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Portland -- Josselyn Garden

Architect:
Graham, Rod  Search this
Landscape architect:
Kiest, Craig  Search this
Provenance:
The Portland Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Josselyn Garden (Portland, Oregon)
United States of America -- Oregon -- Multnomah County -- Portland
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets.
General:
A 1922 Tudor-style house with three acres, listed on the National Historic Register, required extensive renovation by the current owners to preserve the original craftsmanship. The grounds were in need of reconditioning as well, including an original Japanese garden whose pond had to be re-dug, rocks repositioned, and plantings restored with more than 40 different Japanese maple trees. Landscape architect Craig Kiest's (ASLA) plan includes garden rooms, paths and hardscape, described by the owner as a classic design that features their plant collections. A circular driveway in front of the house surrounds a boxwood knot garden punctuated with container plantings. The uphill walk to the garden runs along a wall with espaliered camellias and is overlooked by a balcony for viewing the knot garden that has a wrought iron railing assembled from old gates found on the property. A serpentine rose border with more than one hundred plants is a colorful connector along the back driveway between the house and garage. An orchard, perennial bed, soccer field and upper lawn are arrayed between the house and the streets that border this corner lot.
Several bluestone terraces with stone steps and balustrades accommodate the terrain behind the house and lead to a formal garden that is on an axis with the dining room. A pergola planted with wisteria japonica crosses the entrance to the formal garden. In this garden surrounded by a hedge of holly there are boxwood parterres centered by a circular patch of lawn with an enormous restored stone planter with white Iceland roses and white alyssum in the summer. Large cast iron planters on bluestone platforms contain Japanese maples. The formal garden terminates in a seating area backed by a semi-circle of four columns and an old planting of English holly. Other features include a grotto with granite semi-circular steps and a grindstone, a wall fountain with a bronze frog, and an Italianate cobblestone patio with beds of hydrangea. Frogs and dragonflies are recurring motifs in the iron hardware on the buildings and in garden ornaments. Flowering vines and container gardens, climbing roses, and a rose and wild geranium parterre add color to the vigorous greenery that grows in this favorable climate.
The Japanese garden features the colorful Japanese maple tree collection and a pond stocked with koi. Additional trees from the earlier garden include copper beech, gingko, and Japanese umbrella pine. There is a raised vegetable garden for berries, grapes, pumpkins and artichokes with a custom made wooden fence, and wooded areas underplanted with hosta and other shade-tolerant perennials. A large lawn bisecting these forests leads to a rectangular reflecting pool with a colonnade that was found buried in an old laurel hedge on the property and restored.
Persons associated with the garden include Percy Smith family (former owners, 1922-1994); Craig Kiest, ASLA (landscape architect, 1997-1999); Dave Sexton (gardener, 1999-present)
Related Materials:
Josselyn Garden related holdings consist of 1 folder (26 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Oregon -- Portland  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File OR050
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Oregon
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb66099b348-e089-478c-bb8b-7203eaa24392
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref10146

Knoxville -- Craiglen

Consultant:
Verey, Rosemary  Search this
Landscape architect:
Lester, Charles F.  Search this
Former owner:
Craig, John J., Mrs.  Search this
Craig, John J.  Search this
Garden designer:
Spengler, Mary  Search this
Architect:
Barber & McMurry  Search this
Creator:
Knoxville Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Craiglen (Knoxville, Tennessee)
United States of America -- Tennessee -- Knox County -- Knoxville
Scope and Contents:
Copies of original photographs are included in file.

The folder includes a work sheet, garden plans, photo copies of articles, nursery invoices, correspondence, and booklet on Craig family and Candoro Marble Company.
General:
Charles I. Barber, of Barber and McMurry, designed the house in 1926 for Mr. John J. Craig, III., one of the owners of Candoro Marble Company. Landscape architect Charles F. Lester was hired to mold the surrounding eighty acres to complement the strongly Italianate house. Lester laid out green terraces on a slope between the north front of the house and a man-made lake below and created a large formal garden to the west. Developers purchased the property in 1971, with the intent of demolishing the residence and constructing a subdivision. The house and several acres, however, were preserved with the remaining being developed into the Westlands and Westchase condominiums and Craigland subdivision. The current owners of the existing property have restored and renovated the gardens and remaining two acres of property, which combine formal and naturalistic elements. In 1998, a wall was added to define the north side of the formal garden, which features ponds and stone benches original to the property, concrete sculptures, boxwoods, and espaliered "Smoothee" apple trees. To the east of the house is a large lawn surrounded by woods of mature dogwoods, maples, tulip poplars, magnolias, hackberries, walnuts, oaks, and hemlocks. A cottage garden is kept behind the garage. The owners planted an herb garden in large clay pots just outside the kitchen door.
Persons associated with the garden include: Mr. and Mrs. John J. Craig, III. (former owners, 1926-1945); Mrs. John J. Craig, III. (former owner, 1945-1971); Mrs. and Mrs. Calvin Walter (former owners, 1971-1992); Charles F. Lester (landscape architect, 1926); Charles I. Barber (architect, 1926); Albert Milani (marble sculpture, 1926); Mary Spengler (garden designer, 1992-1998); Rosemary Verey (garden consultant, 1995); and Peter Thevenot (plant supplier, 1998).
Related Materials:
Craiglen related holdings consist of 1 folder (11 35 mm. slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Courtyard gardens  Search this
Gardens -- Tennessee -- Knoxville  Search this
Formal gardens  Search this
Cottage gardens  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File TN064
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Tennessee
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb68eb85b97-30ff-4321-b07b-2b585be168da
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref10919

