Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
7 documents - page 1 of 1

Chemehuevi

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Laird, Carobeth, 1895-1983  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
27 Boxes
Culture:
Chemehuevi  Search this
Mojave (Mohave)  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Date:
1910-1946
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southern California/Basin series contains John P. Harrington's research on Chemehuevi.

Materials from his early field work in 1910 and 1911 consist of vocabulary organized into catagories including tribenames, geographic terms, placenames, plants (mainly cacti), and shells as adornment. Among the tribenames are a number of Mohave and Diegueno equivalences, as well as a good bit of Mohave ethnohistory, based on Alfred L. Kroeber's "Shoshonean Dialects of California" and T. T. Waterman's "Religious Practices of the Diegueno Indians." Certain notes indicate the availability and use of the records of Barbara Freire-Marreco. Harrington also accumulated notes for a proposed review of Waterman's "The Phonetic Elements of the Northern Paiute Language," into which he put some of his recently acquired Chemehuevi phonetics.

Carobeth's field notes are also present in this subseries. The bulk of the lingustic and ethnographic data was amassed from her work with George Laird. Harrington copied her notes onto slips, some of which he arranged semantically. The topical vocabulary includes terms for cosmography, geography, age/sex, kinship, material culture, plants, animals, animal parts, and tribenames. There are smaller sections for minerals, names of places and persons, colors, religion, and history.

A section of grammar notes includes excerpts from Carobeth's notes, Edward Sapir's manuscript titled "Southern Paiute, an Illustrative Sketch" (B.A.E. ms. 1751), and from other secondary sources. There are also excerpts from Ben Paddock, Ruby Eddy, and Kitanemuk and Serrano speakers. The organizational pattern is loosely based on Sapir's manuscript.

The subseries also contains a set of thirty-size texts (of which number thirty is missing), each with related notes. In most cases there are typed versions, interlinear translations, handwritten notes, and free English translations. This material was intended for publication, possibly in the form of a primer. This section also contains the Lord's Prayer, notes on song, textlets, and folklore.

Some miscellaneous notes include Chemehuevi names extracted from a June 30, 1918 census of the Mohave Indians of the Colorado River Agency; quotations for the proposed Chemehuevi publication from little-used secondary sources and interviews with colleagues; texts related to sketches; notes and questions to be reheard or clarified; and general linguistic and ethnographic miscellany. There is also an article from fieldwork undertaken in 1934, probably by Harrington's daughter Awona and Carobeth. Notes in an unidentified handwriting list as informants Satania Lopez (Susie), Jerome Booth, George Snyder, and Mukewine.

The last section of this subseries consists of field notes from his research in 1946. There is a comparative vocabulary based on Harrington's Serrano information from Juan Lozada and on Edward Sapir's Paiute terms in "Southern Paiute, a Shoshonean Language." Lucy Mike (referred to as Mrs. Lucy and who also knew Walapai) and Luisa gave Chemehuevi equivalences. There are also notes on placename trips, rehearings of tribenames, and some ethnographic and anecdotal notes
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington first conducted research on Chemehuevi in 1910-1911, collecting information from Jack Jones, George Johnson, and Ohue. In 1919 and 1920, Carobeth, his wife at the time, accumulated extensive data from George Laird, Annie Laird, and Ben Paddock. These notes formed the backbone of Harrington's Chemehuevi material, which was copied, organized, and often reheard in Washington in 1920. Harrington renewed his research in 1946, initiating a search for surviving Chemehuevi speakers. He connected with a number of speakers and embarked with them on placename trips from Barstow to Needles, Searchlight, Nelson, and Las Vegas.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Chemehuevi language  Search this
Mohave language  Search this
Diegueño language  Search this
Serrano language  Search this
Southern Paiute language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 3.10
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 3: Papers relating to the Native American history, language and culture of southern California and Basin
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3039f7824-8d73-4a8b-a243-6ba360229312
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14367

Kiowa

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
26 Boxes
Culture:
Kiowa  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Dictionaries
Manuscripts
Narratives
Place:
Devils Tower National Monument (Wyo.)
Date:
1916-1948
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Plains series contains Harrington's Kiowa research, primarily consisting of vocabulary, comparative vocabulary, a dictionary, linguistic notes, grammar, and texts.

