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Oral history interview with Judy Chicago

Interviewee:
Chicago, Judy, 1939-  Search this
Interviewer:
Richards, Judith Olch  Search this
Names:
ACA Galleries  Search this
LewAllen Contemporary (Gallery)  Search this
Bergen, Jeffrey, 1955-  Search this
Bullard, E. John(Edgar John), 1942-  Search this
Copeland, John  Search this
Dobbins, Norman  Search this
Dobbins, Ruth  Search this
Flack, Audrey  Search this
Hopkins, Henry, 1928-2009  Search this
LaMonte, Karen, 1967-  Search this
Lemon, Jack  Search this
LewAllen, Arlene  Search this
Lu, Jie, 1958-  Search this
Lucie-Smith, Edward  Search this
Marisol, 1930-2016  Search this
McFadden, David Revere  Search this
Neel, Alice, 1900-1984  Search this
Perkins, Flo  Search this
Pruitt, Tom  Search this
Rodee, Susannah  Search this
Rosenberg, Harold, 1906-1978  Search this
Saint-Phalle, Niki de, 1930-2002  Search this
Schneemann, Carolee, 1939-  Search this
Semmel, Joan, 1932-  Search this
Taylor, Mary, 1947-  Search this
Thompson, Viki D., 1947-  Search this
Woodman, Donald  Search this
Youdelman, Nancy, 1948-  Search this
Extent:
74 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2009 August 7-8
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Judy Chicago conducted 2009 August 7 and 8, by Judith Olch Richards, for the Archives of American Art, at Chicago's home and studio, in Belen, New Mexico.
Chicago speaks of her work since the late 1980s, having previously discussed her early life and works; printmaking projects with various print studios around the country; giving archived documents to important museums; creating a foundation with her husband Donald Woodman to protect the legacy of their art; the non-profit organization she started in 1978, Through the Flower; her studio practices and her most practiced techniques; keeping a regular schedule; her interest in collaborative projects such as The Dinner Party [1974-1979], the Birth Project [1980-1985], the Holocaust Project [1985-1993] and Resolutions: A Stitch in Time [1994-2000]; working with various textile and glass artists; feeling a kin with other female artists, like Nikki de Saint Phalle and Marisol Escobar; the responsibility she feels to share underrepresented information; her enjoyment of the process of making art and the hope that she creates art that is not bound by time; her relationships with galleries though the years including the ACA Galleries in New York and LewAllen Contemporary in Santa Fe; her intention in making art was not create proactive or controversial art; various teaching positions; her interest in combining text and images in works like Song of Songs [1997-1999]; her more current interest in glass; experimenting with the techniques of casting and etching to achieve her desired images; her want to change institutional policies that underrepresent women artists in museums and the absence of images of women by women artists. Chicago also recalls Henry Hopkins, Mary Ross Taylor, Susannah Rodee, John Bullard, Jack Lemon, Alice Neel, Edward Lucie-Smith, John Copeland, Harold Rosenberg, Carolee Schneemann, Jeffery Bergen, Audrey Flack, Joan Semmel, Nancy Youdelman, David McFadden, Viki Thomson Wylder, Tom Pruitt, Arlene LewAllen, Flo Perkins, Norman and Ruth Dobbins, Karen LaMonte, Lu Jie and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Interviewee Judy Chicago (1939- ) is a feminist artist and author who lives and works in Belen, New Mexico. Interviewer Judith Olch Richards (1947- ) is former executive director of iCI in New York, New York.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 compact discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 4 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hr., 40 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
Women sculptors -- New Mexico -- Interviews  Search this
Feminism and art  Search this
Women painters -- New Mexico -- Interviews  Search this
Women photographers -- New Mexico -- Interviews  Search this
Art -- Technique  Search this
Glass artists -- New Mexico -- Interviews  Search this
Women printmakers -- New Mexico -- Interviews  Search this
Function:
Artists' studios -- New Mexico
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.chicag09
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-chicag09

Oral history interview with Jo Harvey Allen, 1998 April 21

Interviewee:
Allen, Jo Harvey, 1942-  Search this
Interviewer:
Karlstrom, Paul J  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Performance artists -- Interviews  Search this
Playwrights -- Interviews  Search this
Performance art  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13117
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)216445
AAA_collcode_allenj98
Theme:
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_216445
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Jo Harvey Allen

Interviewee:
Allen, Jo Harvey, 1942-  Search this
Interviewer:
Karlstrom, Paul J.  Search this
Extent:
25 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1998 April 21
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Jo Harvey Allen conducted 1998 April 21, by Paul Karlstrom, for the Archives of American Art, at Allen's studio, in Santa Fe, New Mexico.
Allen discusses her roles of writer, actress, and performance artist; her early career which included working at underground radio station KPPC as the first woman country music announcer; her views on feminism and the degradation of motherhood, describing her most creative act as the birth of her children; her childhood in Lubbock, Texas; life with husband Terry Allen, with whom she moved to Los Angeles where he attended Chouinard Art Institute; conducting interviews with waitresses as material for a photo book, which led to writing, producing, and acting in her own plays; her relationship with Terry Allen and working with him and the discovery of her artistic independence.
Biographical / Historical:
Jo Harvey Allen (1942- ) is a performance artist, writer, and actress of Sante Fe, New Mexico.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 4 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hrs., 3 minutes.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Actors -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Performance artists -- Interviews  Search this
Playwrights -- Interviews  Search this
Performance art  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.allenj98
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-allenj98