Westminster West -- Hayward Garden

Gardener:
O'Donnell, Helen  Search this
Owner:
Hayward, Mary  Search this
Hayward, Gordon  Search this
Provenance:
Garden Club of Dublin (New Hampshire)  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Hayward Garden (Westminster West, Vermont)
United States of America -- Vermont -- Windham -- Westminster West
Scope and Contents:
Hayward Garden includes 63 digital images and a folder that includes worksheets, photocopies of articles and additional images including a pamphlet about a musical program created for and perfomed in the garden in 2014 as a the Yellow Barn summer program.
General:
The owners describe their one and one-half acre ornamental garden as a new garden in an old place, with its 200 year-old colonial farmhouse and attached barn, low stone walls, and old farm building foundations that have been repurposed as distinctive garden rooms within surrounding meadows and woods. They purchased the property in 1983 and spent about one year clearing the land of scrap metal and other debris, brambles and weed trees, a rotting barn, dead trees, and an old Nash Metropolitan automobile. The garden style is English, with a rectilinear format from south to north softened by lush growth in season and more evident in the long Vermont winter. The design began by drawing a straight line from the front door of the house to a 75-year-old apple tree. There is a crab apple orchard along that main axis that can be seen from the house. Brick and pea stone gravel walks, 90-foot long mixed borders, and an herb garden laid out in formal parterres are either parallel or perpendicular to the central axis of the garden. The 14 garden rooms are delineated by clipped hedges of varying heights, many of yew but also other plant materials for variation. There are four places to sit within the garden: a gazebo at the far end reached through a tunnel of pleached copper beech, an outdoor dining room on pavers under tall trees, a bench slightly above and overlooking their spring garden, and another bench next to a shed near the herb garden.
Creating a garden in harmony with the rural location was important to the owners, who subsequently purchased 19 adjacent acres and preserved the meadows and woods with the Vermont Land Trust. To instill harmony in the diverse garden rooms the owners adhere to three themes: hedges for structure, black locust posts and terra cotta containers for materials, and burgundy and other reds for the color that recurs throughout the garden rooms. Since the entire garden is unified it is possible to add variations without muddling the design. Honoring the long gone dairy farms they have turned the foundations of a milking parlor into a garden room that has low, drought tolerant plants growing among the stone flooring and three rusted milk cans. The cracked cement foundation of a former silo was turned into a pond with a fountain built into a stone wellhead and a statue of Buddha on the shore.
Gordon Hayward has written many articles for Horticulture, Taunton's Fine Gardening, and regional magazines using his own garden to teach design aesthetics and their practical application. Topics include the effective placement of planted and unplanted containers and other garden ornaments, how to build a small fountain, the importance of proportions to design, how to set vertical posts, and tips on outdoor seating and dining rooms. Good design is illustrated by reshaping lawns to complement planted borders or trees, through consistent choices of decorative materials, through applying the principles of theme and variation when choosing what to put in the garden, and through planning for the winter garden with berries and crab apples for birds and good "bones" that become evident in winter.
Persons associated with the garden include: Gordon Hayward (owner, garden designer, and gardener, 1983- ), Mary Hayward (owner, garden designer, and gardener, 1983- ), Ephraim and Lydia Johnson Ranney, and their descendants in the Buxton and Reed families (former owners, circa 1790-1983); Helen O'Donnell (gardener, 2008-2015).
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Vermont -- Westminster West  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File VT019
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Vermont
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6348782db-b9b4-4f9c-bd8d-72b7affb6963
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref11360

Mequon -- Little House in the Big Woods

Former owner:
Kuehn, Otto  Search this
O'Malley, Peter  Search this
Keegan, Richard  Search this
Landscape architect:
Stark, Judith Z.  Search this
Prairie developer:
Prairie Nursery  Search this
Provenance:
Green Tree Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Little House in the Big Woods (Mequon, Wisconsin)
United States of America -- Wisconsin -- Ozaukee County -- Mequon
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, plant list, and photocopies of newspaper articles.
General:
The eleven acre property includes a country Cape Cod style house, nine acres of hardwood trees, perennial and vegetable gardens designed by landscape architect Judith Stark (ASLA), a prairie, fairy garden, frog pond with a water garden and a mowed meadow next to a volley ball field. Stone walls separate the perennial garden from the prairie and set off play areas, and four custom wooden gates define access to the prairie. The vegetable garden alongside the house has rustic fencing, a rose bed and a rustic rose arbor. The perennial garden displays flowers suited to the climate, while on the other side of a stone wall in the 1.5 acres of prairie the flower are less organized. Woodlands include an American beech grove and a spruce grove as well as a treehouse and a 'Winnie the Pooh' tree. The fairy garden is set among spring bulbs on pebble paths and brought inside during the winter. Each year the property becomes a 'county fair' when the grandkids and their friends bring pet animals for 'judging' and parades.
The semi-rural location included woods, farm fields and hunting preserve with a cabin in a 167 acre tract before this house was built by a previous owner. The current owners converted the garage into a library, changed windows and added a free standing garage.
Persons associated with the garden include: Otto Kuehn (former landowner, 1940); Peter O'Malley (former owner, 1979-1986); Richard Keegan (former owner, 1986-1988); Judith Stark, ASLA (landscape architect, 1990s); Prairie Nursery (prairie developer, 1995).
Related Materials:
Little House in the Big Woods related holdings consist of 1 folder (25 digital images and 25 corresponding digital prints)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Wisconsin -- Mequon  Search this
Vernacular gardens  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File WI045
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Wisconsin
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6f6467b76-46f6-4a04-8e20-8b76c39bb6ab
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref11671

