthropologist 113(2): 375-377.

1932 -- Born October 25 in Brooklyn, New York

1953 -- Marries Gabriel Laderman and takes a leave from Brooklyn College

1972 -- Earns B.A. in Anthropology from Hunter College

1972-1973 -- Conducts research at Mt. Sinai Hospital on ethnic eating patterns, food beliefs, and anemia in adolescent Puerto Rican mothers

1975-1977 -- Conducts fieldwork in Merchang in Trengganu, Malaysia

1979 -- Earns Ph.D. in Anthropology from Columbia University

1982 -- Returns to Malaysia to conduct fieldwork on shamanism and trance healing

1982-1988 -- Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Fordham University

1988-1990 -- Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Fordham University

1990-2010 -- Professor, Department of Anthropology, City University of New York City College

2010 -- Dies on July 6
Related Materials:
Two videotapes were received with the Carol Laderman papers and transferred to the Human Studies Film Archives.

Some of Laderman's original field recordings are at Columbia University's Center for Ethnomusicology. Copies of those recording are in this collection and are so noted.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Carol Laderman's sons, Raphael and Michael Laderman in 2012.
Restrictions:
The Carol Laderman Papers are open for research. Access to the Carol Laderman Papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use. Permission to use sound recordings of Main Peteri ceremonies transcribed and published in Taming the Wind of Desire must be obtained from Columbia University's Center for Ethnomusicology.
Topic:
Traditional medicine  Search this
Shamanism  Search this
Malay language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Medical anthropology  Search this
Malays (Asian people) -- Medicine  Search this
Seances  Search this
Pregnancy -- Nutritional aspects  Search this
Midwifery  Search this
Ethnology -- Malaysia  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Sound recordings
Photographs
Citation:
Carol Laderman Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2012-09
See more items in:
Carol Laderman Papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw33834bd8d-479d-4d3c-ab0d-97f73a5a3609
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2012-09
Online Media:

MS 4658 Field notes and ethnographic material on Alabama, Choctaw, and Koasati (latter incomplete), plus a partial Southeast comparative ethnology of southeastern U.S.

Creator:
Taylor, Lyda Averill  Search this
Extent:
3 Boxes
Culture:
Alibamu  Search this
Choctaw  Search this
American Indian -- Southeast  Search this
Coushatta (Koasati)  Search this
Alabama Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Field notes
Date:
1936-1940 (part)
Scope and Contents:
Shelf list: Box 1. Alabama, Choctaw, and Koasati field notes. Box 2. Ethnographic material on Alabama and Koasati, plus incomplete manuscript on ethnography of southeastern U.S. Box 3. Miscellaneous notes on Alabama and Koasati. Detailed list of contents accompanies main catalog card.
Arrangement:
Divided into 15 series:
(1) Alibamu field notes, miscellaneous subjects July 2 - August 27, 1940;
(2) Alibamu field notes, miscellaneous subjects June 7 - July 28,
(3) Choctaw field notes on native medicinal practices. July 12 - July 17,
(4) Choctaw (at least in part) field notes on medicinal plants July - July 27,
(5) Alabama, Choctaw, Koasati?? field notes, miscellaneous notes from published sources, and questions,
(6) Alibamu? field notes on folktales July 31 - August 11,
(7) Questions,
(8) Alabama ethnographic material ,
(9) Koasati culture summary,
(10) Comparative Southeast ethnographic material ,
(11) Linguistic notes,
(12) Tribal names and kinship charts,
(13) Lyda Averill Taylor Photographs,
(14) Miscellaneous notes,
(15) Indian artifacts from Harrington, Texas,
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 4658
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Citation:
Manuscript 4658, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4658
See more items in:
MS 4658 Field notes and ethnographic material on Alabama, Choctaw, and Koasati (latter incomplete), plus a partial Southeast comparative ethnology of southeastern U.S.
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3f9d6aa82-ab7d-4d21-80c4-14524050a661
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4658
Online Media:

O. Roger Gallagher Papers

Creator:
Gallagher, Orvoell Roger, 1916-1975  Search this
Names:
United States. Air Force  Search this
Extent:
4.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Europe
South Asia
North America
France
Saratoga Springs (N.Y.)
Jharkhand (India)
Date:
1949-1973
Summary:
The Gallagher papers consist of materials relating to his major field work in France, India, and the United States.
Scope and Contents:
The Gallagher papers consist mainly of materials relating to his major field work. In 1949-1950 and in 1951, he investigated social arrangements, especially kinship, in the rural village of Civaux in the Department of Vienne in central France. In 1953-1954, working for International Public Opinion Research, Inc., which was under contract with the U. S. Air Force Human Resources Research Institute, he returned to France and studied the relations between the people of Chateauroux, a small city in the Department of Indre, and the personnel of a nearby American air base. The great bulk of Gallagher's material relating to France resulted from the work at Civaux. Only a few writings, including his Ph.D. dissertation, reflect the work at Chateauroux.

