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Robert Young

Artist:
Unidentified Artist  Search this
Copy after:
Gilbert Stuart, 3 Dec 1755 - 9 Jul 1828  Search this
Other attribution:
James Peale, 1749 - 24 May 1831  Search this
Sitter:
Robert Young, 1748 - 1814  Search this
Medium:
Oil on canvas
Dimensions:
27.9 x 25.4cm (11 x 10")
Type:
Painting
Date:
late 18th-early 19th century
Topic:
Home Furnishings\Curtain  Search this
Costume\Dress Accessory\Stock  Search this
Robert Young: Male  Search this
Robert Young: Politics and Government\US Senator  Search this
Robert Young: Military\Army  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
Owner: Private collection
Object number:
VA990121
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
Catalog of American Portraits
Data Source:
Catalog of American Portraits
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm4e2d9b666-675e-48ae-a8f6-83aed3677851
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_VA990121

Robert Young

Attribution:
Gilbert Stuart, 3 Dec 1755 - 9 Jul 1828  Search this
Sitter:
Robert Young, 1748 - 1814  Search this
Medium:
Oil on canvas
Dimensions:
74.3cm x 61.5cm (29 1/4" x 24 3/16"), Accurate
Type:
Painting
Date:
1805
Topic:
Robert Young: Male  Search this
Robert Young: Politics and Government\US Senator  Search this
Robert Young: Military\Army  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
Owner: New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation
Object number:
PM1972.9
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
Catalog of American Portraits
Data Source:
Catalog of American Portraits
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm43732e138-2a5b-440f-9384-102198e11f64
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_PM1972.9

Ebenezer Denny

Artist:
Robert R. Young, born mid 19th century  Search this
Copy after:
James Peale, 1749 - 24 May 1831  Search this
Sitter:
Ebenezer Denny, 1761 - 1822  Search this
Medium:
Oil on wood
Dimensions:
75cm x 62.2cm (29 1/2" x 24 1/2"), Sight
Type:
Painting
Date:
c. 1870-1950
Topic:
Ebenezer Denny: Male  Search this
Ebenezer Denny: Politics and Government\Public Official\Mayor  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
Owner: Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania
Object number:
PA210035
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
Catalog of American Portraits
Data Source:
Catalog of American Portraits
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm4fe584b5c-33ce-418a-806e-bfaaafce833e
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_PA210035

Deep drilling frontiers of the central Rocky Mountains Dudley W. Bolyard, editor

Title:
Symposium on Deep Drilling Frontiers in the Central Rocky Mountains
Deep drilling frontiers
Author:
Symposium on Deep Drilling Frontiers in the Central Rocky Mountains (1975 : Steamboat Springs, Colo.)  Search this
Bolyard, Dudley W (Dudley Wood) 1932-  Search this
Rocky Mountain Association of Geologists  Search this
Physical description:
334 pages (pages 321-334 advertisements) illustrations (11 folded in pocket) 29 cm
Type:
Congresses
Conference papers and proceedings
Place:
Colorado
Date:
1975
Topic:
Geology  Search this
Petroleum--Geology  Search this
Boring  Search this
Call number:
QE92.R6S9 1975X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_95755

The Lives of Robert and Mary Moffat

Maker:
Elliott & Fry  Search this
Blind, Rudolf  Search this
Photographer:
Brittain  Search this
Publisher:
T. Fisher Unwin  Search this
Measurements:
overall: 20 cm x 14 cm x 4.5 cm; 7 7/8 in x 5 1/2 in x 1 3/4 in
Object Name:
Book
book
Place made:
United Kingdom: England, London
Date made:
1886
Credit Line:
Albert Boni
ID Number:
PG.77.14.16
Catalog number:
77.14.16
Accession number:
299134
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Photographic History
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a7-198b-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_892233

sheet (paper)

Recipient:
Young, Robert  Search this
Object Name:
Sheet (Paper)
ID Number:
DL.62.0505
Catalog number:
62.0505
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Domestic Life
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a1-0a7d-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_314331

Geukensia demissa

Ocean/Sea/Gulf:
North Atlantic Ocean  Search this
Preparation:
Dry
Place:
New Jersey, United States, North Atlantic Ocean
Common name:
Bivalves
Published Name:
Geukensia demissa (Dillwyn, 1817)
Other Numbers:
Sort Order : MB-R22-C055-733
USNM Number:
513670
See more items in:
Invertebrate Zoology
Mollusca
Data Source:
NMNH - Invertebrate Zoology Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/39c6c13ba-6dd5-48bc-894c-ae4fee2e4383
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhinvertebratezoology_12437963

Scrapbook - African-Americans in Aviation

Collection Author:
White, Dale L., Sr., 1899-1977  Search this
Container:
Box 3, Folder 1
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1933-1939
Scope and Contents:
Scrapbook, 28 pages, unbound, with heavily tooled brown leather cover with gold decoration. Contents include newspaper clippings and photographs (dated 1933-1939) of members of the Challenger Air Pilots Association (CAPA) from Chicago, Illinois, particularly John C. Robinson and his activities with the Imperial Ethiopian Air Force, which earned him the nickname of the "Brown Condor," and Dale L. White and Chauncey Spencer's 1939 "Goodwill Flight" (May 11 to May 16) from Chicago to Washington, DC.

