Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
199 documents - page 1 of 10

Katharine Kuh papers

Creator:
Kuh, Katharine  Search this
Names:
Albright-Knox Art Gallery  Search this
Art Institute of Chicago -- Faculty  Search this
Biennale di Venezia  Search this
Katharine Kuh Gallery (Chicago, Ill.)  Search this
Adams, Ansel, 1902-1984  Search this
Albers, Josef  Search this
Albright, Ivan, 1897-1983  Search this
Archipenko, Alexander, 1887-1964  Search this
Arensberg, Louise S. (Louise Stevenson), 1879-1953  Search this
Arensberg, Walter, 1878-1954  Search this
Arp, Jean, 1887-1966  Search this
Barnet, Will, 1911-  Search this
Barr, Alfred H., Jr., 1902-1981  Search this
Biddle, George, 1885-1973  Search this
Breuer, Marcel, 1902-  Search this
Calder, Alexander, 1898-1976  Search this
Campoli, Cosmo  Search this
Chagall, Marc, 1887-1985  Search this
Chavez Morado, José, 1909-2002  Search this
Chermayeff, Serge, 1900-  Search this
Cornell, Joseph  Search this
Cox, Richard  Search this
Davis, Stuart, 1892-1964  Search this
Day, Worden, 1916-1986  Search this
De Kooning, Willem, 1904-1997  Search this
Dickinson, Edwin Walter, 1891-1978  Search this
Dubuffet, Jean, 1901-  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel, 1887-1968  Search this
Elizabeth, Queen of Great Britain, II, 1926-  Search this
Ernst, Jimmy, 1920-1984  Search this
Falkenstein, Claire, 1908-1997  Search this
Feitelson, Lorser, 1898-1978  Search this
Friendly, Fred W.  Search this
Giacometti, Alberto, 1901-1966  Search this
Golub, Leon, 1922-2004  Search this
Goto, Joseph, 1920-  Search this
Grabe, Klaus  Search this
Graves, Robert, 1895-1985  Search this
Guggenheim, Peggy, 1898-1979  Search this
Guston, Philip, 1913-1980  Search this
Hare, David, 1917-  Search this
Hare, Denise Browne  Search this
Hayter, Stanley William, 1901-1988  Search this
Hirshhorn, Joseph  Search this
Hofmann, Hans, 1880-1966  Search this
Hélion, Jean, 1904-1987  Search this
Inverarity, Robert Bruce, 1909-1999  Search this
Johns, Jasper, 1930-  Search this
Johnson, Philip, 1906-2005  Search this
Johnson, Ray, 1927-  Search this
Kandinsky, Wassily, 1866-1944  Search this
Kepes, Gyorgy, 1906-2001  Search this
Kepes, Juliet  Search this
Klee, Paul, 1879-1940  Search this
Kline, Franz, 1910-1962  Search this
Knox, Seymour H., 1898-1990  Search this
Le Corbusier, 1887-1965  Search this
Lundeberg, Helen, 1908-1999  Search this
Lye, Len, 1901-1980  Search this
Léger, Fernand, 1881-1955  Search this
Mies van der Rohe, Ludwig, 1886-1969  Search this
Millier, Arthur, 1893-  Search this
Moholy-Nagy, László, 1895-1946  Search this
Motherwell, Robert  Search this
Mérida, Carlos, 1891-1984  Search this
Nutting, Muriel Leone Tyler, b. 1892  Search this
Nutting, Myron Chester, 1890-1972  Search this
O'Higgins, Pablo, 1904-  Search this
Orozco, José Clemente, 1883-1949  Search this
Ozbekhan, Hasan, 1921-2007  Search this
Perkins, Frances  Search this
Picasso, Pablo, 1881-1973  Search this
Putnam, Wallace, 1899-1989  Search this
Ray, Man, 1890-1976  Search this
Rich, Daniel Catton, 1904-1976  Search this
Rothko, Mark, 1903-1970  Search this
Sandberg, Carl  Search this
Seligmann, Kurt, 1900-1962  Search this
Shackelford, Shelby  Search this
Shahn, Ben, 1898-1969  Search this
Spaeth, Otto, d. 1966  Search this
Sterne, Hedda, 1916-  Search this
Stevenson, Adlai E. (Adlai Ewing), 1900-1965  Search this
Still, Clyfford, 1904-  Search this
Tanning, Dorothea, 1910-2012  Search this
Tobey, Mark  Search this
Winston, Harry Lewis  Search this
Woolf, Olga  Search this
Young, Victor  Search this
Photographer:
Pollack, Peter, 1909-1978  Search this
Extent:
12 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Illustrated letters
Resumes
Travel diaries
Minutes
Calendars
Visitors' books
Photographs
Paintings
Awards
Drawings
Sound recordings
Collages
Scrapbooks
Lithographs
Prints
Wills
Watercolors
Poetry
Lecture notes
Lectures
Sales records
Date:
1875-1994
bulk 1930-1994
Summary:
The papers of art historian, dealer, critic, and curator Katharine Kuh measure 12 linear feet and date from 1875-1994, with the bulk of the material dating from 1930-1994. The collection documents Kuh's career as a pioneer modernist art historian and as the first woman curator of European Art and Sculpture at the Art Institute of Chicago. Found within the papers are biographical material; correspondence with family, friends and colleagues; personal business records; artwork by various artists; a travel journal; writings by Kuh and others; scrapbooks; printed material; photographs of Kuh and others; and audio recordings of Kuh's lectures and of Daniel Catton Rich reading poetry.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of art historian, dealer, critic, and curator Katharine Kuh measure 12 linear feet and date from 1875-1994, with the bulk of the material dating from 1930-1994. Found within the papers are biographical material; correspondence with family, friends and colleagues; personal business records; artwork by various artists; a travel journal; writings by Kuh and others; scrapbooks; printed material; photographs of Kuh and others; and audio recordings of Kuh's lectures and of Daniel Catton Rich reading poetry.

Biographical material consists of copies of Kuh's birth certificate, resumés, passports, award certificates, honorary diplomas, and address books listing information about several prominent artists and colleagues.

Four linear feet of correspondence offers excellent documentation of Kuh's interest in art history, her travels, her career at the Art Institute of Chicago, her work as a corporate art advisor, and as an author. There are letters from her mother Olga Woolf, friends, and colleagues. There is extensive correspondence with various staff members of the Art Institute of Chicago, the First National Bank of Chicago, and The Saturday Review. Also of interest are letters from artists and collectors, several of whom became life-long friends including Walter and Louise Arensberg, Cosmo Campoli, Serge Chermayeff, Richard Cox, Worden Day, Claire Falkenstein, Fred Friendly, Leon Golub, Joseph Goto, David Hare, Denise Brown Hare, Jean Hélion, Ray Johnson, Gyorgy and Juliet Kepes, Len Lye, Wallace Putnam, Kurt Seligmann, Shelby Shackelford, Hedda Sterne, and Clyfford Still. Many letters are illustrated with original artwork in various media.

There are also scattered letters from various artists and other prominent individuals including Josef Albers, George Biddle, Marcel Breuer, Joseph Cornell, Stuart Davis, Edwin Dickinson, Joseph Hirshhorn, Daniel Catton Rich, and Dorothea Tanning.

Personal business records include a list of artwork, Olga Woolf's will, inventories of Kuh's personal art collection, miscellaneous contracts and deeds of gift, receipts for the sale of artwork, files concerning business-related travel, and miscellaneous receipts.

Artwork in the collection represents a wide range of artist friends and media, such as drawings, watercolors, paintings, collages, and prints. Included are works by various artists including lithographs by David Hare and a watercolor set, Technics and Creativity, designed and autographed by Jasper Johns for the Museum of Modern Art, 1970.

Notes and writings include annotated engagement calendars, travel journals for Germany, a guest book for the Kuh Memorial gathering, and many writings and notes by Kuh for lectures and articles concerning art history topics. Of interest are minutes/notes from meetings for art festivals, conferences, and the "Conversations with Artists Program (1961). Also found are writings by others about Kuh and other art history topics.

Six scrapbooks contain clippings that document the height of Kuh's career as a gallery director and museum curator. Scrapbook 6 contains clippings about Fernand Léger, the subject of a retrospective exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago in 1953.

Additional printed material includes clippings about Kuh and her interests, a comprehensive collection of clippings of Kuh's articles for The Saturday Review, exhibition announcements and catalogs, calendars of events, programs, brochures, books including Poems by Kuh as a child, and reproductions of artwork. Of particular interest are the early and exhibition catalogs from the Katharine Kuh Gallery, and rare catalogs for artists including Jean Arp, Alexander Calder, Marc Chagall, Jean Dubuffet, Marcel Duchamp, Stanley William Hayter, Hans Hofmann, Wassily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, Franz Kline, Le Corbusier, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, and Pablo Picasso.

Photographs provide important documentation of the life and career of Katharine Kuh and are of Kuh, family members, friends, colleagues, events, residences, and artwork. Several of the photographs of Kuh were taken by Will Barnet and Marcel Breuer and there is a notable pair of photo booth portraits of Kuh and a young Ansel Adams. There are also group photographs showing Angelica Archipenko with Kuh; designer Klaus Grabe; painters José Chavez Morado and Pablo O'Higgins in San Miguel, Mexico; Kuh at the Venice Biennale with friends and colleagues including Peggy Guggenheim, Frances Perkins, Daniel Catton Rich, and Harry Winston; and "The Pre-Depressionists" including Lorser Feitelson, Robert Inverarity, Helen Lundeberg, Arthur Millier, Myron Chester Nutting, and Muriel Tyler Nutting.