In 1962-1963, Gallagher was at Ranchi University, in the state of Bihar (now Jharkhand), in central India, on a National Science Foundation Science Faculty Fellowship. From there, he carried out studies in the village of Makhmandro among Oroans (Kurukh), a Dravidian group. Again, his focus was on social relations. His main method consisted of interviews of laborers.

Early in Gallagher's career, in 1951, he worked for the Science Museum in St. Paul, Minnesota, attempting to establish criteria for identifying tribal origins and dates for American Indian beaded artwork. Few materials resulting from this study appear in the collection. Gallagher's interest in isolated communities of northern Saratoga County, New York is represented by a few items, most of them manuscripts of writings.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into four series: (1) Studies of French communities; (2) Study of an Indian community; (3) Study of American Indian beaded art; and (4) Studies in Saratoga County, New York.
Biographical note:
Orvoell Roger Gallagher was educated at the University of California at Berkeley, London School of Economics (M.A., 1951), and Columbia University (Ph.D., 1955). He taught at New York University from 1954-1959 and at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, New York, from 1959 until his death in 1975.
Restrictions:
The O. Roger Gallagher papers are open for research.

Access to the O. Roger Gallagher requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Oraon (Indic people)  Search this
Beadwork  Search this
Kinship  Search this
Citation:
O. Roger Gallagher papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.XXXX.0212
See more items in:
O. Roger Gallagher Papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw36b45ef7d-c2cf-44e7-9f3c-631acb082823
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-xxxx-0212

A. Harvey Schreter papers

Creator:
Schreter, A. Harvey  Search this
Names:
Explorers Club  Search this
Extent:
10.25 Linear feet
3,943 Slides (35mm color)
5 Scrapbooks
19 Sound cassettes
9 Videocassettes (VHS)
1 DVD
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Slides
Scrapbooks
Sound cassettes
Videocassettes (vhs)
Dvd
Place:
Africa, East
Africa, North
Africa, West
Africa, Southern
Caribbean Area
East Asia
Europe
Middle East
North America
Oceania
South America
Southeast Asia
Date:
1916-2015
bulk 1960-2008
Summary:
A. Harvey Schreter (1916-2008) was a world traveler and collector of pre-Columbian, African, and Pacific art. The collection contains materials related to trips taken by Harvey and his wife Phyllis between 1960 and 2000, slide lectures based on these trips,and personal and professional papers.
Scope and Contents:
The A. Harvey Schreter papers consist of correspondence, lecture notes, promotional materials, clippings, photographs (color 35mm slides and prints), scrapbooks, and audio and video recordings documenting his world travels, lecture series, and personal and professional life. The bulk of the collection contains material related to trips taken by Harvey and his wife Phyllis to North and South America, Europe, Africa, Asia, and Oceania between 1960 and 2000. These trips becasme the basis for lectures delivered by the Schreters monthly from the 1980s through the early 2000s. Also included are personal and biographical papers of Harvey Schreter, his wife Phyllis, their children and extended family; materials related to Harvey's membership in the Explorers Club; materials related to the Schreter Neckwear Company; and materials related to the "Schreter System," an exercise program for the pelvic floor muscles.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into two series: (1) World travels, lectures, and related documentation and (2) Personal and professional papers.
Biographical Note:
A. Harvey Schreter (1916-2008) was the President of Schreter Neckware, a necktie manufacturer, as well as a world traveler and collector of pre-Columbian, African and Pacific art. Schreter became a member of the Explorers Club in 1982, frequently lecturing to the Washington Chapter about his travels with his wife, Phyllis Schreter.
Related Materials:
The Baltimore Museum of Industry holds the records of the Schreter Neckwear Company.

