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James and Ethel Lucus papers

Creator:
Lucus, Ethel Minns  Search this
Lucus, James William  Search this
Names:
Lucus, Ethel Minns  Search this
Lucus, James William  Search this
Extent:
0.53 Linear feet (3 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Diplomas
Leaflets
Correspondence
Photographic prints
Awards
Postcards
Marriage certificates
Programs
Clippings
Pamphlets
Date:
circa 1902-1990
bulk 1919-1960
Summary:
The collection, which dates from circa 1902 to 1990 and measures .53 linear feet, documents the personal and professional lives of James William Lucus and Ethel Minns Lucus. The collection is comprised of photographs, correspondence, postcards, newspaper clippings, diplomas, awards, pamphlets, leaflets, programs, and vital statistics records.
Scope and Contents:
The collection, which dates from 1902 to 1990, documents the activities of James and Ethel Lucus. It contains material related to Mr. Lucus's education, military service, and his teaching career with the Public Schools of Chicago. Additionally, the collection documents Ethel Minns Lucus's education and her involvement in various Chicago area theatrical activities. Included in the collection are awards, certificates, correspondence, diplomas, military records, and photographic prints.
Arrangement:
The papers are organized into three series one of which has been further arranged into subseries. The contents of each series and subseries are arranged alphabetically. There are oversize materials in the Awards and Citations and Education subseries, as well as in the Photographs series. The series and subseries are arranged as follows:

Series I: Biographical

Subseries 1.1: Awards and Citations

Subseries 1.2: Education

Subseries 1.3: General Series II: Correspondence Series III: Photographs
Biographical / Historical:
James William Lucus was born in Abbeville, GA on 26 December 1895 to Jack and Hattie Dean Lucus. Despite the fact that both his father and mother worked - a railroad laborer and domestic servant, respectively --the family still struggled to maintain their simple existence. In one of his earliest recollections, Mr. Lucus describes his childhood home as, "…a one-room house of uncertain pedigree…" Yet the family persevered. In addition to her work as a domestic, his mother worked in the cotton and corn fields during planting and harvest seasons. As for his father, if local railroad work became sparse, Jack Lucus travelled to other parts of the state to find work.

Given these circumstances it is not surprising that James did not enter school until fourth grade. Shortly after he was enrolled, he was withdrawn so that he could work with his father cutting wood for railroad ties. This action was taken at the behest of the family's doctor, who felt that James needed to build his strength and bulk. A few years later, a stronger and older James William Lucus re-entered fourth grade. However, he could only attend school in the spring because he had to work the rest of the year. It was at this time that his parents separated and, since his mother's income was not sufficient to support the household, James had to step in to fill the financial void left by his father. His early education came to a temporary halt in 1911, when he graduated from eighth grade at the age of fifteen.

After graduation, James spent a year earning income as a railroad worker and cotton-picker; and to some extent he accepted these occupations as his lot in life. That all changed when family friend Charlie Jefferson suggested that he and James move to Waycross, GA to find better employment opportunities. They left in the spring of 1912 and both found jobs immediately. Buoyed by this initial success, Mr. Jefferson encouraged James to attend trade school at Tuskegee Institute.

James Lucus entered Tuskegee in 1913 and, as it was with his early education, he worked while attending school. He performed various jobs around the school during the day and took classes at night. In 1915 he earned his high school academic diploma and in 1916 he earned his applied electricity diploma.

The skills he acquired at Tuskegee Institute enabled him to serve in the U.S. Army's C.O. Company "F" 317th Engineers during World War I. In June 1918 his unit was deployed to France for nine months. Their primary mission was to dig trenches and dugouts in the battle zones. His unit returned on 31 March 1919 and Mr. Lucus was honorably discharged on18 April 1919.

Once he left the military in 1919 he moved to Chicago, IL, where he attended Lewis Institute. He earned a Bachelor of Science in 1923 and a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering in 1924. Unfortunately, his two degrees were not enough to secure an engineering job, so he decided to become a teacher. He completed his course work at the Chicago Normal School in 1925. The kid whose initial education experience was a sporadic four-year stint in a country grammar school would go on to have a 36-year teaching career with the Public Schools of Chicago.

A year after starting his employment as a teacher James Lucus married Ethel E. Minns, a dramatist. Mrs. Lucus was born in 1903. She studied theatre at the Chicago Conservatory from where she earned a diploma in 1935 and a Bachelor of Dramatic Art in 1940. Thereafter, she acted, danced, and sang her way through the Chicago arts scene. Later Mrs. Lucus established the E. M. L. Creative Theatre which presented performances in the Chicago area. The performances ranged from dramas to large scale musicals. The Theatre also offered a variety of classes for actors of all ages. Given her extensive involvement in Chicago's cultural life, she received awards and other recognition for her contributions.