Digital images displayed are the only pages which have been digitized at this time.
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Collection Rights:
Permissions Requests
Collection Citation:
Dale L. White, Sr., Papers Collection, Accession 2013-0050, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Dale L. White, Sr., Papers
Dale L. White, Sr., Papers / Series 1: Career and African-Americans in Aviation
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg23c7dd5b7-89f2-4591-8caf-4c9ded9deef9
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-2013-0050-ref36
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Scrapbook - African-Americans in Aviation digital asset number 1

M

Type:
Archival materials
Date:
July–Dec. 1868
Collection Restrictions:
Freedmen's Bureau Digital Collection, 1865–1872, is a product of and owned by the National Museum of African American History and Culture, Smithsonian Institution. Copyright for digital images is retained by the donor, FamilySearch International; permission for commercial use of the digital images may be requested from FamilySearch International, Intellectual Property Office, at: cor-intellectualproperty@ldschurch.org.
Collection Citation:
Courtesy of the U. S. National Archives and Records Administration, FamilySearch International, and the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.
Identifier:
NMAAHC.FB.M752, File 2.13.12
See more items in:
Registers and Letters Received by the Commissioner of the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, 1865–1872
Registers and Letters Received by the Commissioner of the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, 1865–1872 / Series 2: Letters Received / 2.13: Entered in Register 13
Archival Repository:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/io3a7cd6ed9-1429-430a-9d6b-120225f7d05a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmaahc-fb-m752-ref285
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View M digital asset number 1

General and Miscellaneous Materials

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Waterman, T. T. (Thomas Talbot), b. 1885  Search this
Greiner, Ruth H.  Search this
Marr, John Paul  Search this
Garfield, Viola Edmundson, 1899-1983  Search this
Gunther, Erna, 1896-1982  Search this
Young, Robert W., 1912-2007  Search this
Names:
Angulo, Jaime de  Search this
Bloomfield, Leonard, 1887-1949  Search this
Boas, Franz, 1858-1942  Search this
Frachtenberg, Leo Joachim, 1883-1930  Search this
Hoijer, Harry, 1904-1976  Search this
Jacobs, Melville, 1902-1971  Search this
Ray, Verne Frederick, 1905-2003  Search this
Swadesh, Morris, 1909-1967  Search this
Voegelin, C. F. (Charles Frederick), 1906-1986  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1.83 Linear feet ((6 boxes))
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Coos (Kusan)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Maps
Place:
Olympic Peninsula (Wash.)
Wishram (Wash.)
Northwest Coast of North America
Oregon
Puget Sound (Wash.)
Date:
1933, 1938-1943
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Alaska/Northwest Coast series consists of materials pertaining to the area Alaska / Northwest Coast as a whole and those which are too limited in scope to constitute a full subseries in themselves. Included are writings by Harrington, notes from his conversations with others, notes from secondary sources, and field notes and writings he collected from others. Some items date as early as 1933; most are from the period 1938 to 1943.

The writings represent Harrington's attempt to synthesize the results of his years of work in the Northwest--particularly with regard to his Athapascan studies. There are several typed drafts of an untitled paper [former B.A.E. ms. 4360] dated April 4, 1943 on the tribal distribution along the Oregon coast. This work, accompanied by a map, describes tribal boundaries in detail and makes reference to the geographical and cultural setting. There follow notes, outlines, rough and final drafts of three papers of varying length relating to Harrington's theories on the origin and relationship of the Athapascan languages. Two of these were published (1940, 1943). Illustrations sent to the printer are also included here. The section of writings also contains several pages of notes and very rough drafts of short articles on the etymology of the term "Athapascan."

The notes from conversations vary in length and content. Information from Franz Boas consists of two undated pages concerning phonetics in Coast Salish and Chinook. From a March 1933 discussion with Joe Maloney, Harrington obtained data on tribes of southwestern Oregon, predominently on the Coos. W. O. Thorniley of the Puget Sound Navigation Company provided biographical and general information of the Olympic Peninsula, with special attention to the Ozette and Queets areas. Thomas Yallup spoke on Wishram, the tribal boundaries and practices of neighboring tribes, and possible informants.

Most significant are records of Harrington's meetings with Melville Jacobs in December 1939. Those discussions referred to Jacobs' own studies and included comments on the work of other linguists and anthropologists such as Jaime de Angulo, Leonard Bloomfield, Franz Boas, Leo J. Frachtenberg, Harry Hoijer, Verne F. Ray, Morris Swadesh, and C. F. Voegelin. The notes also reflect a mutual interest in orthographies, the relationship of Athapascan languages (particularly Kwalhioqua and Tlatskanai), and the theory of the Siberian origin and migration of the North American Indian. This section includes a few interspersed notes from Erna Gunther and Viola Garfield.

Notes from secondary sources consists of a few pages on each of several miscellaneous topics. The notes reflect Harrington's attempt to locate a speaker of Cayuse, and his interest in the early voyages to the Northwest Coast. Also included are comparative data on Athapascan languages compiled into a chart from a variety of manuscript and published sources.

Notes and writings from others include a small set of sketch maps and field data collected for Harrington by his assistant John Paul Marr. These notes were obtained while Harrington was in Washington, D.C. and unable to get to the field himself. There is also a section of original field notes on Puget Sound ethnogeography obtained from Thomas Talbot Waterman. They cover his collection of placename data in Clallam and in the Shoalwater Bay area in the period 1919-1921 and are supplemented by original notes from Ruth H. Greiner dated 1920-1921. Her records consist of lists of numbered placenames in a variety of Puget Sound Salish languages, with translations, etymologies, and brief commentaries. These field data were part of the basis for a manuscript Waterman prepared for the Bureau of American Ethnology (Waterman 1922) and are keyed to a number of large maps contained therein. Harrington also collected a short typed paper by his co-worker Robert W. Young dated 1938. This article, relevant to their study of Navaho, puts forward a theory on the origin and dispersion of a branch of Athapascan languages. It contains charts and numbered examples of linguistic features in Navaho, Carrier, Sekani, Chipewyan, Hare, and Hupa, among other languages.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Athapascan languages  Search this
Chinook language  Search this
Puget Sound Salish languages  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Maps
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 1.15
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 1: Native American History, Language, and Culture of Alaska and the Northwest Coast
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw381bdc6ea-ff32-4acc-9764-681613663942
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref13103
Online Media:

Apache and Kiowa Apache

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Young, Robert W., 1912-2007  Search this
Correspondent:
Bloomfield, Leonard, 1887-1949  Search this
Hoijer, Harry, 1904-1976  Search this
Haile, Berard, 1874-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Boxe
Culture:
Apache  Search this
Plains Apache (Kiowa Apache)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Dictionaries
Date:
1936-1945
Scope and Contents:
This set of files contains Harrington's Apache and Kiowa Apache research and writings. Most of the materials consist of notes and drafts for his and Robert W. Young's unpublished manuscripts on the life of Geronimo, as well as their project to translate the Chiricahua Apache chief's published autobiography into Apache. Harrington's Apache notes provide a useful block of placenames and names of persons, with random linguistic, ethnographic, biographical, and historical observations. The notes are arranged according to topic, each probably corresponding to a proposed chapter heading in Harrington's write-up. Entries from secondary souces and the related information supplied by rehearings in the field and in Washington were clipped together. Wherever possible these groups of notes are now pasted on a single sheet. Harrington apparently hoped to use the notes for additional monographs under such headings as "The Etymology of Geronimo's Name," "The Etymology of the Word Apache," and a review of Clum's Apache Agent. There are several incomplete typed or handwritten preliminary drafts, but neither Harrington or Young published the proposed papers. The numbered typewritten slips filed with the Apache notes may be responses to a questionnaire (not found in his papers) that Harrington sent to Young and William R. Hill. Also present are Harrington's correspondence with Father Berard Haile and other scholars involved in Athapascan studies, such as Harry Hoijer and Leonard Bloomfield.

While Harrington did not compile an Apache dictionary, his papers do contain vocabulary collected from the historical and ethnographic observations he made on the tribe. There is a rough beginning of a dictionary collected from Howard Soontay in 1944, and from Philip Cosen and Raymond Loco in 1945.
Biographical / Historical:
Harrington's study of Apache and Kiowa Apache spanned almost a decade. It began with an examination of secondary sources in 1936 and culminated in 1945 with the recording of brief vocabularies from native speakers. Speakers of several dialects were interviewed. Asa Deklugie and Raymond Loco provided Chiricahua data while Percy Bigmouth and Victor Dolan gave Mescalero terms. White Mountain Apache words were obtained from Philip Cosen and Kiowa Apache items from Howard Soontay. Related Navajo and Yavapai terms were given by Adolph Dodge Bitanny, Howard Gorman, and Mollie Starr. Deklugie, the son of Geronimo's sister, served as the principal source of primary data on Apache.

In collaboration with Robert W. Young, Harrington evidently planned a linguistic treatment of the life of Geronimo, the famous Chiricahua Apache chief, and, even more ambitiously, hoped to translate Geronimo's published autobiography into Apache. Harrington was in Washington, D.C., for all of 1936 and 1937 and, in fact, was hospitalized for six weeks in January and February 1937. He therefore accumulated his initial facts principally from secondary sources, using particularly S. M. Barrett's Life of Geronimo, identified in the field notes as "Autobiography," and W. Clum, Apache Agent. In most cases he gave page references for the material he copied.

Between June 1936 and June 1937, Harrington carried on a lively correspondence with William R. Hill, Engineer-in-Charge at the Mescalero Indian Reservation. Hill's father worked for the Bureau of American Ethnology and was Harrington's friend. Robert Young also collected data for him in the fall of 1936 through interviews with Asa Deklugie and Eugene Chihuahua. Young and Hill reheard the copied entries from the secondary sources, and Harrington attempted to synthesize the historic and ethnological information into a coherent text. He also tried to establish definitive etymologies and orthography for Apache placenames and personal names.

Harrington was in touch with Father Berard Haile, a linguist and Navajo lexicographer at the Franciscan Mission in St. Michaels, Arizona. A limited number of letters were exchanged with several other scholars involved in Athapascan studies, such as Harry Hoijer and Leonard Bloomfield.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Apache languages  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Dictionaries
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 4.1
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 4: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Southwest
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3248f0088-5aec-4682-b104-8fcc3cb9873b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14441

Letters Received

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Roberts, Helen H. (Helen Heffron), 1888-1985  Search this
Correspondent:
Boas, Franz, 1858-1942  Search this
Collins, Henry Bascom, 1899-1987  Search this
Densmore, Frances, 1867-1957  Search this
Fewkes, Jesse Walter, 1850-1930.  Search this
Harrington, Arthur  Search this
Hewett, Edgar L. (Edgar Lee), 1865-1946  Search this
Hodge, Frederick Webb, 1864-1956  Search this
Kroeber, A. L. (Alfred Louis), 1876-1960  Search this
Marr, John Paul  Search this
Martin, Fredericka I.  Search this
Mason, John Alden, 1885-1967  Search this
Merriam, C. Hart (Clinton Hart), 1855-1942  Search this
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Roberts, Frank H. H. (Frank Harold Hanna), 1897-1966  Search this
Sapir, Edward, 1884-1939  Search this
Speck, Frank G. (Frank Gouldsmith), 1881-1950  Search this
Stirling, Matthew Williams, 1896-1975  Search this
Tolkien, J. R. R. (John Ronald Reuel), 1892-1973  Search this
Van Valkenburgh, Richard F.  Search this
Voegelin, C. F. (Charles Frederick), 1906-1986  Search this
Waterman, T. T. (Thomas Talbot), b. 1885  Search this
Young, Robert W., 1912-2007  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology  Search this
United States. Office of Censorship  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
26 Boxes
Type:
Archival materials
Correspondence
Date:
1904-1960
bulk 1935-1954
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Correspondence series contains letters received by John P. Harrington. His incoming letters include handwritten and typed letters, postcards, and telegrams.

