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MS 1627 Miscellaneous vocabularies of 32 different tribes

Collector:
Bartlett, John Russell, 1805-1886  Search this
Husband, Bruce  Search this
Encinas, Fr  Search this
Whipple, Amiel Weeks, 1817?-1863  Search this
Brown, H. B.  Search this
Heintzelman, Samuel Peter, 1805-1880  Search this
Duralde, Martin  Search this
Informant:
Cawewas, Pedro  Search this
Peraza, Hieronymo  Search this
Alejo, Marcos  Search this
Ortiz, Santiago  Search this
A-he-ba-tu  Search this
Esteban  Search this
Colusio  Search this
Extent:
183 Items (numbered pages )
Culture:
Kiowa  Search this
Nahua  Search this
Athapascan Indians  Search this
Tanoan Indians  Search this
Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan)  Search this
Pujunan  Search this
Athapaskan  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Seri  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Tanoan  Search this
Wakashan Indians  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Kulanapan  Search this
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Chitimacha  Search this
Atakapa  Search this
Maya  Search this
San Luis Rey  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Pomo  Search this
Maidu  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Basin  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
On page 129-134, there is a Comanche vocabulary alongside with Spanish and Luiseno. Follows items called for in Smithsonian Institution Comparative Vocabulary. Some Comanche terms lacking.
Contents: Bartlett, John R. "Cochimi language of Lower California obtained through Mr Robinia of Guaymas, Sonora." No date. [post 1852] Autograph document. pages 215-218 in bound volume of vocabularies. Vocabulary written in "American Ethnological Society Circular Number 1, Indian Languages of America, June, 1852," a printed outline of 200 words. Negative microfilm on file. Heintzelman, Major S. P. Vocabulary of the Cocopa language. Fort Yuma, Colorado, April 19, 1854. Copy by Bartlett, pages 165-166. Heintzelmam, Major S. P. Vocabulary of the Mohavi or Hum-mock-havy taken by Major Heintzelman. Copy by Bartlett, pages 167-176. Copy in another hand in printed outline published by American Ethnological Society, pages 177-180. On negative Microfilm reel #37. Comanche San Luis Rey [Bartlett, John R.] San Luis Rey- Comanche comparative vocabulary. No informant or date is recorded for the Comanche vocabulary of about 150 words, pages 129-135. All pages are in the handwriting of George Gibbs, here not specifically attributed to Bartlett. However, penciled note on another copy of the Comanche vocabulary (Bureau of American Ethnology Manuscript Number 762) states "probably of J. R. Bartlett." Approximately 5 extra Comanche terms are listed in 1627 which were not copied into the manuscript filed under 762.
Contents: San Luis Rey Comanche [Bartlett, John R.] San Luis Rey- Comanche comparative vocabulary. San Luis Rey vocabulary of about 180 words, pages 128-135. May 10, 1852. All pages are copies in handwriting of George Gibbs, here not specifically attributed to Bartlett, but so attributed to Bartlett, but so attributed in another copy, namely, Bureau of American Ethnology Manuscript Number 772. According to the discussion, pages 128 and 135, vocabulary was recorded from Pedro Cawewas, an old man called the captain or chief of his tribe, about 150 of which now live where