Claudia DeMonte and Ed McGowin papers

Creator:
DeMonte, Claudia  Search this
McGowin, Ed  Search this
Extent:
7.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Video recordings
Date:
1960-2018
Summary:
The papers of Claudia DeMonte and Ed McGowin measure 7.2 linear feet and date between 1960 and 2018. The papers primarily document Claudia DeMonte's career as a painter, and to a lesser extent her husband's career, through correspondence with family, friends, colleagues, and art institutions; notebooks, poetry, and other writings; scrapbooks; curriculum vitas, awards and certificates, commissions, and other professional activity; exhibition announcements and catalogs, newspaper clippings, magazine articles, and other printed material; sketchbooks and other artwork; personal photographs, portraits, of artwork, and other photographic material.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Claudia DeMonte and Ed McGowin measure 7.2 linear feet and date between 1960 and 2018. The papers primarily document Claudia DeMonte's career as a painter, and to a lesser extent her husband's career, through correspondence with family, friends, colleagues, and art institutions; notebooks, poetry, and other writings; scrapbooks; curriculum vitas, awards and certificates, commissions, and other professional activity; exhibition announcements and catalogs, newspaper clippings, magazine articles, and other printed material; sketchbooks and other artwork; personal photographs, portraits, of artwork, and other photographic material.

Correspondence includes letters and postcards to and from family, friends, colleagues, and art institutions.

Writings includes a file of poetry written by DeMonte, manuscripts of books written by DeMonte, and a series of notebooks. Some of the notebooks are a combination of notes and sketches.

Scrapbooks consist of eight scrapbooks consisting of mixed material such as notes, photographs, sketches, and printed material.

Professional material consists of awards and certificates, a large number of calendars, commision work including an art project for the University of Northern Iowa completed by both DeMonte and McGowin, and a number of VHS and Betamax cassettes documenting DeMonte's career and interviews in connection with her Women of the World exhibition.

Printed material consists of newspaper clippings, magazine articles, exhibition announcements and catalogs, exhibition posters, and newsletters.

Artwork consists of a file of drawings and some sketchbooks.

Photographic material consists of photographs and slides of DeMonte, her artwork, and some of her exhibitions. There is also a file of photographs of DeMonte and McGowin at the White House with First Lady Laura Bush, and there are personal photographs of DeMonte and McGowin traveling and with family and friends.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into seven series.

Series 1: Correspondence, 1967-2013 (1.7 linear feet; Boxes 1-2)

Series 2: Writings, 1975-2013 (0.5 linear feet; Boxes 2-3)

Series 3: Scrapbooks, 1967-2009 (1.0 linear feet; Box 3, 9-10)

Series 4: Professional Activity Files, 1964-2013 (1.7 linear feet; Boxes 3-5, 9)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1960-2018 (1.9 linear feet; Boxes 5-7)

Series 6: Artwork, circa 1973 (0.1 linear feet; Box 7)

Series 7: Photographic Material, circa 1977-2010 (0.3 linear feet; Boxes 7-8)
Biographical / Historical:
Claudia DeMonte (1947- ) was born and raised in Astoria, New York City. She has more than 100 one-person shows and 600 group exhibitions nationally and internationally, including exhibitions at the Corcoran Museum, Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Mississippi Museum, Tucson Museum, Flint Institute of Art, Museum of the Southwest, etc.

Her work is in numerous museum permanent collections, including the Brooklyn Museum of Art, Stamford Museum, Boca Raton Museum, and in major corporate collections such as those of Hyatt Regency Hotels, Exxon, Citibank and Siemens. Her public commissions have come from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, Brooklyn Library System, Queens Supreme Court, Prudential Life Insurance, the State of New Mexico, and New York City School Construction Authority.

DeMonte is also the curator of "Women of the World: A Global Collection of Art." This traveling exhibition, with accompanying books, includes works of women from 177 countries dealing with the images of women.

DeMonte's work is heavily influenced by her travels to over 80 countries, her interest in the roles of women in contemporary society and Outsider Art, a collection compiled with her husband, artist Ed McGowin.

For 33 years, DeMonte has served on the faculty of the University of Maryland, where she was named Distinguished Scholar Teacher and Professor Emerita. In 2006, She was awarded an Honorary Doctorate from the College of Santa Fe.

DeMonte presently lives with her husband in New York City and Kent, Connecticut.