Photographs of exhibition installations and openings include views of the Katharine Kuh Gallery; Fernand Léger, Man Ray, and László Moholy-Nagy at the Art Institute of Chicago; and Philip Guston, Jimmy Ernst, Seymour H. Knox, Franz Kline, Robert Motherwell, and Mark Rothko at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, New York. There are also photographs depicting three men posing as Léger's "Three Musicians" and the visit of Queen Elizabeth II to the Art Institute of Chicago. There is a photograph by Peter Pollack of an elk skull used as a model by Georgia O'Keeffe.

Additional photographs of friends and colleagues include Ivan Albright, Alfred Barr, Alexander Calder, Marc Chagall, Willem De Kooning, Edwin Dickinson, Marcel Duchamp, Claire Falkenstein, Alberto Giacometti, poet Robert Graves with Len Lye, Philip Johnson, Gyorgy and Juliet Kepes, Carlos Mérida, José Orozco, Hasan Ozbekhan, Pablo Picasso, Carl Sandberg, Ben Shahn, Otto Spaeth, Hedda Sterne, Adlai Stevenson, Clyfford Still, Mark Tobey, and composer Victor Young.

Photographs of artwork include totem poles in Alaska; work by various artists including Claire Falkenstein, Paul Klee, and Hedda Sterne; and work donated to the Guggenheim Museum.

Four audio recordings on cassette are of Katharine Kuh's lectures, including one about assembling corporate collections, and of Daniel Catton Rich reading his own poetry. There is also a recording of the Second Annual Dialogue between Broadcasters and Museum Educators.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 9 series. Undated correspondence, artwork, and photographs of individual artists are arranged alphabetically. Otherwise, each series is arranged chronologically.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1945-1992 (Box 1; 16 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1908-1994 (Boxes 1-5, 13-14, OV 15; 4.0 linear feet)

Series 3: Personal Business Records, 1941-1989 (Box 5; 19 folders)

Series 4: Artwork, 1931-1986 (Boxes 5, 13-14, OVs 15-23; 1.7 linear feet)

Series 5: Notes and Writings, 1914-1994 (Boxes 5-7; 1.7 linear feet)

Series 6: Scrapbooks, 1935-1953 (Box 7; 8 folders)

Series 7: Printed Material, 1916-1992 (Boxes 7-10, 13, OV 22; 3.0 linear feet)

Series 8: Photographs, 1875-1993 (Boxes 10-13; 1.2 linear feet)

Series 9: Audio Recordings, 1977 (Box 12; 1 folder)
Biographical Note:
Katharine Kuh (1904-1994) worked primarily in the Chicago area as an modern art historian, dealer, critic, curator, writer, and consultant. She operated the Katharine Kuh Gallery from 1935-1943 and was the first woman curator of European and Art and Sculpture at the Art Institute of Chicago.

Katharine Kuh (née Woolf) was born on July 15, 1904 in St. Louis, Missouri, the youngest of the three daughters of Olga Weiner and Morris Woolf, a silk importer. In 1909, the family moved to Chicago, Illinois. While traveling with her family in Europe in 1914, Katharine contracted polio, causing her to spend the next decade in a body brace. During this time of restricted movement, she developed an interest in art history through the collecting of old master prints.

After her recovery, Katharine Woolf attended Vassar College where one of her professors, Alfred Barr, encouraged her to study modern art. She graduated from Vassar in 1925 and received a master's degree in art history from the University of Chicago in 1929. Later that year, she moved to New York to pursue a Ph.D. in Renaissance and medieval art at New York University.

In 1930, Katharine Woolf returned to Chicago and married businessman George Kuh and began to teach art history courses in the suburbs of Chicago. After divorcing George Kuh in 1935, she opened the Katharine Kuh Gallery, the first gallery devoted to avant-garde art in Chicago. It was also the first gallery to exhibit photography and typographical design as art forms, and featured the work of Ansel Adams, Josef Albers, Alexander Calder, Wassily Kandinsky, Fernand Léger, and Man Ray, among others. From 1938 to1940, Kuh was the Visiting Professor of Art at the University School of Fine Arts, San Miguel, Mexico.

After the Katharine Kuh Gallery closed in 1943, Kuh was hired by museum director Daniel Catton Rich to fill a position in public relations at the Art Institute of Chicago. During the following years, Kuh edited the museum's Quarterly publication, took charge of the museum's Gallery of Interpretive Art, and began a long term relationship with Rich. In 1946, Kuh was sent on a special mission for the U. S. Office of Indian Affairs to make a detailed study of Native American totemic carvings in Alaska.

In 1949, Kuh persuaded Mr. and Mrs. Walter Arensberg of Los Angeles to exhibit their collection of modern art, creating the first post-war exhibition of modern art in Chicago. She published her first book Art Has Many Faces in 1951, and in the following year, she began writing art criticism for The Saturday Review. In 1954, Kuh was appointed the first woman curator of European Art and Sculpture at the Art Institute. She assembled the American contribution for the Venice Biennale in 1956 and during these years, Kuh helped acquire many of the works of modern art currently in the museum's collection.

A year following Daniel Catton Rich's 1958 resignation from the Art Institute of Chicago, Kuh also resigned and pursued a career in New York as an art collection advisor, most notably for the First National Bank of Chicago. In 1959, Kuh was made art critic for The Saturday Review, and she continued to publish books, including The Artist's Voice in 1962, Break-Up: The Core of Modern Art in 1965, and The Open Eye: In Pursuit of Art in 1971.

Katharine Kuh died on January 10, 1994 in New York City.
Provenance:
The Katharine Kuh papers were donated in several installments from 1971 to 1989 by Katharine Kuh and in 1994 by her estate. Artwork was donated in 1995 by Kuh's former employer, the Art Institute of Chicago.
Restrictions:
Authorization to quote, publish or reproduce requires written permission until 2019. Contact the Archives of American Art Reference Services department for additional information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Authors -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Art historians -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Art dealers -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Art critics -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Curators -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Art consultants -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Topic:
Art, Abstract -- United States  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Women art dealers  Search this
Women art historians  Search this
Women museum curators  Search this
Women authors  Search this
Women art critics  Search this
Function:
Art festivals
Genre/Form:
Illustrated letters
Resumes
Travel diaries
Minutes
Calendars
Visitors' books
Photographs
Paintings
Awards
Drawings
Sound recordings
Collages
Scrapbooks
Lithographs
Prints
Wills
Watercolors
Poetry
Lecture notes
Lectures
Sales records
Citation:
Katharine Kuh papers, 1875-1994, bulk 1930-1994. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.kuhkath
See more items in:
Katharine Kuh papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw987a0763e-de6c-4f9e-b143-4875b3a2244a
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-kuhkath
Online Media:

Mildred Constantine Papers

Creator:
Constantine, Mildred  Search this
Names:
Cleveland Museum of Art  Search this
Getty Conservation Institute  Search this
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.) -- Employees  Search this
Museum of New Mexico  Search this
Philadelphia Museum of Art  Search this
Rhode Island School of Design  Search this
The Ohio State University  Search this
Abakanowicz, Magdalena  Search this
Albers, Anni  Search this
Barr, Alfred Hamilton, 1902-  Search this
Barragán, Luis, 1902-  Search this
Block, Lou, 1895-1969  Search this
Bourgeois, Louise, 1911-2010  Search this
Buic, Jagoda, 1930-  Search this
Burle Marx, Roberto, 1909-1994  Search this
Cohen, Elaine Lustig, 1927-  Search this
Coiner, Charles T., 1897-  Search this
Corzo, Miguel Angel  Search this
D'Harnoncourt, Anne, 1943-2008  Search this
Danto, Arthur Coleman, 1924-  Search this
Dehner, Dorothy, 1901-1994  Search this
Fitch, James Marston  Search this
Goeritz, Mathias, 1915-  Search this
Hart, Allen M., 1925-  Search this
Hicks, Sheila, 1934-  Search this
Koch, Richard H., d. 2009  Search this
Larsen, Jack Lenor  Search this
Lionni, Leo, 1910-  Search this
Reeves, Ruth, 1892-1966  Search this
Reuter, Laurel  Search this
Roosevelt, Eleanor, 1884-1962  Search this
Shahn, Ben, 1898-1969 -- Photographs  Search this
Smith, David, 1906-1965  Search this
Ten Haeff, Ingeborg, 1915-  Search this
Vignelli, Massimo  Search this
Weisman, Donald M.  Search this
Wilder, Elizabeth, 1908-  Search this
Wilke, Ulfert, 1907-1987  Search this
Zeisler, Claire, 1903-1991  Search this
Extent:
5.3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Illustrated letters
Transcripts
Video recordings
Interviews
Date:
1945-2008
Summary:
The papers of Mildred Constantine measure 5.3 linear feet and are dated 1945-2009. Subject files, writings, photographs, and a scrapbook provide an overview of her curatorial work in the Architecture and Design department of the Museum of Modern Art, and subsequent activities as an independent curator, and art consultant. Especially well documented is Whole Cloth, a book written with Laurel Reuter that presents an historical overview of how artists have used cloth in their work.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of Mildred Constantine measure 5.3 linear feet and are dated 1945-2008. Subject files, writings, photographs, and a scrapbook provide an overview of her curatorial work in the Architecture and Design department of the Museum of Modern Art, and subsequent activities as an independent curator, and art consultant. Especially well documented is the book Whole Cloth that she wrote with Laurel Reuter.