Goose Creek -- Medway Plantation

Architect:
van der Gracht, Ides  Search this
Landscape architect:
Shipman, Ellen, 1869-1950  Search this
Creator:
Little Garden Club of Rye--provenance.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Medway Plantation,(Goose Creek, South Carolina)
United States of America -- South Carolina -- Berkeley County -- Goose Creek
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, site plans, plant lists, and photocopies of articles.
General:
Medway Plantation comprises 6700 acres of longleaf and loblolly pine, live oaks, tupelo, swampland and lakes as well as the oldest masonry house in South Carolina. An ornamental garden with irregularly-shaped beds and serpentine paths, known as Miss Lou's garden, was redesigned in the 1930s by Ellen Biddle Shipman. The earlier garden was described as a bird sanctuary and nursery growing anise and Chinese bay trees, azaleas, fringe trees, roses, flowering almond, lilacs, spireas, myrtle, and yellow Jessamine, with wisteria growing up into deciduous trees. The surplus from Miss Lou's garden was planted in long borders alongside three shallow brick terraces, and along paths that led to a schoolhouse on the property. The current drive to the house has double borders of live oak trees hung with Spanish moss that were first planted after the Civil War. In the 1930s architect Ides van der Gracht designed a greenhouse with stepped gables, echoing that feature from the house, and added serpentine brick walls surrounding a garden of flowers and vegetables, on the site of the historic kitchen garden. Prior to the Civil War rice was cultivated at Medway Plantation, followed by cotton and the current crop, timber.
Medway Plantation was first organized as a land grant to Johan (or Jan) van Aerssen in the last quarter of the 17th century. He started the original house which during its long history was burned and rebuilt, nearly abandoned and used only as a hunting lodge, and finally renovated. The house has unusual stepped gables in the Dutch style, reflecting the van Aerssen heritage. After van Aerssen's death circa 1867 and the remarriage of his widow, Sabina de Vignon to Thomas Smith in 1689, the property came into the prominent South Carolina Smith family.
In the early days land parcels routinely were acquired and sold and the dimensions of Medway Plantation changed frequently, finally ending up at 6700 acres under the ownership of Sidney J. and Gertrude S. Legendre in the 20th century, who had purchased and annexed neighboring plantations. Before her death in 2000 Gertrude Legendre put the property in a non-profit foundation with a conservation easement to preserve the pine forests, wetlands, and wildlife. It is recognized as a breeding site for endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers, bald eagles, wood ducks and wintering ring-necked ducks, and provides habitat for deer, turkey and quail.
Persons associated with the garden include Johan van Aerssen (former owner and builder of original house, 1686-circa 1688); Sabina de Vignon, (former owner, 1688-1689); Thomas Smith and members of the Smith family (former owners, 1689-1701); Edward Hyrne (former owner, 1701-1711); Peter Gaillard Stoney and family (former owners, 1833-1930); Sidney J. and Gertrude Sanford Legendre (former owners, 1930-1993; Ides van Waterschoot van der Gracht (architect, 1930s); Ellen Biddle Shipman (landscape architect, 1930s).
Related Materials:
Medway Plantation related holdings consist of 2 folders (2 35mm slides (photographs), 34 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- South Carolina -- Goose Creek  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File SC082
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / South Carolina
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6eef92d46-4ed6-41e2-8ee9-f17ee6b00d50
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref12480

Houston -- Bayou Bluff

Former owner:
Carter, W.T. Jr.  Search this
Carter, W.T. III  Search this
Carter, Victor N.  Search this
McCormick, Sanford  Search this
Steenland, Nelson  Search this
Samuels, Jan  Search this
Samuels, David  Search this
Searls, David T.  Search this
Abercrombie, Catherine Searls  Search this
Landscape architect:
Steele, McDugald  Search this
Conservationist:
Hershey, Terese Tarlton  Search this
Horticulturist:
Ruckstuhl, Eric  Search this
Provenance:
Garden Club of Houston  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Bayou Bluff (Houston, Texas)
United States of America -- Texas -- Harris -- Houston
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets.
General:
The 7.75 acres property was part of 100 acres the W.T. Carter family purchased as a weekend retreat from the city of Houston in 1929. Later subdivided into smaller parcels, the current owners have bought neighboring properties as they came on the market in order to triple the size of their property and recreate a native habitat along Buffalo Bayou. Invasive plants and vines have been removed from otherwise undisturbed areas above the bayou, including non-native ornamental escapees from previous gardens. The hydrology of the property was another concern: the formal landscaped areas had to be able to withstand occasional flooding and the high bank above the bayou that was going native needed to be stabilized. Native trees including burr oak, Live oak, and Mexican plum were planted to stabilize the soil for butterfly and wildflower gardens and were augmented with walking trails. A wooden retaining wall was installed. Native wood fern, Turk's cap, American beauty berry, lantana and butterfly bush were planted in the organized beds on the adjacent properties. Gravel that allows run-off has replaced hardscape in the formal courtyards and gravel swales for run-off throughout the property double as walking paths when dry.
The circa 2005 house replacing the original house on the lot is approached over a small bridge spanning a ravine then entered through formal contemporary courtyards with high walls draped with ivy and bougainvillea and bordered by hedges of jasmine and camellias. Behind the house there is a reflecting pool plaza with massive container plantings of geraniums, variegated ivy and foxtail ferns. The lawn in back is bordered by colorful azaleas planted in the 1990's bordered by a low stone wall and featuring a small stone Hindu temple. A swimming pool with a contemporary sculptural fountain was added when the house on one adjacent property was demolished.
Local conservationist Terry Hershey is a neighbor and was instrumental in preserving Buffalo Bayou in the 1960's. She encouraged all the neighbors to leave the land adjacent to the bayou in a natural state that would support wildlife, and organized the Bayou Preservation Association. The formal plaza and landscaped azalea garden of this property transition to native plantings for the benefit of local wildlife, including armadillos, raccoons, barn owls and other birds, butterflies, and possibly coyotes.
Persons associated with the garden include W. T. Carter, Jr., W.T. Carter, III & Victor N. Carter (former owners, 1929-1956); Sanford McCormick (former owner, 1980-1993); Nelson Steenland (former owner, 1956-1986); Jan & David Samuels (former owners, 1986-2006); David T. Searls (former owner, 1957-1972); Catherine Searls Abercrombie (former owner, 1972-1998); McDugald Steele (Landscape Architect, 2010- ); Terry Hershey (conservationist, 1993- ); Eric Ruckstuhl (horticulturist and hydrologist, 2005- ).
Related Materials:
Bayou Bluff related holdings consist of 1 folder (16 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Texas -- Houston  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File TX194
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Texas
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6e22d2eab-0e46-4121-bdc4-833e6ad18828
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref13512

South Euclid -- Cropthorn

Provenance:
Shaker Lakes Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Cropthorn (South Euclid, Ohio)
United States of America -- Ohio -- Cuyahoga County -- South Euclid
Scope and Contents:
Cropthorn related holdings consist of 2 folders, 2 35 mm. slides (c.1987-1992) and 25 35mm slides (1984).
General:
The main feature of the garden was its arc of perennial and rose gardens, sloping to catch the sun and the visitor's eye. The Tudor house, lawns, and gardens became an organic part of the property, which had been second or third growth forest, part of long-abandoned farmland. Well-grown trees were preserved, along with sections of the woods. The south area was kept unchanged except for a flagstone-paved picnic area with brick seating and a large brick fireplace. The woods to the east were somewhat tamed by lining the stream with sandstone; putting in primroses, ferns and other shade-loving plants; and adding two small stone bridges. The flower beds were terraced with low sandstone walls lining broad grass paths. Dense plantings of iris and roses bloomed through the summer. Cutting gardens, two greenhouses, a cold-frame, tool shed, vegetable garden; and field completed the property.
Person(s) associated with the property and garden include: Richard Preston and Helen Millikin Nash, II (former owners, ca. 1923-1990).
Related Materials:
Additional records may be available at the Shaker Lakes Garden Club and also the Western Reserve Historical Society.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Ohio -- South Euclid  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File OH049
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Ohio
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6232d0786-ed91-4f91-be1b-4f4eaa789a8d
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref15561