James and Ethel Lucus remained married for sixty years. They had one child, Hildred, who followed in her father's footsteps, becoming a teacher with the Chicago Public Schools. Mr. Lucus died on 5 September 1986 as a result of injuries he sustained in two separated muggings. Mrs. Lucus died three years later in the early spring of 1990.
Rights:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans -- Education  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African Americans -- Employment  Search this
African Americans -- Social life and customs  Search this
African American military personnel  Search this
African American families  Search this
African American actresses  Search this
World War, 1914-1918 -- African Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Diplomas
Leaflets
Correspondence
Photographic prints
Awards
Postcards
Marriage certificates
Programs
Clippings
Pamphlets
Citation:
James and Ethel Lucus papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Meridith McCurtis and Hildred Lucus McCurtis.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-023
See more items in:
James and Ethel Lucus papers
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa703dff5af-3e52-42c1-a5f4-abe8028da66b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-023
Online Media:

Portrait of J.W. (James William) Lucus in Jussey, France during World War I

Creator:
Lucus family  Search this
Collection Creator:
Lucus, Ethel Minns  Search this
Lucus, James William  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , gelatin silver, 5 1/2 x 3 1/2 in. (14 x 8.9 cm))
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Portraits
Place:
France
Date:
1918
Scope and Contents:
James William Lucus was born in Abbeville, GA on 26 December 1895 to Jack and Hattie Dean Lucus. James entered Tuskegee Institute in 1913 and earned his high school academic diploma in 1916 and his applied electricity diploma in 1916. The skills he acquired at Tuskegee enabled him to serve in the U.S. Army's C.O. Company "F" 317 Engineers during World War I. In June 1918 his unit was deployed to France for nine months. Their primary mission was to dig trenches and dugouts in the battle zones. His unit returned on 31 March 1919 and Mr. Lucus was honorably discharged on 18 April 1919.
Collection Rights:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American military personnel  Search this
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Portraits -- African American men
Collection Citation:
James and Ethel Lucus papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Meridith McCurtis and Hildred Lucus McCurtis.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-023, Item ACMA PH2004.7002.23a
See more items in:
James and Ethel Lucus papers
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7f40faab6-372f-4111-842e-b9b1b8744272
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-023-ref556

Discharge Certificate for James William Lucus, World War I

Creator:
United States. Army  Search this
Collection Creator:
Lucus, Ethel Minns  Search this
Lucus, James William  Search this
Extent:
1 Item
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Certificates
Date:
1918
Scope and Contents:
James William Lucus was born in Abbeville, GA on 26 December 1895 to Jack and Hattie Dean Lucus. James entered Tuskegee Institute in 1913 and earned his high school academic diploma in 1916 and his applied electricity diploma in 1916. The skills he acquired at Tuskegee enabled him to serve in the U.S. Army's C.O. Company "F" 317 Engineers during World War I. In June 1918 his unit was deployed to France for nine months. Their primary mission was to dig trenches and dugouts in the battle zones. His unit returned on 31 March 1919 and Mr. Lucus was honorably discharged on 18 April 1919.
Collection Rights:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American military personnel  Search this
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
Genre/Form:
Certificates
Collection Citation:
James and Ethel Lucus papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Meridith McCurtis and Hildred Lucus McCurtis.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-023, Item ACMA 2004.7002.61
See more items in:
James and Ethel Lucus papers
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa722dddad5-0fb0-430a-b791-e7c8f490a130
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-023-ref557
Online Media:

Enlistment Record for James William Lucus, World War I

Creator:
United States. Army  Search this
Collection Creator:
Lucus, Ethel Minns  Search this
Lucus, James William  Search this
Extent:
1 Item
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Certificates
Date:
1918 March 16
Scope and Contents:
James William Lucus was born in Abbeville, GA on 26 December 1895 to Jack and Hattie Dean Lucus. James entered Tuskegee Institute in 1913 and earned his high school academic diploma in 1916 and his applied electricity diploma in 1916. The skills he acquired at Tuskegee enabled him to serve in the U.S. Army's C.O. Company "F" 317 Engineers during World War I. In June 1918 his unit was deployed to France for nine months. Their primary mission was to dig trenches and dugouts in the battle zones. His unit returned on 31 March 1919 and Mr. Lucus was honorably discharged on 18 April 1919.
General:
Honorable Discharge certificate located on verso of enlistment record.
Collection Rights:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American military personnel  Search this
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
Genre/Form:
Certificates
Collection Citation:
James and Ethel Lucus papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Meridith McCurtis and Hildred Lucus McCurtis.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-023, Item ACMA 2004.7002.62
See more items in:
James and Ethel Lucus papers
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7bb01e07f-e592-409d-a5ed-07bb071fffa1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-023-ref558
Online Media:

Group of soldiers in France during World War I

Collection Creator:
Lucus, Ethel Minns  Search this
Lucus, James William  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , gelatin silver, 5 1/4 x 3 1/4 inches)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Portraits
Place:
France
Date:
circa 1918
Collection Rights:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Portraits -- African American men
Collection Citation:
James and Ethel Lucus papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Meridith McCurtis and Hildred Lucus McCurtis.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-023, Item ACMA 2004.7002.45
See more items in:
James and Ethel Lucus papers
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7090139aa-ede3-4292-8b78-ca817f34ad92
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-023-ref560

Photographic postcard of soldiers in World War I at Verdun

Photograph by:
Unidentified  Search this
Subject of:
Oscar Calmeise, American, born 1889  Search this
Unidentified Man or Men  Search this
372nd Infantry Regiment, American, 1918 - 1946  Search this
Medium:
silver and photographic gelatin on photographic paper with ink and paper (fiber product)
Dimensions:
H x W x D: 3 9/16 × 5 1/2 in. (9 × 14 cm)
Type:
gelatin silver prints
photographic postcards
Cultural Place:
Verdun-sur-Meuse, France, Europe
Date:
July 1918
Topic:
African American  Search this
Military  Search this
Photography  Search this
World War I  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of the Greer-Calmeise Family of Cincinnati, Ohio
Object number:
2019.18.11
Restrictions & Rights:
Public domain
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Media Arts-Photography
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5ecfa3d5d-2c21-43a5-9313-56f95f03bd3a
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2019.18.11
Online Media:

"Help the Negro People Help Their Own" / the Negro Base Hospital Contributions Great and Small Needed Crispus Attucks Circle "For War Relief Work" ... Crispus Attucks Circle.