The Mid-Atlantic Regional Moving Image Archive Repository holds the A. Harvey Schreter Home Movies collection.
Separated Materials:
Video recordings in this collection have been transferred to the Human Studies Film Archives.
Provenance:
Received from Harvey Schreter in 1985 and Carol Schreter in 2016.
Restrictions:
Access to the A. Harvey Schreter papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Tourism  Search this
Voyages and travels  Search this
Citation:
A. Harvey Schreter papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2016-37
See more items in:
A. Harvey Schreter papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw387f6bc0b-e893-44b8-94dc-f03517d8ddba
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2016-37

George V. Allen photograph collection of photographs of Native Americans and the American frontier

Collector:
Allen, George V.  Search this
Names:
Albuquerque Indian School  Search this
Castillo de San Marcos (Saint Augustine, Fla.)  Search this
Chilocco Indian School  Search this
Geological Survey (U.S.)  Search this
Haskell Indian Nations University  Search this
United States Indian School (Carlisle, Pa.)  Search this
Yankton Mission (Yankton Indian Reservation, S.D.)  Search this
American Horse, 1840-1908  Search this
Big Bow Chief  Search this
Bogy, Lewis V. (Lewis Vital), 1813-1877  Search this
Cushing, Frank Hamilton, 1857-1900  Search this
Harding, Warren G. (Warren Gamaliel), 1865-1923  Search this
Hough, Walter, 1859-1935  Search this
Iron Bull (Crow Indian chief)  Search this
Kelly, Luther S. (Luther Sage), 1849-1928  Search this
Mató-Tópe, Mandan chief, d. 1837  Search this
Mix, Charles E.  Search this
Monroe, Mark, 1930-  Search this
Moran, John, 1831-1903  Search this
Ouray  Search this
Red Cloud, 1822-1909  Search this
Red Dog, Oglala chief  Search this
Red Shirt, 1845?-1925  Search this
Reilly, John James, 1838-1894  Search this
Reynolds, Joseph Jones, 1822-1899  Search this
Sitting Bull, 1831-1890  Search this
Spotted Tail, 1823-1881  Search this
Stevenson, Matilda Coxe, 1850-1915  Search this
Two Guns White Calf, 1872-1934 (Piegan)  Search this
Photographer:
Alvord, Kellogg, & Campbell  Search this
Bailey & Whitesides  Search this
Bailey, Dix, & Mead  Search this
Bennett & Brown  Search this
Black Hills View Company  Search this
Brooks Photo  Search this
Brubaker and Whitesides  Search this
C. Duhem & Bro.  Search this
Calfee & Catlin  Search this
Caswell & Davy  Search this
Copelin & Son  Search this
Cosand & Mosser  Search this
Cunningham & Co. (1880-1889)  Search this
D.D. Merrill, Randall & Co.  Search this
E. & H.T. Anthony (Firm)  Search this
Eaton, of Ralston, Oklahoma  Search this
Griffith & Griffith  Search this
Gurnsey & Illingworth  Search this
Hamilton and Hoyt  Search this
Hamilton and Kodylek  Search this
Hansard & Carden  Search this
Henry L. Shepard & Co.  Search this
Ingersoll View Company (St. Paul, Minnesota)  Search this
J.J. Reilly & Co.  Search this
Judd and McLeish  Search this
Keystone View Company  Search this
Kilburn Brothers  Search this
Lawrence & Houseworth  Search this
Leonard & Martin  Search this
M.S. Mepham & Bro.  Search this
Martin's Gallery  Search this
Montgomery Ward  Search this
Ramsour & Pennel  Search this
Reed & McKenney  Search this
Rodocker & Blanchard  Search this
Savage & Ottinger  Search this
Thomas Houseworth & Co  Search this
Underwood & Underwood  Search this
Universal Photo Art Co  Search this
Whitney & Zimmerman  Search this
Wittick & Bliss  Search this
Wittick & Russell  Search this
Young & Chase  Search this
Barker, George, 1844-1894  Search this
Barry, D. F. (David Francis), 1854-1934  Search this
Batchelder, B. P. (Benjamin Pierce), 1826-1891  Search this
Bates, Edw. (Edward)  Search this
Beaman, Edward O.  Search this
Bell, C. M. (Charles Milton), approximately 1849-1893  Search this
Bell, William, 1830-1910  Search this
Benecke, Robert  Search this
Bennett, H. H. (Henry Hamilton), 1843-1908  Search this
Bierstadt, Charles, 1819-1903  Search this
Blessing, S. T.  Search this
Blosser, J. A.  Search this
