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Koa the Kiwi

Creator:
National Zoo  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2009-01-06T19:21:06.000Z
YouTube Category:
Science & Technology  Search this
Topic:
Zoology;Animals;Veterinary medicine;Animal health  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNZP
Data Source:
National Zoo
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNZP
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_RjUsNa882qo

An introduction to zoo biology and management Paul A. Rees

Author:
Rees, Paul A  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource (vii, 416 pages) illustrations
Type:
Electronic resources
Electronic books
History
Date:
2011
Topic:
Zoos--Management  Search this
Zoo animals--Behavior  Search this
Zoos--History  Search this
SCIENCE--Life Sciences--General  Search this
Zoos  Search this
Animals, Zoo  Search this
Behavior, Animal  Search this
Tiergartenbiologie  Search this
Zoologischer Garten  Search this
Zootiere  Search this
Tierhaltung  Search this
Call number:
QL76 .R44 2011 (Internet)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1146089

Website Records, 1996-2020

Creator:
National Zoological Park (U.S.)  Search this
Type:
Electronic records
Digital images
Web sites
Date:
1996
1996-2020
Topic:
Web sites  Search this
Zoos  Search this
Zoo animals  Search this
Public relations  Search this
Zoo exhibits  Search this
Wildlife conservation  Search this
Local number:
SIA RS01574
See more items in:
Website Records 1996-2020 [National Zoological Park (U.S.)]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_297855

Records

Creator::
National Zoological Park  Search this
Extent:
147 cu. ft. (288 document boxes) (1 tall document box) (4 bound volumes) (71 microfilm reels)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Maps
Black-and-white photographs
Serials (publications)
Drawings
Clippings
Books
Manuscripts
Scrapbooks
Sketches
Pamphlets
Diaries
Plates (illustrations)
Letterpress copybooks
Picture postcards
Architectural drawings
Date:
1887-1966
Introduction:
The earliest records concerning the National Zoological Park date from 1887. They were kept by the Office of the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution until 1890, when they were transferred to Holt House, the Park's administrative headquarters. During the late 1960's the records were transferred to the custody of the Smithsonian Institution Archives. The finding aid for these records was first written in 1972 and revised in 1989.

The Archives would like to thank Dr. Theodore H. Reed, former director of the National Zoological Park, and Sybil E. Hamlet, Public Information Officer, NZP, for their support and assistance in the transfer of the records to the Archives, and in providing historical information necessary for the processing of these records.
Descriptive Entry:
The records of the National Zoological Park document the development of the Park, from the site survey work begun by William T. Hornaday in 1888 through the beginnings of its modernization plans in 1965.

Several series of records are of particular importance. They include records of the National Zoological Park Commission, 1889-1891, and records created by William T. Hornaday, who had a significant part to play in the early development of the Park. Some of these records also demonstrate the important influence of Secretary Samuel P. Langley, who succeeded in persuading Congress to authorize the Park, and who kept it under his close personal supervision until he died in 1906. This material consists of minutes of the founding Commission, plats, maps, blueprints, photographs, and correspondence documenting acquisition of land for the Park, as well as records detailing the Park's changing boundaries, layouts of buildings and grounds, and construction of buildings. A more detailed description of the Park's correspondence system can be found in series 12 through 14. Additional information regarding the Commission's activities and Langley's close involvement with the Zoo may be found in Record Unit 31, the incoming correspondence of the Office of the Secretary (Samuel P. Langley), 1891-1906, and related records to 1908, and Record Unit 34, the Secretary's outgoing correspondence, 1887-1907.

Correspondence in these records embraces a number of other subjects as well. Acquisition of specimens is extensively documented. Animals were obtained from donors, from dealers in wild animals, from circuses, from American military and diplomatic personnel, from participation in various American expositions, and from expeditions abroad for the purpose of collecting animals for the Park. Collections gathered abroad came from the Smithsonian-Roosevelt African Expedition (1909), the Smithsonian-Chrysler Expedition (1926-1927), the Argentine Expedition (1938-1939), the Antarctic Expedition (1939-1940), and the Firestone-Smithsonian Expedition (1940-1941). In addition, the Park provided specimen exhibitions and built facilities for several expositions, including the Pan-American Exposition (1901-1902), the Louisiana Purchase Exposition (1904), the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (1909), and the Panama-Pacific International Exposition (1914-1917). Record Unit 70 documents the Smithsonian's participation in expositions in detail.

The records also document the more mundane aspects of Park administration. There is considerable correspondence between the Park's director and colleagues at other institutions at home and abroad, and with various federal agencies. There is particularly full documentation of dealings with federal offices in control of animal quarantine regulations and with the rebuilding of the Park by various New Deal agencies in the 1930's. There are daily diaries of the superintendents, directors, and assistant directors of the Park (1895-1930), as well as diaries and daily reports of various subordinate staff members.

