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Aline and Eero Saarinen papers, 1906-1977

Creator:
Saarinen, Aline B. (Aline Bernstein), 1914-1972  Search this
Saarinen, Eero, 1910-1961  Search this
Saarinen, Aline B. (Aline Bernstein), 1914-1972  Search this
Subject:
White, Stanford  Search this
Saarinen, Eero  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Motion pictures (visual works)
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Architecture -- United States  Search this
Architects -- Michigan -- Bloomfield Hills  Search this
Women art historians -- Michigan  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- United States  Search this
Women architectural critics -- Michigan  Search this
Women art critics -- Michigan  Search this
Theme:
Art Theory and Historiography  Search this
Architecture & Design  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)5589
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)211237
AAA_collcode_saaralin
Theme:
Art Theory and Historiography
Architecture & Design
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_211237
Online Media:

Aline and Eero Saarinen papers

Creator:
Saarinen, Aline B. (Aline Bernstein), 1914-1972  Search this
Names:
Saarinen, Eero, 1910-1961  Search this
White, Stanford, 1853-1906  Search this
Extent:
14.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Motion pictures (visual works)
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1906-1977
Summary:
The Aline and Eero Saarinen papers measure approximately 14.2 linear feet and date from 1906 to 1977. The bulk of the collection consists of Aline Saarinen's papers which document her relationship with her husband Eero Saarinen and other aspects of their personal lives, as well as Aline's work as an art and architectural critic, author, and television correspondent. Papers include research files for published and planned books (in which can be found scattered original letters of Stanford White, John Quinn and Edward Root) and other projects, NBC correspondent files, writings, committee files, correspondence, photographs, printed material, and miscellaneous personal papers.
Scope and Content Note:
The Aline and Eero Saarinen papers measure approximately 14.2 linear feet and date from 1906 to 1977. The bulk of the collection consists of Aline Saarinen's papers which document her relationship with her husband Eero Saarinen and other aspects of their personal lives, as well as Aline's work as an art and architectural critic, author, and television correspondent. Papers include research files for published and planned books (in which can be found scattered original letters of Stanford White, John Quinn and Edward Root) and other projects, NBC correspondent files, writings, committee files, correspondence, photographs, printed material, and miscellaneous personal papers.

The portion of the collection relating to personal aspects of Aline and Eero Saarinen's lives consists of: Aline Saarinen's diary, guest book, notebooks, personal writings, biographical material, awards and honorary degrees; scattered papers of Eero Saarinen, including biographical material, drawings of furniture designs, various sketches and drawings, and some project timelines and notes; correspondence between Aline and Eero Saarinen (the bulk of which dates from the year they met and married), as well as general and family correspondence received by Aline Saarinen and some miscellaneous and personal correspondence of Eero Saarinen; printed material, mostly clippings, documenting aspects of the life, work, and achievements of both Aline and Eero Saarinen; and photographs, including ones of Aline Saarinen, Eero Saarinen, Aline and Eero Saarinen together, and family members, as well as ones from various trips and of various residences, and various slides.

The bulk of the collection consists of material, including research and writing files, NBC correspondent files, and committee files, stemming from Aline Saarinen's various professional activities. Writings include manuscripts, typescripts, notes, notecards, and clippings of Aline Saarinen's various articles, lectures and speeches on art and architecture, scripts for television, creative and college writing. Research files include material for Saarinen's published book on art collectors, The Proud Possessors, and her planned, but never completed, biography of the architect, Stanford White. Research material for The Proud Possessors includes files of notes, manuscripts, correspondence, photographs and printed material on art collectors, and related material such as scrapbooks of correspondence and clippings in response to the book. Files also include scattered original material, such as correspondence and photographs, belonging to the collectors, John Quinn and Edward Root. Research material on Stanford White includes correspondence, notebooks, writings, printed material, photographs, and copies of architectural drawings. Also found is scattered original material belonging to Bessie White, Stanford White, and the firm of McKim, Mead and White. NBC material consists of files, including correspondence, printed material, notes, scripts, motion picture films and video transfers, and photographs, kept by Aline Saarinen while working as a television correspondent. Also found are miscellaneous research files on artists that may relate to television or other projects and files stemming from her involvement in various arts-related and other committees.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into two series:

Series 1: Aline and Eero Saarinen Personal Papers, 1928-1977 (Boxes 1-4, 15, OV 16; 3.7 linear feet)

Series 2: Aline Saarinen Professional Papers, 1906-1969 (Boxes 4-15, OV 16, FC 17-18; 10 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Aline Bernstein Saarinen was born on March 25, 1914 in New York City. She attended Vassar College, where she took art courses and became interested in journalism, and graduated with a B.A. in 1935. She went on to receive her M.A. in the history of architecture from the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University in 1941. She married Joseph H. Louchheim in 1935, and they had two sons, Donald and Harry (or Hal). They divorced in 1951.