Creator:
Negro Base Hospital  Search this
McHarris (artist?)  Search this
Crispus Attucks Circle. (149 South Broad Street.)  Search this
Collection Creator:
Princeton University  Search this
Extent:
1 Poster (1/4 size; Monochrome, 35.5 x 56 cm)
Container:
Box 25, Folder 1
Culture:
African Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Posters
Place:
United States
Image:
Main Image: Black soldier with rifle leading a charge across a battlefield
Local numbers:
Princeton Poster# 6523
General:
Issued by: Cirspus Attucks Circle

Issued for: Negro Base Hospital

Artist(s): McHarris
Locale:
149 S. Broad Street
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but is stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Collection Rights:
Copyright status of items varies. Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Relief and volunteer organizations  Search this
Ethnic groups  Search this
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
World War, 1914-1918 -- War work  Search this
World War, 1914-1918 -- Posters -- United States  Search this
African American military personnel  Search this
Genre/Form:
Posters
Posters -- World War, 1914-1918 -- United States
Collection Citation:
Princeton University Posters Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Princeton University Poster Collection
Princeton University Poster Collection / Series 2: World War One / United States
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8a9f7f800-0251-41c5-93ca-5dce62e57228
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0433-ref7694

Liberty Loan Pictorial News: "Inspection of Our Negro Troops in Alsace"

Creator:
Liberty Loan Pictorial News  Search this
Collection Creator:
Princeton University  Search this
Extent:
1 Poster (1/4 size; Multi-color, 48.5 x 32 cm)
Container:
Box 50, Folder 1
Type:
Archival materials
Posters
Place:
United States
Image:
Main Image: Photograph of U.S. Afro-American soldiers lined up for inspection
Local numbers:
Princeton Poster# 9513
General:
Issued for: Liberty Loan Pictorial News

Artist(s): Anon
Series:
12
Printing Info:
Other Printing Info: Photograph copyright: Underwood & Underwood from Elliott Service Co
Related Materials:
Duplicates: 9513, 9633

Condition differs: No
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but is stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Collection Rights:
Copyright status of items varies. Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Fund raising  Search this
Morale and propaganda  Search this
Propaganda  Search this
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
Morale -- World War, 1914-1918  Search this
War posters, American -- 1914-1918.  Search this
United States -- History, 1913-1921  Search this
World War, 1914-1918 -- Posters -- United States  Search this
African American soldiers -- World War, 1914-1918  Search this
Liberty bonds  Search this
Genre/Form:
Posters
Posters -- World War, 1914-1918 -- United States
Collection Citation:
Princeton University Posters Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Princeton University Poster Collection
Princeton University Poster Collection / Series 2: World War One / United States
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep896271bc7-8b51-46b3-bf0d-74e8b3e225a4
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0433-ref7850

Charlene Hodges Byrd collection

Creator:
Byrd, Charlene Hodges, 1929-2009  Search this
Names:
Morgan State College  Search this
Bearden, Romare, 1911-1988  Search this
Cummings, Ida R. (Ida Rebecca), 1868-1958  Search this
Douglass, Frederick, 1817?-1895  Search this
Grimké, Francis J. (Francis James), 1850-1937  Search this
Hodges, Joyce Ethel Cummings, 1903-1971  Search this
Shimm, Erminie F. (Erminie Florence), 1867-1936  Search this
Shimm, Sarah A., 1843-1885  Search this
Thomas, Elizabeth N. (Elizabeth Nelson), d. 1932  Search this
Washington, Booker T., 1856-1915  Search this
Extent:
43 Linear feet (35 document boxes and 39 oversize boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
circa 1750-2009
bulk 1880-1960
Summary:
The Charlene Hodges Byrd collection measures 43 linear feet, and dates from circa 1750-2009, with the bulk of the material dating from 1880-1960. The collection documents the personal life and professional career of Charlene Hodges Byrd, an African American teacher from Washington, D.C., along with material for several related families from Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Washington, D.C. Family members prominently represented include Sarah A. Shimm, teacher and essayist under the name Faith Lichen; her daughters Erminie F. Shimm and Grace E. Shimm Cummings, both teachers; and Byrd's mother, Joyce Ethel Cummings Hodges, also a teacher. Correspondence and writings chiefly discuss family life, religion, race, education, and the relationship with Frederick Douglass and his family. The collection is arranged in 10 series: Biographical Material, Correspondence, Writings, Subject Files, Financial and Legal Records, Printed Material, Volumes, Memorabilia, Textiles, and Photographs.
Scope and Contents:
Series 1. Papers related to biographical and family histories of the Byrd, Cummings, Davage, Dews, Hodges, Shimm, Spruill, and Thomas families. Material includes family trees; school diplomas and certificates; programs; awards; marriage and divorce papers; funeral documents; and obituaries.

Series 2: Chiefly letters from family and friends regarding family news, financial matters, school, work, neighborhood affairs, church events, travel and the weather. The majority of the letters are addressed to Charlene Hodges Byrd, Grace E. Shimm Cummings, Ida R. Cummings, Elizabeth Dews Hodges, Joyce Ethel Cummings Hodges, Erminie F. Shimm, Sarah A. Shimm, and Elizabeth N. Thomas. Other correspondence includes letters from Booker T. Washington, Bessye Beardon, Charlotte Davage, Amelia Douglass, and Harrell S. Spruill. There are also a number of greeting cards, postcards, and empty envelopes.