Correspondence, though mostly business related, often touches on personal matters since many of the artists and art world figures with whom she corresponded were also friends. Correspondents include Miguel Angel Corzo, Arthur C. Danto, Dorothy Dehner, Allen Hart (who sent more than 40 illustrated letters), Elizabeth Wilder and Donald L. Weisman. She also corresponded with many art institutions and organizations, among them the Cleveland Museum of Art, Independent International Design Conference, El Museo del Barrio, Museum of New Mexico, Ohio State University, Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Estate of David Smith.

Subject files reflect Constantine's activities and interests. A large portion of this series concerns Whole Cloth, a book written with Laurel Reuter that presents an historical look at how artists have used cloth in their work. Correspondence between the two authors, with artists, institutions, and others concerns researching and writing the volume. Also documented are the successes and failures of Constantine's decade long pursuit to publish the book. Other substantive files relate to the Cleveland Museum of Art, Getty Conservation Institute, Sheila Hicks, Jack Lenor Larsen, Rhode Island School of Design, and Soviet Film Posters. Files concerning the University of the Arts' 2003 Commencement include a videocassette.

Writings by Constantine are lecture material and notes. Also found are transcripts of interviews with Constantine and writings by others. Printed material includes newspaper and magazine articles about Constantine and her career. A scrapbook of printed material and photographs documents an exhibition of Latin American posters at the Library of Congress organized by Constantine.

Photographs of people include Mildred Constantine with family, friends, artists and others at public and private events around the world. Notable photographs include: Magdalena Abakanowicz, Anni Albers, Alfred Barr, Luis Barragan, Lou Block, Louise Bourgeois, Jagoda Buic, Elaine Lustig Cohen, Charles Coiner, James Marston Fitch, Mathias Goeritz, Ingeborg Ten Haeff, Ann d'Harnoncourt, Sheila Hicks, Richard Koch, Nancy Koenigsberg, Jack Lenor Larsen, Leo Lionni, Roberto Burle Marx, Ruth Reeves, Laurel Reuter, Eleanor Roosevelt, Ben Shahn, Massimo Vignelli, Ulfert Wilke, and Claire Zeisler. Also, there are photographs of artwork by a wide range of artists.
Arrangement:
The Mildred Constantine papers are organized into 8 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1947-1997 (Boxes 1, 6; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1964-2008 (Boxes 1, 6; 1.0 linear feet)

Series 3: Subject Files, 1964-2008 (Boxes 2-5; 3.3 linear feet)

Series 4: Writings, 1991-2008 (Box 5; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1961-2006 (Box 5; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 6: Photographs, 1993 (Box 5; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 7: Artwork, 1945 (Box 5; 1 folder)

Series 8: Scrapbook, circa 1940s (Box 6; 0.1 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Curator and writer Mildred Constantine (1913-2008) was associated with the Museum of Modern Art's Department of Architecture and Design from 1943 to 1971. She then became an art consultant and independent curator, and wrote on fiber and textiles, decorative arts, photography, caricature and cartoons.

Mildred Constantine (known as "Connie") began her career at College Art Association. Hired as a stenographer in 1930, she soon was promoted to editorial assistant for Parnassus, the forerunner of Art Journal.

Constantine left the College Art Association in 1937 to study at New York University and earned BA and MA degrees. She then continued her education at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. In 1940, Constantine worked in the Office of Inter-American Affairs at the Library of Congress; it was there that she met René d'Harnoncourt.

Influenced by her 1936 travels in Mexico, Constantine's first curatorial effort was an exhibition of Latin American posters. Drawn from the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, the exhibition was held at the Library of Congress.

At the urging of René d'Harnoncourt, The Museum of Modern Art's Architecture and Design Department hired Constantine in 1943. The majority of her 28 year tenure at the museum was spent working with the department's founder, architect Philip Johnson. As a curator during the 1950s and 1960s, Constantine's innovative exhibitions brought lesser known portions of the museum's collection to public attention. Among her exhibtions were: "Words and Images," that focused on graphic design and posters; "Polio Posters," the first Museum of Modern Art show dedicated to social issues; "Olivetti: Design in Industry;" "Signs in the Street;" and "Lettering by Hand." She also published books on Art Nouveau, contemporary package design, and other subjects.

In 1971, Constantine left the Museum of Modern Art to become an independent curator and art consultant. Exhibitions included "Frontiers in Fiber: The Americans," and "Small Works in Fiber" with Jack Lenor Larsen. Tina Modotti: A Fragile Life, Constantine's book on the photographer, actress, model, and political activist, appeared in 1974. That same year, she and Alan Fern produced Revolutionary Soviet Film Posters that focused on works from the 1920s. Her last published work, Whole Cloth, was written with Laurel Reuter and published in 1997. Constantine continued to research and write, and at the time of her death was working on a large, international survey of the study of thread.

Mildred Constantine and Ralph W. Bettelheim (1909-1993) were married for 50 years. They had two daughters, Judith and Vicki.

Mildred Constantine died from heart failure on December 10, 2008, at home in Nyack, New York.
Related Material:
Oral history interviews with Mildred Constantine were conducted for the Archives of American Art by Harlan Phillips, 1965 October 15, and by Paul Cummings, 1976 May 3-1976 August 26.
Provenance:
The papers were donated to the Archives in 2009 by Mildred Constantine's daughters, Judith Bettelheim and Vicki McDaniel.
Restrictions:
Use of origininal material requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Curators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art consultants -- New York -- New York  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Textile fabrics in art  Search this
Film posters, Russian  Search this
Women museum curators  Search this
Women authors  Search this
Women art historians  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Illustrated letters
Transcripts
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Mildred Constantine papers, 1945-2008. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.consmild
See more items in:
Mildred Constantine Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9ceec1503-7840-4279-b08d-1d44f625df3e
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-consmild
Online Media:

Elizabeth McCausland papers

Topic:
Springfield Republican
Creator:
McCausland, Elizabeth, 1899-1965  Search this
Names:
American Art Research Council  Search this
Barnard College -- Faculty  Search this
Federal Art Project (U.S.)  Search this
United States. Farm Security Administration  Search this
Abbott, Berenice, 1898-1991  Search this
Dove, Arthur Garfield, 1880-1946  Search this
Hartley, Marsden, 1877-1943  Search this
Hawthorne, Charles Webster, 1872-1930  Search this
Henri, Robert, 1865-1929  Search this
Henry, Edward Lamson, 1841-1919  Search this
Hine, Lewis Wickes, 1874-1940  Search this
Inness, George, 1825-1894  Search this
Kleinholz, Frank, 1901-  Search this
Lawrence, Jacob, 1917-2000  Search this
Maurer, Alfred Henry, 1868-1932  Search this
Morgan, Barbara Brooks, 1900-1992  Search this
Stieglitz, Alfred, 1864-1946  Search this
Weegee, 1899-1968  Search this
Weston, Edward, 1886-1958  Search this
Extent:
45 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Drawings
Photographs
Place:
New York N.Y. -- Pictorial works -- Photographs
Date:
1838-1995
bulk 1920-1960
Summary:
The papers of art critic, writer, and historian Elizabeth McCausland measure 45 linear feet and date from 1838 to 1995, with the bulk of the material dating from 1920 to 1960. The collection provides a vast accumulation of research data on various artists and aspects of American art, especially the early American modernists and the Federal Arts Projects. Papers include McCausland's extensive research and writing files, particularly on Marsden Hartley, E. L. Henry, Lewis Hine, George Inness, and Alfred H. Maurer. McCausland's correspondence with artists includes a substantial amount with Arthur Dove and Alfred Stieglitz. Her collaborative work with Berenice Abbott on the Changing New York book and series of photographs is well-documented within the collection. Also found are general writings, subject files, files relating to exhibitions, teaching, and committees, photographs, art work, personal papers, and printed material. Additional McCausland material donated later from the estate of Berenice Abbott include biographical materials, project files, writings, and printed materials.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of art critic, writer, and historian Elizabeth McCausland measure approximately 45 linear feet and date from 1838 to 1995, with the bulk of the material dating from 1920 to 1995. The collection provides a vast accumulation of data on various artists and aspects of American art, especially the early American modernists and the Federal Arts Projects. Papers include McCausland's extensive research and writing files, particularly on Marsden Hartley, E. L. Henry, Lewis Hine, George Inness, and Alfred H. Maurer. McCausland's correspondence with artists includes a substantial amount with Arthur Dove and Alfred Stieglitz. Her collaborative work with Berenice Abbott on the Changing New York book and series of photographs is well-documented within the collection. Also found are general writings, subject files, files relating to exhibitions, teaching, and committees, photographs, art work, personal papers, and printed material. Additional McCausland material from the estate of Berenice Abbott include biographical materials, project files, writings, and printed materials.