Lastly, records of the Park document Samuel P. Langley's 1901-1903 research on the flight of birds, Frank Baker's survey of private and public zoological parks and his buffalo census, 1902-1905, and Baker's involvement on a subcommittee entrusted with recommending a site for a zoological park to the New York Zoological Society.
Historical Note:
In 1989 the National Zoological Park celebrated its centennial. However, as early as 1855 the Smithsonian had received gifts of live animals. In addition, the United States National Museum acquired living animals for life studies in order to create lifelike specimens for exhibit in the Museum. Since there were no facilities for caring for animals not used as specimens, those animals were either transferred to the Superintendent of the United States Insane Asylum (now St. Elizabeth's Hospital) for the amusement of its patients or else sent to the Philadelphia Zoological Garden.

However, parochial needs were not the only source for the idea of a national zoological park. During the last quarter of the nineteenth century there was growing concern that a number of animals would soon become extinct in their natural habitats, among them the American buffalo. William T. Hornaday, taxidermist at the Institution since 1882, had found the National Museum with only a few inferior specimens of the buffalo; and, with the support of Secretary Spencer F. Baird, he traveled to Montana in May and again in September of 1886 to collect specimens while they could still be had. Hornaday was able to collect numerous specimens. However, the state of the buffalo herds he observed during these trips evidently affected him deeply. In 1888, he published his The Extermination of the American Bison. Already, in March 1887 he had proposed to Secretary Baird that a zoological park be established in Washington under the Smithsonian's direction. Baird died before anything could be done; but in October 1887, with the consent of the new Secretary, Samuel P. Langley, a new Division of Living Animals was created in the U. S. National Museum and Hornaday was made its curator. In 1888 Hornaday had, at Secretary Langley's direction, undertaken a survey of land along Rock Creek in northwest Washington lying between the White House and Georgetown to determine its suitability as a zoo site.

The National Zoological Park was established by an Act of Congress in March 1889. The Secretary of the Smithsonian, the Secretary of the Interior, and the President of the Board of Commissioners of the District of Columbia, were constituted as Commissioners of a National Zoological Park in order to purchase land for a zoo in the District of Columbia, "...for the advancement of science and the instruction and recreation of the people." The commissioners ultimately acquired one hundred and sixty-four acres at this site, some by condemnation, most by purchase. In April 1890 Congress passed another act, placing the National Zoological Park under the direction of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution. Half its operating funds were to come from the federal government, half from the District of Columbia. The Board was authorized to expend funds, transfer and exchange specimens, accept gifts, and to generally oversee Zoo operations.

Secretary Langley wanted the best professional advice in planning the layout and design of the Park, and Frederick Law Olmsted, the noted landscape architect, was consulted about all aspects of the Park's layout and design, including pathways, animal enclosures, public access, and the like. Copies of Olmsted's drawings and sketches are at the National Zoological Park today. In practice, however, much of Olmsted's advice was ignored, either because the Park lacked funds to follow his plans or because Secretary Langley often chose to follow his own counsel.

Hornaday became the first Superintendent of the Park but soon resigned because of differences of opinion with Secretary Langley over the scope of the superintendent's authority to control Park operations. In 1890 Frank Baker, Assistant Superintendent of the Light House Service, was appointed Acting Manager in place of Hornaday. From 1893 to until his retirement in 1916 Baker served as superintendent. These early years were full of difficulties. While the Rock Creek site had much natural charm, it was necessary to balance the demands for building construction, park layout and roads, and acquisition of animals--all on an extremely tight budget. Still, as the more mundane affairs of the Park moved slowly forward, there were important "firsts" as well. In 1891 Dunk and Gold Dust, the Park's first elephants, arrived. They were great favorites at the Park, notwithstanding their reputations as troublemakers in the circus which sold them to their new owner. That same year came French, the first lion, then only a cub, who was sold to the Park after he began to alarm the neighbors of his owner in Alderson, West Virginia. During its early years the Park was also the site of Secretary Langley's efforts to study and film the flight of birds, work he undertook as part of his effort to produce a manned flying machine.

On Baker's retirement in 1916, Ned Hollister, an assistant curator of mammals in the U. S. National Museum, was appointed to succeed him. Hollister served until his death in 1924. During his tenure the Park continued to receive very modest appropriations. On that account, it was not possible to purchase much zoo stock; but gifts were numerous. In 1922, they ranged from an opossum given by President Harding to the 15 mammals, 50 birds, and 17 reptiles collected by William M. Mann while on expedition with the Mulford Biological Exploration of the Amazon Basin. Housing for the animals remained inadequate, and many old structures had to remain in use. In 1924 the Park did manage to construct its first restaurant for the use of visitors, who numbered more than 2.4 million people in that year. Superintendent Hollister died in 1924 and was succeeded by Alexander Wetmore, who served only five months before leaving to become Assistant Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution.