Leesburg -- Oatlands Plantation

Creator:
Hutchins, Stilson, 1838-1912  Search this
Former owner:
Eustis, William Corcoran Mrs  Search this
Carter, George C.  Search this
Carter, George C. Jr  Search this
Owner:
National Trust for Historic Preservation in the United States  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Oatlands Plantation (Leesburg, Virginia)
United States of America -- Virginia -- Loudoun County -- Leesburg
Scope and Contents:
Folder includes work sheets, brochures, garden map, landscape plan since 1965, photo prints, and copies of articles.
General:
George Carter, great-grandson of Robert "King" Carter built the three-story mansion and developed the land as an agricultural plantation shortly after the turn of the 19th century. The Eustises, former owners, renovated the mansion and restored the walled gardens. They extended the terraces, added a boxwood walk, and built a tea house and reflecting pool. In 1965, the Eustis daughters presented the National Trust with the 261-acre estate. The estate became a National Historic Landmark in 1972. A restoration effort began in 1980s to return the gardens to Mrs. Eustis's plans in the early 1900s. The mansion and gardens are now open to the public.
Persons associated with the property include: George Carter (former owner, 1798-); George C. Carter, Jr. (former owner, ?-1897); Stilton Hutchins (1897-1902); William Corcoran Eustis (former owner, 1902-1965); Mrs. Eustis Emmet and Mrs. David Findley (former owners, 1964); National Trust for Historic Preservation (owner, 1965-present); George Carter (constructed terraces and orangerie, early 1880s); Mrs. Custis Eustis (designer of flower beds and rose garden and extended boxwood parterre); and Alredo Francesco Siani (horticulturist, 1982-?).
Related Materials:
Oatlands Plantation related holdings consist of 1 folder (22 35 mm. slides and 44 glass lantern slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Virginia -- Leesburg  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File VA018
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Virginia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6ef890546-2503-4d4b-b21e-b6c25654307a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref18836

Princeton -- New Jersey Woodland Property

Former owner:
Stanley, Thomas Mr.  Search this
Stanley, Thomas Mrs.  Search this
Heins, Katharine P.  Search this
Heins, John J.  Search this
Architect:
Bauhan, Rolf William, 1892-1966  Search this
Bennett, Robert S.  Search this
Landscape architect:
Lenker, David M.  Search this
Bencze, S. Lawrence  Search this
Olejnik, Barbara J. CLA  Search this
Doerler Landscapes  Search this
Sculptor:
Mallory, Ann  Search this
Ditarando, Roger  Search this
Stokes, Charlotte C.  Search this
Provenance:
Stony Brook Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
New Jersey Woodland Property (Princeton, New Jersey)
United States of America -- New Jersey -- Mercer County -- Princeton
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets and write-ups of the property's planting scheme.
Varying Form:
Frog Pond
General:
The New Jersey Woodland Property comprises 3.5 acres, a Colonial Revival house designed by architect Rolf W. Bauhan (1892-1966) in 1959, and ten distinct garden areas that the owner has been developing since 1981. Among the first area encountered is wooded lot bordered by preserved open space, a spring-fed pond, a swimming pool, and a graceful curving entry with bluestone steps and mature rhododendron and mountain laurel. Problems to overcome included a huge native deer population, undeveloped areas where invasive plants thrived, heavy clay soil, a cinder block retaining wall near the swimming pool, and the competing roots and canopies of mature trees that had to be accommodated in the landscape designs. The owner undertook a three-year course of study at the Barnes Arboretum, installed a six-foot tall deer fence around the property, and found the right plant for the right place, taking into account light, soil conditions and terrain. The style of the gardens is naturalized, with different species intermingling, rather than formally planted garden beds.
The entry courtyard was improved by replacing black asphalt with stone pavers, installing a brick retaining wall and piers, and planting bulb, perennial and shrub gardens under existing trees. The front path to the main entrance of the house is a bluestone walkway bordered by rhododendron and mountain laurel under planted with hosta, tiarella, euonymous and other ground covers. The pool terrace is in full sun, and features a 50-year-old wisteria that wraps around the house, Chippendale style gates lead to the pool, and vistas of the other gardens, pond and woodlands due to its higher elevation. Dwarf conifers are planted under the overhanging roof.
A perennial garden that replaced grass on the south side of the house was the owner's first project, with stone retaining walls defining the space. The eastern border of the property features unusual rhododendron. `The cryptomeria garden is a small woodland screen that features naturalized plantings. The woodland garden was designed with a meandering stone path and beds of naturalized perennials and shrubs but the soil was poor and needed yearly additions of leaf compost. A tennis court and outdoor room were installed in 1987 near Stony Brook and the designated open space. The banks of the pond created from a spring by the previous owners are accessible for bass fishing, with the outer perimeter planted in trees and shrubs that screen the property from the street.
Persons associated with the garden include Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Stanley (former owners, 1959-1981); Rolf W. Bauhan (architect, 1959); Robert S. Bennett (architect, 1997, 2008); David M. Lenker (landscape architect, 1959); Doerler Landscapes (landscape architect, 1973, 1975); S. Lawrence Bencze (landscape architect, 1988, 1990, 1992, 1995); Barbara J. Olejnik, CLA (landscape architect, 2000-2002); Ann Mallory (sculptor of "Forest Pool"); Roger Ditarando (sculptor of "Bird's Nest"); Charlotte Calwell Stokes (sculptor of "Francis of Assisi")
Related Materials:
New Jersey Woodland Property related holdings consist of 1 folder (25 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- New Jersey -- Princeton  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NJ519
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New Jersey
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb65ffbef9f-36a6-4108-8360-c9cade0cea38
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref20203