McCausland's personal papers consist of appointment books and engagement calendars, scrapbooks, student papers, works printed on her private press, financial records, biographical material, and scattered memorabilia, which together document other aspects of her life apart from her work. Correspondence includes incoming and outgoing letters along with enclosures, dating from McCausland's time as a journalist for The Springfield Republican in the 1920s and 1930s to her time as a freelance writer, art critic, and historian (1940s-1960s) and mostly concerning professional matters. Also included is a substantial amount of correspondence with artists, particularly Arthur Dove and Alfred Stieglitz, and some personal correspondence with her mother. General writings consists primarily of copies of McCausland's speeches and lectures on various art topics in addition to her early poems (dating from the 1930s) and scattered essays and articles.

The most extensive part of the collection is comprised of McCausland's research and writing files pertaining to large research and curatorial projects, such as ones on the artists Alfred H. Maurer and Marsden Hartley (which was begun by the American Art Research Council and subsequently taken over by McCausland), and one for the American Processional exhibition at the Corcoran Gallery in 1950. A wide variety of smaller projects are also well-documented in the series Other Research and Writing Files, including ones on E. L. Henry, Lewis Hine, George Inness, her collaborative work with Berenice Abbott on the Changing New York book and series of photographs. Numerous other artists and art topics are covered as well, such as Arthur Dove, Robert Henri, Jacob Lawrence, Charles Hawthorne, film, and photography. Files for her book Careers in Art (1950), her many speaking and lecture engagements, and editing work are also found in this series. Files consist primarily of correspondence, notes, research material, manuscripts, bibliographies, photographs of works of art, completed research forms for works of art, card index files, and printed material.

Also found are subject files containing printed material, scattered notes and correspondence, and photographs, which may have been used for reference and/or collected in the course of McCausland's research activities; files relating to various exhibitions organized by McCausland from 1939 to 1944, including ones of silk screen prints and modern photography; files relating to courses on art history taught by McCausland, especially the one she taught at Barnard College in 1956; and files stemming from her participation in various art organizations and committees, especially during the time period just before and during the Second World War.

Printed material consists primarily of clippings and tear sheets of McCausland's newspaper articles and columns, which document her contributions to The Springfield Republican from 1923 to 1946, in addition to scattered exhibition catalogs, announcements, books, and miscellaneous publications. Photographs include ones of various artists and works of art, ones from the Farm Security Administration, and ones by photographers, such as Berenice Abbott (including ones from the Federal Art Project book, Changing New York), Barbara Morgan, Weegee, and Edward Weston, among others. Photographs, sometimes annotated or including notes, are scattered throughout her research files. Also included are photographs of McCausland, dating from her childhood. Art work found in the collection includes drawings, prints, and watercolors that were either given to McCausland by the artist or collected by her in the course of her work as an art critic and historian.

Additional material belonging to Elizabeth McCausland and donated by the estate of Berenice Abbott includes biographical material; business and personal correspondence; professional project files and writings, including drafts and research materials related to the book projects Art in America, Conversations with March, and Frank Kleinholz; and printed materials, including reprints of critical essays and articles by McCausland.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 15 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Personal Papers, 1838, 1920-1951 (Boxes 1-2, 34; 1.5 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1923-1960 (Boxes 2-5; 2.9 linear feet)

Series 3: General Writings, circa 1930-1954 (Boxes 5-6; 0.9 linear feet)

Series 4: Alfred H. Maurer, 1851-1951, bulk 1948-1950 (Boxes 6-9; 3.7 linear feet)

Series 5: American Processional, 1949-1951 (Boxes 10-11; 1.8 linear feet)

Series 6: Marsden Hartley, 1900-1964, bulk 1944-1964 (Boxes 11-21, OV 37; 10 linear feet)

Series 7: Other Research and Writing Files, 1896, 1926-1958 (Boxes 21-25, 31; 4.6 linear feet)

Series 8: Subject Files, 1927-1954 (Boxes 25-26; 1.0 linear feet)

Series 9: Other Exhibition Files, 1939-1941, 1944 (Box 26; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 10: Teaching Files, 1939-1965 (Box 27; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 11: Committee Files, 1936-1960 (Box 27; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 12: Printed Material, 1923-1953 (Boxes 28-32, 34, OV 38, BV 44-47; 4.6 linear feet)

Series 13: Photographs, circa 1905-1950 (Boxes 32-36, OV 37; 1.4 linear feet)

Series 14: Art Work, 1887-1942 (Boxes 33-34, OV 39-43; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 15: Elizabeth McCausland Material from the Estate of Berenice Abbott, 1920-1995 (Boxes 48-53; 5.4 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Elizabeth McCausland, the art critic and writer, was born in Wichita, Kansas in 1899. She attended Smith College, receiving her Bachelor's degree in 1920 and her Master's in 1922. Beginning in 1923, she worked as a general reporter for The Springfield Republican (Springfield, Massachusetts). After several years, she began to review art exhibitions and soon became an established art critic. In the course of her work, she began to develop friendships with artists, such as Alfred Stieglitz and Arthur Dove. During these early years, she also wrote poetry and designed and printed limited edition publications on her private press.

McCausland moved to New York in 1935, but continued to contribute a weekly art column to The Springfield Republican until it suspended publication in 1946. From the mid-1930s on, she worked primarily as a freelance writer and art critic, contributing articles to publications such as Parnassas, The New Republic, and Magazine of Art. In the latter part of her career, her writings focused more on art history and special studies on artists.

In the late-1930s, McCausland collaborated with the photographer Berenice Abbott on the Federal Art Project book, Changing New York, for which she provided the text to Abbott's now-famous photographs of New York City neighborhoods, architecture, and street scenes. She studied and wrote about photography, including numerous articles on the photographer Lewis Hine (of whose work she organized a retrospective exhibition at the Riverside Museum in 1939), and was appointed to the Advisory Committee of the Museum of Modern Art's Department of Photography in 1944.

McCausland went on to organize other exhibitions, including a show of contemporary work, "The World of Today" (Berkshire Museum, 1939), shows of silk screen prints (Springfield Museum of Fine Arts, March 1940 and New York State Museum, Summer 1940), and a photography show, "Photography Today" (A.C.A. Gallery, 1944). In the late 1930s, she embarked upon a study of "the status of the artist in America from colonial times to the present, with especial attention to the relation between art and patronage," which continued over twenty years (and was never completed) and for which she received a Guggenheim fellowship in 1943.

In addition to her other writing, during the 1940s, McCausland carried out studies on the artists, E. L. Henry and George Inness, which resulted in exhibitions at the New York State Museum in 1942 and the George Walter Vincent Smith Art Museum in 1946, respectively and publications (a report on Henry and a book on Inness). From 1948 to 1949, she carried out an extensive study of the painter, Alfred H. Maurer, organizing an exhibition, "A. H. Maurer: 1868-1932," which showed at the Walker Art Center and the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1949, and publishing the biography, A. H. Maurer, in 1951. In 1950, she worked as a special consultant on the American Processional exhibition at the Corcoran Gallery and as editor of the accompanying book. Shortly thereafter, she began a study of Marsden Hartley for a monograph, which was published in 1952, and she helped organize the Hartley exhibition at the University of Minnesota that same year. She continued the Hartley study on larger scale for a planned biography and catalogue raisonne; although she continued to work on it off and on for the next decade, the project was never completed.

McCausland published other books, including Careers in the Arts (1951), and undertook other research and consulting projects, such as photo-editing Carl Sandburg's Poems of the Midwest (1946), conducting surveys of art and advertising for an article in Magazine of Art and of art education for Cooper Union Art School, and contributing yearly articles on art to various encyclopedias. At different times throughout her career, she supplemented her income by taking teaching positions. She taught courses on art history at Sarah Lawrence College from 1942 to 1944 and at Barnard College in 1956, as well as courses at the Design Laboratory (1939) and the New School for Social Research (1946). She also gave numerous lectures and speeches on various art topics, and regularly participated in conferences and symposiums. Towards the end of her career, she was publishing less, but was still involved in many projects, most notably the Hartley study.

McCausland was a tireless promoter of the arts, and often an advocate for artists. Even though her work was well-known among certain art circles, she never received the recognition as a writer that she deserved. Nor was she ever able to free herself from the pressure of writing for a living. Continually suffering from poor health, she died on May 14, 1965.
Related Material:
Related material found in the Archives includes a sound recording from a symposium on Marsden Hartley, of which McCausland was a participant, held at the Portland Museum of Art in 1961. The Frank Kleinholz papers contain a recorded interview of McCausland done in 1944-1945 for radio station WNYC. Some of McCausland's correspondence is found in the G. Alan Chidsey papers; Chidsey served as a trustee of the Marsden Hartley estate.
Separated Material:
Material separated from the collection includes some issues of Camera Work (Vol. 30, 47, 49/50), which were combined with other issues in an artificial collection created by the Archives at some earlier point.
Provenance:
Elizabeth McCausland donated the bulk of her papers in several installments from 1956 to 1961. An unknown donor, perhaps her literary executor, donated additional papers sometime after her death in 1965. It appears that McCausland originally donated her research files on Marsden Hartley, measuring 10 linear feet, to the Whitney Museum, who then lent them to the Archives for microfilming in 1966, and donated them sometime thereafter. McCausland originally donated files of newspaper clippings and offprints of her articles to the The New York Public Library, who gave them to the Archives in 1968. Additional McCausland material from the estate of Berenice Abbott was donated to the Archives in 2009.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Women art critics  Search this
Topic:
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Art -- History -- Study and teaching  Search this
Modernism (Art)  Search this
Women art historians  Search this
Women authors  Search this
Function:
Arts organizations
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Drawings
Photographs
Citation:
Elizabeth McCausland papers, 1838-1995, bulk 1920-1960. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.mccaeliz
See more items in:
Elizabeth McCausland papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9cebe32f8-0180-44bb-a2a8-8ed061f173c1
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-mccaeliz
Online Media:

Patricia Hills papers

Creator:
Hills, Patricia  Search this
Names:
Women's Caucus for Art  Search this
Lawrence, Jacob, 1917-2000  Search this
Neel, Alice, 1900-1984  Search this
Sargent, John Singer, 1856-1925  Search this
Stevens, May  Search this
Extent:
47.5 Linear feet
0.113 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Date:
circa 1900-2022
bulk 1968-2009
Summary:
The papers of art historian, curator, and educator Patricia Hills measure 47.5 linear feet and 0.113 GB and date from circa 1900-2022, bulk 1968-2009. Central to this collection are project files documenting professional work that resulted in lectures, publications, exhibitions, art history courses on numerous artists including Alice Neel, Jacob Lawrence, May Stevens, Rudolf Baranik, and John Singer Sargent. These files and files documenting Hills's tenure at the Whitney Museum of American Art include planning documents, research files, correspondence, manuscripts and accompanying publications, as well as other printed materials. Some of this material is in digital format. The collection also contains correspondence with art historians, artists, curators, and others, notably Lawrence Alloway, Lowery Stokes Sims, Lucy R. Lippard, T.J. Clark, Leon Golub, and Donald Kuspit; professional files documenting grants and residencies awarded and consulting work; artist and subject files; other writings; and printed and digital material. Membership and affiliation records document Hills' service to the profession, including Women's Caucus for Art and the Visual Culture/Art History Caucus of the American Studies Association.

There is an 8.4 linear foot unprocssed addition to this collection donated in 2022 that includes Patricia Hills' research material regarding Eastman Johnson, consisting of biographical information; professional correspondence; printed material; institutional, exhibition, subject and genre files for Eastman Johnson's works of art; photographs of works of art; writings and lectures; catalog cards; and files regarding works not by Johnson.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of art historian, curator, and educator Patricia Hills measure 47.5 linear feet and 0.113 GB and date from circa 1900-2022, bulk 1968-2009. Central to this collection are project files documenting professional work that resulted in lectures, publications, exhibitions, art history courses on numerous artists including Alice Neel, Jacob Lawrence, May Stevens, Rudolf Baranik, and John Singer Sargent. These files and files documenting Hills's tenure at the Whitney Museum of American Art include planning documents, research files, correspondence, manuscripts and accompanying publications, as well as other printed materials. Some material is in digital format. The collection also contains correspondence with art historians, artists, curators, and others, notably Lawrence Alloway, Lowery Stokes Sims, Lucy R. Lippard, T.J. Clark, Leon Golub, and Donald Kuspit; professional files documenting grants and residencies awarded and consulting work; artist and subject files; other writings; and printed and digital material. Membership and affiliation records document Hills' service to the profession, including Women's Caucus for Art and the Visual Culture/Art History Caucus of the American Studies Association.

There is an 8.4 linear foot unprocssed addition to this collection donated in 2022 that includes Patricia Hills' research material regarding Eastman Johnson, consisting of biographical information; professional correspondence; printed material; institutional, exhibition, subject and genre files for Eastman Johnson's works of art; photographs of works of art; writings and lectures; catalog cards; and files regarding works not by Johnson.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 13 series.

Series 1: Correspondence, circa 1958-2019 (2.6 Linear Feet; Boxes 1-2, 25)

Series 2: Project Files, circa 1900-2011 (15.2 Linear Feet; Boxes 3-13, 25-30, OV24, 0.041 GB; ER01-ER02)

Series 3: Whitney Museum Files, circa 1900-2015, bulk 1973-1987 (4.1 Linear Feet; Boxes 13-16, 30)

Series 4: Boston University Files, circa 1974-2015 (1.3 linear feet; Boxes 30-31)

Series 5: Professional Files, circa 1959-2019 (2.4 linear feet; Boxes 17-18, 32)

Series 6: Membership and Affiliation Records, circa 1969-2013 (2 linear feet; Boxes 18-20, 32)

Series 7: Museum of Fine Arts Restructuring Files, circa 1997-2005 (1.2 linear feet; Boxes 32-33)

Series 8: Writings, circa 1962-2019 (5.4 linear feet; Boxes 20-21, 34-38, 0.068 GB; ER03, ER05)

Series 9: Teaching Files, circa 1974-2019 (0.9 linear feet; Box 39)

Series 10: Artist Files, circa 1958-2014 (0.9 Linear Feet; Box 21)

Series 11: Subject Files, circa 1961-2007 (1.0 linear Feet; Box 22, 0.004 GB; ER04)

Series 12: Printed Material, circa 1970-2010 (1.0 linear Feet; Box 23)

Series 13: Unprocessed Addition, circa 1970-2022 (8.4 linear feet; Boxes 40-49)
Biographical / Historical:
Patricia Hills (1936-) is an art historian, curator, and Professor Emerita of American Art and African American Art at Boston University. Hills obtained a B.A. from Stanford University in Modern European Literature, an M.A. from Hunter College in 1968, where she was advised by Leo Steinberg, and her PhD. from New York University's Institute of Fine Arts. Hills worked as Associate and later Adjunct Curator of 18th and 19th Century American Art at the Whitney Museum of American Art from 1972 until 1987. During that time she organized exhibitions including John Singer Sargent (1986) while progressively becoming more invested as an educator, with teaching positions at Hunter College and the Institute of Fine Arts. In February 2011 she received the Distinguished Teaching of Art History award from the College Art Association.

Hills served as the Director of the Boston University Art Gallery from 1980-1989, and began her tenure in the art history department as Associate Professor in 1978. She was co-founder of the Boston Chapter of the Women's Caucus for Art and was highly active in the College Art Association and American Studies Association. She has held fellowships at numerous institutions including the W.E.B. DuBois Institute for African and African American Research at Harvard University, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the Georgia O'Keeffe Museum Research Center, and the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

As a principal author she is responsible for organizing a number of monograph and exhibition catalog publishing efforts including Painting Harlem Modern: The Art of Jacob Lawrence (2010), May Stevens (2005), Eastman Johnson: Painting America (co-authored, 1999), John Singer Sargent (1986), Alice Neel (1983), Social Concern and Urban Realism: American Painting of the 1930s (1983), Turn-of-the-Century America: Paintings, Graphics, Photographs, 1890-1910 (1977), The Painters' America: Rural and Urban Life, 1810-1910 (1974), and The American Frontier: Images and Myths (1973). In addition, Patricia Hills has authored numerous articles for art publications, served as reviewer for College Art Association's CAA Reviews, and has contributed greatly as a peer reviewer and editor. From 1990 to 1999, she served as series editor for six books in the Cambridge Studies in American Visual Culture series, published by Cambridge University Press.
Provenance:
Donated in 2006, 2018, 2019 and 2022 by Patricia Hills.
Restrictions:
This collection is temporarily closed to researchers due to archival processing. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Writings by Patricia Hills: The donor has retained all intellectual rights, including copyright, that she may own.
Occupation:
Educators -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Art historians -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Museum curators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
African American artists  Search this
Art, American -- 19th century  Search this
Art -- Political aspects  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Women art historians  Search this
Women museum curators  Search this
Citation:
Patricia Hills Papers, circa 1900-2022, bulk 1968-2009. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.hillspat
See more items in:
Patricia Hills papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw94c3f79a5-92b6-4d74-8ddb-d1957923a415
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-hillspat

Avis Berman research material on Juliana Force, circa 1930-2020

Creator:
Berman, Avis, 1949-  Search this
Subject:
Force, Juliana  Search this
Whitney, Gertrude Vanderbilt  Search this
Whitney Museum of American Art  Search this
Type:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Interviews
Video recordings
Citation:
Avis Berman research material on Juliana Force, circa 1930-2020. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Women art dealers  Search this
Women art historians  Search this
Theme:
Women  Search this
Research and writing about art  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)22032
AAA_collcode_bermavis4
Theme:
Women
Research and writing about art
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_22032