In 1925, Dr. William M. Mann became Superintendent (Director after 1926) of the National Zoological Park, a job he was to hold until his retirement in 1956. He hoped to build a zoo which housed a first-class collection in a first-class environment. As in the past, there was little money for purchase of animals, so he continued to rely on gifts. Mann was a good publicist, and he enlisted the sympathies of Walter P. Chrysler. On March 20, 1926, the Smithsonian-Chrysler Expedition set out, arriving at Dar-es-Salaam, Tanganyika, on May 5 of that year. The expedition was a splendid success and returned with 158 mammals, 584 birds, 56 snakes, 12 lizards, 393 tortoises, and 1 frog. Many specimens, like the giraffe, were quite new to the Park. The male and female impala obtained were the only ones in any zoo in the world at that time.

On his return, Mann finally succeeded in obtaining an appropriation for a new bird house to replace the one erected 37 years before. A reptile house followed in 1929. In 1935 some of the Zoo's remaining need for new buildings was finally met. The Public Works Administration, a New Deal relief program, allocated $680,000 for the construction of a Small Mammal and Great Ape House, a Pachyderm House, an addition to the Bird House, and several operations buildings. One of the New Deal's programs for the relief of artists, the Treasury Department's Section of Painting and Sculpture, furnished artists to decorate areas of the Zoo. In fact, the Park employed more artists than any other local institution.

In 1937 the Park was once more the beneficiary of a collecting expedition, the National Geographic Society-Smithsonian Institution Expedition to the Dutch East Indies. Mann brought back with him 74 crates of mammals, 112 crates of birds, and 30 crates of reptiles. In 1940 Harvey Firestone, Jr., offered to finance a collecting expedition to Liberia. Again, the expedition supplied the Park with many specimens, including a female pygmy hippopotamus, Matilda, as companion for the lonely Billy, already at the Park.

When World War II began, the Zoo could not escape its effects. In fact, in 1942 for fear that poisonous snakes might be released from their cages if the Reptile House were struck by an air raid, all the Park's collection of cobras and other venomous snakes was traded to other locations less likely to undergo air attacks. Subsequently, the Park spent some time making repairs and resuming normal activities. In 1956 Dr. Mann retired and was succeeded by acting Director Theodore H. Reed, who was made Director in 1958. In 1958 the Friends of the National Zoo, a group dedicated to supporting the National Zoo and maintaining its reputation as one of the world's great zoos, was organized. In 1960 the Park's budget exceeded a million dollars for the first time. For many years the formula which charged half the Park's expenses to the budget of the District of Columbia had caused a great deal of difficulty. Local residents felt they were being taxed to pay for an institution national in character. Park officials argued that they needed more money than the existing formula could provide. Finally, in 1961, a compromise was reached. All costs for construction and repair of the Park would be carried in the appropriation for the Smithsonian Institution. The District of Columbia would contribute only to the Park's operating costs. As if to give the new arrangement a good send-off, in 1962 Congress appropriated four million dollars for the Park, more than half of it earmarked for a perimeter road around the Zoo and a tunnel to carry automobile traffic through the Zoo. In this way, it was at last possible to close the Park proper to through traffic and to devote the Park reservation solely to strengthening and improving the National Zoological Park's programs.
Chronology:
October 1887 -- Department of Living Animals created under the direction of the United States National Museum

1888 -- William T. Hornaday, curator of the Department of Living Animals, directed by Secretary Samuel P. Langley to draw up a preliminary plan for the Zoo

March 1889 -- Congress authorized the formation of a National Zoological Park Commission to select and purchase land for a zoological park

April 1890 -- Congress placed the National Zoological Park (NZP) under the Smithsonian Institution's Board of Regents

May 1890 -- Frederick Law Olmsted invited by Langley to consult on the layout of the Zoo

May 10, 1890 -- Hornaday appointed superintendent of the Zoo

June 1, 1890 -- Frank Baker appointed temporary acting manager of the NZP

June 9, 1890 -- Hornaday resigned

-- 1891 Buffalo and elk barn built

January 29, 1891 -- William H. Blackburne appointed first head keeper

April 30, 1891 -- First animals, two male Indian elephants, Dunk and Gold Dust, brought to Zoo grounds

June 27, 1891 -- First group of animals moved from Mall to NZP

1892 -- Authorization to purchase and transport animals revoked for six years

1892 -- First permanent building completed. Called the main animal house, it was later renamed the Lion House.

1893 -- Baker appointed superintendent

1894 -- First beaver arrived from Yellowstone National Park. They inhabited "Missouri Valley," later called "Beaver Valley."

1898 -- Antelope House built

1898 -- NZP given authorization by Congress to purchase animals

1899 -- Illustrated circular on animals desired by NZP distributed to United States officers stationed overseas

1900 -- As a result of the circular, animals were received from Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, Panama, and the Philippine Islands

1900 -- New iron bridge constructed across the creek at Harvard Street (then called Quarry Road)

1901 -- Twenty-inch sundial purchased in London and installed on lawn near the Animal House

1902 -- A flying cage was completed

November 1902 -- Two fifty-foot towers erected in order to provide platforms for photographers to take pictures of flying vultures. Work was in conjunction with Langley's research on flight.