Ed McGowin (1938- ) was born in 1938 in Hattiesburg, Mississippi and grew up in Mississippi and Alabama, receiving the M.A. from the University of Alabama. He has had one-person exhibitions at the Corcoran Gallery in Washington, D.C.; the Baltimore Museum; and the Museum of Modern Art of the City of Paris, France. Since 1979, McGowin has executed major outdoor commissions for numerous public and private organizations, often collaborating with his wife, Claudia DeMonte.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Claudia DeMonte conducted by Liza Kirwin between February 13 and April 24, 1991; and the Ed McGowin papers, 1962-1998.
Provenance:
The Claudia DeMonte and Ed McGowin papers were donated in 1994 by Claudia DeMonte and in 2020 by Claudia DeMonte and Ed McGowin.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Women artists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Claudia DeMonte and Ed McGowin papers, 1960-2018. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.democlau
See more items in:
Claudia DeMonte and Ed McGowin papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-democlau

Oral history interview with Ramona Sakiestewa

Interviewee:
Sakiestewa, Ramona, design collaborator  Search this
Interviewer:
Zrebiec, Alice, 1947-  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Extent:
100 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2010 July 21-22
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Ramona Sakiestewa conducted 2010 July 21 and 22, by Alice Zrebiec, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Sakiestwa's studio, in Santa Fe, N.M.
Biographical / Historical:
Ramona Sakiestewa (1948- ) is a contemporary artist who works in tapestry, paper, and architectural design in Santa Fe, N.M. Alice Zrebiec (1947-) is a curatorial consultant in Santa Fe, N.M.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 memory cards as 14 digital sound files. Duration is 5 hr., 51 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Rights:
Authorization to publish, quote, or reproduce must be obtained from Ramona Sakiestewa.
Topic:
Women artists -- New Mexico -- Santa Fe -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.sakies10
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-sakies10

Oral history interview with Eugenie Shonnard

Interviewee:
Shonnard, Eugenie Frederica, 1886-1978  Search this
Interviewer:
Loomis, Sylvia Glidden  Search this
Creator:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Names:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound tape reels (Sound recordings, 7 in.)
22 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound tape reels
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1964 February 27-1964 April 9
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Eugenie Shonnard conducted 1964 February 27-1964 April 9, by Sylvia Loomis, 9 for the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project.
Biographical / Historical:
Eugenie Frederica Shonnard (1886-1978) was a sculptor and designer from Santa Fe, N.M.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound tape reels. Reformatted in 2010 as 2 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hr., 10 min.
Provenance:
Conducted as part of the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts project, which includes over 400 interviews of artists, administrators, historians, and others involved with the federal government's art programs and the activities of the Farm Security Administration in the 1930s and early 1940s.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Designers -- New Mexico -- Santa Fe -- Interviews  Search this
Sculptors -- New Mexico -- Santa Fe -- Interviews  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.shonna64
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-shonna64

Oral history interview with Olive Rush

Interviewee:
Rush, Olive, 1873-1966  Search this
Interviewer:
Loomis, Sylvia Glidden  Search this
Creator:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Names:
Federal Art Project (N.M.)  Search this
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Extent:
26 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1963 November 13
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Olive Rush conducted 1963 November 13, by Sylvia Loomis, for the Archives of American Art.
Rush speaks of her family background and youth; her education at the Corcoran School of Art; her involvement with the Federal Art Project; working on murals for public buildings in Santa Fe and the southwest; and the public's perception of the Federal Art Project and its administration.
Biographical / Historical:
Olive Rush (1873-1966) was a painter and muralist in Santa Fe, N.M.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound tape reel. Reformatted in 2010 as 2 digital wav files. Duration is 29 min.
Provenance:
This interview conducted as part of the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts project, which includes over 400 interviews of artists, administrators, historians, and others involved with the federal government's art programs and the activities of the Farm Security Administration in the 1930s and early 1940s.
Restrictions:
Transcript: Patrons must use microfilm copy.
Topic:
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Mural painting and decoration -- New Mexico -- Santa Fe  Search this
Muralists -- New Mexico -- Santa Fe -- Interviews  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.rush63
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-rush63

Oral history interview with Alice Kagawa Parrott

Interviewee:
Parrott, Alice Kagawa, 1929-2009  Search this
Interviewer:
Smith, Paul J.  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Extent:
32 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2005 July 10
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Alice Kagawa Parrott conducted 2005 July 10, by Paul J. Smith, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in Santa Fe, N.M.
Parrott speaks of her childhood in Hawaii; her extended family's fate in the atomic bombing at Hiroshima; her education at the University of Hawaii, The Cranbrook Academy of Art, and at the studio of Marguerite Wildenhain, at Pond Farm, in Guerneville, California; her teaching years at the University of New Mexico and on the island of Maui; her marriage to Alan Parrott in 1956; her travels in Mexico, Guatemala, and India; and her various exhibitions across the U.S. and abroad. She recalls Claude Horan, Hester Robinson, Ernestine Murai, Anna Kang Burgess, Toshiko Takaezu, Marianne Strengell, Maija Grotell, Jack Lenor Larsen, Rufino Tamayo, Isamu Noguchi, George Nakashima, Joan Mondale, and Aileen Osborne Webb, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Alice Kagawa Parrott (1929-2009) was a fiber artist from Santa Fe, N.M. Paul J. Smith is the Director Emeritus, American Craft Museum, New York, N.Y.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 4 digital wav files. Duration is 1 hr., 27 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
Fiber artists -- New Mexico -- Interviews  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.parrot05
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-parrot05