The primary focus of Harrington's correspondence is his work--both that which he undertook on an official basis for the B.A.E. and that which he pursued because of strong personal interests. References to his research and fieldwork take the form of passing references in letters to acquaintances, detailed accounts in letters to close friends, requests for authorization of proposed fieldwork, and reports of work accomplished in letters to supervisors, and lists of instructions to field and clerical assistants.

Much of the correspondence involves queries and the exchange of information and questions. Harrington wrote to scientists for identification of plant, animal or mineral specimens collected during fieldwork, and to postmasters, Indian agents, and social works in search of informants. There is also correspondence regarding acquisition of books, photostats, microfilm, and various supplies and equipment. There are also letters to editors of various journals enclosing articles for publication as well as letters of introduction, obtained by Harrington to facilitate his own work or prepared by him for use by his assistants. A number of letters involve answers which Harrington prepared to questions which were addressed directly to him by members of the public or were referred to him in the capacity of Senior Ethnologist at the B.A.E.

Several hundred items of correspondence relate to Harrington's duties when detailed to the Office of Censorship from 1943 to 1945. Most of these reflect his efforts to obtain translations of letters in foreign languages which he could not identify or for which dictionaries were not available.

Finally there are letters exchanged with landladies; real estate agents; bank personnel; and city, county and federal officials regarding payment or collection of rent, selling of property, confirmation of bank balances, and payment of taxes, as well as letters written to friends and family dealing with purely personal matters.

Some of the letters are incomplete. A number of lengthy responses to Harrington's queries were cut apart by him and pasted on separate sheets for filing in various subject categories in his field notes. Such letters were reconstructed as much as possible by N.A.A. staff. Attempts were also made to determine the identity of each correspondent. The full name of an individual is supplied if known even though only the first name, initials, or a nickname were used on a letter. In those cases in which signatures are illegible, a suggested form is given in brackets; if the form is doubtful, it is marked with a question mark. There is a small file of four items at the end for which the identity of the correspondent has not been determined. In those cases where onlly a partial date was given by Harrington or his correspondents, brackets have been used to supply a fuller suggested date.

More than 140 incoming letters were never opened by Harrington. These items were removed from their envelopes after any relevant data appearing on an envelope were transferred to the letter. These are annotated with the date when they were opened at the N.A.A.
Arrangement:
The documents are arranged alphabetically by the surname of the correspondent and thereunder chronologically; any undated items have been placed at the end of the group of letters for each person. In those instances when only a company name is given, the item in question is filed under that name. Some letters written by third parties to various acquaintances of Harrington were then forwarded to him without a cover letter. These records have been filed under the name of the original recipient as though they were enclosures. Letters, photographs, notes, drawings, maps, and other miscellaneous items which were sent under cover of a letter are labeled as enclosures and immediately follow the letter with which they were sent.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 9.1
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 9: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3aa1e7caa-edea-4fac-a7d7-6d0d7e7936fe
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15991

Letters Sent

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Roberts, Helen H. (Helen Heffron), 1888-1985  Search this
Correspondent:
Boas, Franz, 1858-1942  Search this
Collins, Henry Bascom, 1899-1987  Search this
Densmore, Frances, 1867-1957  Search this
Fewkes, Jesse Walter, 1850-1930.  Search this
Harrington, Arthur  Search this
Hewett, Edgar L. (Edgar Lee), 1865-1946  Search this
Hodge, Frederick Webb, 1864-1956  Search this
Kroeber, A. L. (Alfred Louis), 1876-1960  Search this
Marr, John Paul  Search this
Martin, Fredericka I.  Search this
Mason, John Alden, 1885-1967  Search this
Merriam, C. Hart (Clinton Hart), 1855-1942  Search this
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Roberts, Frank H. H. (Frank Harold Hanna), 1897-1966  Search this
Sapir, Edward, 1884-1939  Search this
Speck, Frank G. (Frank Gouldsmith), 1881-1950  Search this
Stirling, Matthew Williams, 1896-1975  Search this
Van Valkenburgh, Richard F.  Search this
Voegelin, C. F. (Charles Frederick), 1906-1986  Search this
Waterman, T. T. (Thomas Talbot), b. 1885  Search this
Young, Robert W., 1912-2007  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology  Search this
United States. Office of Censorship  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
11 Boxes
Type:
Archival materials
Correspondence
Date:
1904-1960
bulk 1935-1954
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Correspondence series contains copies of letters that John P. Harrington sent. For the most part the file consists of carbon copies of typed letters or handwritten drafts. There are also a number of signed originals. It is not always clear whether these documents were not sent or whether they were returned to Harrington. In those cases in which an original letter was returned with a reply written on it, the original letter is filed as though it were the reply and can be located under the name of the correspondent who returned it; a photocopy has been made for filing in correct chronological order within the file of letters sent.

The primary focus of Harrington's correspondence is his work--both that which he undertook on an official basis for the B.A.E. and that which he pursued because of strong personal interests. References to his research and fieldwork take the form of passing references in letters to acquaintances, detailed accounts in letters to close friends, requests for authorization of proposed fieldwork, and reports of work accomplished in letters to supervisors, and lists of instructions to field and clerical assistants.

Much of the correspondence involves queries and the exchange of information and questions. Harrington wrote to scientists for identification of plant, animal or mineral specimens collected during fieldwork, and to postmasters, Indian agents, and social works in search of informants. There is also correspondence regarding acquisition of books, photostats, microfilm, and various supplies and equipment. There are also letters to editors of various journals enclosing articles for publication as well as letters of introduction, obtained by Harrington to facilitate his own work or prepared by him for use by his assistants. A number of letters involve answers which Harrington prepared to questions which were addressed directly to him by members of the public or were referred to him in the capacity of Senior Ethnologist at the B.A.E.