1903 -- New Elephant House completed

1903 -- NZP received its first Kodiak bear

November 24, 1904 -- President Theodore Roosevelt gives the Zoo an ostrich, the gift of King Menelik of Abyssinia

1908 -- Last of the bear cages were completed

1909 -- Theodore Roosevelt in British East Africa on a Smithsonian collecting expedition. Friend William Northrup Macmillan offered NZP his animal collection if transported by a Zoo official. Assistant superintendent A. B. Baker transferred the animals to the Park.

1913 -- Cook House used for food storage and preparation was built

1916 -- Estimated attendance reached over one and one-half million visitors

November 1, 1916 -- Baker retired. Ned Hollister appointed superintendent.

August 13, 1917 -- Zoo purchased first motor truck

October 1, 1920 -- Visitor attendance reached two million

1921 -- Two giant tortoises received from Albemarle and Indefatigable Islands

May 24, 1922 -- African Cape big-eared fox transported to the Zoo. First of its species to be exhibited alive in America.

November 3, 1924 -- Ned Hollister died. Alexander Wetmore appointed interim superintendent.

May 13, 1925 -- William M. Mann appointed superintendent

May-October 1926 -- Smithsonian-Chrysler Fund Expedition to Tanganyika (now Tanzania). 1,203 animals transferred to the Zoo.

1928 -- First breeding of an American white pelican on record

June 1928 -- New Bird House opened

February 27, 1931 -- Reptile House opened. Voted by the American Institute of Architects as the outstanding brick building in the east.

October 7, 1932 -- Eagle Cage completed

November 23, 1933 -- The only maned wolf from South America to be exhibited in a zoo was received by the NZP

June 21, 1934 -- Zoo received its first Komodo dragon

January 16, 1935 -- NZP received a $680,000 Public Works Administration appropriation. Funds would provide for the construction of a Small Mammal and Great Ape House, Elephant House, addition to the Bird House, two shops, and a central heating plant.

January 12, 1937 -- Lucile and William Mann depart on the National Geographic Society-Smithsonian Institution Expedition to the East Indies

September 27, 1938 -- 879 specimens from the East Indies Expedition are received at the Zoo

April 6, 1939 -- Lucile and William Mann leave for a collecting trip in Argentina

June 27, 1939 -- 316 specimens are received at the Zoo from the trip to Argentina

November 11, 1939 -- Zoo keeper Malcolm Davis sailed with Admiral Richard E. Byrd to establish bases during the Antarctica Expedition.

February 17, 1940 -- Lucile and William Mann leave on the Smithsonian Institution-Firestone Expedition to Liberia

March 5, 1940 -- Zoo received first emperor penguin collected by Davis while on Antarctica expedition

August 6, 1940 -- Zoo received 195 specimens collected in Liberia

December 31, 1943 -- Blackburne retired from Zoo at 87, after fifty-two years of service

June 29, 1950 -- Smokey Bear, a four-month old cub, arrived at the Zoo

November 5, 1953 -- Two Philippine macaques, Pat and Mike, launched by an Aerobee rocket to an altitude of 200,000 feet, were transferred to the Zoo by the United States Air Force

July 15, 1955 -- Theodore H. Reed became the Zoo's first full-time veterinarian

October 31, 1956 -- Mann retired. Theodore H. Reed appointed acting director.

1957 -- The Zoo was the first to use the Cap-Chur gun for the immobilization and/or treatment of animals

March/April 1957 -- United States Signal Corps transferred two hero pigeons to NZP. Anzio Boy and Global Girl completed sixty-one missions between them.

March 12, 1958 -- Reed appointed director of the Zoo

April 10, 1958 -- Friends of the National Zoo (FONZ) organized

April 16, 1958 -- Female banded linsang received as a gift from a staff officer stationed in Kuala Lampur, Malaya. The species had never been exhibited at the Zoo, and was the only one in captivity.

May 16, 1958 -- Julie Ann Vogt, two-and-a-half years old, was killed by one of the Zoo's lions

May 18, 1958 -- First birth of a female snow leopard in the Western Hemisphere

September 1958 -- First wisent born in this country

July 1, 1960 -- Davis retired after spending thirty-three years at the Zoo

December 5, 1960 -- Female white tiger, Mohini, received as a gift from the chairman of the board of Metropolitan Broadcasting Corporation

December 16, 1960 -- A master plan for the development of the Zoo was presented to the Smithsonian by the president of FONZ

September 9, 1961 -- A male gorilla, Tomoka, was born, the second born in captivity in the world

1962 -- An appropriation of 1.3 million dollars was approved by the Senate Appropriations Committee as an initial investment on a ten-year capital improvement program

April 17, 1962 -- The Zoo hired its first zoologist

April 5, 1963 -- Ham, the chimponaut, was formally transferred to the Zoo by the United States Air Force. On January 31, 1961, Ham handled the controls on a Redstone rocket. Traveling up to a speed of 5,887 miles per hour, Ham was on-board the rocket for a 16.5 minute flight. Three months later, Commander Alan B. Shepard operated Mercury 3, the United States' first manned space mission.