Princeton -- Stony Wood Garden

Former owner:
Weeder, Erica  Search this
Fillo, Elizabeth  Search this
Coucill, Chris  Search this
Garden designer:
McCoy, Richard A.  Search this
Stone mason:
McCoy, Richard A.  Search this
Provenance:
Garden Club of Princeton  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Stony Wood Garden (Princeton, New Jersey)
United States of America -- New Jersey -- Mercer -- Princeton
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets.
General:
The woodland gardens were created out of three and one-half acres of woods and rocks and nurtured constantly for about thirteen years. With many years of previous experience gardening a sunny seven and one-half acre estate the owner had to learn gardening in the shade, specifically which shrubs and trees would survive as understory. Since it backed up to 125 acres of preserved woods the first undertaking was to have the entire property enclosed by an eight-foot tall deer fence. Next paths were laid out, rocks and stones were excavated, and terraced beds were designed and filled with topsoil. At first the stones were dumped in piles along the walkways but eventually were used to build walls or line those paths. Thirteen dogwoods were planted along a new macadam driveway with mixed success; the owner found that kousa dogwoods were more successful but still was able to cultivate specimen trees. Various ground cover plants were tried out, including ajuga, vinca, epimedium, sweet woodruff, wild ginger and pachysandra, and whatever succeeded was divided and used to fill in other locations. Tens of thousands of daffodils, scillas and mertensia were planted. Mosses and ferns, brunneras and many varieties of hostas grew very well in this woodlands garden. On the sunnier south side of the house there was an herb garden and there were pots and trellises of summer flowers, usually in shades of pink, purple, blue and white on the deck and along the walk.
The entire property was gardened organically and all the organic material that came out of the garden was composted and put back in; trees that fell or died were turned into mulch for the numerous paths. Deer still came in from the driveway and some years voles and rabbits devoured plantings that were in their prime. With so many trees the property suffered considerable damage from winter storms and Hurricane Sandy - but when trees fell a sunny spot might open up for different plants. When plantings lost their looks - too many brown leaves or too straggly - they were replaced. Varieties of trees and shrubs with yellow or variegated leaves were sought after to lighten the shade. Climbing hydrangeas and clematis succeeded in disguising the fences. Old Christmas trees and damaged trees and shrubs were grouped together in a bed known as Tapestry Row that would have varying shades of green when the plants filled out.
The owner noted that gardens are not for having but for doing. Garden work would start at the highest elevation, the entrance to the driveway, proceed downhill to the bottom of the garden then start at the top all over again. There were twenty different garden beds on the property that were planted, tended and replanted whenever that became necessary.
Persons associated with the garden include Erica Weeder (former owner, 1980-2000); Elizabeth Fillo and Chris Coucill (former owners, 2000-2014); William K. Doerler (garden designer, 1999-2001); Richard A. McCoy (garden designer and stone mason, 2001-2014).
Related Materials:
Stony Wood Garden related holdings consist of 1 folder (24 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- New Jersey -- Princeton  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NJ670
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New Jersey
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6b5210fbb-02d6-487b-941b-1f8a2d9e5585
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref20204

New Haven -- Elizabeth R. Hooker House

Landscape architect:
Coffin, Marian Cruger, 1876-1957  Search this
TPA Design Group  Search this
Architect:
Delano & Aldrich  Search this
Provenance:
Garden Club of New Haven  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Elizabeth R. Hooker House (New Haven, Connecticut)
United States of America -- Connecticut -- New Haven County -- New Haven
Scope and Contents:
The folders include work sheets, site plans, and copies of site plans by Coffin and Delano & Aldrich.
Varying Form:
Home of Edith H. Ilmanen, formerly known as.
General:
The brick house was designed in 1914-1915 by architects Delano & Aldrich with a brick walled garden. Marian Coffin designed the perennial border. The grounds were designed to complement the house which was fashioned in the style of the English Arts and Crafts movement. The walled garden is a formal terraced garden situated near the house. Beyond the walled garden is a more naturalized, wooded area featuring a pond on the lower lying grounds.
Current owners of the property have undertaken a restoration of the property to reflect the original Delano and Aldrich design. The property has since received recognition from the New Haven Preservation Trust, the Connecticut chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects, and the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.
This garden was originally documented in 2005, at that time it was identified as the Home of Edith H. Ilmanen. An update of the garden documentation was provided in 2012, as the Elizabeth R. Hooker House.
Persons and organizations associated with the property include: Elizabeth Russell Hooker (former owner, 1911-1965); Edith Hooker Ilmanen (former owner, 1965-2004); Delano & Aldrich (architects, 1914-1915); and Marian Coffin (landscape architect, 1929 and 1940); and TPA Design Group (landscape architects, 2008).
Related Materials:
Elizabeth R. Hooker House related holdings consist of 2 folders (13 35 mm slides (photographs); 40 digital images)
Plans and photographs are to be given to the New Haven Colony Historical Society.
Additional materials are located at Columbia University's Avery Library.
Additonal materials are located in the Marian Cruger Coffin Papers at The Winterthur Library/Archives at the Henry Francis Du Pont Winterthur Museum in Winterthur, Delaware.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Connecticut -- New Haven  Search this
Walled gardens  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File CT338
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Connecticut
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6b79f69c7-0a8e-4c40-aed7-c89f4715be77
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref21600
Online Media:

Atlanta -- Turner Lynch Garden

Architect:
Smith, Francis Palmer, 1886-1971  Search this
Pringle, Robert Smith, d. 1937  Search this
Provenance:
Peachtree Garden Club  Search this
Cherokee Garden Club (Atlanta, Ga.)  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Turner Lynch Garden (Atlanta, Georgia)
United States of America -- Georgia -- Fulton -- Atlanta
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets.
General:
The Turner Lynch Garden is located on a 3.08 acre property in the historic district of Peachtree Heights Park. The architecture firm Carrè€re & Hastings planned the district's street layout, a curvilinear design that incorporates the natural terrain of the region. In keeping with this plan, a long winding driving driveway leads to the Mediterranean style house which is sited at the crest of a gently sloping hill. While preserving the bones of the original landscape, the Turner Lynch Garden features a series of garden rooms that have been developed by the present owner. These include a formal rose garden, a Japanese woodland garden, a conifer garden, and a children's playhouse garden. Original to the property, a perennial garden dates back to the early 1920's when it was termed a "round garden." The four quadrants of the garden, which mirror each other, have been enlarged to accommodate a larger planting area, and annual plants are added to provide color in late summer.
The front of the house features a large fescue lawn framed with border plantings offering the architectural features of the house as the focal point of that view. A terrace at the back of the house features a knot garden that overlooks a reflecting pool below, with a view of the perennial garden beyond. From the terrace and the perennial garden the sloping property continues down to a wooded area featuring rock walls and tile paths that wind through the trees and a recirculating stream and three ponds accented with small wooden bridges and stone benches.
Persons associated with the garden include: Harold O. Rogers (former owner, 1923-1927); J.W. (Wick) Goldsmith (former owner, 1927-1928); Clarence Haverty (former owner, 1928-1986); A. Emmett Barnes IV (former owner, 1986-1989); Pringle and Smith (architects, 1921); and T.C. Wesley (contractor/builder, 1922/1923).
Related Materials:
Turner Lynch Garden related holdings consist of 1 folder (17 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Georgia -- Atlanta  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File GA194
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Georgia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6d81bc024-8bbf-4276-889d-ce450dd65a15
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref23127