Oral history interview with Lucy Lippard

Interviewee:
Lippard, Lucy R.  Search this
Interviewer:
Heinemann, Sue  Search this
Creator:
Elizabeth Murray Oral History of Women in the Visual Arts Project  Search this
Names:
Art Workers Coalition  Search this
Elizabeth Murray Oral History of Women in the Visual Arts Project  Search this
Guerilla Art Action Group  Search this
Heresies Collective, Inc.  Search this
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.) -- Employees  Search this
Political Art Documentation/Distribution (Organization)  Search this
Smith College -- Students  Search this
Ashton, Dore  Search this
Chicago, Judy, 1939-  Search this
Hammond, Harmony  Search this
Judd, Donald, 1928-1994  Search this
LeWitt, Sol, 1928-2007  Search this
Miss, Mary, 1944-  Search this
Reinhardt, Ad, 1913-1967  Search this
Ryman, Robert, 1930-2019  Search this
Schneemann, Carolee, 1939-  Search this
Sholette, Gregory  Search this
Stevens, May  Search this
Extent:
4 Items (memory cards (4 hr., 29 min.), secure digital, wav, 1.25 in.)
97 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2011 Mar. 15
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Lucy Lippard conducted 2011 Mar. 15, by Sue Heinemann, for the Archives of American Art's Elizabeth Murray Oral History of Women in the Visual Arts project, at Lippard's home, in Galisteo, N.M.
Lippard discusses her childhood summers in Maine; growing up in New Orleans, La., and Charlottesville, Va.; attending the Abbot Academy and Smith College; her junior year in Paris; working in the Museum of Modern Art Library; living on Avenue D; meeting Bob Ryman and Sol Lewitt; birth of her son Ethan; Dore Ashton as a role model; involvement with various groups and political causes including the Angry Arts movement, the Art Workers' Coalition, Women Artists' Committee, Guerilla Art Action Group, Womanhouse, Political Art Documentation and Distribution (PAD/D), the Ad Hoc Women Artists Committee, and others; the development of Heresies Collective; her publications including, "From the Center: Feminist Essays on Women's Art," (1976), "On the Beaten Track: Tourism, Art and Place," (1999), "Mixed Blessings: New Art in a Multicultural America," (1990, 2000), "The Lure of the Local: Sense of Place in a Multicentered Society," (1997), and "Overlay: Contemporary Art and the Art of Prehistory," (1983) ; curating exhibitions; travels to Argentina and Mexico; moving to Galisteo, N.M.; interest in the Galisteo Basin; teaching; and other topics. She recalls Ad Reinhardt, Donald Judd, Harmony Hammond, Judy Chicago, Gregory Sholette, Carolee Schneemann, Max Koszloff, Joyce Koszloff, May Stevens, Betsy Hess, Mary Miss, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Lucy R. Lippard (1937- ) is a writer and art critic in New York, N.Y. and Galisteo, N.M.
General:
Originally recorded on Edirol R-09HR on 4 secure digital memory cards. Duration is 4 hr., 29 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
This transcript is open for research. Access to the entire recording is restricted. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Topic:
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Art historians -- New Mexico -- Santa Fe -- Interviews  Search this
Curators -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.lippar11
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-lippar11

Oral history interview with Dorothy Morang

Interviewee:
Morang, Dorothy, 1906-1994  Search this
Interviewer:
Loomis, Sylvia Glidden  Search this
Creator:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Names:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Extent:
13 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1964 Dec. 3
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Dorothy Morang conducted on 1964 Dec. 3, by Sylvia Loomis, for the Archives of American Art New Deal and the Arts Project.
Biographical / Historical:
Dorothy Morang (1906-1994) was a painter from Santa Fe, N.M.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound tape reel. Reformatted in 2010 as 1 digital wav file. Duration is 26 min.
Sound quality is poor.
Provenance:
Conducted as part of the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts project, which includes over 400 interviews of artists, administrators, historians, and others involved with the federal government's art programs and the activities of the Farm Security Administration in the 1930s and early 1940s.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Painters -- New Mexico -- Santa Fe -- Interviews  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.morang64
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-morang64

Oral history interview with Mary Giles

Interviewee:
Giles, Mary  Search this
Interviewer:
Sauer, Jane, 1937-  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
American Crafts Council. Museum of Contemporary Crafts  Search this
Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts -- Students  Search this
Haystack Mountain School of Crafts -- Students  Search this
Mankato State University -- Students  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Penland School of Crafts -- Students  Search this
SOFA Chicago  Search this
Buckman, Jan  Search this
DeRaad, Rianna  Search this
Hu, Mary Lee, 1943-  Search this
Itter, Diane, 1946-1989  Search this
Jacobs, Ferne K. (Ferne Kent), 1942-  Search this
Kranzberg, Nancy  Search this
Larsen, Jack Lenor  Search this
Martin, Agnes, 1912-2004  Search this
Nottingham, Walter, 1930-2012  Search this
Okun, Barbara Rose  Search this
Reed, Duane  Search this
Schira, Cynthia, 1934-  Search this
Shieber, Horty  Search this
Extent:
4 Items (Sound recording: 4 sound files (2 hr., 43 min.), digital, wav)
46 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Minnesota -- Description and Travel
Date:
2006 July 18
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Mary Giles conducted 2006 July 18, by Jane Sauer, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at the home of Jane Sauer, in Santa Fe, New Mexico.
Giles speaks of childhood summers spent on Pine Lake in Minnesota; receiving a B.S. in art education from Mankato State University, Minnesota; educational experiences at Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts, Penland School of Crafts, and Haystack Mountain School of Crafts; the influence of nature and Native American art in her work; finding inspiration in "woods and water"; spirituality; teaching elementary art in St. Louis for 28 years while pursuing her art; the materials she works with, including wax linen and various metals; the techniques she uses, such as coiling, twining, torching, hammering, and knotting; the importance of a studio; the appeal of natural aging and corrosion of materials; the competitiveness of craft fields in the United States; attending American Craft Council shows and Sculpture Objects & Functional Art expositions in Chicago; craft as art in the United States; her experience showing in galleries and struggles with pricing; participating in the Poland Triennale in Lodz, Poland, 2001; the pioneering efforts of female fiber artists. Giles also recalls Mary Lee Hu, Diane Itter, Jack Lenor Larsen, Walter Nottingham, Rianna DeRaad, Cynthia Schira, Ferne Jacobs, Barbara Rose Okun, Nancy Kranzberg, Jan Buckman, Horty Shieber, Duane Reed, Agnes Martin, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Mary Giles (1944- ) is an artist of Stillwater, Minnesota. Jane Sauer (1937- ) is an artist and gallery owner of Santa Fe, New Mexico.
General:
Originally recorded 3 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 4 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hr., 43 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Fiber artists  Search this
Topic:
Decorative arts  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.giles06
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-giles06