1964 -- Several construction projects, including reconstruction of the Bird House, a new Great Flight Cage, parking lots and roads were going on at the same time

January 6, 1964 -- Mohini gave birth to three cubs, one of which was white

September 1, 1965 -- Zoo hired first resident scientist to supervise the Scientific Research Department
Topic:
Zoos  Search this
Scientific expeditions  Search this
Zoo exhibits  Search this
Zoo directors  Search this
Genre/Form:
Maps
Black-and-white photographs
Serials (publications)
Drawings
Clippings
Books
Manuscripts
Scrapbooks
Sketches
Pamphlets
Diaries
Plates (illustrations)
Letterpress copybooks
Picture postcards
Architectural drawings
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 74, National Zoological Park, Records
Identifier:
Record Unit 74
See more items in:
Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0074

Deutsche Kriegsausstellung .../ Ausstellungshallen am Zoo

Collection Creator:
Princeton University  Search this
Extent:
1 Poster (Full size; Multi-color, 72 x 95 cm)
Container:
Map-folder 372
Type:
Archival materials
Posters
Place:
Germany
Date:
1916 Jan
Image:
Main Image: Pile of various war artefacts: cannonball, cavalry, helmet, artillery piece, drum, etc.
Local numbers:
Princeton Poster# 2986
General:
Issued by: Kriegsministeriums Veranstaltet; Central Komitee der Deutschen Vereine; Rotes Kreuz

Issued for: Deutsche Kriegsausstellung

Artist(s): Orlik
Locale:
[Zoo Exhibit Hall]
Printing Info:
Printer: Kunstanstalt Weylandt, Berlin

25 Dez 1915
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Copyright status of items varies. Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Conservation/Food production  Search this
Relief and volunteer organizations  Search this
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
Genre/Form:
Posters
Collection Citation:
Princeton University Posters Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Princeton University Poster Collection
Princeton University Poster Collection / Series 2: World War One / Germany
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0433-ref5911

Zoogoer Magazine

Topic:
The Zoogoer (Serial)
Creator::
Friends of the National Zoo  Search this
Extent:
1 cu. ft. (1 record storage box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Serials (publications)
Date:
1972-1974, 1976-1994, 1998-2000, 2002, 2005-2006
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of a reference set of "Zoogoer" magazine, which provides information on animals and exhibitions at the National Zoological Park and in-depth articles on natural history. Earlier issues date from when the magazine was known as "The Zoogoer" (1972-1978). Materials include publications.
Topic:
Periodicals  Search this
Zoo animals  Search this
Zoo exhibits  Search this
Zoos  Search this
Genre/Form:
Serials (publications)
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 19-189, Friends of the National Zoo, Zoogoer Magazine
Identifier:
Accession 19-189
See more items in:
Zoogoer Magazine
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa19-189

Zoo Exhibits and Graphics, 1973

Collection Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Office of Exhibits Central  Search this
Container:
Box 6 of 26
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 503, Smithsonian Institution, Office of Exhibits Central, Records
See more items in:
Records
Records / Box 6
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru0503-refidd1e2705

Zoogoer Magazine

Topic:
Zoo animals
Zoogoer (Serial)
Creator::
Friends of the National Zoo  Search this
Extent:
1 cu. ft. (1 record storage box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Serials (publications)
Date:
1995-2008
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of a reference set of Zoogoer magazine. The publications date July/August 1995 through November/December 2008. Materials include serial publications.
Topic:
Periodicals  Search this
Zoos  Search this
Zoo exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Serials (publications)
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 09-088, Friends of the National Zoo, Zoogoer Magazine
Identifier:
Accession 09-088
See more items in:
Zoogoer Magazine
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa09-088

Zoogoer Magazine

Topic:
Zoogoer (Serial)
Creator::
Friends of the National Zoo  Search this
Extent:
0.5 cu. ft. (1 document box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Serials (publications)
Date:
1977, 2014-2018
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of a reference set of Zoogoer magazine issued bimonthly and, beginning in July 2014, quarterly, by the Friends of the National Zoo (FONZ). Materials include serial publications and FONZ calendars (Volume 6, Number 1; and Volume 43, Number 1 through Volume 47, Number 1).
Topic:
Periodicals  Search this
Zoo animals  Search this
Zoo exhibits  Search this
Zoos  Search this
Genre/Form:
Serials (publications)
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 18-169, Friends of the National Zoo, Zoogoer Magazine
Identifier:
Accession 18-169
See more items in:
Zoogoer Magazine
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa18-169