Bonine, Elias A., 1843-1916  Search this
Brockham, William (of Morris, Minnesota)  Search this
Brown, William Henry, 1844-1886  Search this
Brubaker, C. B.  Search this
Buehman, Henry, 1851-1912  Search this
Calfee, H. B. (Henry Bird), 1848-1912  Search this
Carbutt, John, 1832-1905  Search this
Carter, C. W., 1832-1918  Search this
Chamberlain, W. G. (William Gunnison)  Search this
Chase, D. B. (Dana B.)  Search this
Childs, B. F. (Brainard F.), ca. 1841-1921  Search this
Choate, J. N. (John N.), 1848-1902  Search this
Clark, George A. (George Alfred), 1936-  Search this
Climo, John Saunders  Search this
Cobb, William Henry, 1859-1909  Search this
Conklin, E (Enoch)  Search this
Cozzens, Samuel Woodworth, 1834-1878  Search this
Croft, Thomas  Search this
Cross, W. R. (William R.)  Search this
Currier, Frank, fl. 1890-1909  Search this
Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952  Search this
Curtis, George E., 1830-1910  Search this
Cushing, W. H., fl. 1870-1889  Search this
Davis, S., fl. 1860-1880  Search this
Doremus, John P., 1827-1890  Search this
Eaton, E. L. (Edric L.), b. ca. 1836  Search this
Ebell, Adrian J. (Adrian John), 1840-1877  Search this
Eisenmann, Charles, b. 1850  Search this
Flanders, Dudley P.  Search this
Forsyth, N. A. (Norman A.), 1869-1949  Search this
Fouch, John H., 1849-1933  Search this
Gardner, Alexander, 1821-1882  Search this
Godkin, William R.  Search this
Goodell, Abner Cheney, 1831-1914  Search this
Graves, C. H. (Carleton H.), -1943  Search this
Gurnsey, B. H. (Byron H.), 1833-1880  Search this
Hamilton, J. H. (James H.)  Search this
Hart, Alfred A., 1816-1908  Search this
Hawkins, B.A.  Search this
Haynes, F. Jay (Frank Jay), 1853-1921  Search this
Hazeltine, M. M. (Martin Mason), 1827-1903  Search this
Heister, H. T., (Henry T.), -1895  Search this
Heller, Louis Herman, ca. 1839-1929  Search this
Heston, Wat  Search this
Hillers, John K., 1843-1925  Search this
Hook, W. E. (William Edward), 1833-1908  Search this
Huffman, L. A. (Laton Alton), 1854-1931  Search this
Illingworth, W. H. (William H.), 1842-1893  Search this
Immke, Henry W.  Search this
Ingalls, George W., 1838-1920  Search this
Jackson, William Henry, 1843-1942  Search this
Jacoby, W. H. (William H.), 1841-1905  Search this
Jarvis, J. F. (John F.), b. 1850  Search this
Johnson, W.S.  Search this
Kirkland, Geo. W. (George W.)  Search this
Knight, J. Lee  Search this
Landon, S. C. (Seth C.), b. 1825  Search this
Line, A. A.  Search this
Little, H.N.  Search this
Marshall, William I. (William Isaac), 1840-1906  Search this
Martin, Alex (Alexander), 1841-1929  Search this
Maude, F. H. (Frederic Hamer)  Search this
Maynard, Hannah, 1834-1918  Search this
Maynard, Richard, 1832-1907  Search this
McIntyre, A. C. (Alexander Carson)  Search this
Meddaugh, J. E.  Search this
Mellen, Geo. E. (George Egbert), b. 1854  Search this
Mepham, Michael S.  Search this
Mitchell, Daniel S.  Search this
Morrow, Stanley J.  Search this
Muybridge, Eadweard, 1830-1904  Search this
Newcomb, C. H.  Search this
Nims, F.A.  Search this
O'Sullivan, Timothy H., 1840-1882  Search this
Palmer, A. A.  Search this
Parker, Joseph C.  Search this
Pierron, Geo. (George), b. 1816  Search this
Pollock, Charles, 1832-1910  Search this
Powers, F. F.  Search this
Raitt, T.G.  Search this
Randall, A. Frank  Search this
Rau, William Herman, 1855-1920  Search this
Rinehart, F. A. (Frank A.)  Search this
Rodocker, D. (David)  Search this
Rothrock, George H.  Search this
Rudy, W. Ira  Search this
Russell, Andrew J.  Search this
Rutter, Thomas H., 1837-1925  Search this
Savage, C. R. (Charles Roscoe), 1832-1909  Search this
Seaver, C. (Charles)  Search this
Sedgwick, S. J. (Stephen James)  Search this
Shipler, James William, 1849-1937  Search this
Soule, John P.  Search this
Stoddard, Seneca Ray, 1844-1917  Search this
Taber, I. W. (Isaiah West), 1830-1912  Search this
Thorne, G.W.  Search this
Thurlow, J., 1831-1878  Search this
Towne, Bertram C.  Search this
Trager, George E.  Search this
Upton, B. F. (Benjamin Franklin)  Search this
Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916  Search this
Weitfle, Charles, 1836-1921  Search this
Wendt, Julius M.  Search this
Whitney, Joel E. (Joel Emmons), 1822-1886  Search this
Williscraft, W.H.  Search this
Wittick, Ben, 1845-1903  Search this
Woodburn, J. R.  Search this
Zimmerman, Charles A., 1844-1909  Search this
Publisher:
Beal's Gallery  Search this
Continent Stereoscopic Company  Search this
Florida Club (Cooperative)  Search this
Union View Company (Rochester, New York)  Search this
Webster & Albee (Rochester, N.Y.)  Search this
Smith, O. C.  Search this
Extent:
67 Lantern slides
26 Negatives (glass)
10 Negatives (nitrate)
6 Autochromes (photographs)
50 Stereographs (circa 50 printed stereographs, halftone and color halftone)
1,000 Stereographs (circa, albumen and silver gelatin (some tinted))
239 Prints (circa 239 mounted and unmounted prints, albumen (including cartes de visite, imperial cards, cabinet cards, and one tinted print) and silver gelatin (some modern copies))
96 Prints (Album :, silver gelatin)
21 Postcards (silver gelatin, collotype, color halftone, and halftone)
Culture:
Puyallup  Search this
Kumeyaay (Diegueño)  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Tohono O'odham (Papago)  Search this
Kalispel (Pend d'Oreilles)  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Taos Indians  Search this
Nuu-chah-nulth (Nootka)  Search this
Kickapoo  Search this
Laguna Indians  Search this
Pueblo  Search this
Ho-Chunk (Winnebago)  Search this
Havasupai (Coconino)  Search this
Assiniboine (Stoney)  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Mojave (Mohave)  Search this
Mewuk (Miwok)  Search this
Kwakwaka'wakw (Kwakiutl)  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Piipaash (Maricopa)  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Modoc  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Niimíipuu (Nez Perce)  Search this
Washo Indians  Search this
A'aninin (Gros Ventre)  Search this
Tonkawa  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Yavapai  Search this
Ute  Search this
Sauk  Search this
Chaticks Si Chaticks (Pawnee)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Bannock  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Cochiti Pueblo  Search this
Omaha  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Basin  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Choctaw  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Eskimos  Search this
Northwest Coast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Numakiki (Mandan)  Search this
Sahnish (Arikara)  Search this
Tlingit  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Haida  Search this
Cree  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Quapaw Indians  Search this
Osage  Search this
Apache  Search this
Kaw (Kansa)  Search this
Umatilla  Search this
Shawnee  Search this
Fox Indians  Search this
Pomo  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Paiute  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Mi'kmaq (Micmac)  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Potawatomi  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Lantern slides
Negatives
Autochromes (photographs)
Stereographs
Prints
Postcards
Place:
Custer Battlefield (Montana)
Date:
circa 1860-1935
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs relating to Native Americans or frontier themes, including portraits, expedition photographs, landscapes, and other images of dwellings, transportation, totem poles, ceremonies, infants and children in cradleboards, camps and towns, hunting and fishing, wild west shows, food preparation, funeral customs, the US Army and army posts, cliff dwellings, and grave mounds and excavations. The collection also includes images of prisoners at Fort Marion in 1875, Sioux Indians involved in the Great Sioux Uprising in Minnesota, the Fort Laramie Peace Commission of 1868, Sitting Bull and his followers after the Battle of the Little Bighorn, and the aftermath of the Wounded Knee Massacre in 1890.