Michele Zackheim papers

Creator:
Zackheim, Michele  Search this
Names:
College of Santa Fe -- Faculty  Search this
Extent:
2.3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Photographs
Date:
1976-2012
bulk 1980-2000
Summary:
The papers of artist Michele Zackheim measure 2.3 linear feet and date from 1976 to 2012, bulk 1980-2000. The collection documents her career in the visual arts through correspondence, interviews, writings, project files, teaching files, printed material, and photographic material.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of artist Michele Zackheim measure 2.3 linear feet and date from 1976 to 2012, bulk 1980-2000. The collection documents her career in the visual arts through correspondence, interviews, writings, project files, teaching files, printed material, and photographic material.

Correspondence includes communication with museums, galleries, and publishers relating to Zackheim's projects. The interview is a radio broadcast on one sound cassette. Writings include an illustrated botany manuscript and learning portfolios. Project files relate to Zackheim's major works including Tent of Meeting and The Café Series, and are comprised of notes, correspondence, photographic material, video recordings, and a sound recording. Teaching files include notes, slides, and articles that Zackheim used for courses she taught at the College of Santa Fe. Printed material includes exhibition cards and announcements, clippings, journals, and a poster. Photographic material includes artwork, installation process, and portraits of the artist.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 7 series

Series 1: Correspondence, 1986-2002 (0.2 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Interviews, circa 1980s (0.1 linear foot; Box 1)

Series 3: Writings, 1990-1991 (0.3 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 4: Project Files, 1983-2012 (0.5 linear feet; Box 1-2)

Series 5: Teaching Files, circa 1990-1991 (0.4 linear feet; Box 2)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1977-1998 (0.4 linear feet; Box 2-3)

Series 7: Photographic Material, 1976-circa 2000 (0.4 linear feet; Box 2-3)
Biographical / Historical:
Michele Zackheim (1941- ) is a writer and former visual artist in New York City working throughout the 1970s-1990s as a fresco muralist, installation artist, print-maker, and painter.

Zackheim was born in Reno, Nevada and grew up in Compton, California. She began working as an artist in the 1970s in New York City, where she was active in the early feminist art movement. In the 1980s, Zackheim moved to Santa Fe, New Mexico, where she taught at the College of Santa Fe and continued to make art. Notable projects include Inherited Dreams, Tent of Meeting, and The Café Series. Tent of Meeting was a large-scale installation using fabric that she printed with images from religious history and proposed the possibility of peaceful coexistence among people of various backgrounds.

In the mid-1990s, Zackheim became a writer of biographical fiction. She currently teaches Creative Writing from a Visual Perspective at the School of Visual Arts in New York City.
Provenance:
Michele Zackheim donated her papers to the Archives in 2014.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.

Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Michele Zackheim papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Mural painting and decoration  Search this
Installations (Art)  Search this
Women artists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Photographs
Citation:
Michele Zackheim papers, 1976-2012, bulk 1980-2000. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.zackmich
See more items in:
Michele Zackheim papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-zackmich

Olive Rush papers

Creator:
Rush, Olive, 1873-1966  Search this
Names:
United States. Dept. of the Treasury. Section of Fine Arts  Search this
Extent:
6.3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketches
Diaries
Photographs
Date:
1879-1967
Summary:
The papers of Olive Rush measure 6.3 linear feet and date from 1879 to 1967. They contain correspondence, artwork, photographs, writings, and other personal papers documenting Rush's education and career as an illustrator, portraitist, muralist, painter, teacher, and promoter of Native American art.
Scope and Contents note:
The records of Olive Rush measure 6.3 linear feet and date from 1879 to 1967. They contain correspondence, artwork, photographs, writings, and other records that document her education and career as an illustrator, portraitist, muralist, painter, and promoter of Native American art.

Biographical materials include several narratives written by Rush and others, as well as a few items related to Delaware artist Ethel Pennewill Brown Leach, Rush's close friend and colleague. Correspondence spans Rush's education and career, and documents her early career in illustration, purchases and exhibitions of her work, her efforts to secure exhibitions for Native American artists, and her dealings with administrators of Federal Art Projects of the 1930s.