Some of the vocabulary gathered between 1918 and 1920 remains in slipfile form, arranged semantically (former B.A.E. mss. 2289pt. and 2297pt.). Subjects include animals, material culture, plants, and personal categories. During 1945 and 1946, Harrington reorganized his Kiowa notes based on a continuing enlargement of the earlier semantically arranged vocabulary, adding such categories as astronomy, geography, minerals, months, placenames, rank, relationship terms, songs, and tribenames (former B.A.E. ms. 4622pt.). The etymology of some personal names and a partial draft and notes for a proposed paper on "Human Terms" form part of the vocabulary material. The geographic terms were provided by Parker McKenzie and, according to correspondence, most of the relationship terms may also be McKenzie's work. Some of the latter's letters are cut and mounted on separate sheets of paper, others were copied by Harrington, and many are identified with the symbol "<U+2642>." Miscellaneous material includes photocopies of fragments from Robert M. Lowie's "A Note on Kiowa Kinship Terms and Usages," mounted, annotated, and reheard with Keahtigh. A few tribenames elicited from Guy Quoetone (data from him are labeled "Guy Kiowa") and Kiowa Charlie in March and April of 1946 add randomly to the earlier lists.

The comparative vocabulary section contains Tewa comparisons based on Harrington's 1927 accumulation of information from Tewa speaker Eduardo Cata (former B.A.E. ms. 4705pt.). Harrington also used Tewa terms from his "Ethnogeography of the Tewa Indians" (1916), as well as Kiowa terms from James Mooney's "Calendar History of the Kiowa Indians" (1918). In addition, there are a few brief comparisons of Kiowa with Navajo, Paiute (eight pages), and Siouan (two pages).

His dictionary files consist of a manuscript and related notes. The manuscript contains most but not all of the lexical portion of "Vocabulary of the Kiowa Language" with an addition of further entries which were apparently written at a later date.

Among his linguistic notes is a partial draft written in 1916 titled ''The Language of the Kaekua or Kiowa Indians." From 1918 to 1920 while in Anadarko and in Washington, Harrington accumulated extensive information (about 700 pages) on Kiowa vocabulary, grammar, and texts. In 1922 he began a paper on "Notes on the Kiowa Language." He later collated this material in Washington, and in 1928 published a synthesis titled "Vocabulary of the Kiowa Language." The publication encompassed grammatical information with Tewa comparisons, a glossary of lexical terms , and a Kiowa text, (former B.A.E. mss. 4705pt., 2289pt., and 2297pt.).

Documented among the grammar files is Harrington's interest in Kiowa intonation, a title he gave to an unpublished manuscript for which Perry Keahtigh provided information. Their work on this aspect of Kiowa grammar proceeded from September to November 1944, and included recording sessions at the Library of Congress.

There is another unpublished manuscript titled "Kiowa, Pueblo Language of the Plains." This is probably the manuscript that underwent many revisions and rehearings before being published in 1948 as "Popular Account of the Kiowa Indian Language." It encompassed only a minute portion of the ambitious and comprehensive grammar which Harrington had originally envisioned. Because of the diligent reworking of the information, it is rather difficult to determine in what sequence the drafts were created. In order to eliminate as much confusion as possible, all the grammatical drafts of the 1940s are placed together, followed by notes that most nearly reflect the outline of the 1948 publication. Phonetics and morphology are dealt with in detail. Included is brief information on syntax, Indian native language, Spanish and English loanwords, foreign words, slang, and polysynthetic words based on Robert W. Young's "Language: Interesting Side-views of Its Study." (April 1937).

The text section contains over twenty brief stories of Seindei, the culture hero, provided by Delos K. Lonewolf and George Hunt in 1924. Some are in Kiowa and English, some in English only. One myth was given in English by a Comanche Indian named Albert Attock. This textual material was formerly cataloged as part of B.A.E. ms. 4705. There are various versions of Lonewolf's "The Udder-angry Travelers-off" text which appeared in "Vocabulary of the Kiowa Language," "Three Kiowa Texts," and "Popular Account of the Kiowa Indian Language." Frequent rehearings with Keahtigh in November 1945 preceded the last-named publication. Additional material for "Three Kiowa Texts" contains extensive annotations by McKenzie and a few further rehearings from Keahtigh. Laura D. Pedrick translated the Lord's Prayer; a "Church Song" in Kiowa (former B.A.E. ms. 4705pt.) came from Mr. Light (not further identified). There are several texts edited by McKenzie for collaboration with Harrington. They include Enoch Smoky's "Bear Girl Story," recorded March 26,1946, and Hunting Horse's "Mad Girl Story," heard on February 24, 1946 (former B.A.E. ms. 4622pt.). On March 31, 1940, Kiowa Charlie, with the help of Guy Quoetone and Lonewolf, dictated still another Devils Tower myth.

Harrington's Kiowa files also contain other notes and information about Devils Tower in the Black Hills of Wyoming. This evolved into his 1939 publication, "Kiowa Memories of the Northland." The bulk of the Devils Tower material was originally listed as B.A.E. ms. 6070.
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington's search for a relationship between Kiowa and the Tanoan languages led to a substantial accumulation of and career-long interest in Kiowa grammatical, linguistic, and textual material. His study resulted in eight publications on Kiowa, the first appearing in 1910 and the last in 1948.