the mission of San Luis Rey is situated. Tiwa: Piro [Bartlett, John R.] Piro vocabulary of about 180 words, pages 53-54, and another copy, pages 67-68. "Language of the Piros," discussion, pages 55-59. No date. [Ca. October 2, 1852: date on "Tigua" (Piro ?) vocabulary immediately following on pages 63-65.] All pages are copies in handwriting of George Gibbs, here not specifically attributed to Bartlett, but so attributed in other copies, namely, Bureau of American Ethnology Numbers 458-b and 458-c. According to discussion, page 55, vocabulary was recorded from Hieronymo Peraza and Marcus Alejo, principal men of the pueblo of "Sinecu" [Senecu del Sur, Chihuahua] a few miles below El Paso de Norte, on the western bank of the Rio Grande. Tiwa: Senecu del Sur (Piro ?) [Bartlett, John R.] "Tigua" vocabulary of about 200 words, pages 63-65. October 2, 1852. Copy in handwriting of George Gibbs, here not specifically attributed to Bartlett, but was so attributed in other copies, namely, Bureau of American Ethnology Numbers 458-a and 458-c. Note following heading: "[Language of ?] Indians of Taos, in New Mexico (pronounced Tee-wa) [sic] taken from Santiago Ortiz (A-he-ba-tu) head chief of Senecu, Isleta, etc. [i. e. Senecu del Sur, Chihuahua; see Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 30, II, 509.]" Bartlet's Vocabularies ? 1. Pages 17-19 Sioux vocabulary, translated into Sioux by Bruce Husband, Fort Laramie, February 26, 1849. 2 pages. 2. Pages 21-24 Kiowa vocabulary, from Esteban, a Mexican captive for 7 years among the Comanches and Kiowas in Texas. 5 pages. 3. Pages 25-27 cf. Manuscript 1139- a copy of this. Ceris (Seri) vocabulary taken from a native at Hermosillo, January 1, 1852 (note by Gatschet says 1853). Informant- Colusio. 3 pages. 4. Pages 31-34 Yaqui vocabulary by Fr. Encinas of Ures, December 1851. 4 pages, including notes. 5. Pages 37-39 Opate (Nahuatlan) vocabulary, taken at Ures, Sonora. 3 pages. 6. Pages 43-45; 49-51. Apaches of the Coppermine, taken from Mangus Colorado July, 1851. 3 pages. (also duplicate copy). 7. Pages 53-59; 57 Piro (Tanoaan) vocabulary, taken from two Indians, Hieromymo Peraza and Marcus Alejo. 2 pages. Notes 5 pages. 8. Pages 63-65 "Tigua " [Tiwa] Indians of Taos in New Mexico vocabulary, taken from Santiago Ortiz, head chief of Senecu, Isleta, etc. 3 pages.
Contents: 9. Pages 71-73 Vocabulary of the language of the Coco-Maricopas of the river Gila (Yumian). 3 pages. 10. Pages 77-81; 85-92; Reel #21 Vocabulary of the Diegueno tribe, vocabulary, 8 pages; and 11. Los Angeles Indians, Diegueno tribe, vocabulary, 8 pages. 12. Pages 93-103 Yuman or Cuchan and Comiya (Comeya) vocabulary and notes, 11 pages, including extract from Lt Whipple's diary, October 7, 1849. 13. Pages 105-6; 109-10 13. Vocabulary in the Digger (Pujunan) [Maidu] language, from manuscript in the possession of J. B. Moore obtained by H. B. Brown. 4 pages. 14. Pages 113-116 Napa Valley (Digger) [Pujunan] vocabulary. 3 pages. 15. Pages 117-123 Makah of Cape Flattery and Diggers [Pujunan] of Napa Valley- vocabulary. 6 pages. 16. Pages 125-128 Kechi (Mission of San Luis Rey) vocabulary. Taken from Pedro Cawenas, May 10, 1852, San Luis Rey. Notes. 17. Pages 129-35 San Luis Rey and Comanche vocabulary. 7 pages. Taken from Pedro Cawewas. Includes notes. 18. Pages 137-39. San Luis Obispo vocabulary. 3 pages. 19. Pages 141-144 San Jose Indian vocabulary. 4 pages including notes.