Minutes

Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Board of Regents  Search this
Extent:
8.70 cu. ft. (9 document boxes) (7 12x17 boxes) (1 16x20 box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Date:
1846-1995
Descriptive Entry:
These records are the official minutes of the Board. They are compiled at the direction of the Secretary of the Smithsonian, who is also secretary to the Board, after approval by the Regents' Executive Committee and by the Regents themselves. The minutes are edited, not a verbatim account of proceedings. For reasons unknown, there are no manuscript minutes for the period from 1857 through 1890; and researchers must rely on printed minutes published in the Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institution instead. Minutes are transferred regularly from the Secretary's Office to the Archives. Minutes less than 15 years old are closed to researchers. Indexes exist for the period from 1907 to 1946 and can be useful.
Historical Note:
The Smithsonian Institution was created by authority of an Act of Congress approved August 10, 1846. The Act entrusted direction of the Smithsonian to a body called the Establishment, composed of the President; the Vice President; the Chief Justice of the United States; the secretaries of State, War, Navy, Interior, and Agriculture; the Attorney General; and the Postmaster General. In fact, however, the Establishment last met in 1877, and control of the Smithsonian has always been exercised by its Board of Regents. The membership of the Regents consists of the Vice President and the Chief Justice of the United States; three members each of the Senate and House of Representatives; two citizens of the District of Columbia; and seven citizens of the several states, no two from the same state. (Prior to 1970 the category of Citizen Regents not residents of Washington consisted of four members). By custom the Chief Justice is Chancellor. The office was at first held by the Vice President. However, when Millard Fillmore succeeded to the presidency on the death of Zachary Taylor in 1851, Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney was chosen in his stead. The office has always been filled by the Chief Justice since that time.

The Regents of the Smithsonian have included distinguished Americans from many walks of life. Ex officio members (Vice President) have been: Spiro T. Agnew, Chester A. Arthur, Allen W. Barkley, John C. Breckenridge, George Bush, Schuyler Colfax, Calvin Coolidge, Charles Curtis, George M. Dallas, Charles G. Dawes, Charles W. Fairbanks, Millard Fillmore, Gerald R. Ford, John N. Garner, Hannibal Hamlin, Thomas A. Hendricks, Garret A. Hobart, Hubert H. Humphrey, Andrew Johnson, Lyndon B. Johnson, William R. King, Thomas R. Marshall, Walter F. Mondale, Levi P. Morton, Richard M. Nixon, Nelson A. Rockefeller, Theodore Roosevelt, James S. Sherman, Adlai E. Stevenson, Harry S. Truman, Henry A. Wallace, William A. Wheeler, Henry Wilson.

Ex officio members (Chief Justice) have been: Roger B. Taney, Salmon P. Chase, Nathan Clifford, Morrison R. Waite, Samuel F. Miller, Melville W. Fuller, Edward D. White, William Howard Taft, Charles Evans Hughes, Harlan F. Stone, Fred M. Vinson, Earl Warren, Warren E. Burger.

Regents on the part of the Senate have been: Clinton P. Anderson, Newton Booth, Sidney Breese, Lewis Cass, Robert Milledge Charlton, Bennet Champ Clark, Francis M. Cockrell, Shelby Moore Cullom, Garrett Davis, Jefferson Davis, George Franklin Edmunds, George Evans, Edwin J. Garn, Walter F. George, Barry Goldwater, George Gray, Hannibal Hamlin, Nathaniel Peter Hill, George Frisbie Hoar, Henry French Hollis, Henry M. Jackson, William Lindsay, Henry Cabot Lodge, Medill McCormick, James Murray Mason, Samuel Bell Maxey, Robert B. Morgan, Frank E. Moss, Claiborne Pell, George Wharton Pepper, David A. Reed, Leverett Saltonstall, Hugh Scott, Alexander H. Smith, Robert A. Taft, Lyman Trumbull, Wallace H. White, Jr., Robert Enoch Withers.

Regents on the part of the House of Representatives have included: Edward P. Boland, Frank T. Bow, William Campbell Breckenridge, Overton Brooks, Benjamin Butterworth, Clarence Cannon, Lucius Cartrell, Hiester Clymer, William Colcock, William P. Cole, Jr., Maurice Connolly, Silvio O. Conte, Edward E. Cox, Edward H. Crump, John Dalzell, Nathaniel Deering, Hugh A. Dinsmore, William English, John Farnsworth, Scott Ferris, Graham Fitch, James Garfield, Charles L. Gifford, T. Alan Goldsborough, Frank L. Greene, Gerry Hazleton, Benjamin Hill, Henry Hilliard, Ebenezer Hoar, William Hough, William M. Howard, Albert Johnson, Leroy Johnson, Joseph Johnston, Michael Kirwan, James T. Lloyd, Robert Luce, Robert McClelland, Samuel K. McConnell, Jr., George H. Mahon, George McCrary, Edward McPherson, James R. Mann, George Perkins Marsh, Norman Y. Mineta, A. J. Monteague, R. Walton Moore, Walter H. Newton, Robert Dale Owen, James Patterson, William Phelps, Luke Poland, John Van Schaick Lansing Pruyn, B. Carroll Reece, Ernest W. Roberts, Otho Robards Singleton, Frank Thompson, Jr., John M. Vorys, Hiram Warner, Joseph Wheeler.