Several hundred items of correspondence relate to Harrington's duties when detailed to the Office of Censorship from 1943 to 1945. Most of these reflect his efforts to obtain translations of letters in foreign languages which he could not identify or for which dictionaries were not available.

Finally there are letters exchanged with landladies; real estate agents; bank personnel; and city, county and federal officials regarding payment or collection of rent, selling of property, confirmation of bank balances, and payment of taxes, as well as letters written to friends and family dealing with purely personal matters.

There are small subsections for undated letters and unmatched portions of letters (second and third pages without salutation) at the end of the file of outgoing letters.
Arrangement:
The section of outgoing letters is arranged chronologically. Under each date, letters are further arranged in alphabetical order by the name of the addressee. When multiple letters were sent to the same correspondent on the same date, these are labeled "(1st)," "(2nd)," etc. In some cases Harrington addressed a letter to a company; when the identity of the respondent at the company is known, this individual's name has been added to the letter in brackets and is the basis for filing. When Harrington addressed a letter to one individual and another replied, the letter is filed under the name of the addressee, but the name of the respondent has been added in a cross-reference note on the letter or on a target.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 9.2
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 9: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3f693dc10-bacc-4a10-95bc-a457bc6c9541
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref16046
Online Media:

John Peabody Harrington papers: Navajo (part 1)

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Young, Robert W., 1912-2007  Search this
Clark, Ann Nolan, 1898-1995  Search this
La Farge, Oliver  Search this
Hoijer, Harry, 1904-1976  Search this
Van Valkenburgh, Richard F.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
59 Boxes
Culture:
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Date:
1935-1949
Scope and Contents:
This set of files contains Harrington's Navajo research. The materials consist of vocabulary, dictionary notes, grammar, rehearings of linguistic data, ethnobotany notes, ethnographic notes, texts, drafts and notes relating to primers, published and unpublished primers, unpublished and published papers, extracts from secondary sources, and miscellaneous notes.

The vocabulary section contains terms extracted from Young and Morgan's The Navaho Language, which were reheard principally to obtain Kiowa and Hano (Arizona Tewa) equivalences. Information is occasionally included from Harrington's Apache and Tewa notes. A brief typed vocabulary contains scattered grammatical material. There is also a slipfile of terms based mainly on An Ethnological Dictionary of the Navaho Language. It contains annotations and relevant excerpts from Harrington-Young correspondence. Plant names wIth Young's annotations are based on W. L. Jepson's A Manual of Flowering Plants of California (1925) and Washington Matthews' The Navajo Names for Plants (1886). Of the twenty semantic categories, the sections on animals, animal parts, plants, and placenames are particularly substantial.

The dictionary section consists of lexical terms from the Bureau of Indian Affairs' "Navajo Phrase Book," obtained from Willard Beatty and sent by Harrington to Young for rehearings. Navajo entries with Kiowa equivalences were apparently taken from a manuscript for a dictionary by Young. Two miscellaneous groups of entries are in Navajo/English.

The material on Navajo grammar is extensive and includes notes, drafts of a manuscript, excerpts from secondary sources, correspondence between Young and Harrington, and slips. The file was for proposed publications ranging from introductory manuals to the structuring of a comprehensive Navajo grammar.

A further substantial body of grammatical material is found on large slips. These include information from Young's voluminous correspondence, not otherwise interfiled. Part of this section is a further rehearing by Young of Morice's The Carrier Language. Another group of notes records comparisons with several southern Athapascan languages, evidently based on Young's notes, vocabulary items, correspondence, and other undocumented material. Harrington also used the slipfile format to index questions which he had earlier sent to Young.

Most of the rehearings of lingustic data are of Edward Sapir's linguistic terms by Young in 1940 and 1941. Though the copied materials may be similar in content, they do not appear to be exact duplicates of the Sapir linguistic holdings at the American Philosophical Society. Young also reheard terms from Hoijer's Chiricahua and Mescalero Apache Texts late in 1940. George E. Hood commented on Hoijer's "The Southern Athapascan Languages," possibly at about the same time. There are typed excerpts from Young's May 1938 letters regarding Morice's The Carrier Language and miscellaneous linguistic information given by Hood and reheard by Richard Long. Other miscellaneous rehearings are with Alfred Sanchez (abbreviated"Alf." or "Alfredo"), Willietto Antonio, George Hood, and Robert Young (September 1939); and with Howard Gorman, Albert Sandoval, and John Charles (1939). There is also a rehearing with Henry Tsosie of terms from Gladys A. Reichard and Adolph Dodge Bittany's Agentive and Causative Elements in Navaho (1940), including some excerpts from the book. Finally, in February 1941, he reheard the vocabulary of Pedro Bautista Pino with Howard Gorman; Young did not consider these terms to be Navajo.

The files also contains Harrington's notes on Navajo names for plants, gathered from secondary sources and possibly original data from colleagues or friends. Young also annotated some of the notes.

Harrington's ethnographic files includes notes, vocabulary, and illustrations on the structure of dwelling places as well as some information on the mythic origins of the Navajo. Many of the illustrations are by Charles Keetsie Shirley. On the same subject is a set of cards in Young's hand which was sent to Harrington at Fort Wingate in August 1939. At Harrington's request, Young also translated what appears to be a lesson on hogans, possibly a section of a proposed text for instructional purposes. A group of Chaco Canyon placenames were given by Ed Henry in June 1939; several others were extracted from various secondary sources. Other ethnographic subjects briefly covered are the Hoop and Pole game, a social and economic survey questionnaire, White Hat's funeral (1939), the Lord's Prayer as recorded by Berard Haile, and notes on Sandoval's sound recordings. Malcolm Farmer supplied nonlinguistic information and there is a small set of highly miscellaneous ethnographic and historical notes.