Aline joined the staff of Art News Magazine in 1944 and served as managing editor from 1946 to 1948. She edited and provided commentary for the book, 5000 Years of Art in Western Civilization, which was published in 1946. She served as associate art editor and critic at The New York Times from 1948 to 1953 and then as associate art critic from 1954 to 1959. She received awards for her newspaper work, including the International Award for Best Foreign Criticism at the Venice Biennale in 1951, the Frank Jewett Mather Award for best newspaper art criticism in 1953, and the American Federation of Arts Award for best newspaper criticism in 1956.

In 1953, Aline interviewed the architect Eero Saarinen for an article. Eero was born in 1910 in Kirkkonummi, Finland, and received his B.F.A. in Architecture from Yale University in 1934. He began work as an architect in his father Eliel Saarinen's firm and went on to start his own firm, Eero Saarinen and Associates. Among his best-known works are the Gateway Arch in St. Louis, Missouri, the Trans World Air Lines Terminal Building at John F. Kennedy Airport in New York, and Dulles International Airport in Chantilly, Virginia.

Aline and Eero became romantically involved shortly after they met and were married in December 1953. The following year, they had a son, Eames (named after Eero's friend, the designer and architect Charles Eames). After their marriage, Aline relocated to Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, where she continued to work as associate art critic for The New York Times and where she served as Director of Information Service in the office of Eero Saarinen and Associates (from 1954 to 1963).

In 1957, she received a Guggenheim Fellowship to work on a book about major American art collectors, The Proud Possessors, which was published by Random House in 1958. Thereafter, she began work on a biography of the architect, Stanford White, also for Random House; this work continued for several years, but the book was never completed. Over the years, she wrote numerous freelance articles on art, architecture, socio-cultural history, travel, and theater for magazines such as Atlantic Monthly, Vogue, Saturday Review of Literature, Reader's Digest, and Cosmopolitan.

After Eero's sudden death in 1961, Aline edited the book, Eero Saarinen on His Work (1962). She then embarked upon a new career in television, appearing on shows such as "Today" and "Sunday" where she reported on manners, morals, culture, and the arts, and eventually becoming, in 1964, an NBC News correspondent for such shows as "The Huntley-Brinkley Report" and "The Frank McGee Report" in addition to the shows on which she was already appearing. In 1971, she was appointed chief of the NBC News Paris Bureau, becoming the first woman to hold such a position in television.

In the 1960s, Aline served on various arts-related committees, including the Design Advisory Committee of the Federal Aviation Administration, the Fine Arts Commission, and the New York State Council of the Arts. She received honorary degrees from the University of Michigan in 1964 and Russell Sage College in 1967.

Aline Saarinen died from a brain tumor on July 13, 1972.

This biographical notes draws from the one on Aline Bernstein Saarinen by Seymour Brody in Jewish Heroes and Heroines of America: 150 True Stories of American Jewish Heroism, and from the one on Eero Saarinen in the Guide to the Eero Saarinen Collection at Yale University Library.
Related Material:
Also found in the Archives are: the Museum of Modern Art exhibition correspondence concerning Eero Saarinen, 1958-1959; the Lily Swann Saarinen papers, 1924-1974; an oral history interview with Lily Swann Saarinen, 1979-1981; and an oral history interview on Aline Saarinen with Charles Alan, 1973 February 17.

Other related material includes: Eero Saarinen Collection, Manuscripts and Archives, Yale University Library.
Separated Material:
Two exhibition catalogs and various clippings that were donated as part of the collection were transferred to the Smithsonian American Art Museum Library in 1981.
Provenance:
The Aline and Eero Saarinen papers were donated in 1973 by Charles Alan, Aline Saarinen's brother and executor of her estate, and microfilmed. In 1966 five photographs of Eliel Saarinen's home in Helsinki, Finland were donated by Florence Davis and were subsequently integrated into the collection. The NBC material was donated in 1974 by NBC Studios via Charles Alan. Additional material, which had originally been donated to the Parrish Museum by Aline Saarinen, was donated to the Archives in 1991 by the Museum.
Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website. Use of material not digitized requires an appointment.
Rights:
NBC TV scripts or film prepared for television: Authorization to publish, quote or reproduce requires written permission from NBC Studios. Contact Reference Services for more information.
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Architectural historians -- Michigan  Search this
Topic:
Architecture -- United States  Search this
Architects -- Michigan -- Bloomfield Hills  Search this
Women art historians -- Michigan  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- United States  Search this
Women architectural critics -- Michigan  Search this
Women art critics -- Michigan  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Motion pictures (visual works)
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Aline and Eero Saarinen Papers, 1906-1977. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.saaralin
See more items in:
Aline and Eero Saarinen papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-saaralin
Online Media:

April Kingsley and Budd Hopkins papers

Creator:
Hopkins, Budd, 1931-2011  Search this
Kingsley, April  Search this
Names:
Long Point Gallery (Provincetown, Mass.)  Search this
Diebenkorn, Richard, 1922-1993  Search this
Motherwell, Robert  Search this
Pindell, Howardena, 1943-  Search this
Rosenblum, Robert  Search this
Extent:
11 Linear feet
0.209 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
circa 1945-2017
Summary:
The papers of art critic, curator, and educator April Kingsley and painter, sculptor, writer, and educator Budd Hopkins measure 11 feet and 0.209 Gigabytes, and date from circa 1945-2017. Kingsley's papers are comprised primarily of artist files for figures that April had a significant engagement with, project files, interviews with artists, subject file index cards, biographical materials, and miscellaneous correspondence. Hopkins' papers are comprised of biographical material, as well as correspondence with various prominent art world figures including Richard Diebenkorn, Robert Motherwell, Carl Andre, Howardena Pindell, and Robert Rosenblum. Hopkins' personal business records include correspondence and sale and consignment information. Also found are writings, printed material, including exhibition invitations and catalogs and press clippings, and photographic material depicting Hopkins and his artwork.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of art critic, curator, and educator April Kingsley and painter, sculptor, writer, and educator Budd Hopkins measure 11 feet and 0.209 Gigabytes, and date from circa 1945-2017. Kingsley's papers are comprised primarily of artist files for figures that April had a significant engagement with, with contents ranging from correspondence to printed material, including invitations and catalogs and press clippings, as well as notes and manuscript material including reviews. Project files include various topics of interest and research for tentative and actualized exhibitions, as well as writing projects and committee work related to Kingsley's tenure at the American Craft Museum and the Kresge Museum at Michigan State University. Also found are recorded interviews with artists and other figures conducted by April Kingsley between the years of 1988 and 1990, most of which are affiliated with the Abstract Expressionist movement. The subject file index cards are comprised of various sets of notes and citations regarding themes, movements, and artists central to Kingsley's ongoing research throughout her career. Also included are various biographical materials and miscellaneous correspondence that comprise the personal papers subseries.

Hopkins' papers are comprised of biographical material including biographies and a chronology, correspondence with various prominent art world figures including Richard Diebenkorn, Robert Motherwell, Carl Andre, Howardena Pindell, and Robert Rosenblum. Personal business records include correspondence and sale and consignment information related to particular galleries, as well as records regarding the Long Point Gallery co-founded by Hopkins and twelve other artists on Cape Cod in 1977. His writings include manuscript material regarding one of Hopkins' titles on UFO abductions, as well as various typescripts for reviews and essays written by Hopkins, as well as one audio recording for a lecture regarding his essay "Modernism and the Collage Aesthetic." Printed material including exhibition invitations and catalogs and press clippings are also found. Photographic materials include images of Hopkins, exhibition installations, and artwork in various formats, such as photographic prints, negatives, slides, and transparencies.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged in two series:

Series 1: April Kingsley papers, circa 1960s-2017 (7.7 Linear Feet; Boxes 1-8, 0.209 Gigabytes; ER01)

Series 2: Budd Hopkins papers, circa 1945-2010 (3.3 Linear Feet; Boxes 7, 9-11)
Biographical / Historical:
April Kingsley (1941- ) is an art historian, critic, and curator living in Harwich, Massachusetts. Budd Hopkins (1931-2011) was an Abstract Expressionist artist and writer of both art criticism and UFO and abduction phenomena accounts, who lived primarily in New York City and Cape Cod.

Following a short-lived career as a nurse while married to her first husband, Kingsley completed a Masters of Fine Arts from New York University, and later a PhD in Art History from the City University Graduate Center. Kingsley studied in depth the Abstract Expressionist art movement, and also focused heavily on women artists and contemporary craft art. Kingsley held curatorial positions at a range of institutions including at The Museum of Modern Art, The American Craft Museum, and at the Pasadena Art Museum. She has written major monographs on numerous artists including Jean Miotte and Alice Dalton Bown, and contributed to the catalogs of more than 75 artists. Among her most notable publications are The Turning Point: The Abstract Expressionists and the Transformation of American Art (1992) and Emotional Impact: American Figurative Expressionism (2013). Kingsley and Hopkins were married from 1973-1991, and had one daughter, Grace Hopkins-Lisle. Kingsley currently resides in Harwich, Massachusetts with her husband Donald Spyke, who she married in 2005.