Citizen Regents have been: David C. Acheson, Louis Agassiz, James B. Angell, Anne L. Armstrong, William Backhouse Astor, J. Paul Austin, Alexander Dallas Bache, George Edmund Badger, George Bancroft, Alexander Graham Bell, James Gabriel Berrett, John McPherson Berrien, Robert W. Bingham, Sayles Jenks Bowen, William G. Bowen, Robert S. Brookings, John Nicholas Brown, William A. M. Burden, Vannevar Bush, Charles F. Choate, Jr., Rufus Choate, Arthur H. Compton, Henry David Cooke, Henry Coppee, Samuel Sullivan Cox, Edward H. Crump, James Dwight Dana, Harvey N. Davis, William Lewis Dayton, Everette Lee Degolyer, Richard Delafield, Frederic A. Delano, Charles Devens, Matthew Gault Emery, Cornelius Conway Felton, Robert V. Fleming, Murray Gell-Mann, Robert F. Goheen, Asa Gray, George Gray, Crawford Hallock Greenwalt, Nancy Hanks, Caryl Parker Haskins, Gideon Hawley, John B. Henderson, John B. Henderson, Jr., A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr., Gardner Greene Hubbard, Charles Evans Hughes, Carlisle H. Humelsine, Jerome C. Hunsaker, William Preston Johnston, Irwin B. Laughlin, Walter Lenox, Augustus P. Loring, John Maclean, William Beans Magruder, John Walker Maury, Montgomery Cunningham Meigs, John C. Merriam, R. Walton Moore, Roland S. Morris, Dwight W. Morrow, Richard Olney, Peter Parker, Noah Porter, William Campbell Preston, Owen Josephus Roberts, Richard Rush, William Winston Seaton, Alexander Roby Shepherd, William Tecumseh Sherman, Otho Robards Singleton, Joseph Gilbert Totten, John Thomas Towers, Frederic C. Walcott, Richard Wallach, Thomas J. Watson, Jr., James E. Webb, James Clarke Welling, Andrew Dickson White, Henry White, Theodore Dwight Woolsey.
Topic:
Museums -- Administration  Search this
Museum trustees  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 1, Smithsonian Institution. Board of Regents, Minutes
Identifier:
Record Unit 1
See more items in:
Minutes
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0001
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Online Media:

Photographs

Creator::
National Zoological Park  Search this
Extent:
78 cu. ft. (78 record storage boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Color transparencies
Black-and-white photographs
Color negatives
Color photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Date:
circa 1955-2005
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of the National Zoological Park's (NZP) photograph collection. Images document the zoo and its animals, veterinary care, staff, exhibits, facilities, events, and research. The majority of images were taken by staff such as Jessie Cohen, NZP's official staff photographer from 1979 through 2009. Materials include slides, negatives, contact sheets, prints, and transparencies. A small number of images are accompanied by textual information.
Topic:
Publicity  Search this
Zoo exhibits  Search this
Research  Search this
Zoos -- Employees  Search this
Zoos -- Educational aspects  Search this
Zoo animals  Search this
Zoos  Search this
Special events  Search this
Veterinary medicine  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Color transparencies
Black-and-white photographs
Color negatives
Color photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 16-065, National Zoological Park, Photographs
Identifier:
Accession 16-065
See more items in:
Photographs
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa16-065

Transparencies - From Miniature Zoo Exhibit, 1978

Collection Creator::
National Zoological Park  Search this
Container:
Box 80 of 80
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 16-065, National Zoological Park, Photographs
See more items in:
Photographs
Photographs / Box 80
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-fa16-065-refidd1e36676

Zoo Exhibit, Betacam SP

Collection Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Office of Telecommunications  Search this
Container:
Box 1 of 1
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Restrictions pertaining to the use of these materials may apply (based on contracts/copyright). Access restrictions may also apply if viewing copies are not currently available. Viewing copies can be made for a fee. Contact reference staff for details.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 09-041, Smithsonian Institution. Office of Telecommunications, Productions
See more items in:
Productions
Productions / Box 1
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-fa09-041-refidd1e446

Audiovisual Recordings

Creator::
National Zoological Park  Search this
Extent:
51.5 cu. ft. (45 record storage boxes) (13 document boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Digital versatile discs
Electronic records
Audiotapes
Motion pictures (visual works)
Videotapes
Date:
circa 1974-2007
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of audiovisual recordings featuring the National Zoological Park (NZP) and its animals, staff, activities, events, research, medical procedures, and exhibitions. Some materials were created by NZP and others were created by news media and radio, television, and video production companies. Included in this accession are original footage, news segments, interviews with staff, public service announcements, B-roll footage, educational videos, television productions, and related media types. Materials include video as well as a small amount of film and audio and a study guide. Some materials are in electronic format.
Topic:
Publicity  Search this
Zoo exhibits  Search this
Research  Search this
Zoos -- Employees  Search this
Zoos -- Educational aspects  Search this
Radio programs  Search this
Television programs  Search this
Video recordings  Search this
Zoo animals  Search this
Zoos  Search this
Special events  Search this
Veterinary medicine  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Digital versatile discs
Electronic records
Audiotapes
Motion pictures (visual works)
Videotapes
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 16-064, National Zoological Park, Audiovisual Recordings
Identifier:
Accession 16-064
See more items in:
Audiovisual Recordings
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa16-064