The text section contains billingual texts that Young collected and sent to Harrington in 1936. They were written with interlinear translations and followed by a precis in English. Titles include: "Deer and Coyote," "Where the People Came Out," "A Wedding Ceremonial," and "The Woman Who Changed into a Bear." A recording session on October 31, 1949, with Dick Left, Richard Long, and Harry (not further identified) provided Navajo songs, ceremonies, and legends. Harrington's notes supply the identity of the discs and peripheral information such as the gestures accompanying the songs. Some linguistic annotations are interspersed. The discs described in the notes have not been located.

Notes, drafts, and mockups from Harrington and Young's work creating Navajo primers are also present. During the course of their work together from 1937 to 1939, Harrington and Young prepared drafts for two primers, "Little Bear Primer" and "Spotted Dog Primer," a pre-primer (probably the so called "Doda Primer"), and a playbook or cut-out book. Despite an assurance that at least both of the major works were to be printed, neither of the primers were ever published. He and Young also served as translators for a set of four primers in the "Little Herder" series, and Harrington was also credited with developing the "Harrington-La Farge phonetic system" utilized in the three-volume set entitled Little Man's Family. Harrington and Young also helped translate Ann Nolan Clark's "Who Wants To Be a Prairie Dog?"

Other materials related to Harrington's writing include notes for his "Southern Peripheral Athapaskawan Origins, Divisions, and Migrations" and preliminary drafts and notes for the Navajo portion of "Earliest Navaho and Quechua" (1944) coauthored by Robert W. Young. There are also notes and drafts for his unpublished writings, among which include "Navaho Mouthmap," "The Indian Dog Comes into His Own,"and "What Light Can Navajo Throw on Indogermanic Reconstruction?"

Among his miscellaneous notes is a comparison of Navajo with other Indian languages. There are brief notes on trips made in 1940, a list of the names of non-Indians, miscellaneous correspondence, and notes which are neither linguistic nor ethnographic.

Because of their long-term collaboration, Young's notes are inextricably intermixed with those of Harrington. Although some are labeled "Y," Young's unlabeled contributions can be identified through his handwriting and printing, and even with his style. Other hand-copied material is the work of B.A.E. assistant, Arvilla Johnson. Harrington's daughter Awona produced many of the copies in eighteen-point type.
Biographical / Historical:
Although John P. Harrington published brief articles on Navajo in 1911 and 1929, his most sustained work in this language spanned the years 1935 to 1946. Correspondence and reports indicate that during this period he was in the field from July to November 1939, and from August to mid-November 1940 at such places as Fort Wingate and Gallup, New Mexico, and Phoenix, Tuba CIty, and Window Rock, Arizona. His success in the field is due in no small part to his brilliant young collaborator, Robert W. Young, whom he first contacted in August 1936 and with whom he carried on an extensive correspondence into the mid-1940s. In fact their joint efforts in Navajo were accomplished mainly by mail.

Harrington collaborated or corresponded with others, among whom were Ann Nolan Clark, Oliver La Farge, Francis Elmore, Harry Hoijer, William Hill, and Richard Van Valkenburgh. He also contacted various university professors and graduate students, some of whom taught at such programs as those directed by the Summer Institute of Linguistics (Camp Wycliffe) and the University of New Mexico School of American Research.

Harrington consulted a wide array of secondary sources and reheard or compared data from them which he later combined with original notes. These include several hundred terms from then-unpublished manuscripts of Edward Sapir, and two of Harry Hoijer's publications--Chiricahua and Mescalero Apache Texts (1938) and "The Southern Athapascan Languages" (1938). He made extensive use of two works published by the Franciscan Fathers, An Ethnological Dictionary of the Navaho Language (1910) and A Vocabulary of the Navaho Language (1912). He turned to W. L. Jepson and Washington Matthews for botanical terms, and to Adrien G. Morice for Carrier comparisons. In a search for precise grammatical terminology, he consulted a score or more of grammars, dictionaries, and publications on language and linguistics in Latin, Greek, Indo-Germanic, and several Arabic languages. Most prominent are Walter A. Ripman's Latin Handbook (1930) and Alan H. Gairdner's publication on Arabic phonetics (1935).

He worked with many Navajo speakers, some of whom were well-educated. Mentioned frequently are Willietto Antonio, Chee Dodge, Howard Gorman, George E. Hood, Hoskie Naswood, Albert Sandoval (also called "Chic"), Charles Keetsie Shirley, and Sam Tilden.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Local Note:
This subseries was broken up into two catalog records to facilitate viewing of digital surrogates. See the catalog record for John Peabody Harrington papers: Navajo (part 2) to view surrogates for the rest of Harrington's Navajo files.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Navajo language  Search this
Kiowa language  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Carrier language  Search this
Athapascan languages  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Zoology -- nomenclature  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 4: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Southwest / 4.2: Navajo
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3a20de076-50c6-4ba1-a37d-c9dbdce60655
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref17243

John Peabody Harrington papers: Navajo (part 2)

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Young, Robert W., 1912-2007  Search this
Clark, Ann Nolan, 1898-1995  Search this
La Farge, Oliver, 1901-1963  Search this
Hoijer, Harry, 1904-1976  Search this
Van Valkenburgh, Richard F.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
59 Boxes
Culture:
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Date:
1935-1949
Scope and Contents:
This set of files contains Harrington's Navajo research. The materials consist of vocabulary, dictionary notes, grammar, rehearings of linguistic data, ethnobotany notes, ethnographic notes, texts, drafts and notes relating to primers, published and unpublished primers, unpublished and published papers, extracts from secondary sources, and miscellaneous notes.