There are studio portraits of well-known Native Americans, including American Horse, Big Bow, Four Bears, Iron Bull, Ouray, Red Cloud, Red Dog, Red Shirt, Sitting Bull, Spotted Tail, Three Bears, and Two Guns White Calf. Depicted delegations include a Sauk and Fox meeting in Washington, DC, with Lewis V. Bogy and Charles E. Mix in 1867; Kiowas and Cheyennes at the White House in 1863; and Dakotas and Crows who visited President Warren G. Harding in 1921. Images of schools show Worcester Academy in Vinita, Oklahoma; Chilocco Indian School; Carlisle Indian Industrial School; Haskell Instittue, and Albuquerque Indian School.

Some photographs relate to the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia, 1876; World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, 1893; Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis, 1903; and Centennial Exposition of the Baltimore and Ohio Railraod, 1876. Expedition photographs show the Crook expedition of 1876, the Sanderson expedition to the Custer Battlefield in 1877, the Wheeler Survey of the 1870s, Powell's surveys of the Rocky Mountain region during the 1860s and 1870s, and the Hayden Surveys.

Outstanding single views include the party of Zuni group led to the sea by Frank Hamilton Cushing; Episcopal Church Rectory and School Building, Yankton Agency; Matilda Coxe Stevenson and a companion taking a photographs of a Zuni ceremony; John Moran sketching at Acoma; Ben H. Gurnsey's studio with Indian patrons; Quapaw Mission; baptism of a group of Paiutes at Coeur d'Alene Mission; court-martial commission involved in the trial of Colonel Joseph J. Reynolds, 1877; President Harding at Sitka, Alaska; Walter Hough at Hopi in 1902; and Mrs. Jesse Walter Fewkes at Hopi in 1897.
Biographical/Historical note:
George V. Allen was an attorney in Lawrence, Kansas and an early member of the National Stereoscope Association. Between the 1950s and 1980s, Allen made an extensive collection of photographs of the American West, mostly in stereographs, but also including cartes-de-visite and other styles of mounted prints, photogravures, lantern slides, autochromes, and glass negatives.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 90-1
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Camps  Search this
Child care  Search this
Rites and ceremonies  Search this
Totem poles  Search this
Cookery  Search this
Wild west shows  Search this
Fishing  Search this
Hunting  Search this
Transportation  Search this
Dwellings  Search this
Funeral rites and ceremonies  Search this
Wounded Knee Massacre, S.D., 1890  Search this
Citation:
Photo Lot 90-1, George V. Allen collection of photographs of Native Americans and the American frontier, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.90-1
See more items in:
George V. Allen photograph collection of photographs of Native Americans and the American frontier
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3c6f12a20-b859-4219-a567-b2b3246a66be
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-90-1
Online Media:

MS 2372 Garrick Mallery Collection on Sign Language and Pictography

Creator:
Mallery, Garrick, 1831-1894  Search this
Extent:
41.29 Linear feet (22 boxes, 29 folders, 3 mounted drawings, and 3 rolled items)
Note:
Some materials, especially in series 3, are stored in the NAA artwork collection.
Culture:
Arctic peoples  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pictographs
Place:
Oceania
Date:
1849-1902
bulk 1870-1895
Summary:
Garrick Mallery (1831-1894) was an ethnologist with the Bureau of American Ethnology who focused primarily on Native American sign language and pictography. This collection reflects Mallery's research interests and methods. Much of the collection is comprised of correspondence and notes relating to sign language and pictography and is organized chiefly by either the cultural or geographic region to which the material belongs. Bound volumes of several of his publications are included, along with annotated draft copies from collaborators. In the case of Mallery's work on pictography, the collection includes several oversize items including original works and reproductions.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains Garrick Mallery's research and writings as a BAE ethnologist and is largely comprised of correspondence and preparatory materials for publications on Native American sign language and pictography. The geographic scope of the material is chiefly the present-day United States and Canada, though other areas of the world are represented less comprehensively. Correspondence and research notes include verbal descriptions of signs, sometimes with illustrations included. Bound volumes of Mallery's publications are included, along with annotations from collaborators. In addition, this collection includes notecards, drawings, illustrations, photographs, articles, and art objects. Art objects (mostly oversize) deal chiefly with Dakota winter counts and other artifacts.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged into 3 series: 1) Research Notes, undated; 2) Materials on Sign Language, 1843-1849, 1873-1894; 3) Materials on Pictographs and Petroglyphs, 1849-1902, undated
Biographical Note:
Garrick Mallery (1831-1894) was born in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania and practiced law in Philadelphia from 1853 until the outbreak of the American Civil War. While serving in the army, he became interested in Native American sign language and pictography, perhaps while performing his duties in frontier areas. After retiring from the military in 1879, Mallery was appointed to the newly created Bureau of American Ethnology as one of its first ethnologists. In his work with the Bureau, Mallery pioneered the study of sign language and pictographs, examining them as a universal human phenomenon with a direct link to spoken language.

In his work, Mallery collected and examined sign language vocabulary from Native American groups throughout the U.S. and Canada and regularly solicited contributions from collaborators. He also related his findings to examples from the wider world, comparing the formation of Native American signs to those in other areas by hearing individuals and by the deaf. Mallery completed several publications on the topic throughout the 1880s, notably Introduction to the Study of Sign language Among the North American Indians (1880), A Collection of Gesture- Signs and Signals of the North American Indians (1880), and "Sign-language among North American Indians Compared with that Among other People and Deaf-mutes," which appeared in the BAE 1st Annual Report (1881).