Islip -- Twyford

Former owner:
Webster, Charles D., d. 1998,  Search this
Webster, Natalie Peters  Search this
Landscape architect:
Weber, Nelva M.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Twyford (Islip, New York)
United States of America -- New York -- Suffolk County -- Islip
Scope and Contents:
The folders include work sheets, a 1963 description of the garden by Charles D. Webster, a garden plan, a map of the area, and a copy of an article about the property.
General:
Twyford was the home of Charles D. and Natalie Peters Webster on the south shore of Long Island. Although the entire property encompassed nearly 200 acres, the gardens, house, and outbuildings were confined to 10 acres, which in turn was part of a 30-acre tract of open fields, marshland, and woods. The Websters began gardening in 1936, when they moved to the late 19th-century house. Formal beds and paths and other designs were complemented by a greenhouse, potting house and tool shed, and an octagonal lathhouse. Other features included a swimming pool, extensive borders and planting of broad-leaved evergreens, lawns, a waterfowl pool, and a farmyard. The property was given by the Websters to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 1968 (with life tenancy). The house and other buildings were demolished in 2002 despite the efforts of several preservation groups to save them.
Persons and organizations associated with the property include: Charles D. Webster (former owner, d. 1998); Natalie Peters Webster (former owner); and Nelva M. Weber (landscape architect, c. 1960-1973).
Related Materials:
Twyford related holdings consist of 2 folders (18 35 mm. slides; 2 120 mm. slides; 29 photoprints; 143 negatives)
See others in:
Maida Babson Adams American Garden Collection, ca. 1960-1994.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- New York -- Islip  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NY299
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New York
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6693e8ab0-0060-49de-8a1a-bddad442886e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref26812

Rye -- Rye Nature Center

Urban farming installation:
Nurick, Jacob  Search this
Director and conservation:
Letaka, Taro  Search this
Horticulturist:
Hein, Annette  Search this
Former owner:
Parsons family  Search this
Owner:
City of Rye  Search this
Rain garden design and installation:
Nature's Cradle  Search this
Provenance:
Little Garden Club of Rye  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Rye Nature Center (Rye, New York)
United States of America -- New York -- Westchester -- Rye
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, a photocopy of an article and other materials.
Varying Form:
Parsons Garden, formerly known as.
General:
The mission of the Rye Nature Center is to promote conservation and environmental education within an urban forest and preserve. The 47 acre site, once a private estate, is comprised of three distinct gardens: a 300 square foot educational garden inside a deer fence, a rain garden, and a native plant garden, an educational center with two classrooms in the former carriage house of the estate, woodlands with natural water features and an outcropping of volcanic gneiss, more than two miles of hiking trails, a seasonal butterfly house, and two children's playgrounds and a sunflower maze. Classes are given for pre-school and school age children, summer campers, and adults on water conservation and storm water management, plant lifecycles including decomposition, and gardening techniques that are beneficial to the environment and wildlife. The teaching methods are hands on, encouraging participants to sample organically grown produce while planting or hand-picking insects that will be fed to the bearded dragons housed in the educational center. Rain water is collected and channeled to the rain garden's ferns, Joe Pye weed, milkweed, blue flag iris, cardinal flower and shrubs. A roof garden with self-watering containers also demonstrates how rain water can be captured and used.
Food grown in the gardens is used for cooking demonstrations and leftover food from the campers is turned into compost for the vegetable garden. Logs from the woodlands, straw and wood chips are inoculated with several varieties of mushroom spawn, also demonstrating how decomposition aids food production. Tomatoes and squash are planted in straw bales that were used for autumn decorations and an old wash basin is repurposed as a bog garden containing Venus flytraps, pitcher plants, cranberries and sphagnum moss. The native plant garden, established by the Little Garden Club of Rye in 1988, includes an edible forest garden shaded by sweet gum trees growing native perennials, trees, shrubs and ground covers that provide food for wildlife and humans. Also a bee-friendly garden is being planned by the nature center staff.
The Friends of Rye Nature Center was first founded as the Rye Conservation Society in 1964 and has been managed by the non-profit Friends since 2006. It has been certified as an urban wildlife sanctuary by the National Institute for Urban Wildlife.
Persons associated with the garden include: Parsons family (former owners 1902-1942); City of Rye (owner, 1959- ); Nature's Cradle (rain garden design and installation, 2011); Jacob Nurick (urban farming installation, 2013); Taro Letaka (director of conservation, 2013- ); Annette Hein (horticulturist, 2014- ).
Related Materials:
Rye Nature Center related holdings consist of 2 folders (1 lantern slide and 26 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- New York -- Rye  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NY135
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New York
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6ca5dcee6-ecf6-4c61-92fe-3b8a606fca8b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref27063