Writings include diaries from Rush's early years, including an especially detailed diary from her Santa Fe Indian School mural project in 1932. Also found are lectures, talks, essays, notebooks with technical experiments and aesthetic ideas, and loose notes for her FAP project at the New Mexico College of Agricultural and Mechanical Arts.

Records of Rush's artwork include two record books, receipts for supplies and shipments, price lists, inventories, records of submissions, and a small number of similar records of artwork by Native American artists. Sketchbooks, loose sketches, and drawings by Rush span her entire career and include many studies and proposed designs for murals and frescoes.

Printed Materials consist of exhibition catalogs, clippings, and reproductions of artwork, especially illustration work from Rush's early career. Photographs include a class photograph from the Corcoran School of Art circa 1890 and many of Rush and her fellow artists in Wilmington, Delaware from around 1904 to 1910. Photographs of works of art document Rush's murals and frescoes in private homes, businesses, and public buildings.
Arrangement note:
The collection is arranged into seven series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1886-1966 (Box 1; 7 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1889-1964 (Boxes 1-2, 8; 1.4 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings, 1886-1962 (Box 2; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 4: Records of Artwork, 1904-1956 (Box 3; 8 folders)

Series 5: Artwork, 1896-1957 (Boxes 3-4, 7, OV 8-12; 1 linear foot)

Series 6: Printed Materials, 1879-1967 (Boxes 4-5, 7, OV 13; 1.6 linear feet)

Series 7: Photographs, circa 1890-1966 (Box 6; 0.4 linear feet)
Biographical/Historical note:
Olive Rush was born in Fairmount, Indiana in 1875 to a Quaker farm family of six children, and attended nearby Earlham College, a Quaker school with a studio art program. Encouraged by her teacher, Rush enrolled in the Corcoran School of Art in Washington, D.C. in 1890, where she stayed for two years and achieved early recognition for her work. In 1893, Rush joined the Indiana delegation of artists to the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago.

In 1894, she moved to New York City and continued her studies at the Art Students League with Henry Siddons Mowbray, John Twachtman, and Augustus St. Gaudens. She secured her first job as an illustrator with Harper and Brothers and quickly started doing additional illustration work for Good Housekeeping, Scribner's, The Delineator, Woman's Home Companion, Sunday Magazine and St. Nicholas Magazine. Rush also became a staff artist at the New York Tribune and illustrated several books.

In 1904, Rush sent an inquiry with samples of her work to master illustrator Howard Pyle, who had established what was then the only school of illustration in the country in Wilmington, Delaware. There he provided free instruction to a small number hand-picked artists culled from hundreds of applicants. Although Pyle did not admit women to his studio, he encouranged her to come and join the class for lectures and criticisms. Rush moved to Delaware later that year, joining a growing number of female illustrators there including Ethel Pennewill Brown (later Leach), Blanche Chloe Grant, Sarah Katherine Smith, and Harriet Roosevelt Richards, among others. Rush and her female colleagues lived together in a boarding house known as Tusculum, which became well-known as a gathering place for women artists.

Rush traveled to Europe in 1910, embarking on a period of intense study and travel which would mark a steady transition from illustration to painting. She studied at Newlyn in Cornwall, England and then in France with the American impressionist Richard E. Miller. She returned to Wilmington in 1911, where she moved into Pyle's studio with Ethel Pennewill Brown. Rush bounced to New York, Boston, and back to France, where she lived for a time with fellow artists Alice Schille, Ethel Pennewill Brown, and Orville Houghton Peets. Her reputation grew, and she began to exhibit regularly in major national and regional juried exhibitions including the Carnegie, Pennsylvania Academy, and Corcoran annual exhibitions, as well as the Hoosier Salon.

In 1914, Rush made her first trip to Arizona and New Mexico. Passing through Santa Fe on her return trip, Rush made contact with the artists community at the Museum of New Mexico, where she secured an impromptu solo exhibition after showing her new work, inspired by the landscape of the Southwest. She made Santa Fe her permanent home in 1920 in an adobe cottage on Canyon Road, which became a main thoroughfare of the Santa Fe artists' community.

Rush began to experiment with fresco painting, and developed her own techniques suitable to the local climate. She became a sought-after muralist and was asked to create frescoes for many private homes and businesses. In her painting, she often depicted the Native American dances and ceremonies she attended. She exhibited these paintings around the country, including with the Society of Independent Artists in New York, and in the Corcoran Annual Juried exhibition, where Mrs. Herbert Hoover and Duncan Phillips both purchased her work.

In 1932, Rush was hired to teach at the Santa Fe Indian School. Rush's enthusiastic work in the 1930s with the young pueblo artists is credited with helping to bring about a flourishing of Native American visual art in New Mexico. Rush continued to work with native artists throughout her life, and many of her associates went on to gain national reputations, including Harrison Begay, Awa-Tsireh, Pop Chalee, Pablita Valerde, and Ha-So-De (Narciso Abeyta).

From 1934 to 1939, Rush executed murals for the Public Works of Art Project (PWAP) and the Federal Art Project (FAP) of the Works Progress Administration (WPA). Rush's federal art projects included murals for the Santa Fe Public Library (1934), the Biology Building of the New Mexico Agricultural College (1935), the Pawhuska, Oklahoma Post Office (1938), and the Florence, Colorado Post Office (1939). Rush was also asked to join the Advisory Committee on Indian Art created by the PWAP in 1934, to help administer a segment of the program aimed at employing Native American artists.