Series 3. Writings include essays, speeches, papers written for school, teacher's notebooks, and a diary of Erminie F. Shimm, 1903. Topics include education, Frederick Douglass, religion, race, Africa, and the temperance movement.

Series 4. Subject files on Charlene Hodges Byrd's involvement with Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority; Book Lovers of Charleston, West Virginia, a women's book club organized in 1923; Church Women United radio program; and The Links, Inc., a volunteer service organization. The papers on Liberia relate to missionary work, and were probably gathered by Erminie F. Shimm; and the Shimm-Thomas Collection are papers related to the deposit and later return of family items housed as a collection at Morgan State College.

Series 5. The financial and legal records include invoices and receipts, bank books, real estate tax assessments, deeds, and wills. There is also material related to the estate of Erminie F. Shimm.

Series 6. Printed materials includes books, pamphlets, newspapers, newsletters, clippings, invitations and programs. The books and pamphlets are chiefly school yearbooks and newspapers and other texts related to religion, politics, music, and poetry. Also included is a copy of Frederick Douglass's autobiography and a printed copy of his speech "The Race Problem." The clippings include obituaries, articles about Charlene Hodges Byrd and her husband Charles R. Byrd, essays by Sarah A. Shimm under the name Faith Lichen, and articles on the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. The invitations and programs are primarily for school graduations, weddings, social events, and funerals. Other printed material includes newsletters; business cards; calling cards; postage stamps, chiefly from Liberia; and blank postcards. The binder on Frederick Douglass was prepared by Byrd and her goddaughter for the West Virginia School Studies Fair, and includes copies of Byrd family artifacts.

Series 7. Autograph books, guest books, and scrapbooks. The autograph book of Grace E. Shimm Cummings includes autographs from Amelia Douglass, Lewis B. Douglass, Charles R. Douglass, W. H. Clair, and Francis J. Grimke. The scrapbook of Grace E. Shimm Cummings and Erminie F. Shimm consists primarily of clippings, and was assembled from an old teacher's book with a student registration and punishment pages still intact at the back.

Series 8. Miscellaneous items in the collection including artwork, a coin purse, a piece of handwoven cloth belonging to Catherine Nelson's great grandmother, and leather hair curlers.

Series 9: The textiles are chiefly christening gowns, children's garments, and an apron. Several garments belonged to Joyce Ethel Cummings Hodges, Charlene Hodges Byrd, and Elizabeth N. Thomas. There is also a doll that belonged to Amelia Douglass's niece, Kitty Cromwell.

Series 10. Photographs include pictures of Charlene Hodges Byrd, Joyce Ethel Hodges Cummings, Frederick Douglass, Elizabeth Dews Hodges, Charles Gilmor Cummings, Grace E. Shimm Cummings, Erminie F. Shimm, and other friends and relatives of the Byrd, Hodges, Cummings, Douglass, and Shimm families. Subjects are primarily portraits and candids, along with some wedding, baby, and school pictures. While some of the photographs are annotated, many of the individuals are unidentified. Included are vintage photographs, cabinet cards, cartes-de-visites, tintypes, daguerreotypes, and negatives.
Biographical / Historical:
The Shimm, Thomas, Cummings, Hodges, Davage, and related African American families chiefly lived in Virginia, Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Washington, D.C. Numerous family members worked as teachers, barbers, or in the service industry. They were active in local churches and service organizations, and had established friendships with local church leaders as well as with Frederick Douglass and his family.

The Shimm and Thomas families were located in Virginia, Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Washington, D.C. The Thomas family can be traced back to Philip Nelson, who owned property in Leesburg, Virginia and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Family genealogical papers list Nelson as a descendent of British Admiral Horatio Nelson. This lineage, however, is not supported in publically available family histories of Horatio Nelson. Philip Nelson and his wife Araminta had five children: Catherine (b. 1805?), William, Levi (b. 1820?), Henrietta, and Grayson.

Catherine Nelson married Elias E. Thomas (b. 1816?) of Virginia in 1840. They wed in Philadelphia and had five children: Levi Nelson (b. 1841), Sarah (1843-1885), Edward (b. 1844), Elizabeth (1848-1932), and Charles (b. 1851).

Sarah Thomas married William Y. Shimm (b. 1841), a barber in Reading, Pennsylvania, on July 26, 1863. They had 2 daughters, Erminie (1867-1936) and Grace (1865-1910). The Shimms lived in Pennsylvania and Ohio, but had moved to Washington, D.C., around 1871. Sarah was a teacher and a writer who published under the name "Faith Lichen." Her writings, primarily essays and commentaries about race and politics, were printed in several newspapers including The National Republican, The Celtic Weekly, The People's Advocate, and The Sunday Morning Gazette.

Sarah's sister Elizabeth was also a teacher in Maryland. Her brother Charles was a lawyer in Washington, D.C., and a graduate of the first class at Howard University's law school.

Erminie and Grace Shimm became teachers in the Washington, D.C., public school system. Erminie was active in her church and supportive of missionary work in Liberia. Grace married Charles Gilmor Cummings, a pastor in Alexandria, Virginia, on July 9, 1902. They had one daughter, Joyce Ethel (1903-1971), and second child in 1905 who died in infancy. Grace died in 1910 of heart failure. After her death, Grace's sister Erminie and Charles's family helped raise Joyce Ethel in Washington, D.C., and Baltimore, Maryland.