Southampton -- St. Andrew's Dune Church

Provenance:
Southampton Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
St. Andrew's Dune Church (Southampton, New York)
United States of America -- New York -- Suffolk County -- Southampton
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes a worksheet.
General:
The land surrounding Saint Andrew's Dune Church represents some of the last surviving dunescape in the village of Southampton that the public can enjoy. The planting immediately surrounding the Church and the Magowan Memorial Garden to the west have been steadily improved over the past twenty years. Since the 1920s, all of the improvements to the gardens have involved the direction of members of the Southampton Garden Club. The Trustees annually select a member of the Garden Club as the Chairman of the Grounds Committee, and the then-serving President of the Garden Club is invited to serve as an ex-officio member of that Committee. This eighty-year tradition has expedited rapid recovery after hurricanes and allowed knowledgeable supervision of construction and repair projects. The purpose of the garden is not only to enhance the beauty of the Church, but also to demonstrate the variety of native and ornamental plants that can tolerate an oceanside setting and contribute to the preservation of both natural and man-made environments. in 1987, the garden was redesigned through the generosity of Mrs. Robert A. Magowan and her children and dedicated to the memory of Robert Anderson Magowan, a Trustee for 37 years and former Treasurer of Saint Andrew's. Following Mrs. Magowan's death in 2001, a new memorial table was placed on a stone in the garden.
Persons and firms associated with the garden include: United States Coast Guard-US Life Saving Service (former owners, 1851); Dr. T. Gaillard Thomas (donor, 1879); C. Wyllis Betts (donor of land and church, 1879); Edward H. Kendall (designer of choir and aisles, 1887-88 and 1894); R. H. Robertson (designer of reredos, altar, and decorations, 1893); George E. Wood (designer of belfry tower with main entrance, 1903); Arthur W. L. Fraser (designer of organ tower, 1995); Mrs. Alexander T. Mason & Mrs. William M. Carson (designer of Magowan Memorial Garden, 1987); and Mrs. Richard D. Lisman (designer of expanded garden, 1996).
Related Materials:
St. Andrew's Dune Church related holdings consist of 1 folder (4 35 mm. slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- New York -- Southampton  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NY803
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New York
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb69fba3741-dc92-4b2b-9b92-c2f86f590a32
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref27132

Cazenovia -- The Meadows

Photographer:
Vickers, James B.  Search this
Mistur, Jane  Search this
Vickers, Nancy Murphy  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital images
Place:
The Meadows (Cazenovia, New York)
United States of America -- New York -- Madison -- Cazenovia
Scope and Contents:
26 digital images (2005,2021), one 35mm slide (1987) and 2 file folders
General:
The Meadows has a Greek Revival house built in 1826 and formal gardens originally laid out circa 1830 that have changed very little. The property, a country seat at the time, comprised 250 acres with farmland, apple orchard, woodland and the undeveloped meadow in front of the house for which it was named. The Meadows was passed down within the Jonathan Denise Ledyard family until 1994 and portions of farmland are owned by descendants. The current owners who bought the property in 2006 with about 30 acres have since acquired about 50 acres of vista and intend to strip away any development rights.

The designed garden is behind the house entered under an arch that supports clematis in summer. The wide gravel walkway continues the central axis of the house. There are deep flower beds on either side of the gravel walkway flanked by rectangular lawns with additional perennial beds around the perimeter outside barns and under trees dating back to the 19th century. In Victorian times there were more pathways around the garden for strolling but those were replaced long ago, and the original tanbark walkway was replaced with gravel. During one ownership a fountain and pond were added in the center of the walkway; now the pond is filled in and planted but the fountain still spouts water from the original fish-shaped fixture onto a bed of rocks. A sundial at the end of the walkway in front of an elaborate iron gate that leads to pastures is thought to be original. A curving wall and curved stone benches with planted urns have replaced a cedar hedge that was destroyed by a storm but maintain the same footprint. The garden features herbaceous and wood peonies hybridized by Percy Saunders in Clinton, New York in the 20th century. Other perennials include daylilies, dianthus, ferns, phlox, Siberian iris and hosta, all suited to the climate. In order to simplify maintenance the owners have replaced the annual flowerbed running down the middle of the gravel walkway with a rock garden planted with sedum. In other spots crumbling brick edging has been replaced with steel. The trees have matured but the original formal shape and plant selection, typical of the region and the era, has remained.
Related Materials:
The Lorenzo State Historic Site in Cazenovia, New York.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- New York -- Madison -- Cazenovia  Search this
Formal gardens  Search this
Genre/Form:
Digital images
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NY466
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New York
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6ddd46d15-db68-48ca-bdd1-dfd997c68beb
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref27207

Rye -- Bird Homestead

Provenance:
Garden Club of Rye  Search this
Owner:
City of Rye  Search this
Former owner:
Bird, Henry  Search this
Erikson, Alice Bird  Search this
Landscape architect:
Erikson, Alice Bird  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Bird Homestead (Rye, New York)
United States of America -- New York -- Westchester -- Rye
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets and photocopies of articles.
General:
Located on the banks of the tidal Blind Brook estuary, lined with salt marshes, Bird Homestead was the home of Henry Bird (1869-1959), a prominent entomologist and president of the New York Entomological Society who specialized in the study of moths. The landscape and garden was of a modest size and represents a unique combination of a small self-sufficient farm with ornamental perennial beds, shrubs, and roses plus fruit trees that combined both beauty and utility, along with specific plants grown for entomological research. The Greek revival style house, outbuildings, picket fence and stonewall all date to the 19th century, a rarity on Westchester County's Long Island Sound Shore.
The garden features date primarily from the 1920s and 1940s, with additions in 2012 for educational purposes. The Bouton-Bird Erikson family owned the property for five generations from 1852-2009. The non-profit Bird Homestead Preservatio trust now operates the property as a historic, environmental, and educational site.
The Greek revival style house built in the 19th century, white oak trees shading the house, the remains of earlier gardens, and outbuildings including a barn, a workshop and chicken coop. The small family farm was self-sufficient until well into the 20th century, raising chickens and growing fruits and vegetables. The property is being restored by the Bird Homestead Preservation Trust and is used to teach children about the natural environment including organic gardening in four raised beds on the site of an earlier large cold frame. A cedar arbor for grape vines was recently hoisted back to stand vertically in the garden after many years of leaning at a severe angle. Surviving shrubs near the house include lilac, wisteria, roses, azalea, mock orange and beautybushes, and a bed of ferns is undisturbed by neglect for many years.
Henry Bird encouraged the use of beneficial insects in the garden rather than spraying pesticides and maintained a small garden area with plants that would attract the insects he wanted to study. Bird also was a proponent of native plants and established a large natives garden at 'Bye-Wood' on the Mr. and Mrs. William J. Knapp estate, which led him to write "A Proposed Type of American Garden" with Louise Allen Knapp, published in 1929 in ASLA's "Landscape Architecture" journal. Daughter Alice Bird Erikson (1903-1993) was an artist and trained as a landscape architect at the Lowthorpe School of Landscape Architecture. In 1942 she illustrated Trees of the Countryside (Alfred A. Knopf) by Margaret McKenny, who had been a classmate.
Persons associated with the garden include Henry Bird (former owner, 1959), Alice Bird Erikson (former owner and landscape architect, 1903-1994); City of Rye, New York (2009- ).
Related Materials:
Bird Homestead related holdings consist of 1 folder (24 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- New York -- Rye  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NY873
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New York
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6d79386ff-6e30-4e1b-8aaf-99adb384c45e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref30065