The vocabulary section contains terms extracted from Young and Morgan's The Navaho Language, which were reheard principally to obtain Kiowa and Hano (Arizona Tewa) equivalences. Information is occasionally included from Harrington's Apache and Tewa notes. A brief typed vocabulary contains scattered grammatical material. There is also a slipfile of terms based mainly on An Ethnological Dictionary of the Navaho Language. It contains annotations and relevant excerpts from Harrington-Young correspondence. Plant names wIth Young's annotations are based on W. L. Jepson's A Manual of Flowering Plants of California (1925) and Washington Matthews' The Navajo Names for Plants (1886). Of the twenty semantic categories, the sections on animals, animal parts, plants, and placenames are particularly substantial.

The dictionary section consists of lexical terms from the Bureau of Indian Affairs' "Navajo Phrase Book," obtained from Willard Beatty and sent by Harrington to Young for rehearings. Navajo entries with Kiowa equivalences were apparently taken from a manuscript for a dictionary by Young. Two miscellaneous groups of entries are in Navajo/English.

The material on Navajo grammar is extensive and includes notes, drafts of a manuscript, excerpts from secondary sources, correspondence between Young and Harrington, and slips. The file was for proposed publications ranging from introductory manuals to the structuring of a comprehensive Navajo grammar.

A further substantial body of grammatical material is found on large slips. These include information from Young's voluminous correspondence, not otherwise interfiled. Part of this section is a further rehearing by Young of Morice's The Carrier Language. Another group of notes records comparisons with several southern Athapascan languages, evidently based on Young's notes, vocabulary items, correspondence, and other undocumented material. Harrington also used the slipfile format to index questions which he had earlier sent to Young.

Most of the rehearings of lingustic data are of Edward Sapir's linguistic terms by Young in 1940 and 1941. Though the copied materials may be similar in content, they do not appear to be exact duplicates of the Sapir linguistic holdings at the American Philosophical Society. Young also reheard terms from Hoijer's Chiricahua and Mescalero Apache Texts late in 1940. George E. Hood commented on Hoijer's "The Southern Athapascan Languages," possibly at about the same time. There are typed excerpts from Young's May 1938 letters regarding Morice's The Carrier Language and miscellaneous linguistic information given by Hood and reheard by Richard Long. Other miscellaneous rehearings are with Alfred Sanchez (abbreviated"Alf." or "Alfredo"), Willietto Antonio, George Hood, and Robert Young (September 1939); and with Howard Gorman, Albert Sandoval, and John Charles (1939). There is also a rehearing with Henry Tsosie of terms from Gladys A. Reichard and Adolph Dodge Bittany's Agentive and Causative Elements in Navaho (1940), including some excerpts from the book. Finally, in February 1941, he reheard the vocabulary of Pedro Bautista Pino with Howard Gorman; Young did not consider these terms to be Navajo.

The files also contains Harrington's notes on Navajo names for plants, gathered from secondary sources and possibly original data from colleagues or friends. Young also annotated some of the notes.

Harrington's ethnographic files includes notes, vocabulary, and illustrations on the structure of dwelling places as well as some information on the mythic origins of the Navajo. Many of the illustrations are by Charles Keetsie Shirley. On the same subject is a set of cards in Young's hand which was sent to Harrington at Fort Wingate in August 1939. At Harrington's request, Young also translated what appears to be a lesson on hogans, possibly a section of a proposed text for instructional purposes. A group of Chaco Canyon placenames were given by Ed Henry in June 1939; several others were extracted from various secondary sources. Other ethnographic subjects briefly covered are the Hoop and Pole game, a social and economic survey questionnaire, White Hat's funeral (1939), the Lord's Prayer as recorded by Berard Haile, and notes on Sandoval's sound recordings. Malcolm Farmer supplied nonlinguistic information and there is a small set of highly miscellaneous ethnographic and historical notes.

The text section contains billingual texts that Young collected and sent to Harrington in 1936. They were written with interlinear translations and followed by a precis in English. Titles include: "Deer and Coyote," "Where the People Came Out," "A Wedding Ceremonial," and "The Woman Who Changed into a Bear." A recording session on October 31, 1949, with Dick Left, Richard Long, and Harry (not further identified) provided Navajo songs, ceremonies, and legends. Harrington's notes supply the identity of the discs and peripheral information such as the gestures accompanying the songs. Some linguistic annotations are interspersed. The discs described in the notes have not been located.

Notes, drafts, and mockups from Harrington and Young's work creating Navajo primers are also present. During the course of their work together from 1937 to 1939, Harrington and Young prepared drafts for two primers, "Little Bear Primer" and "Spotted Dog Primer," a pre-primer (probably the so called "Doda Primer"), and a playbook or cut-out book. Despite an assurance that at least both of the major works were to be printed, neither of the primers were ever published. He and Young also served as translators for a set of four primers in the "Little Herder" series, and Harrington was also credited with developing the "Harrington-La Farge phonetic system" utilized in the three-volume set entitled Little Man's Family. Harrington and Young also helped translate Ann Nolan Clark's "Who Wants To Be a Prairie Dog?"

Other materials related to Harrington's writing include notes for his "Southern Peripheral Athapaskawan Origins, Divisions, and Migrations" and preliminary drafts and notes for the Navajo portion of "Earliest Navaho and Quechua" (1944) coauthored by Robert W. Young. There are also notes and drafts for his unpublished writings, among which include "Navaho Mouthmap," "The Indian Dog Comes into His Own,"and "What Light Can Navajo Throw on Indogermanic Reconstruction?"