Contents: Bartlett's vocabularies. 20. Pages 145-152 H'hana of Sacramento (Kulanapan) vocabulary, 6 pages. 21. Pages 155-159 Coluse (between Sacramento River and Clear Lake), vocabulary- 6 words only. Erroneously marked Athapaskan in Hewitt's hand. Actually Patwin and Wintun; see word for "Indian"- Note by M. R. Haas. 11/58. Items 21 ans 22: See Pitkin, Harvey and William Shipley, Comparative Survey of California Penutian, IJAL, Volume 24, Number 3, July, 1958, pages 174-88. (Reference from MRH). 22. Coluse and Noema vocabulary. 3 pages. 23. Page 163 Tehama vocabulary. 1 page. 24. Pages 165-66 Cocopa vocabulary. (Fort Yuma, Colorado, Mouth of the Colorado River). 2 pages. April 19, 1854. 25. Pages 167-180 Mohave vocabulary. Major Heintzelman. 14 pages including notes. 26. Pages 181-84 Otomi (Mexico) vocabulary. 3 pages. (1767 and 1826). 27. Pages 186-201 Chitimacha and Attacapa vocabularies and notes. 15 pages. (1848) 28. Pages 203-206 Maya vocabulary. From manuscript dictionary in possession of John Carter Brown. 3 pages. 29. Pages 207-210 Tarahumara vocabulary. 3 pages. (1787 and 1826). 30. Pages 211-214 Cahita (Sonora) vocabulary. 3 pages. 31. Pages 215-18 Cochimi (of Lower California), vocabulary. 3 pages. 32. Pages 219-221 Nevome (Pima of Sonora) vocabulary. 2 pages. (printed). 33. Pages 223-224 Letter to John R. Bartlett from George Gibbs re. to vocabularies. 3 pages.
Contents: Smith, Buckingham. "Vocabulary of the Nevome, As Spoken by the Pima of Moris, A Town of Sonora." 1861, and prior. Printed document. 2 pages. On pages 219 and 221 of this Manuscript. Published excerpt from History Magazine, July, 1861, pages 202-203. Contains grammatical notes, general vocabulary, and the Lord's Prayer in the Nevome dialect of Piman.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1627
Local Note:
Manuscript document
Topic:
Dakota language; Mayo dialect (Piman); Kumiai language; Central Pomo language  Search this
Kiowa language  Search this
Seri language  Search this
Yaqui language  Search this
Opata language  Search this
Chiricahua language  Search this
Maricopa language  Search this
Yuma language  Search this
Maidu language  Search this
Makah language  Search this
Luiseño language  Search this
Comanche language  Search this
Chumash language  Search this
Cocopa language  Search this
Mohave language  Search this
Chitimacha language  Search this
Atakapa language  Search this
Tarahumara language  Search this
Pima Bajo language  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Otomi language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Athabaskan  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Wakash  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Pima (Akimel O'odham)  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 1627, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1627
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1627
Online Media:

MS 1870 Comparative American Indian vocabularies

Collector:
Klett, Francis  Search this
Loew, O. (Oscar), 1844-  Search this
Yarrow, H. C. (Harry Crécy), 1840-1929  Search this
Brown, Theodore V.  Search this
Hoffman, Walter James, 1846-1899  Search this
Extent:
119 Pages
Culture:
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Paiute  Search this
Dilzhe'e (Tonto Apache)  Search this
Osage  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Basin  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Includes vocabularies of Acoma Pueblo, Isleta Pueblo, Hopi (Moqui), Paiute (Pah-Ute), Shoshone, Osage, Navaho, Digger, Tonto-Apache. Also Tewa vocabulary, marked "Los Luceros, New Mexico." Identified as Tewa by Randall H. Speirs, University of Buffalo, April, 1964. Klett, Francis. Acoma vocabulary. New Mexico. November 18, 1873. Autograph document. 10 pages. Recorded in Smithsonian Institution Comparative Vocabulary. Title page in H. C. Yarrow's handwriting includes a note reading, "Lt. Wheeler's Exped. for Exploration and Surveys west of the 100th Meridi[an]." There are also two notes in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting on the title page; one reads, "Lieut. Wheeler's Expedition: 29," and the other is a comment on Klett's handwriting. Published as vocabulary Number 36 in George M. Wheeler, Report upon United States Geographical Surveys West of the One Hundredth Meridian, v. VII, Washington, 1879, pages 405 and 424-465. Loew, Oscar. "Moqui vocabulary." Arizona. 1873. Manuscript document. 11 pages. Recorded in Smithsonian Institution Comparative Vocabulary. Copied from an original in Gibbs' orthography. The 17 in red pencil on the title page refers to Vocabulary Number 17 in George M. Wheeler, Report Upon United States Surveys West to the One Hundreth Meridian, v. VII, Washington, 1879, pages 405, 424-65 and 473, which is either from the original or this Manuscript. The spelling in the published version differs from that used here. Original not located as of January, 1970. Note on the last page reads, "This dialect is copied from the original Manuscript of Dr Oscar Loew and is written according to Gibbs' method." The title page is stamped, "U. S. Engineer Office. Explorations West of the 100th Meridian. Apr[il] 9, 1875."