Website Records

Topic:
Smithsonian Institution National Zoo: 125 Years (Website)
Creator::
National Zoological Park  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Electronic records
Date:
2014
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of the "Smithsonian Institution National Zoo: 125 Years" website as it existed on September 22, 2014. The website was launched in August 2014 to mark the 125th anniversary of the National Zoological Park as well as the return of American bison to the zoo. It includes information about the history of the zoo and its conservation efforts as well as the history of American bison and the new bison exhibit. Also included is an interactive bison exhibit. Materials are in electronic format.
Topic:
Web sites  Search this
Zoos  Search this
Zoo animals  Search this
Public relations  Search this
Zoo exhibits  Search this
Wildlife conservation  Search this
American bison  Search this
Genre/Form:
Electronic records
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 15-028, National Zoological Park, Website Records
Identifier:
Accession 15-028
See more items in:
Website Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa15-028

Zoogoer Magazine

Topic:
Zoogoer (Serial)
The Zoogoer (Serial)
Creator::
Friends of the National Zoo  Search this
Extent:
0.5 cu. ft. (1 document box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Serials (publications)
Date:
1972-1979
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of a reference set of "Zoogoer" magazine, which provides information on animals and exhibitions at the National Zoological Park and in-depth articles on natural history. Earlier issues date from when the magazine was known as "The Zoogoer" (1972-1978). Materials include publications.
Topic:
Periodicals  Search this
Zoo animals  Search this
Zoo exhibits  Search this
Zoos  Search this
Genre/Form:
Serials (publications)
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 15-285, Friends of the National Zoo, Zoogoer Magazine
Identifier:
Accession 15-285
See more items in:
Zoogoer Magazine
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa15-285

Website Records

Creator::
National Zoological Park  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Electronic records
Date:
2015
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of the website of the National Zoological Park, including the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center, and the Friends of the National Zoo, as it existed on April 17, 2015. It includes information about exhibits, animals, conservation projects, membership, events, educational programs, and visiting as well as image galleries and press releases. Live animal cams do not function properly. Materials are in electronic format.
Topic:
Web sites  Search this
Public relations  Search this
Special events  Search this
Wildlife conservation  Search this
Zoo animals  Search this
Zoo exhibits  Search this
Zoos -- Educational aspects  Search this
Zoos  Search this
Genre/Form:
Electronic records
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 15-224, National Zoological Park, Website Records
Identifier:
Accession 15-224
See more items in:
Website Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa15-224

Stewart Brothers Photographers Collection of National Zoological Park Construction Prints

Creator::
Stewart Brothers Photographers, Inc.  Search this
Extent:
1 cu. ft. (1 record storage box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
1974-1978, 1985-1986
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of photographic prints documenting the construction of exhibits at the National Zoological Park. The photographs were taken by Stewart Brothers Photographers, Inc.
Topic:
Zoos  Search this
Zoo exhibits  Search this
Zoos -- Design and construction  Search this
Photographers  Search this
Photography  Search this
Genre/Form:
Black-and-white photographs
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 16-162, Stewart Brothers Photographers Collection of National Zoological Park Construction Prints
Identifier:
Accession 16-162
See more items in:
Stewart Brothers Photographers Collection of National Zoological Park Construction Prints
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa16-162

Constance P. Warner Slide Collection

Creator::
Warner, Constance P.  Search this
Extent:
1.25 cu. ft. (1 record storage box) (1 half document box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Color photographs
Color transparencies
Date:
circa 1959-1970
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of slides documenting animals, particularly birds and reptiles, taken by Constance P. Warner. Warner was an animal photographer known for her images of animal eyes, adaptations, and behavior. She often donated her time and images to the National Zoological Park and supplied images for exhibit labels. Materials also include an index and reference prints of some of the slides.
Topic:
Zoos  Search this
Zoo animals  Search this
Zoo exhibits  Search this
Photography of animals  Search this
Birds  Search this
Reptiles  Search this
Photographers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Color photographs
Color transparencies
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 16-158, Constance P. Warner Slide Collection
Identifier:
Accession 16-158
See more items in:
Constance P. Warner Slide Collection
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa16-158

Subject Files

Creator::
National Zoological Park. Public Affairs and Communications Department  Search this
Extent:
4.69 cu. ft. (4 record storage boxes) (1 16x20 box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Clippings
Manuscripts
Compact discs
Digital images
Electronic records
Date:
1994-2013
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consist of records documenting the activities of the Public Affairs and Communications Department as well as press coverage of the National Zoological Park and its animals, facilities, exhibits, staff, events, and research. Materials include clippings, media reports, press packets, planning files, internal communications, talking points, images, notes, and related materials. Some materials are in electronic format. The department was previously known as the Office of Public Affairs.
Topic:
Zoos  Search this
Zoo animals  Search this
Zoo exhibits  Search this
Public relations  Search this
Publicity  Search this
Zoology -- Research  Search this
Genre/Form:
Clippings
Manuscripts
Compact discs
Digital images
Electronic records
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 17-170, National Zoological Park. Public Affairs and Communications Department, Subject Files
Identifier:
Accession 17-170
See more items in:
Subject Files
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa17-170

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