While most widely known for his work with sign language, Mallery also undertook extensive research into Native American pictography. Like his work with sign language, he both conducted original research and solicited assistance from collaborators. He was especially interested in the representational images in Dakota winter counts and petroglyphs in the United States and throughout the world.

Sources Consulted

Fletcher, Robert. "Garrick Mallery, President of the Philosophical Society of Washington, in 1888." In Brief Memoirs of Colonel Garrick Mallery, U.S.A., Who Died October 24, 1894, 3-8. Washington: Judd & Detweiler, 1895.

Fletcher, Robert. "Colonel Garrick Mallery, U.S.A." American Anthropologist 8, no. 2 (1895): 79-80.

Chronology

1831 -- Born in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, on April 25

1850 -- Graduates Yale College

1853 -- Earns LL. B. from the University of Pennsylvania Admitted to the Pennsylvania bar

1853-1861 -- Practices law in Philadelphia

1861 -- Enters the volunteer army of the United States

1862 -- Severely wounded in the battle of Peach Orchard, Virginia Captured and held prisoner at Libby prison in Richmond, Virginia

1866 -- Completes service with volunteer army of the United States Accepts commission in regular army of the United States

1870 -- Marries Helen W. Wyckoff

1879 -- Retires from the United States army due to disability Appointed to the Bureau of American Ethnology

1880 -- Publishes Introduction to the Study of Sign-Language Among the North American Indians as Illustrating the Gesture-Speech of Mankind and A Collection of Gesture-Signs and Signals of the North American Indians With Some Comparisons

1881 -- Publishes "Sign Language Among North American Indians, Compared with that Among Other Peoples and Deaf-Mutes"

1894 -- Dies after a short illness in Washington, D.C., on October 24
Related Materials:
See MS 2322 A collection of gesture-signs and signals of the North American Indians for more of Garrick Mallery's work on sign language.
Provenance:
MS 2372 was transferred from the Bureau of Ethnology Archives to the Smithsonian Office of Anthropology Archives with the merger of the BAE and the Department of Anthropology of the National Museum of Natural History in 1965. The Smithsonian Office of Anthropology Archives was renamed the National Anthropological Archives in 1968.
Restrictions:
Manuscript 2372 is open for research.

Access to Manuscript 2372 requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Sign language  Search this
Picture-writing  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Anthropology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Pictographs
Citation:
Manuscript 2372, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2372
See more items in:
MS 2372 Garrick Mallery Collection on Sign Language and Pictography
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw367638eb8-dce6-4d4e-bea5-2204e49134ef
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2372
Online Media:

Scenes of native life including hunting, sledding, games, animal husbandry and ceremonies

Creator:
Ivanoff, Stephen ?  Search this
Extent:
130 Items (ca. 130 drawings)
Culture:
Eskimo -- Alaskan -- Hunting  Search this
Eskimo -- Alaska -- Sleds  Search this
Eskimo -- Alaska -- Animal husbandry  Search this
Eskimo -- Alaskan -- Ceremonies  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Date:
ca. 1890-1900
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 260,447
Local Note:
For comments and corrections on this set of drawings (especially those published in George Phebus' book) cf. National Anthropological Archives Correspondence File, June, 1976; Arthur O. Roberts letter of April 2, 1976 to W. Sturtevant forwarded to National Anthropological Archives, June 1976.
Graphite, ink, crayon and watercolor on paper.
Provenance:
Found summer, 1967 in Smithsonian Institution Department of Anthropology storage; transmitted to National Anthropological Archives by George Phebus, Processing Lab, February, 1972. (Catalog Number 260,447, Accession Number 51,115, transferred from U. S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Education, January 27, 1910.)
Topic:
Hunting -- Eskimo  Search this
Games -- Eskimo  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Citation:
Manuscript 260,447, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS260447
See more items in:
Scenes of native life including hunting, sledding, games, animal husbandry and ceremonies
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw38d90318d-5271-4e31-818c-5ce34ae642b2
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms260447
Online Media:

MS 2902 Tracings showing 9 stone carvings

Creator:
Galbraith, F. J.  Search this
Mooney, James, 1861-1921  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
December 13, 1879
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2902
Topic:
Pennsylvania -- Archeology -- Petroglyphs  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 2902, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2902
See more items in:
MS 2902 Tracings showing 9 stone carvings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3ed559ad5-f26a-4d48-aeb7-a4d40c2e3a05
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2902
Online Media:

Albertype Company photograph collection relating to Native Americans

Collector:
Albertype Co.  Search this
Witteman, Hermann L., -1952  Search this
Photographer:
Fred Harvey (Firm)  Search this
Kiser Photo Co. (Portland, Or.)  Search this
N.W. Halsey & Co.  Search this
Bell, C. M. (Charles Milton), approximately 1849-1893  Search this
Clarke, H. H.  Search this
Cornish, Geo. B. (George Bancroft)  Search this
Fiske, Frank Bennett, 1883-1952  Search this
Flood, H. Lee  Search this
Hazeltine, H. R.  Search this
Martin, W. H. (William H.), 1865-1940  Search this
Mathers, C. W.  Search this
Matsura, Frank, 1873-1913  Search this
Reed, Roland, 1864-1934  Search this
Stimson, Joseph Elam, 1870-1952  Search this
Watkins, H. H.  Search this
Names:
Wittemann, A. (Adolph), 1845-1938 (collector and photographer)  Search this
Extent:
318 Negatives (circa, nitrate (includes copy negatives))
Culture:
Pueblo  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Cree  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Coast Salish  Search this
Colville  Search this
Eskimos  Search this
Fox Indians  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Tli Cho (Dogrib/Thlingchadinne)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Caddo  Search this
Nuxalk (Bellacoola)  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Apache  Search this
Inunaina (Arapaho)  Search this
Assiniboine (Stoney)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Laguna Indians  Search this
Kiowa  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Piipaash (Maricopa)  Search this
Havasupai (Coconino)  Search this
Haida  Search this
A'aninin (Gros Ventre)  Search this
Ponca  Search this
Chaticks Si Chaticks (Pawnee)  Search this
Osage  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Niimíipuu (Nez Perce)  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Mojave (Mohave)  Search this
Tewa Pueblos  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Taos Indians  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Shawnee  Search this
Northwest Coast  Search this
Sarsi Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Basin  Search this
Hawaiians  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Japanese  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives
Photographs
Place:
Maine
Kansas City (Mo.)
British Columbia
Virgin Islands
Vancouver (British Columbia)
Date:
circa 1890-1910
Scope and Contents note:
The collection consists of photographs collected by the Albertype Company for their postcards and viewbooks, including portraits, scenery, camps, Native Americans schools, and some paintings and composites for postcard printing. Additional subjects include rock drawings in Maine; a statue in Kansas City, Missouri; Standing Rock Monument in North Dakota; people in Atlin, British Columbia; Carib rock drawings in the Virgin Islands; and totem poles in Vancouver.

Included are works of Charles Milton Bell, E. A. Benson, C. R. Bourne, H. E. Brown, William Bull, H. H. Clarke, George B. Cornish, Frank Bennett Fiske, H. Lee Flood, N. W. Halsey, Fred Harvey, H. R. Hazeltine, Kiser Photograph Company, W. H. Martin, C. W. Mathers, Frank Matsura, W. H. Matthewson, Charles E. Morris, Ernest Moses, J. S. Myers, M. OʹConnor, G. W. Parsons, Roland W. Reed, C. B. Robinson , J. E. Stimson, W. M. Stoltz, and H. H. Watkins. Clarke and Fiske, however, are the only photographers with more than a few images.
Biographical/Historical note:
The Albertype Company, headquartered in Brooklyn, New York, published viewbooks and postcards for national distribution. Founded by Adolph and Herman Witteman, the company began publishing souvenier photographic albums as early as 1867. The Wittemans established Witteman Brothers in 1885, and then the Albertype Company in 1890. From 1890 to 1950, the firm published collotypes made from the photographs of its agents (including Adolph Witteman), other companies, and independent photographers. The firm was purchased in 1952 by Art Vue Post Card Company.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 25
Reproduction Note:
Modern copy negatives and prints made by Smithsonian Institution, circa 1972.
Location of Other Archival Materials:
The Library of Congress, Wisconsin Historical Society, and Historical Society of Pennsylvania also hold original Albertype Company prints and negatives.
Albertype Company views are also held in National Anthropological Archives Photo Lot 88-37, Photo Lot 92-37, and Photo Lot 92-3.
Restrictions:
Original nitrate negatives are in cold storage and require advanced notice for viewing. Modern copy prints and copy negatives for nearly all images are available.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Rock paintings  Search this
Totem poles  Search this
Catawba Indians  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo lot 25, Albertype Company photograph collection relating to Native Americans, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.25
See more items in:
Albertype Company photograph collection relating to Native Americans
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3bed1cd4a-0334-43a5-b145-f66931efedc8
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-25
Online Media:

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