Among his miscellaneous notes is a comparison of Navajo with other Indian languages. There are brief notes on trips made in 1940, a list of the names of non-Indians, miscellaneous correspondence, and notes which are neither linguistic nor ethnographic.

Because of their long-term collaboration, Young's notes are inextricably intermixed with those of Harrington. Although some are labeled "Y," Young's unlabeled contributions can be identified through his handwriting and printing, and even with his style. Other hand-copied material is the work of B.A.E. assistant, Arvilla Johnson. Harrington's daughter Awona produced many of the copies in eighteen-point type.
Biographical / Historical:
Although John P. Harrington published brief articles on Navajo in 1911 and 1929, his most sustained work in this language spanned the years 1935 to 1946. Correspondence and reports indicate that during this period he was in the field from July to November 1939, and from August to mid-November 1940 at such places as Fort Wingate and Gallup, New Mexico, and Phoenix, Tuba CIty, and Window Rock, Arizona. His success in the field is due in no small part to his brilliant young collaborator, Robert W. Young, whom he first contacted in August 1936 and with whom he carried on an extensive correspondence into the mid-1940s. In fact their joint efforts in Navajo were accomplished mainly by mail.

Harrington collaborated or corresponded with others, among whom were Ann Nolan Clark, Oliver La Farge, Francis Elmore, Harry Hoijer, William Hill, and Richard Van Valkenburgh. He also contacted various university professors and graduate students, some of whom taught at such programs as those directed by the Summer Institute of Linguistics (Camp Wycliffe) and the University of New Mexico School of American Research.

Harrington consulted a wide array of secondary sources and reheard or compared data from them which he later combined with original notes. These include several hundred terms from then-unpublished manuscripts of Edward Sapir, and two of Harry Hoijer's publications--Chiricahua and Mescalero Apache Texts (1938) and "The Southern Athapascan Languages" (1938). He made extensive use of two works published by the Franciscan Fathers, An Ethnological Dictionary of the Navaho Language (1910) and A Vocabulary of the Navaho Language (1912). He turned to W. L. Jepson and Washington Matthews for botanical terms, and to Adrien G. Morice for Carrier comparisons. In a search for precise grammatical terminology, he consulted a score or more of grammars, dictionaries, and publications on language and linguistics in Latin, Greek, Indo-Germanic, and several Arabic languages. Most prominent are Walter A. Ripman's Latin Handbook (1930) and Alan H. Gairdner's publication on Arabic phonetics (1935).

He worked with many Navajo speakers, some of whom were well-educated. Mentioned frequently are Willietto Antonio, Chee Dodge, Howard Gorman, George E. Hood, Hoskie Naswood, Albert Sandoval (also called "Chic"), Charles Keetsie Shirley, and Sam Tilden.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Local Note:
This subseries was broken up into two catalog records to facilitate viewing of digital surrogates. See the catalog record for John Peabody Harrington papers: Navajo (part 1) to view surrogates for the rest of Harrington's Navajo files.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Navajo language  Search this
Kiowa language  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Carrier language  Search this
Athapascan languages  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Zoology -- nomenclature  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 4: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Southwest / 4.2: Navajo
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw319a390f3-cfe7-4322-97c0-fe170d37113c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref17244

Young, Robert (1 year 10/1/68)

Collection Creator:
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.). Department of Anthropology  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. United States National Museum. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Container:
Box 9
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1968 October 1
Series Restrictions:
RESTRICTED
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Department of Anthropology Records, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Department of Anthropology records
Department of Anthropology records / Series 28: Personnel / 28.1: Staff Files
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3261fd1e0-a788-4ce8-9454-d9dbb3ad0170
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-xxxx-0311-ref5350

Young, Robert R.

Collection Creator:
Kent, Rockwell, 1882-1971  Search this
Container:
Reel 5248, Frame 406-408
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1949
Collection Restrictions:
The microfilm of this collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website. Use of material not microfilmed or digitized requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Rockwell Kent papers, circa 1840-1993, bulk 1935-1961. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Rockwell Kent papers
Rockwell Kent papers / Series 1: Alphabetical Files
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw955ce65d7-ae4e-4199-83f6-61c615c3739c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-kentrock-ref4206

ALPA Retirement Committee Correspondence

Collection Creator:
Gitt, Michael.  Search this
Container:
Box 4, Folder 5
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1947-1948
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Collection Citation:
Captain Michael Gitt Papers, Acc. NASM.2003.0033, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Captain Michael Gitt Papers
Captain Michael Gitt Papers / Series 2: Canadian Colonial Airways and Colonial Airlines
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg217fe11a8-7c74-4f72-bdb0-b9169890ab21
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-2003-0033-ref564
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View ALPA Retirement Committee Correspondence digital asset number 1

[OX5 Club of America Roster and Newsletter (Vol. 7, No. 6)]

Collection Creator:
Charles, Mary  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 12
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
1965
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Collection Citation:
Mary Charles Collection, Accession XXXX-0011, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Mary Charles Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg27f5d9c41-5705-4918-b677-12092e3a8bbb
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-xxxx-0011-ref19
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View [OX5 Club of America Roster and Newsletter (Vol. 7, No. 6)] digital asset number 1

Social (see also oversized, Box 154)

Collection Creator:
Davis, Benjamin O., Jr., 1912-  Search this
Container:
Box 11, Folder 7
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Collection Citation:
Benjamin O. Davis, Jr. Collection, Acc. 1992.0023, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Benjamin O. Davis Jr. Collection
Benjamin O. Davis Jr. Collection / Series 2: Military Career / 2.3: Materials Arranged by Posting / 2.3.13: Far East Air Force (FEAF) Headquarters (Tokyo, Japan), Director of Operations and Training
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg2731e337a-c5f5-49a8-9698-910b72d673b3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-1992-0023-ref1915
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