Avis Berman research material on Elie Nadelman

Creator:
Berman, Avis  Search this
Names:
Nadelman, Elie, 1882-1946  Search this
Extent:
1 Linear foot
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1998-2002
Summary:
Avis Berman research material on Elie Nadelman measures one linear feet and dates from circa 1998-2002. The research material includes select correspondence regarding the research process, as well as notes and photocopies of material from Nadelman's personal and professional archives for the essay, "Sculptor in the Open Air: Elie Nadelman and the Folk and Popular Arts," written by Berman as a part of the publication Elie Nadelman: Classical Folk (American Federation of Arts, 2001).
Scope and Contents:
Avis Berman research material on Elie Nadelman measures one linear foot and dates from circa 1998-2002. The research material includes select correspondence regarding the research process, as well as notes and photocopies of material from Nadelman's personal and professional archives for the essay, "Sculptor in the Open Air: Elie Nadelman and the Folk and Popular Arts," written by Berman as a part of the publication Elie Nadelman: Classical Folk (American Federation of Arts, 2001).
Arrangement:
Due to its small size the collection is arranged in a single series.
Biographical / Historical:
Avis Berman (1949- ) is a writer, curator, and historian of American art, architecture and culture based in New York, N.Y.. She holds a bachelor's degree from Bucknell University and an master's degree from Rutgers University, both in English literature. She is the author of numerous books including Rebels on Eighth Street: Juliana Force and the Whitney Museum of American Art; James McNeill Whistler; and Edward Hopper's New York. She was also co-author and editor of Katharine Kuh's memoir, My Love Affair with Modern Art: Behind the Scenes with a Legendary Curator. Berman has written numerous articles on subjects including painting, sculpture, photography, illustration, design, architecture, and the social history of the visual arts for a broad range of publications including The New York Times, The New York Review of Books, The Washington Post, Smithsonian, Saturday Review, The Boston Book Review, American Art, ARTnews, The San Francisco Examiner, The Boston Globe, The Philadelphia Inquirer, The Baltimore Sun, Art in America, Art & Antiques, House & Garden, and Architectural Digest. Throughout the 1980s 1990s and 2000s Avis served as a consultant for the Archives of American Art, Washington, D.C., in her capacity as interviewer for the oral history project for which she has researched and interviewed countless artists, collectors, and other figures in the art world in Europe and the United States. Since 2001, Avis Berman has overseen the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation's oral history project.
Related Materials:
Also in the Archives are the Avis Berman research material on Katharine Kuh, 1939-2006, research material on Juliana Force, circa 1930-2020, research material on art and artists, 1976-1994, and an interview of Reuben Nakian conducted by Berman for the Archives Oral History Program, June 1981.
Provenance:
Donated in 2021 by Avis Berman.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
The donor has retained all intellectual property rights, including copyright, that they may own in the following material: all writings by Avis Berman.
Occupation:
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Women art historians  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Citation:
Avis Berman research material on Elie Nadelman, circa 1998-2002. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.bermavis5
See more items in:
Avis Berman research material on Elie Nadelman
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9b6baa174-578f-490b-b9d3-8fe306c67e31
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-bermavis5

Lauris Mason research material on George Bellows, 1976-1981

Creator:
Mason, Lauris  Search this
Subject:
Bellows, George  Search this
Albright, Ivan  Search this
Morgan, Charles H. (Charles Hill)  Search this
Ludman, Joan  Search this
Citation:
Lauris Mason research material on George Bellows, 1976-1981. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Women art historians  Search this
Theme:
Research and writing about art  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)10957
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)214739
AAA_collcode_masolaur
Theme:
Research and writing about art
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_214739

Avis Berman research material on Elie Nadelman, circa 1998-2002

Creator:
Berman, Avis, 1949-  Search this
Subject:
Nadelman, Elie  Search this
Citation:
Avis Berman research material on Elie Nadelman, circa 1998-2002. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Women art historians  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Theme:
Women  Search this
Research and writing about art  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)22101
AAA_collcode_bermavis5
Theme:
Women
Research and writing about art
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_22101

Lauris Mason research material on George Bellows

Creator:
Mason, Lauris  Search this
Names:
Albright, Ivan, 1897-1983  Search this
Bellows, George, 1882-1925  Search this
Ludman, Joan  Search this
Morgan, Charles H. (Charles Hill), 1902-1984  Search this
Extent:
0.01 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1976-1981
Summary:
The Lauris Mason research material on George Bellows dates from 1976-1981 and measures 0.01 linear feet. Records document research conducted by Mason for her book The Lithographs of George Bellows: A Catalogue Raisonné; Lauris Mason; Joan Ludman; Charles H. Morgan (Millwood, N.Y.: KTO Press, 1977).
Scope and Contents:
The Lauris Mason research material on George Bellows dates from 1976-1981 and measures 0.01 linear feet. Records document research conducted by Mason for her book The Lithographs of George Bellows: A Catalogue Raisonné; Lauris Mason; Joan Ludman; Charles H. Morgan (Millwood, N.Y.: KTO Press, 1977).

Records include correspondence with Charles H. Morgan and others discussing inquiries for information on Bellows and his lithographs, and progress on the catalog. Other documentation includes a draft introduction for the catalog written by Morgan and related correspondence, and letters concerning a dispute with Jean Bellows Booth, daughter of George Bellows, over permissions to access her father's record book and publish his lithographs. Also found is a pamphlet announcing the publication, copies of two reviews of the catalog raisonné, and unrelated 1978 correspondence with Ivan Albright related to Mason's request to purchase prints by Albright.
Biographical / Historical:
Coral Gables, Florida, author, editor, and art historian Lauris Mason authored several anthologies and bibliographies on printmaking. Her publications include a catalog raisonné of the lithographs of New York painter and printmaker George Bellows, which she co-authored with Joan Ludman (1932-2015), an art historian with expertise in prints, and Charles Hill Morgan (1902-1984), an educator and art historian from Amherst, Massachusetts. Mason and her husband Daniel J. Mason are also collectors of pop-up books and related ephemera.
Provenance:
The collection was donated to the Archives of American Art by Lauris Mason in 1989.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Authors -- Florida -- Coral Gables  Search this
Editors -- Florida -- Coral Gables  Search this
Art historians -- Florida -- Coral Gables  Search this
Topic:
Women art historians  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.masolaur
See more items in:
Lauris Mason research material on George Bellows
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9241331a2-2497-4db0-a8f7-5f88576a9933
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-masolaur

Patricia Hills papers, circa 1900-2022

Creator:
Hills, Patricia, 1936-  Search this
Subject:
Lawrence, Jacob  Search this
Neel, Alice  Search this
Sargent, John Singer  Search this
Stevens, May  Search this
Women's Caucus for Art  Search this
Citation:
Patricia Hills papers, circa 1900-2022. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
African American artists  Search this
Art, American -- 19th century  Search this
Art -- Political aspects  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Women art historians  Search this
Women museum curators  Search this
Theme:
Women  Search this
Research and writing about art  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)17590
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)396402
AAA_collcode_hillspat
Theme:
Women
Research and writing about art
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_396402

Oral history interview with Diane Waldman

Interviewee:
Waldman, Diane  Search this
Interviewer:
Richards, Judith Olch  Search this
Names:
Elizabeth Murray Oral History of Women in the Visual Arts Project  Search this
Guggenheim International Exhibition  Search this
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum  Search this
Cornell, Joseph  Search this
De Kooning, Willem, 1904-1997  Search this
Ernst, Max, 1891-1976  Search this
Fry, Edward F.  Search this
Hess, Thomas B.  Search this
Kelly, Ellsworth, 1923-  Search this
Lichtenstein, Roy, 1923-1997  Search this
Messer, Thomas M.  Search this
Wright, Frank Lloyd, 1867-1959  Search this
Extent:
106 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2010 June 8-9
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Diane Waldman conducted 2010 June 8-9, by Judith Olch Richards, for the Archives of American Art's Elizabeth Murray Oral History of Women in the Visual Arts project, at Waldman's home, in New York, N.Y.
Waldman speaks of her background; education and early career; her curatorial work at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; relationships with artists; her exhibitions of works by Joseph Cornell, Willem de Kooning, Ellsworth Kelly, Roy Lichtenstein, Max Ernst, and others; her travels to India; her life after resigning from the Guggenheim Museum; Frank Lloyd Wright's building; the Guggenheim International; the museum profession dominated by men; writing detective stories; and other topics. She recalls Ed Fry, Thomas Hess, Thomas Kress, Thomas Messer, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Diane Waldman (1936- ) is an independent art history scholar in New York, N.Y. Judith Olch Richards (1947- ) is a former director of iCI in New York, N.Y.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 memory cards. Duration is 5 hr., 57 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Curators -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Art -- History -- Study and teaching  Search this
Women art historians  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.waldma10
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw96aeb78f4-637e-40a2-bb38-726bc8f2e747
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-waldma10
Online Media:

Avis Berman research material on Juliana Force

Creator:
Berman, Avis  Search this
Names:
Whitney Museum of American Art  Search this
Force, Juliana, 1876-1948  Search this
Extent:
12.3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
circa 1930-2020
Scope and Contents:
Avis Berman research material on Juliana Force measures 12.3 linear feet and dates from circa 1930-2020. The papers document Berman's research for her book Rebels on Eigth Street: Juliana Force and the Whitney Museum of American Art, 1990. Included is correspondence, writings, printed material, audio visual material, transcripts of interviews, administrative and sales records, and photographs. Photographs consist of 93 Rieser/Force family photographs, 45 photographs of Barley Sheaf Farm, Juliana Force's residence in Holicong, Pa., and a photograph album containing 23 images of "Cobweb," Force's cottage in Rosemary Lane, Haddenham, Bucks, England. Also included are 88 contemporary and reproduction photographs.
Biographical / Historical:
Avis Berman (1949- ) is a writer and art historian in New York, N.Y. Berman wrote the book Rebels on Eighth Street: Juliana Force and the Whitney Museum of American Art, 1990.
Provenance:
Donated in 2020 and 2021 by Avis Berman.
Restrictions:
This collection is temporarily closed to researchers due to archival processing. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
The donor has retained all intellectual property rights, including copyright, that they may own in the following material: all writings by Avis Berman.
Occupation:
Art dealers -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Curators -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Art historians -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Art critics -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Authors -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Topic:
Women art dealers  Search this
Women art historians  Search this
Women authors  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.bermavis4
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9fe24ce94-5c70-4ab0-adc9-0193e72014bd
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-bermavis4