Early in 1918 Harrington worked in Washington, D.C., with Delos and Ida Lonewolf, (the latter abbreviated "Mrs. L."), who were accompanied by their youngest son, Theodore. In June 1918, Harrington conducted fieldwork at the Kiowa Agency in Anadarko, Oklahoma. Interviews were held with James Waldo (W.): Enoch Smoky, head of the peyote cult among the Kiowa; Parker McKenzie (McK): Laura D. Pedrick (also referred to as "Mrs. P" and"L. Pro "); and several others. The primary focus of his work at that time was to collect linguistic data needed for comparative studies, especially with the Tanoan languages. From mid-1919 through 1920 Harrington remained at Bureau of American Ethnology headquarters, during which time he sorted and reorganized the Kiowa notes. While in Washington, D.C., in 1924, he elicited Kiowa texts from the Lonewolfs and from George Hunt, who was regarded as a superb tribal historian.

"Vocabulary of the Kiowa Language," published in 1928, unfortunately reflects only a small portion of the information he had amassed during his early work. In his notes, Harrington referred to this publication as the "Dictionary," "Dict.," or "Bulletin." He was evidently not pleased with the work. As he wrote to Parker McKenzie in later years: "It has a lot of idiosyncracies in it which are absolutely incorrect. They [the B.A.E.] forced me to publish, and so I did-to my chagrin now."

In the summer of 1939, Harrington and Parker McKenzie renewed their acquaintance during a visit which Harrington made to Anadarko. They reminisced just a few hours on that occasion. Shortly afterwards they began an exchange of letters which lasted almost into 1950. McKenzie's exposure to linguistic method in their early work together had awakened an abiding interest in the preservation of Kiowa. Thus, he was willing to impart what he had discovered in his efforts to analyze the language. This exchange allowed Harrington to collect updated material for the paper which he eventually published on January 1, 1948, titled "Popular Account of the Kiowa Indian Language."

From September 1944 to early 1947, Harrington elicited additional grammatical information and reheard his earlier notes in work sessions with Perry A. Keahtigh (also referred to as "Keah."). Keahtigh married a daughter of Enoch Smoky around 1930. Knowing that his father-in-law had worked with Harrington in 1918, Keahtigh sought out the linguist when he returned to the East Coast in the 1940s. They worked evenings and weekends while Harrington was detailed to the Office of Censorship as part of a volunteer war effort by members of the Smithsonian staff. Keahtigh provided a wealth of linguistic information during 1945 and most of 1946, his work dwindling off in 1947 as Harrington's manuscript neared completion.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Kiowa language  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Navajo language  Search this
Northern Paiute language  Search this
Southern Paiute language  Search this
Siouan languages  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Dictionaries
Manuscripts
Narratives
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 5.1
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 5: Papers relating to the Native American History, Language and Culture of the Plains
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw30a4064ff-19fc-4834-b08b-03b665396e17
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14726

MS 830 The Life and Culture of the Ute

Creator:
Powell, John Wesley, 1834-1902  Search this
Informant:
Naches  Search this
Extent:
160 Pages
Culture:
Ute  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Title supplied by J. N. B. Hewitt, and sections numbered and arranged by him. Unnumbered sections added later.
Sections entitled: (1) Games and amusements, 3 pages;

(2,3) [Paiute; transferred in 1959 to file Number 831-c, -d];

(4) Means of Subsistence, 52 pages;

(5) Migration, 8 pages;

(6) Home, 5 pages;

(7) Government, 10 pages;

(8) Fear of the insane, 2 pages;

(9) treatment of the sick, 27 pages;

(10) Treatment of the aged, 4 pages;

(11) Killing the doctor (told by Naches, Salt Lake City, May, 1873), 3 pages;

(12) The boundaries of the earth, 5 pages;

(13) Na-gun'-tu-wip, the home of the departed spirits, 8 pages;

(14) Methods of marrying, 7 pages;

(15) Selection of food (1873), 3 pages;

(16) The morning address, 2 pages;

(17) Some of their faculties;, 4 pages;

(18) Notes on the gentes (in shorthand), 2 pages; Mythology of the Numas, 10 pages; Pine nuts are brought from a distant country (legend, 1873), 4 pages; Burying customs (told by Naches, Salt Lake City, 1873), 1 page; Religion of the Utes (talk given by Powell ?), 29 pages.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 830
Topic:
Games -- Ute  Search this
Migration -- Ute  Search this
Habitations -- Ute  Search this
Government -- Ute  Search this
Subsistence -- Ute  Search this
Religion -- Ute  Search this
Pine nuts -- Ute  Search this
Folklore -- Ute  Search this
Kinship -- Ute  Search this
Food -- Ute  Search this
Disease -- Ute  Search this
Geriatrics -- Ute  Search this
geography -- Ute  Search this
Marriage -- Ute  Search this
Death -- Ute  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Mental illness -- Ute  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 830, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS830
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3f73e37dd-f3ee-4075-87d3-291f077f5965
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms830