Contents: Loew, Oscar. "Isletta" vocabulary. New Mexico. November 26, 1873. Autograph document signed. 10 pages. Recorded in Smithsonian Institution Comparative Vocabulary. "Lt. Wheeler's Exped[ition] for Exploration and Surveys west of the 100th Meridian" is written on the title page in H. C. Yarrow's handwriting. A note on the 1st page reads, "See Duplicate. J. H. T.," in reference to four terms in the vocabulary. "J. H. T." probably is J. Hammond TRumbull, but the duplicate referred to has not been located as of 1/70. The Number "30" in red pencil on the title page refers to vocabulary Number 30 in George M. Wheeler, Report upon United States Geographical Surveys West of the One Hundredth Meridian, VII, Washington, 1879, pages 405, and 424-465, which was taken from this original or the duplicate referred to by "J. H. T." Loew, Oscar. "Navajoe" vocabulary. New Mexico. July 20, 1873. Autograph document signed. 10 pages. Recorded in Smithsonian Institution Comparative Vocabulary. "Lt. Wheeler's Exped. for Surveys and Explorations west of the 100th Merid[ian]" is written on the title page in H. C. Yarrow's handwriting. Number "3" in red pencil on the title page refers to vocabulary Number 3 in George M. Wheeler, Report upon United States Geographical Surveys West of the One Hundredth Meridian, v. VII, Washington, 1879, pages 405, 424-465, and 469, which is apparently taken from this original. The published version may be from another copy of the same vocabulary; the date given for the published vocabulary is June, 1873, rather than July, 1873.
Contents: Gatschet, Albert Samuel. Osage vocabulary. No date. Autograph document. 5 pages. Recorded in Smithsonian Institution Comparative Vocabulary. Note in Gatschet's handwriting on 1st page reads, "Big Heart: 2) Nanze tanka; was also name of his father; 1) given name Panka wata-inka, saucy Ponka -- are the two names of the Governor of the Osages, my informant..." This Smithsonian Institution Comparative Vocabulary also contains a Paiute vocabulary recorded by W. J. Hoffman, which Gatschet used in the chapter on vocabularies in George M. Wheeler, Report upon United States Geographical Surveys West of the 100th Meridian, v. VII, Washington, 1879. The Osage vocabulary is not related to that report. Brown, Theo. V., Hospital Steward, U. S. Army. "Pi-Ute" vocabulary. Las Vegas, Nevada. September, 1871. Autograph document signed. 11 pages partly filled. Recorded in Smithsonian Institution Comparative Vocabulary. MOst of the Paiute terms have been crossed out, but are still legible. THe Paiute terms were presumably crossed out by A. S. Gatschet when he added a Paya vocabularyfrom Alberto Membreno, Provincialos mos [?] de Honduras, Tecucigalpa, 1897, to this Smithsonian Institution Comparative Vocabulary. "Lt. Wheeler's exped. for Exploration and Surveys west of the 100th Meridian" is written on the title page in H. C. Yarrow's handwriting. Also on the title page is a note in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting. Also on the title page is a note in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting that reads, "Lieut. Wheeler's Expedition 3." The Number "7" in red pencil refers to vocabulary Number 7 in George M. Wheeler, Report upon United States Geographical Surveys West of the One Hundredth Meridian, v. VII, Washington, 1879, pages 405, 424-465, and 471, which is taken from this original. The published vocabulary gives the location as "a short distance northwest of Las Vegas." (page 471.) This Smithsonian Institution Comparative Vocabulary also contains an Osage vocabulary by A. S. Gatschet, which is apparently not connected with the Wheeler Surveys.