In her later years, Rush's artwork became increasingly experimental, incorporating the ideas of Chinese painting, Native American art, and her contemporaries, the modernists, especially Wassily Kandinsky. She continued painting and exhibiting until 1964, when illness prohibited her from working. She died in 1966, leaving her home and studio to the Santa Fe Society of Friends.

Sources consulted for this biography include Olive Rush: A Hoosier Artist in New Mexico (1992) by Stanley L. Cuba, and Almost Forgotten: Delaware Women Artists and Arts Patrons 1900-1950 (2002) by Janice Haynes Gilmore.
Related Archival Materials note:
The Archives of American Art holds a brief oral history interview with Olive Rush concerning her involvement with Federal Art Projects.
Separated Materials note:
The Archives of American Art also holds material lent for microfilming (reel SW4) including scrapbooks, photographs, clippings, and exhibition catalogs. Most of this material was later donated, but some items remain with the lender and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
Olive Rush donated the bulk of her papers to the Archives of American Art in 1963 and 1964. Additional exhibition catalogs and photographs were added to the collection upon her death in 1966. An anonymous donation of diaries, sketchbooks, and a photograph was received by the Archives in 1970. Also in 1970, the Olive Rush Memorial Studio lent papers for microfilming. Many, but not all, of the loaned materials were later donated.
Restrictions:
The bulk of the collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website. Use of material not digitized requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Olive Rush papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Women painters -- New Mexico -- Santa Fe  Search this
Painters -- New Mexico -- Santa Fe  Search this
American Indians in art  Search this
Art and state  Search this
Mural painting and decoration -- 20th century -- New Mexico -- Santa Fe  Search this
Muralists -- New Mexico -- Santa Fe  Search this
Illustrators -- New Mexico -- Santa Fe  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketches
Diaries
Photographs
Citation:
Olive Rush papers, 1879-1967. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.rusholiv
See more items in:
Olive Rush papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-rusholiv
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Ina Sizer Cassidy

Interviewee:
Cassidy, Ina Sizer, 1869-1965  Search this
Interviewer:
Loomis, Sylvia Glidden  Search this
Creator:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Names:
Federal Art Project (N.M.)  Search this
Federal Writers' Project (N.M.)  Search this
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Public Works of Art Project  Search this
Cassidy, Gerald, 1879-1934  Search this
Extent:
23 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1964 February 13
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Ina Sizer Cassidy conducted by Sylvia Loomis on 1964 February 13 for the Archives of American Art.
Cassidy speaks of her husband Gerald Cassidy, including his background and education; the arts community in Santa Fe in the 1920s; Cassidy's first involvement in the Public Works of Art Project making murals for a federal building in Santa Fe; his death from carbon monoxide poisoning; and his feelings about the PWAP and about government support for the arts. She speaks of her own painting career and her work as head of the WPA Writers Project in New Mexico.
Biographical / Historical:
Ina Sizer Cassidy (1869-1965) was a painter and writer in Santa Fe, New Mexico.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound tape reel. Reformatted in 2010 as 1 digital wav file. Duration is 1 hr.
Provenance:
This interview conducted as part of the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts project, which includes over 400 interviews of artists, administrators, historians, and others involved with the federal government's art programs and the activities of the Farm Security Administration in the 1930s and early 1940s.
Restrictions:
Transcript: Patrons must use microfilm copy.
Topic:
Mural painting and decoration -- New Mexico -- Santa Fe  Search this
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Painters -- New Mexico -- Santa Fe -- Interviews  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.cassid64
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-cassid64

Oral history interview with Elizabeth Boyd

Interviewee:
Boyd, E. (Elizabeth), 1903-1974  Search this
Interviewer:
Loomis, Sylvia Glidden  Search this
Creator:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Names:
Federal Art Project (N.M.)  Search this
Index of American Design  Search this
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Extent:
24 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1964 October 8
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Elizabeth Boyd conducted 1964 October 8, by Sylvia Loomis, for the Archives of American Art.
Boyd discusses her early art training in Philadelphia and Paris; involvement with the Index of American Design; work on the Federal Art Project; New Mexico folk artists; folk art exhibitions in Philadelphia; and the inception of Spanish Colonial department of New Mexico State Museum.
Biographical / Historical:
Elizabeth Boyd (1903-1974) is an art administrator, painter, and writer from Santa Fe, New Mexico.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound tape reel. Reformatted in 2010 as 1 digital wav file. Duration is 55 min.
Provenance:
Conducted as part of the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts project, which includes over 400 interviews of artists, administrators, historians, and others involved with the federal government's art programs and the activities of the Farm Security Administration in the 1930s and early 1940s.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Folk art -- New Mexico  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Painters -- New Mexico -- Santa Fe -- Interviews  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.boyd64
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-boyd64