Born Elliott Budd Hopkins in 1931 in Wheeling West Virginia, Hopkins survived an early battle with polio as a toddler, following which a period of convalescence made an early engagement with drawing possible. He graduated from Oberlin College with an art history degree where he heard a lecture from a future mentor Robert Motherwell. After college Hopkins moved to New York City and became a fixture of the Abstract Expressionist circle, and by 1956 had his first solo show of paintings. In 1976 he earned a Guggenheim Fellowship as well as a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts in 1979. His paintings, which range from gestural Abstract Expressionism to color plane geometric compositions are held in major museum collections ranging from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and the British Museum. In the 1980s Hopkins turned to making large scale sculptures evocative of ancient ritualist architecture, an addition to his well-known painting practice. Hopkins also published a number of reviews of the work of other artists which were very well received at the time. As much as his art career perhaps, Budd Hopkins is known for spreading the word about alien abduction in his popular books on the subject, following a UFO sighting he recounts in Cape Cod in 1964. While Hopkins does not claim to have been abducted he regularly held support groups for others to share their stories. He passed in 2011 in his home in New York City.
Provenance:
The bulk of April Kingsley and Budd Hopkins papers was donated in 2018 by Grace Hopkins, their daughter. Portions of the Budd Hopkins papers were donated by Budd Hopkins between 1980 and 1983.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Abstract expressionism  Search this
Women art critics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
April Kingsley and Budd Hopkins Papers, circa 1945-2017. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.kingapri
See more items in:
April Kingsley and Budd Hopkins papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-kingapri

Amy Goldin papers

Creator:
Goldin, Amy  Search this
Names:
Duncan, Robert Edward, 1919-  Search this
Grabar, Oleg  Search this
Extent:
3.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketchbooks
Date:
1945-1978
Summary:
The papers of author, art critic, and educator Amy Goldin measure 3.5 linear feet and date from 1945 to 1978. The collection comprises biographical materials that include identification documents, a sketchbook from 1946, student records, and other material; personal and professional correspondence with Goldin's sister Ruth Huston, Oleg Grabar, Robert Duncan, and others; Goldin's writing and research projects and a few writings by others; printed materials mainly featuring Goldin's published writings; and photographic materials consisting of photographs of Goldin, friends and family, and works of art by Goldin and others.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of author, art critic, and educator Amy Goldin measure 3.5 linear feet and date from 1945 to 1978. The collection comprises biographical materials that include identification documents, a sketchbook from 1946, student records, and other material; personal and professional correspondence with Goldin's sister Ruth Huston, Oleg Grabar, Robert Duncan, and others; Goldin's writing and research projects and a few writings by others; printed materials mainly featuring Goldin's published writings; and photographic materials consisting of photographs of Goldin, friends and family, and works of art by Goldin and others.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as five series.

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1945-1978 (0.3 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1959-1978 (0.2 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 3: Research and Writing Projects, 1950-1977 (2.0 linear feet; Boxes 1-3, OV 4)

Series 4: Printed Materials, circa 1960-1978 (0.9 linear feet; Boxes 3-4, OV 5)

Series 5: Photographic Materials, circa 1950-circa 1975 (0.1 linear feet; Box 4)
Biographical / Historical:
Amy Goldin (1926-1978) was an art critic, author, and educator in New York, New York.

Goldin started her career in art as a painter in her birthplace of Detroit, Michigan. She attended Wayne University from 1944 to 1946 before attending the University of Chicago from 1946 to 1948. She continued her training in painting after receiving the Art Students' League scholarship for 1948 to 1949 and a scholarship to train under Hans Hofmann from 1950 to 1952. She eventually settled in New York City.

Goldin was a prolific writer over the course of her short career as an art critic. She was contributing editor for the publications Arts, Arts News and Art in America. In 1972 she received a National Endowment Critic's Grant to study with Dr. Oleg Grabar, a leading scholar on Islamic art, at Harvard University and traveled to Iran to study the country's architecture. Goldin devoted much of her career to covering topics such as Islamic art, decoration and pattern, and examining folk art from an original viewpoint. In 1976 the College Art Association awarded her the Frank Jewett Mather award for distinguished art criticism.

Goldin was also a visiting lecturer and educator at the University of California in San Diego, Northwestern University, and Queens College. Goldin and Dr. Michael Brown of Queens College collaborated on the book Collective Behavior (1974) that explored style and collective behavior.

Goldin died of cancer in 1978 in New York, N.Y.
Related Materials:
Also found at the Archives of American art is the Herb Bronstein correspondence with Amy Goldin, circa 1952-1976.
Provenance:
The Amy Goldin papers were donated by Mrs. Ruth M. Huston, the sister of Amy Genevieve Goldin, in 1978.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Women authors  Search this
Women art critics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Citation:
Amy Goldin papers, 1945-1978. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.goldamy
See more items in:
Amy Goldin papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-goldamy

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