Joyce Ethel Cummings Hodges graduated from Morgan College in 1924, and received her master's degree from Howard University in 1931. She taught at Douglass High School in Baltimore from 1924-1964. Joyce Ethel married Charles E. Hodges (1900--975) in 1927 and they divorced in 1953. The couple had one daughter, Charlene (1929-2009).

Charlene Hodges Byrd grew up in Washington, D.C., but attended the Northfield School for Girls in East Northfield, Massachusetts, for high school, graduating in 1946. She received her bachelor's degree from Connecticut College in 1950, and her master's degree in English Language and Literature from the University of Chicago in 1951. She married Charles R. Byrd (1919-2004) in 1952. They had one son in 1954, but he died four days after birth. Byrd soon began a career as a teacher and education administrator, eventually working for Kanawha County Schools in Charleston, West Virginia. She was also active in her local community as a member of the Book Lovers of Charleston, West Virginia; Church Women United; and The Links, Inc.

Charles E. Hodges was born Bridgewater, Virginia, where his father was a minister. He graduated from Morgan College in 1923 and received his master's degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1943. He was a teacher and served as principal of the North Street School in Hagerstown, Maryland. After he and Joyce Ethel divorced in 1953, he married Elizabeth Dews (1913-1999) in 1955.

Elizabeth Dews Hodges, born Elizabeth Virginia Waumbeeka, was adopted by James Edward (1889-1954) and Sarah Virginia Dews (1888?-1964) in Washington, D.C., in 1920. She graduated from Miner Teachers College in 1939, and worked as a teacher in Annapolis, Maryland, at Wiley H. Bates High School for 34 years. She was awarded a medal for her work there by the Freedom Foundation of Valley Forge in 1959. Elizabeth was active in local organizations in Maryland and Washington, D.C., including the SE/NE Friends of the Capitol View Branch Library; Eastern Star Chapter 4; Mount Ephraim Baptist Church; National Museum of Women in the Arts; National Association for the Advancement of Colored Peoples; and the Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind.

The Davage family is descended from Sidney Hall (b. 1818?) and Charles Davage (b. 1815?). Sidney was a former slave at the Perry Hall mansion in Baltimore, and was manumitted by 1840. She married Charles, a coachman, on April 12, 1842. They had five children: Eliza Jane (1843-1913), Sophia (b. 1847), Charlotte (b. 1849), Charles (b. 1854), and Hester (b. 1845). Their daughter Eliza Jane married Henry Cummings (b. 1830?). They had seven children: Harry Sythe (1866-1917), Charles Gilmor (1870-1924), William (b. 1882), Ida R. (1868-1958), Estelle (1874-1944), Carroll (b. 1875), Francis (b. 1872), and Aaron (1864?-1932).

Harry Sythe Cummings, a lawyer in Baltimore, became the city's first African American City Council member. He was first elected in 1890 and served intermittently until his death in 1917, often working on issues related to education. Cummings also delivered a speech at the Republican National Convention in 1904 seconding the presidential nomination of Theodore Roosevelt. He married Blanche Conklin in 1899, and they had three children: Harry S. Jr. (b. 1905), Lucille (d. 1906), and Louise.

Charles Gilmor Cummings graduated from Drew Theological Seminary in 1898, and was a pastor in Alexandria, Virginia and elsewhere. After the death of his wife Grace in 1910, he married Rosa Catherine Bearden, grandmother of artist Romare Bearden, in 1912.

Ida R. Cummings graduated from Morgan College in 1922, and was the first African American kindergarten teacher in Baltimore. She was also active in local organizations, and was president of the Colored Fresh Air and Empty Stocking Circle; chairman of the Woman's Section Council of Defense in Baltimore during the World War, 1914-1918; and president of the Woman's Campaign Bureau of the Colored Republican Voters' League of Maryland.
Provenance:
The Charlene Hodges Byrd collection was donated to the National Museum of African American History and Culture by Herbert S. Garten, co-personal representative of the Estate of Charlene H. Byrd, in 2010.
Restrictions:
Access to collection requires appointment.
Rights:
This collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
African Americans -- Maryland  Search this
African Americans -- Photographs  Search this
African American families  Search this
African Americans -- Pennsylvania  Search this
African American newspapers  Search this
African American -- Social life and customs  Search this
African American women journalists  Search this
African Americans -- Education  Search this
African American churches  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African Americans -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Citation:
Charlene Hodges Byrd collection, circa 1750-2009. National Museum of African American History and Culture, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAAHC.A2010.26
See more items in:
Charlene Hodges Byrd collection
Archival Repository:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/io3b5e50c57-6cdc-4a60-9599-51a62881a4f9
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmaahc-a2010-26
Online Media:

Horace Pippin notebooks and letters, circa 1920

Creator:
Pippin, Horace, 1888-1946  Search this
Pippin, Horace, 1888-1946  Search this
Subject:
Carlen, Robert  Search this
Type:
Diaries
Topic:
Folk art  Search this
Painting -- United States  Search this
African American military personnel  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Self-taught artists  Search this
African American painters  Search this
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
Theme:
Diaries  Search this
African American  Search this
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)8586
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)210765
AAA_collcode_pipphora
Theme:
Diaries
African American
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_210765
Online Media:

Sullivan family papers

Creator:
Sullivan family  Search this
Names:
Sullivan family  Search this
Extent:
2.25 Linear feet (7 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Autograph albums
Books
Correspondence
Certificates
Tintypes (prints)
Ephemera
Financial records
Negatives (photographic)
Photographic prints
Place:
Long Island (N. Y.)
Washington (D.C.)
Warsaw (Poland)
Boston (Mass.)
New Brunswick
Date:
1860-1994
bulk 1920-1960
Summary:
The Sullivan Family papers, which date from 1880 to 1994 and measure 2.25 linear feet, document the personal lives of four generations in the Sullivan Family. The papers are comprised of personal correspondence, school materials, legal documents, financial records, clippings, books, posters, and photographs.
Scope and Contents note:
These papers, which date from 1880 to 1994, bulk dates 1920–1960, document the lives of four generations of the Sullivan family. They contain material relating to a great number of Sullivan family members descended from Livinia and Abraham Sullivan. The papers especially offer insight into the family's life and involvement during the Second World War through a particularly abundant collection of correspondence and photographs. The papers also include books, legal documents, financial records, and school materials.
Arrangement note:
The papers are organized into four series. Folders are arranged alphabetically within series, while documents within folders are organized chronologically. Oversized material appears in the series: Biographical Files, Printed Materials and Photographs. Non archival materials associated with the papers are housed in the Collections Department.

Series I: Biographical Files

Series II: Correspondence

Series III: Printed Materials

Series IV: Photographs
Biographical/Historical note:
In 1883 Abraham Sullivan welcomed his wife, Livinia and four children, Charles, Nynetta, Emma, and Theodore to Boston, Massachusetts. Emigrating from New Brunswick, Canada, the family would remain in the Boston area for many generations to come. After the move to Boston, oldest son Charles H. Sullivan would rise to prominence in the New England music scene. He became a skilled craftsman in instrument-making and founded the Boston Victorian Orchestra, a multi-racial orchestra.

Charles Sullivan never married, which perhaps contributes to the lack of information on his life. His brother Theodore married Anne Vann of Nova Scotia, Canada. Together they raised two daughters from Anne's previous marriage, Sadie and Rosa Jones (later Sadie Thompson and Rosa Miller). They also had four children of their own, Theodore M., twins Mary (later Mary Walters) and May, and Frances (later Frances Mendez).

Theodore and Anne's son Theodore M. began his family's military tradition by enlisting in the army in 1917, during the First World War. He spent two years fighting in Europe before being honorably discharged at the end of the conflict in 1919. In the early 1930s Theodore was awarded the Purple Heart by United States Secretary of War George Dern for eleven different wounds sustained in 1918.

Theodore M.'s example was followed by his immediate and extended family members during the Second World War. Many of the women volunteered in war efforts at home and all three of Theodore M.'s sons, Lewis, Earle, and Edwin (Eddy) enlisted for service in the armed forces. In 1943 Earle Sullivan was accepted into the Tuskegee Institution's program for training the first African American military pilots (now famously known as the "Tuskegee Airmen") and was well into his training before his death at the end of 1943.

The Sullivan family continued their tradition of service for many decades through memberships with the Red Cross and American Legion. In 1954 Sadie Thompson, Theodore M. Sullivan's half sister, was honored with an award for forty years of service in her Boston Chapter of the American Red Cross, and again in 1971 for fifty five years of active involvement.

Although the Sullivan family retained ties to the Boston area they originally settled in, several branches have spread throughout the northeastern United States. After his marriage, Theodore M. Sullivan began working for the Bureau of Engraving in Washington D.C. Still connected to his Boston home, Theodore split his time between the two cities until his death in 1969. Upon her marriage to Thomas Mendes, Ethylene Mendez, daughter of Francis Sullivan Mendez moved to Long Island, N.Y. She was eventually followed by her mother and sister, Lillian, where they lived until their deaths in the 1980s and 90s.
Provenance:
The Sullivan Family papers were donated to the Anacostia Community Museum in April 2005 by Savina Martin, Dominga Martin and Donna Akiba Sullivan Harper.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for unrestricted research. Use requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Sullivan Family papers are the physical property of the Anacostia Community Museum. Literary and copyright belong to the author/creator or their legal heirs and assigns. Rights to work produced during the normal course of Museum business resides with the Anacostia Community Museum. For further information, and to obtain permission to publish or reproduce, contact the Museum Archives.
Topic:
American Legion  Search this
African American military personnel  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
African American families  Search this
World War, 1914-1918 -- African Americans  Search this
American Red Cross  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- African Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Autograph albums
Books
Correspondence
Certificates
Tintypes (prints)
Ephemera
Financial records
Negatives (photographic)
Photographic prints
Citation:
The Sullivan Family papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Savina Martin, Dominga Martin and Donna Akiba Sullivan Harper.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-035
See more items in:
Sullivan family papers
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa790713327-dd0a-4a8f-81fb-e9d772c97b37
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-035
Online Media:

Siblings Francis and Theodore M. Sullivan with family friend

Collection Creator:
Sullivan family  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 4.25 x 2.5 in.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
Boston (Mass.)
United States
Date:
circa 1918
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for unrestricted research. Use requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Sullivan Family papers are the physical property of the Anacostia Community Museum. Literary and copyright belong to the author/creator or their legal heirs and assigns. Rights to work produced during the normal course of Museum business resides with the Anacostia Community Museum. For further information, and to obtain permission to publish or reproduce, contact the Museum Archives.
Topic:
African American families  Search this
African American military personnel  Search this
World War, 1914-1918 -- African Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
The Sullivan Family papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Savina Martin, Dominga Martin and Donna Akiba Sullivan Harper.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-035, Item ACMA PH2005.7002.010
See more items in:
Sullivan family papers
Sullivan family papers / Series 3: Photographs / Theodore M. Sullivan
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa713e8611b-f15c-4aa7-a39a-e09eea68a196
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-035-ref607