Sarasota -- Umbrella House

Former owner:
Hiss, Philip  Search this
Von Tilborg, Rachel  Search this
Von Tilborg, Ross  Search this
Stoller, Gary  Search this
Stoller, Carol  Search this
Ciulla, Vince  Search this
Ciulla, Julie  Search this
Architect:
Rudolph, Paul, 1918-  Search this
Preservation architect:
Hall, Greg  Search this
Landscape designer:
Anderson, Richard  Search this
Provenance:
Founders Garden Club of Sarasota  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital images
Place:
Umbrella House (Sarasota, Florida)
United States of America -- Florida -- Sarasota County -- Sarasota
Scope and Contents:
1 folder and 16 digital images. The folder includes worksheets and photocopies of articles.
General:
Umbrella House is known for its architecture, melding the International Style and Frank Lloyd Wright's Usonian principles to produce a midcentury modern icon for a subtropical location. Architect Paul M. Rudolph was commissioned circa 1950 to build an affordable yet cutting edge residence that would promote a new housing development in Sarasota, Florida, on a small property lot. The style of this house and others came to be known as the Sarasota School of Architecture. The house was geometric and compact with a higher, secondary slatted roof that shaded the property and boosted air circulation. Landscaping was sparse, a single monkeypod tree and crushed native shell instead of grass that could withstand the climate, but the tomato crate wooden slats used for the iconic secondary "umbrella" roof were destroyed in 1966 by Hurricane Alma.
Several successive owners worked with preservation architect Greg Hall to restore the "umbrella" using aluminum and treated wood that conforms to current building codes and can withstand winds of 150 mph. Landscaping was refreshed by removing overgrowth, replacing paved walkways and the swimming pool deck, and adding a new cement and stucco privacy wall along a busy parkway, low enough so the distinctive roof can be seen by passing traffic. Areca palms form privacy screens on each side of the swimming pool, and facing benches are nearly encased in dwarf conifers. Royal Poinciana, Walter's viburnum, bromeliads, shrubby cardboard palms, ornamental grasses, dwarf podocarpus and a staghorn fern can be found in the minimalist landscape. In addition to the swimming pool there is a water feature pond with water jets and a gazebo comprised of a solid roof attached to the aluminum poles that hold up the umbrella roof.
Philip Hiss (former owner, 1950- ); Sommers family (former owners, 1955- ); Ross and Rachel Von Tilborg (former owners, 1969- ); Gary and Carol Stoller (former owners, 1997- ); Vince and Julie Ciulla (former owners, 2005- ); Paul Marvin Rudolph (1918-1997) (architect, 1953-1954); Greg Hall (preservation architect, 1997-2018); Richard Anderson (landscape designer, 2014- ).
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Florida -- Sarasota  Search this
Genre/Form:
Digital images
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File FL265
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Florida
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6d28274c4-909e-4cb6-aa39-833c32f2c852
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref32660

Glass Lantern Slide and Lecture Scripts

Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb653f5a4fa-71fe-4259-ab23-a33248a801d5
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref32850

Hillsborough -- Montrose

Provenance:
Rumson Garden Club  Search this
Former owner:
Graham, William A.  Search this
Graham, Susan Washington  Search this
Landscape gardener:
Paxton, Thomas  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Montrose (Hillsborough, North Carolina)
United States -- North Carolina -- Orange -- Hillsborough
Scope and Contents:
1 folder and 47 digital images.
General:
A 61-acre property is comprised of woodlands and numerous garden rooms, some with layouts that date back to the mid-19th century. The rock garden has remains of the original rocks and lilies of the valley. A fenced sunny garden behind one of many outbuildings is planted for color. A large kitchen garden has been subdivided but honors the original layout. Newer rooms are called the May Garden, Tropical Garden, Aster Border, Color Garden, Moonlight Garden, Jo's Memorial Garden, and Blue and Yellow Garden. Other early gardens rooms include a serpentine boxwood hedge planted in the 1920's and a circle garden on the approach to the house. Venerable trees include a massive juniper, oaks and redwoods, and the trees and varieties of shrubs complement the 1898 main house on a hill and the woodland garden. There are more than 20 named garden rooms or walks, ten historic outbuildings, and newer features that include cold frames, greenhouses, a lath house that provides shade, and deer fencing around 30 acres. The owners ran a small mail order nursery selling rare plants for about 10 years. In 1930 the Works Progress Administration (WPA) terraced the woodlands to control erosion. In 2001 Montrose was added to The National Register of Historic Places; that same year the owners deeded development rights for 50 acres to the North Carolina Triangle Land Conservancy and began planning a preservation project garden with the Garden Conservancy.

The Woodland Garden was started in 1985 on about 20 terraced acres planted with thousands of bulbs that included daffodils, trilliums, bloodroot, selaginella and wood hyacinths from the owner's mother's garden. Snowdrops proliferate along a walk and in the woods, followed by hellebores, rhododendron, Christmas orchids and cyclamen in August. Maple, beech, oak, sweet gum, hickory and walnut with understory dogwood and redbud provide shade and are filled with the sounds of birds. The informal woodland is the "soul" of the owner's garden. Other features throughout the gardens include a hand-made rustic trellis, antique urns and iron fencing, and large iron utilitarian farm pots that are planted with favorites from year to year.

Persons associated with the garden include: Kirkland (former owner, 1799- ); William A. and Susan Washington Graham and family members (former owners, 1842-1977); Thomas Paxton (landscape gardener, 1842)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- North Carolina -- Hillsborough  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NC093
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / North Carolina
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb603e8ee37-0a01-4669-b4fc-9400bc8f0935
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref32887

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