Judith Wilson papers, 1966-2010

Creator:
Wilson, Judith  Search this
Subject:
Thompson, Bob  Search this
Type:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Photographs
Citation:
Judith Wilson papers, 1966-2010. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Interviews  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Women art historians  Search this
African American educators  Search this
Theme:
Women  Search this
African American  Search this
Research and writing about art  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)16064
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)322805
AAA_collcode_wilsjudi
Theme:
Women
African American
Research and writing about art
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_322805
Online Media:

Lucinda H. Gedeon research material on Charles W. White

Creator:
Gedeon, Lucinda H.  Search this
Names:
University of California, Los Angeles  Search this
White, Charles, 1918-1979  Search this
Extent:
1.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Date:
1940-1997
bulk 1980-1981
Summary:
The Lucinda H. Gedeon research materials on Charles W. White measure 1.4 linear feet and date from 1940 to 1997, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1980 to 1981. This research material was compiled for a catalogue raisonné at UCLA and includes correspondence with collectors and institutions; a card file catalogue of works by Charles White; photographs and negatives; printed material; transcripts of interviews; bibliographic information; and writings.
Scope and Contents:
The Lucinda H. Gedeon research materials on Charles W. White measure 1.4 linear feet and date from 1940 to 1997, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1980 to 1981. This research material was compiled for a catalogue raisonné at UCLA and includes correspondence with collectors and institutions regarding Charles White works in their collections; a card file catalogue of works by White; photographs and negatives of works by White; printed material including exhibition materials and magazine and newspaper clippings; transcripts of interviews with White and other individuals; bibliographic information; and writings about White.
Arrangement:
Due to the small size of this collection, the papers are arranged in one series.

Series 1: Lucinda H. Gedeon Research Material on Charles W. White, 1940-1997, bulk 1980-1981 (Boxes1-2; 1.4 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Lucinda H. Gedeon is a retired art historian in Vero Beach, Florida. Previously the director of the Neuberger Museum at the State University of New York, Purchase, and later of the Vero Beach Museum of Art, Gedeon earned both a master's degree and a doctorate at UCLA. She completed her master's thesis on the work of Charles White.

Charles W. White (1918-1979) was an African American painter. White was born in Chicago and attended the Art Institute of Chicago. He worked as an artist for the Works Progress Administration and later taught first at Dillard University, then at Otis Art Institute from 1965 until his death in 1979.

White exhibited widely and his work is held at a number of institutions. He was elected to the National Academy of design in 1972.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art are the Charles W. White papers, circa 1930-1982, and an oral history interview with Charles W. White conducted by Betty Hoag, March 9, 1965.
Provenance:
The Lucinda H. Gedeon research materials on Charles W. White were donated to the Archives of American Art by Lucinda H. Gedeon in 2007.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Occupation:
Art historians -- Florida  Search this
Museum directors -- Florida  Search this
Painters -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Muralists -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Topic:
Women art historians  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Women muralists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Citation:
Lucinda H. Gedeon research material on Charles W. White, 1940-1997, bulk 1980-1981. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.gedeluci
See more items in:
Lucinda H. Gedeon research material on Charles W. White
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9cfef48ad-58ac-4312-8f1f-31bf5ba4f195
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-gedeluci
Online Media:

Marcia M. Mathews papers relating to Henry Ossawa Tanner

Creator:
Mathews, Marcia M.  Search this
Names:
Glackens, Edith  Search this
Tanner, Henry Ossawa, 1859-1937  Search this
Tanner, Jesse O., 1903-  Search this
Tough, Charles C.  Search this
Extent:
54 Items
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1937-1969
bulk, 1963-1969
Scope and Contents:
The Marcia M. Mathews papers relating to Henry Ossawa Tanner consist of 54 items and date from 1937 to 1969, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1963 to 1969. The collection primarily consists of correspondence preceding Mathew's 1969 book Henry O. Tanner, American Artist and related printed material.

REEL 64: 26 letters, January 21, 1966 through March 5, 1968, to Mathews from Jesse O. Tanner, son of Henry Ossawa Tanner, conveying information about his father and particular art works; as well as a letter from Edith D. [Mrs. William] Glackens, August 7, 1937, to Charles C. Tough, Jesse O. Tanner's uncle, advising with regard to Tough's plans of selling Henry O. Tanner's paintings. Also included is a biographical questionnaire completed by Henry O. Tanner for the Art League Publishing Company.

REEL 3268: 23 letters to Mathews regarding her book and exhibitions of Tanner's work; and printed material, 1968-1969. Correspondents include Jesse O. Tanner, Erwin S. Barrie, Romare H. Bearden, George Biddle, Mrs. Samuel M. Bryant, Benjamin Mays, James A. Porter, and Warren Robbins.
Biographical / Historical:
Marcia M. Mathews is a writer and art historian in Durham, North Carolina.

Henry Ossawa Tanner (1859-1937) was an African American painter born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania who spent much of his life in Paris, France. His work often depicts biblical scenes. Tanner trained at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts under Thomas Eakins. In 1891, Tanner traveled to Europe and settled in Paris, where he remained for the rest of his life.
Related Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds the Henry Ossawa Tanner papers, 1860s-1978; the Henry O. Tanner letters to the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, 1885-1909; and the Alexander family papers relating to Henry Ossawa Tanner, 1912-1985. The Atlanta University Center, Robert W. Woodruff Library holds the Henry Ossawa Tanner collection, 1907-1937.
Provenance:
Donated 1969 and 1976 by Marcia Mathews.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Authors -- North Carolina -- Durham  Search this
Art historians -- North Carolina -- Durham  Search this
Topic:
Expatriate painters -- France -- Paris  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Women art historians  Search this
Women authors  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.mathmarc
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw939b49bbf-67ac-4f17-967b-9ac9b464fdd6
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-mathmarc

Oral history interview with La Tanya S. Autry

Interviewee:
Autry, La Tanya S.  Search this
Interviewer:
Franco, Josh T., 1985-  Search this
Names:
Pandemic Oral History Project  Search this
Extent:
1 Item ((21 min.), digital, mp4)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Date:
2020 July 31
Scope and Contents:
An interview with La Tanya S. Autry conducted 2020 July 31, by Josh Franco, for the Archives of American Art's Pandemic Oral History Project at Autry's home in Cleveland, Ohio.
Biographical / Historical:
La Tanya Autry is an art historian and curator in Cleveland, Ohio. Autry co-created the "Museums Are Not Neutral" campaign in 2017.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
This interview is open for research.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its Oral History Program interviews available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. Quotation, reproduction and publication of the audio is governed by restrictions. If an interview has been transcribed, researchers must quote from the transcript. If an interview has not been transcribed, researchers must quote from the audio recording. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art historians -- Ohio -- Cleveland  Search this
Museum curators -- Ohio -- Cleveland  Search this
Topic:
Pandemics  Search this
COVID-19 (Disease)  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Women art historians  Search this
Women museum curators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.autry20
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9aaf38eee-f249-46d6-aa36-8c0827e238a8
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-autry20
Online Media:

Jean Ellen Jones research material on Lizzie Wilkerson

Creator:
Jones, Jean Ellen, 1942-  Search this
Names:
Georgia State University  Search this
Wilkerson, Lizzie, 1900-1984  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Slides (photographs)
Video recordings
Date:
1978-1984
Summary:
The Jean Ellen Jones research material on African American artist Lizzie Wilkerson measures 0.2 linear feet and date from 1978 to 1984. The collection includes printed material, photographic material, and a video recording, Everything That Grows and Moves: The Art of Lizzie Wilkerson.
Scope and Contents:
The Jean Ellen Jones research material on African American artist Lizzie Wilkerson measures 0.2 linear feet and date from 1978 to 1984. The collection includes printed material, photographic material, and a video recording, Everything That Grows and Moves: The Art of Lizzie Wilkerson.

Printed Material includes photocopies of clippings, an exhibition catalog from the 1983 Georgia State University Art Gallery exhibition curated by Jean Ellen Jones, and cards with reproductions of Wilkerson's work. Photographic material includes a black and white portrait of Lizzie Wilkerson and color slides of her work.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in two series.

Series 1: Printed Material, 1983-1984 (Box 1; 4 folders)

Series 2: Photographic Material, 1978-1983 (Box 1; 3 folders)
Biographical / Historical:
Jean Ellen Jones is an art historian in Atlanta, Georgia. She taught at Georgia State University and curated a traveling exhibition of Lizzie Wilkerson's work for the Georgia State University Art Gallery in 1983.