Portrait of World War I soldier, Theodore Milton Sullivan

Collection Creator:
Sullivan family  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , gelatin silver, 5.375 x 3.375 in.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
Boston (Mass.)
United States
Date:
circa 1918
Scope and Contents:
Theodore M. Sullivan began his family's military tradition by enlisting in the military on March 28, 1917, during World War I. Sullivan served in the 372nd Infantry Regiment, Company L, Sixth Infantry of Massachusetts. His military record indicates that he was involved in the Battle at Verdun, France before being honorably discharged at the end of the conflict. In the early 1930s Theodore was awarded the Purple Heart by United States Secretary of War George Dern for eleven different wounds sustained in 1918.
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for unrestricted research. Use requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Sullivan Family papers are the physical property of the Anacostia Community Museum. Literary and copyright belong to the author/creator or their legal heirs and assigns. Rights to work produced during the normal course of Museum business resides with the Anacostia Community Museum. For further information, and to obtain permission to publish or reproduce, contact the Museum Archives.
Topic:
African American military personnel  Search this
Portraits  Search this
World War, 1914-1918 -- African Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
The Sullivan Family papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Savina Martin, Dominga Martin and Donna Akiba Sullivan Harper.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-035, Item ACMA PH2005.7002.046
See more items in:
Sullivan family papers
Sullivan family papers / Series 3: Photographs / Theodore M. Sullivan
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa750f7e284-af07-410b-a06d-d0b0b71a6988
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-035-ref609

Theodore Milton Sullivan posing in his army uniform

Collection Creator:
Sullivan family  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 4.875 x 3.625 in.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
Boston (Mass.)
United States
Date:
circa 1918
Scope and Contents:
Theodore M. Sullivan began his family's military tradition by enlisting in the military on March 28, 1917, during World War I. Sullivan served in the 372nd Infantry Regiment, Company L, Sixth Infantry of Massachusetts. His military records indicates that he was involved in the Battle at Verdun, France before being honorably discharged at the end of the conflict. In the early 1930s Theodore was awarded the Purple Heart by United States Secretary of War George Dern for eleven different wounds sustained in 1918.
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for unrestricted research. Use requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Sullivan Family papers are the physical property of the Anacostia Community Museum. Literary and copyright belong to the author/creator or their legal heirs and assigns. Rights to work produced during the normal course of Museum business resides with the Anacostia Community Museum. For further information, and to obtain permission to publish or reproduce, contact the Museum Archives.
Topic:
African American military personnel  Search this
World War, 1914-1918 -- African Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
The Sullivan Family papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Savina Martin, Dominga Martin and Donna Akiba Sullivan Harper.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-035, Item ACMA PH2005.7002.045
See more items in:
Sullivan family papers
Sullivan family papers / Series 3: Photographs / Theodore M. Sullivan
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7e3ebd061-9f23-47ca-b6f5-a19bcb079172
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-035-ref613

Sullivan family friend "Pee Wee" Perossier in uniform with friends

Collection Creator:
Sullivan family  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 5.375 x 3.375 in.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
Boston (Mass.)
United States
Date:
circa 1942
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for unrestricted research. Use requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Sullivan Family papers are the physical property of the Anacostia Community Museum. Literary and copyright belong to the author/creator or their legal heirs and assigns. Rights to work produced during the normal course of Museum business resides with the Anacostia Community Museum. For further information, and to obtain permission to publish or reproduce, contact the Museum Archives.
Topic:
African American sailors  Search this
World War, 1914-1918 -- African Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
The Sullivan Family papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Savina Martin, Dominga Martin and Donna Akiba Sullivan Harper.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-035, Item ACMA PH2005.7002.039
See more items in:
Sullivan family papers
Sullivan family papers / Series 3: Photographs / "Pee Wee" Perossier
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa73a982ff5-9576-4d53-9efa-c66c10688c2e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-035-ref624

Theodore M. Sullivan with his American Legion Post

Names:
American Legion  Search this
Collection Creator:
Sullivan family  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 10 x 8 in.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
Boston (Mass.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1940
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for unrestricted research. Use requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Sullivan Family papers are the physical property of the Anacostia Community Museum. Literary and copyright belong to the author/creator or their legal heirs and assigns. Rights to work produced during the normal course of Museum business resides with the Anacostia Community Museum. For further information, and to obtain permission to publish or reproduce, contact the Museum Archives.
Topic:
African American military personnel  Search this
Veterans  Search this
World War, 1914-1918 -- African Americans  Search this
Portraits, Group  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
The Sullivan Family papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Savina Martin, Dominga Martin and Donna Akiba Sullivan Harper.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-035, Item ACMA PH2005.7002.049
See more items in:
Sullivan family papers
Sullivan family papers / Series 3: Photographs / Theodore M. Sullivan
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7996afa2b-133e-491e-a780-db1b69eadf72
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-035-ref626