Scrapbook: Return Surplus Lands to Indian People

Collection Creator:
Thorpe, Grace F.  Search this
Extent:
38 Photographic prints
Container:
Box 12
Box 2, Folder 1
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Date:
1971
Scope and Contents:
This scrapbook includes articles, newspaper clippings, letters and photographs from various events and marches Grace participated in regarding the fight for returning surplus lands to Native peoples. These events and materials include--Fishing Rights March (1970) in Yelm, Washington with the McCloud family; Fort Lawton "Surplus" March (1970) in Seattle, Washington; Pit River versus P.G..E. (1970) in Big Bend, California; DQU, Deganawidah Quetzalcoatl University founding (1971) in Davis, California; and documentation as National Commitee Director for the "Return Surplus Lands to Indian People".
Separated Materials:
The cover and back of the scrapbook binder are in Box 12 since they are oversized.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited users to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not changed, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Grace F. Thorpe Collection, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Grace F. Thorpe Collection
Grace F. Thorpe Collection / Series 4: Working on Behalf of Native Americans and Activism
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv488f38056-777d-4178-98b4-90af44699a74
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-085-ref108
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Scrapbook: Return Surplus Lands to Indian People digital asset number 1

MS 1494 Kaivawit [Kaibab] vocabulary

Creator:
Powell, John Wesley, 1834-1902  Search this
Extent:
146 Pages
Culture:
Kaibab Paiute  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
ca. 1870's
Scope and Contents:
Dictionary of Kaibab Paiute dialect of Ute. Extensive.
Contents: Persons Original page Number 1; Consecutive page Number in []. 1. Parts of the body 2, 2. Terms denoting relationship 5, 5. Numerals (including ordinals) 13, 14. Implements and utensils 14, 20. Dress and ornaments 20, 27. Firmament and meteorological phenomena 24, 31. Time 29, 36. Winter moons 30, 37. Geographical terms 31, 38. Geographic names 38, 50. Animals 40, 61. Birds 44, 64. Reptiles 47, 68. Insects 48, 69. Fish 49, 70. Colors 50, 71. Plants, fruits, etc. 51, 72. Names of tribes, and proper names 55, 76. Nouns 58, 79. Adjectives 70, 96. Comparison of adjectives 76, 102. Pronouns (including number and cases) 78, 104. Verbs 80, 109. Adverbs 100, 131. Prepositions 104, 135. Interjections 106, 137. Prefixes and suffixes 107, 138. Phrases 108, 139. Sprites, spirits, etc. 112, 144. Mythological 113, 145. "To be looked up" 114, 146.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1494
Local Note:
This may be the work Pilling (Bureau of American Ethnology AR 1, 1881) lists as "Words, Phrases and sentences in the Kaivavwit Dialect of the Shoshoni Language," on page 574.
manuscript document
Topic:
Tools and implements -- Paiute  Search this
Kinship -- Paiute  Search this
Clothing -- Paiute  Search this
Weather -- Paiute  Search this
Zoology -- Paiute  Search this
geography -- Paiute  Search this
Colors -- Paiute  Search this
Fruit -- Paiute  Search this
Names, tribal -- Paiute  Search this
Names, Personal -- Paiute  Search this
Atime -- Paiute  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 1494, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1494
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3f07b4ec5-ad07-4883-92b9-6535c80a5564
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1494
Online Media:

Landscapes of origin in the Americas : creation narratives linking ancient places and present communities / edited by Jessica Joyce Christie

Author:
Christie, Jessica Joyce 1956-  Search this
Physical description:
vii, 203 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm
Type:
Folklore
Place:
America
Date:
2009
C2009
Topic:
Origin  Search this
Indian mythology  Search this
Sacred space  Search this
Creation--Mythology  Search this
Physical geography  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_947093

Landscapes of movement : trails, paths, and roads in anthropological perspective / edited by James E. Snead, Clark L. Erickson, J. Andrew Darling

Author:
Penn Museum International Research Conference (1st : 2006 : Philadelphia, Pa.)  Search this
Snead, James E (James Elliott) 1962-  Search this
Erickson, Clark L  Search this
Darling, J. Andrew  Search this
University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology  Search this
Physical description:
xviii, 364 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm
Type:
Congresses
Date:
2009
C2009
Topic:
Human geography  Search this
Human beings--Migrations  Search this
Roads--History  Search this
Indian roads--History  Search this
Roads, Prehistoric  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_949745

Modify Your Search







or


Narrow By