Lizzie Wilkerson (1895-1984) was an African American self-taught artist. She worked as a share-cropper and a maid and began painting at the age of 77. She worked primarily in watercolor and pen to create images depicting farm animals, crops, fish, Bible stories, and spiritual matters. Her work is held in collections at the American Folk Art Museum, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, and the High Museum of Art.
Provenance:
The Jean Ellen Jones research material on Lizzie Wilkerson was donated to the Archives of American Art by Jean Ellen Jones in 1986 and 1987.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate copies requires advance notice.
Occupation:
Art historians -- Georgia  Search this
Educators -- Georgia  Search this
Topic:
African American artists  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Self-taught artists  Search this
Watercolorists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women art historians  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Slides (photographs)
Video recordings
Citation:
Jean Ellen Jones research material on Lizzie Wilkerson, 1978-1984, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.jonejean
See more items in:
Jean Ellen Jones research material on Lizzie Wilkerson
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw968436439-c483-4942-ba67-bc8e507ba056
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-jonejean

Judith Wilson papers

Creator:
Wilson, Judith, 1952-  Search this
Names:
Thompson, Bob, 1937-1966  Search this
Extent:
11.2 Linear feet
27.94 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Photographs
Date:
1966-2010
Summary:
The papers of African American art historian Judith Wilson measure 11.2 linear feet and 27.94 GB and date from 1966 to 2010. Wilson's career is documented through correspondence with friends, colleagues, artists, universities, and art organizations; notebooks; files on writing projects, conferences, lectures, symposia and other professional activities; and a small amount of printed material. Also found is research material on artist Bob Thompson, including photographs, printed material, correspondence, notebooks and a documentary video recording. Additionally, the collection includes sound recordings of 71 interviews of artists and art collectors and six video recordings. Some of the materials are in digital format.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of art historian Judith Wilson measure 11.2 linear feet and 27.94 GB and date from 1966 to 2010. Wilson's career is documented through correspondence with friends, colleagues, artists, universities, and art organizations; notebooks; files on writing projects, conferences, lectures, symposia and other professional activities; and a small amount of printed material. Also found is research material on artist Bob Thompson, including photographs, printed material, correspondence, notebooks and a documentary video recording. Additionally, the collection includes sound recordings of 71 interviews of artists and art collectors and six video recordings. Some of the materials are in digital format.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 9 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Correspondence, 1975-2009 (1.3 linear feet; Boxes 1-2)

Series 2: Notebooks, 1977-2008 (1.7 linear feet; Boxes 2-3)

Series 3: Writing Projects, 1972-2010 (1.7 linear feet; Boxes 4-5)

Series 4: Conferences, Lectures, and Symposia, 1978-2009 (2.0 linear feet; Boxes 5-7, 17.11 GB; ER01-ER05)

Series 5: Professional Records, 1979-2009 (1.0 linear foot; Boxes 7-9)

Series 6: Research Material on Bob Thompson, 1966-2006 (1.8 linear feet; Boxes 8-10, 1.70 GB; ER06-ER07)

Series 7: Printed Material, 1981-2010 (0.5 linear feet; Box 10)

Series 8: Interviews, 1978-2008 (1.0 linear foot; Boxes 11-12, 0.697 GB; ER08-ER09)

Series 9: Video Recordings, 1979-2007 (4 folders; Box 12, 8.42 GB; ER10-ER15)
Biographical / Historical:
Judith Wilson (1952- ) is an African American art historian in San Francisco, California. Wilson began her career as an editor for Ms. Magazine in 1975. In 1979 she wrote a profile of Alma Thomas for that magazine, after which she began writing regularly about visual art and cultural politics, reviewing exhibitions, writing feature articles, and serving as guest editor for several publications. Her research interests included African American art and black visual culture. She received her Ph.D. in art history from Yale University with a dissertation on the artist Bob Thompson. Her teaching career included full-time positions in art history at University of Virginia, Yale, and the University of California, Irvine, as well as part-time and visiting professorships at several other schools. In 2006 she retired from the University of California, Irvine after eight years. During her career Wilson served on editorial and advisory boards for art publications and wrote many catalog essays, contributed to anthologies, and presented numerous conference papers, many of which were later published.
Provenance:
The collection was donated in 2012 by Judith Wilson-Pates.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Office. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
"Bob Thompson Happening" (1965) video: Authorization to publish, quote or reproduce requires written permission from Joanne Elkin. Contact Reference Services for more information.
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art historians -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Topic:
Interviews  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Women art historians  Search this
African American educators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Photographs
Citation:
Judith Wilson papers, 1966-2010. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.wilsjudi
See more items in:
Judith Wilson papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9786583b0-7b5c-4a81-bcb1-558bab90cdd1
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-wilsjudi
Online Media:

Lynn and James Igoe papers

Creator:
Igoe, Lynn, 1937-2006  Search this
Igoe, James  Search this
Names:
Artists Equity Association  Search this
Newman, Elias, 1903-  Search this
Pendergraft, Norman E., 1934-  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1883
1968-1996
Summary:
The Lynn and James Igoe papers measure 0.2 linear feet and date primarily from 1968 to 1996 with a single receipt dating from 1883. The papers include correspondence primarily related to the Igoes' book 250 Years of Afro-American Art: An Annotated Bibliography, but also related to the Federal Tax Reform Act of 1969 and its effect on artists, as well as correspondence from artists to Norman Pendergraft; artist files; and printed material.
Scope and Contents:
The Lynn and James Igoe papers measure 0.2 linear feet and date primarily from 1968 to 1996 with a single receipt dating from 1883. The papers include correspondence primarily related to the Igoes' book 250 Years of Afro-American Art: An Annotated Bibliography; correspondence with Artists Equity Association chairman Elias Newman and others related to the Federal Tax Reform Act of 1969 and its effect on artists; correspondence from artists to Norman Pendergraft; artist files; and printed material.
Arrangement:
Due to the small size of this collection the papers are arranged as one series.

Series 1: Lynn and James Igoe papers, 1883, 1968-1996 (Box 1; 0.2 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Lynn Moody Igoe (1937-2006) was an art historian and author who wrote about African American art and artists. She was the chairman of the department of art and the director of the art gallery at North Carolina Central University. In 1981, she and her husband James Igoe published 250 Years of Afro-American Art: An Annotated Bibliography, a comprehensive annotated bibliography compiling citations on 3,900 black artists.
Provenance:
The Lynn and James Igoe papers were donated to the Archives of American Art by Lynn Igoe in 1985, with additional material donated through 1996.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Occupation:
Authors -- North Carolina  Search this
Art historians -- North Carolina  Search this
Topic:
African American art  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Taxation  Search this
Women authors  Search this
Women art historians  Search this
Citation:
Lynn and James Igoe papers, 1883, 1968-1996. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.igoelynn
See more items in:
Lynn and James Igoe papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9f4af3e5d-0339-446d-9331-e3b56ab209cb
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-igoelynn

Sharon Frances Patton research material regarding Vincent Smith

Creator:
Patton, Sharon F.  Search this
Names:
Smith, Vincent, 1929-  Search this
Extent:
0.8 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
1968-2005
Summary:
The Sharon Frances Patton research material on the artist Vincent Smith measures 0.8 linear feet and dates from 1968-2005. Materials document Smith's career as an artist and include many letters as well as autobiographical writings by him. Also featured in this collection are many printed materials relating to his career including magazines, exhibition materials and clippings. This collection also includes three sound cassettes featuring a profile of Smith and his thoughts on music.
Scope and Contents:
The Sharon Frances Patton research material on the artist Vincent Smith measures 0.8 linear feet and dates from 1968-2005. The research materials document Smith's career as an artist and include many letters as well as autobiographical writings by him. Also featured in this collection are many printed materials relating to his career including magazines, exhibition materials and clippings. This collection also includes three sound cassettes featuring a profile of Smith and his thoughts on music.
Arrangement:
Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1980-2004 (3 folders; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1982-1998 (2 folders; Box 1)

Series 3: Writings, 1976-circa 1994 (5 folders; Box 1)

Series 4: Printed Material, 1968-2005 (0.4 linear feet; Boxes 1-2)

Series 5: Sound Recordings, 1986-1989 (3 folders; Box 2)

The collection is arranged as 5 series:
Biographical / Historical:
Sharon Frances Patton (1944- ) is a art historian and museum director in Baltimore, Maryland. Vincent Smith (1929-2003) was a painter from New York City. His work was exhibited extensively and is now part of many distinguished collections.

Patton earned her BA in humanities with an emphasis on Studio Art from Roosevelt University in Chicago. This was followed by an MA from University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana and a Ph.D. in African Art History at Northwestern University. During and after these degrees she was a professor at various colleges around the country as well as a curator at the Studio Museum in Harlem, the Director of the Center for African American Studies at University of Michigan and the Director of the Allen Memorial Art Museum at Oberlin College. From 2003-2008 she was the Director of the Smithsonian's National Museum of African Art. Throughout her career she has organized around 20 exhibitions, compiled catalogs (one of which was on Vincent Smith's "Riding on a Blue Note" exhibit), written articles and essays and given lectures. She has also written two books, Memory and Metaphor: The Art of Romare Bearden and African American Art.

Smith became a full-time artist in 1953 after stints as a hobo, in the army and as a post office worker. Around this time he studied art at the Brooklyn Museum Art School, New York City's Art Students League and attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Maine on a scholarship. He also cited other African American artists as valuable resources for the development of his work. Much of his early work focused on the culture of jazz in New York City, but in the mid-1950s, with the start of the Civil Rights Movement, his work took on a more political tone. His first solo show was in 1955 at the Brooklyn Museum Art School Gallery and this was followed by many more solo and group shows throughout his career. His work is now in the collections of many museums as well as President Clinton, who was given one of Smith's pieces at his first inauguration. In 1980 he received a college degree from Empire State College at the State University of New York, Saratoga.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Sharon Frances Patton in 2012.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters  Search this
Art historians  Search this
Topic:
African American artists  Search this
Women art historians  Search this
Women arts administrators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Sharon Frances Patton research material regarding Vincent Smith, 1968-2005. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.smitvinc
See more items in:
Sharon Frances Patton research material regarding Vincent Smith
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9e2e73940-523d-440d-ac56-3842cf8f1889
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-smitvinc
Online Media:

Modify Your Search







or


Narrow By