Group of World War I soldiers at Kittery Junction Station

Collection Creator:
Sullivan family  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , gelatin silver, 7 1/2 x 9 1/2 inches.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
Maine
United States
Date:
circa 1918
Scope and Contents:
Theodore M. Sullivan (third from left) began his family's military tradition by enlisting in the military on March 28, 1917, during World War I. Sullivan served in the 372nd Infantry Regiment, Company L, Sixth Infantry of Massachusetts. His military record indicates that he was involved in the Battle at Verdun, France before being honorably discharged at the end of the conflict. In the early 1930s Theodore was awarded the Purple Heart by United States Secretary of War George Dern for eleven different wounds sustained in 1918.
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for unrestricted research. Use requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Sullivan Family papers are the physical property of the Anacostia Community Museum. Literary and copyright belong to the author/creator or their legal heirs and assigns. Rights to work produced during the normal course of Museum business resides with the Anacostia Community Museum. For further information, and to obtain permission to publish or reproduce, contact the Museum Archives.
Topic:
African American military personnel  Search this
Portraits  Search this
Railroad stations  Search this
World War, 1914-1918 -- African Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
The Sullivan Family papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Savina Martin, Dominga Martin and Donna Akiba Sullivan Harper.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-035, Item ACMA PH2005.7002.062
See more items in:
Sullivan family papers
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa738dc8734-448b-4871-b5e9-aa2194738b10
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-035-ref656

Group of World War I soldiers and railroad employees at Kittery Junction Station

Collection Creator:
Sullivan family  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , gelatin silver, 7 1/2 x 9 1/2 inches.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
Maine
United States
Date:
circa 1918
Scope and Contents:
Theodore M. Sullivan (third from left) began his family's military tradition by enlisting in the military on March 28, 1917, during World War I. Sullivan served in the 372nd Infantry Regiment, Company L, Sixth Infantry of Massachusetts. His military record indicates that he was involved in the Battle at Vedun, France before being honorably discharged at the end of the conflict. In the early 1930s Theodore was awarded the Purple Heart by United States Secretary of War George Dern for eleven different wounds sustained in 1918.
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for unrestricted research. Use requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Sullivan Family papers are the physical property of the Anacostia Community Museum. Literary and copyright belong to the author/creator or their legal heirs and assigns. Rights to work produced during the normal course of Museum business resides with the Anacostia Community Museum. For further information, and to obtain permission to publish or reproduce, contact the Museum Archives.
Topic:
African American military personnel  Search this
Portraits  Search this
Railroad stations  Search this
World War, 1914-1918 -- African Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
The Sullivan Family papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Savina Martin, Dominga Martin and Donna Akiba Sullivan Harper.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-035, Item ACMA PH2005.7002.063
See more items in:
Sullivan family papers
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa781999ebe-174a-4d74-b019-ea630313e024
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-035-ref657

Enlistment record for Theodore Milton Sullivan, World War I

Creator:
United States. Army  Search this
Collection Creator:
Sullivan family  Search this
Extent:
1 Item
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Certificates
Place:
Boston (Mass.)
Date:
1917 March 28
Scope and Contents:
Almost a century ago, Theodore M. Sullivan enlisted in the U.S. army to fight in World War I. His Enlistment Record lists his character as "excellent," and indicates that he was involved in the Battle at Verdun, France.
General:
Honorable Discharge certificate located on verso of enlistment record.
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for unrestricted research. Use requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Sullivan Family papers are the physical property of the Anacostia Community Museum. Literary and copyright belong to the author/creator or their legal heirs and assigns. Rights to work produced during the normal course of Museum business resides with the Anacostia Community Museum. For further information, and to obtain permission to publish or reproduce, contact the Museum Archives.
Topic:
African American military personnel  Search this
Recruiting and enlistment  Search this
World War, 1914-1918 -- African Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Certificates
Collection Citation:
The Sullivan Family papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Savina Martin, Dominga Martin and Donna Akiba Sullivan Harper.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-035, Item ACMA PH2005.7002.067
See more items in:
Sullivan family papers
Sullivan family papers / Series 1: Biographical Files
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7ff22eaba-b05b-408e-91ce-47e213e94abe
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-035-ref658
Online Media:

Certificate from The commonwealth of Massachusetts to Theodore Milton Sullivan

Creator:
United States. Army  Search this
Collection Creator:
Sullivan family  Search this
Extent:
1 Item
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Certificates
Place:
Boston (Mass.)
Date:
1919 May 16
Scope and Contents:
Theodore M. Sullivan began his family's military tradition by enlisting in the military on March 28, 1917, during World War I. Sullivan served in the 372nd Infantry Regiment, Company L, Sixth Infantry of Massachusetts. This certificate indicates that he was involved in the Battle at Verdun, France before being honorably discharged at the end of the conflict. In the early 1930s Theodore was awarded the Purple Heart by United States Secretary of War George Dern for eleven different wounds sustained in 1918.
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for unrestricted research. Use requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Sullivan Family papers are the physical property of the Anacostia Community Museum. Literary and copyright belong to the author/creator or their legal heirs and assigns. Rights to work produced during the normal course of Museum business resides with the Anacostia Community Museum. For further information, and to obtain permission to publish or reproduce, contact the Museum Archives.
Topic:
African American military personnel  Search this
World War, 1914-1918 -- African Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Certificates
Collection Citation:
The Sullivan Family papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Savina Martin, Dominga Martin and Donna Akiba Sullivan Harper.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-035, Item ACMA PH2005.7002.066
See more items in:
Sullivan family papers
Sullivan family papers / Series 1: Biographical Files
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa76b244556-c8ea-43c5-99d4-3cf2c5a789c3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-035-ref659

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