Oral history interview with Victoria Barr

Interviewee:
Barr, Victoria  Search this
Interviewer:
Cummings, Paul  Search this
Extent:
222 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1977 January 11-February 18
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Victoria Barr conducted 1977 January 11-February 18, by Paul Cummings, for the Archives of American Art.
Barr recalls how she became very interested in theater set and lighting design; the thrill of learning about Greek history and myths and her painting being influenced by dance; studying graphic design and advertising at Parsons School of Design and Cy Sillman as a teacher; at Yale, Neil Welliver influencing her to become a painter; her first trip to Europe with her parents at the age of 14 and spending time with Pablo Picasso, Marc Chagall, and Henri Matisse; fellow Yale students Victor Moscoso, Eva Hesse, Sylvia Mangold, Bob Mangold, and Louise Nevelson; moving to Aspen, Colorado in 1961 and how her brief experience with marijuana influenced her painting more than anything previously; the family friendship with Philip Johnson and building the Glass House in New Canaan, Connecticut; spending time with Johnson, Meis van der Rohe and Phyllis Lambert during the construction of the Seagram Building in Montreal, Canada; Vincent Scully and Bill McDonald as teachers at Yale; visiting Peggy Guggenheim in Venice; going to Budapest, Hungary 1963, right after the Cuban Missile Crisis, to make a film; being awarded the Fulbright to go to France in 1964; her trip to Greece on scholarship and how at home she felt; that it is no longer relevant to paint from nature; meeting Lillian Lynn and becoming great friends; moving back to New York in 1966 and working for the Museum of Natural History in the exhibits department; her work becoming less painterly, more abstract; beginning her teaching career at Barnard College in 1967; the upheaval of student riots at Columbia University and her involvement in the Peace Movement; moving to stain painting; vacationing in Santa Fe, New Mexico and the hippie culture there; how her trip to India in 1971 influenced her to use more color and primitive motifs in her work; embracing the Women's Liberation Movement; summers in Long Island and her trip to Bali. Barr also recalls Gwen Davies, John McAndrew, Alexander Calder, Chick Austin, Sydney Friedberg, Leo Steinberg, Peggy Guggenheim, Diana Cowan, Bob Chamberlain, Joey Cabell, Peter Blum, Marino Marini, Ben Shahn, Mark Rothko, Jack Tworkov, Fritz Bultman, Alice Katz, Jim Brooks, Willem de Kooning, Jasper Johns, Mark Rauschenberg, Jim Rosenquist, Claes Oldenburg, Bernard Berenson, Millard Meiss, Sydney Freedburg, Aline Saarinen, John Johansen, Jim Sobey, Nancy Graves, Richard Serra, Robert Fiore, Philip Glass, Peter Worshall, Michael Helminski, Marcia Tucker, Elke Solomon, Joan Snyder, Nancy Azara, Jane Kaufman, Pat Steir, Susan Hall, and John Giorno.
Biographical / Historical:
Victoria Barr (1937- ) is a set designer and painter from New York, New York.
General:
Originally recorded on 6 sound tape reels. Reformatted in 2010 as 12 digital wav files. Duration is 10 hr., 6 min.
Sound quality is poor.
Provenance:
These interviews are part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
This transcript is open for research. Access to the entire recording is restricted. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.barr77
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-barr77

Oral history interview with Mary Giles, 2006 July 18

Interviewee:
Giles, Mary, 1944-  Search this
Interviewer:
Sauer, Jane, 1937-  Search this
Subject:
Buckman, Jan  Search this
DeRaad, Rianna  Search this
Hu, Mary Lee  Search this
Itter, Diane  Search this
Jacobs, Ferne K. (Ferne Kent)  Search this
Kranzberg, Nancy  Search this
Larsen, Jack Lenor  Search this
Martin, Agnes  Search this
Nottingham, Walter  Search this
Okun, Barbara Rose  Search this
Reed, Duane  Search this
Schira, Cynthia  Search this
Shieber, Horty  Search this
American Crafts Council. Museum of Contemporary Crafts  Search this
Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts  Search this
Haystack Mountain School of Crafts  Search this
Mankato State University  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Penland School of Crafts  Search this
SOFA Chicago  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Minnesota -- Description and travel
Topic:
Decorative arts  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13564
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)261680
AAA_collcode_giles06
Theme:
Craft
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_261680
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Dorothy Morang, 1964 Dec. 3

Interviewee:
Morang, Dorothy, 1906-1994  Search this
Interviewer:
Loomis, Sylvia Glidden  Search this
Subject:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Painters -- New Mexico -- Santa Fe -- Interviews  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12726
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)213668
AAA_collcode_morang64
Theme:
New Deal
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_213668

Oral history interview with Olive Rush, 1963 November 13

Interviewee:
Rush, Olive, 1873-1966  Search this
Interviewer:
Loomis, Sylvia Glidden  Search this
Subject:
Federal Art Project (N.M.)  Search this
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Mural painting and decoration -- New Mexico -- Santa Fe  Search this
Muralists -- New Mexico -- Santa Fe -- Interviews  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12014
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)213785
AAA_collcode_rush63
Theme:
New Deal
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_213785

Oral history interview with Eugenie Shonnard, 1964 February 27-1964 April 9

Interviewee:
Shonnard, Eugenie Frederica, 1886-1978  Search this
Interviewer:
Loomis, Sylvia Glidden  Search this
Subject:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Designers -- New Mexico -- Santa Fe -- Interviews  Search this
Sculptors -- New Mexico -- Santa Fe -- Interviews  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12954
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)213827
AAA_collcode_shonna64
Theme:
Women
Architecture & Design
New Deal
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_213827

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