Contents: Klett, Francis. Assistant Topographer, U. S. Army [?] "Pah-ute" vocabulary. Las Vegas, Nevada. September 16, 1871. Autograph document signed. 11 pages. Recorded in Smithsonian Institution Comparative Vocabulary. "Lt. Wheeler's Exped[ition] for Explorations and Surveys west of the 100th Meridian" is written on the title page in H. C. Yarrow's handwriting. Also on the title page is a note in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting that reads, "Lieut. Wheeler's Exped't'n: 4." The Number "8" in red pencil on the title page refers to vocabulary Number 8 in George M. Wheeler, Report upon United States Geographical Surveys West of the One Hundredth Meridian, v. VII, Washington, 1879, pages 405, 424-465, and 471, which was taken from this original. Gatschet, Albert Samuel. Paya vocabulary and a few ethnographic notes. No date. Autograph document. 9 pages. Recorded in Smithsonian Institution Comparative Vocabulary. Copied from Alberto Membreno, Provincialos mos [? Provincialismos ?] de Honduras, Tegucigalpa, Honduras, 1897, pages 195 and 227-232. Same Smithsonian INstitution Comparative Vocabulary contains Paiute vocabulary recorded by Theo. V. Brown. Yarrow, Henry Crecy, M. D. "Shoshoni vocabulary. Utah and Nevada. August, 1872. Autograph document signed. 11 pages. Recorded in Smithsonian Institution Comparative Vocabulary. Note in Yarrow's handwriting on title page reads, "Lt. Wheeler's Exped. for Explorations and Surveys west of the 100th Meridian." Note in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting , also on the title page, reads, "Lieut. Wheeler's Exped'n: 1." Number "5 (pub no)" refers to vocabulary Number 5 in George M. Wheeler, Report upon United States Geographical Surveys West of the Hundredth Meridian, v. VII, Washington, 1879, pages 405, 424-465, and 470, which is taken from this original.
Contents: Loew, Oscar. "Digger" [Wintun] vocabulary. Colo. August, 1874. Manuscript document. 11 pages. Copy recorded in Smithsonian Institution Comparative Vocabulary. Tribe identified as, "Digger Indians, who had emigrated fr[om] California;" Wintun identification added in another handwriting. Title page stamped, "U. S. Engineer Office Explorations and Surveys West of the 100th Meridian Apr[il] 9, 1875." The Number "39" in red pencil refers to vocabulary Number 39 in George M. Wheeler, Report upon United States Geographical Surveys West of the One Hundredth Meridian, v. VII, Washington, 1879, page 405, 424-465, and 484, which was taken from the same original as this copy or from this copy itself. The original vocabulary has not been located as of 1/70. Yarrow, Henry Crecy, M. D. [Tewa] Los Luceros Pueblo vocabulary. Los Luceros, New Mexico. August 12, 1874. Autograph document signed. 10 pages. Recorded in Smithsonian Institution Comparative Vocabulary. "This vocabulary was obtaine from an old INdian formerly the Alcalde of the tribe. It has been compared with one obtained by Dr Oscar Loew at the same place and is found to be almost identical. H. C. Yarrow." Title page is stamped, "U. S. Engineer Office Explorations and Surveys West of the 100th Meridian Mar. 30, 1874."Yarrow's note on the title page reads, "Lt. Wheeler's Exped. for Explorations west of the 100 Meridian." The vocabulary was identified as Tewa by Randall H. Speirs, University of Buffalo, April, 1964. Published as vocabulary Number 32, "Tehua, Los Luceros Pueblo," in George M. Wheeler, Report upon United States Geographical Surveys west of the One Hundredth Meridian, v. VII, Washington, 1879, pages 405, 424-465, and 482. The Number "32" is written in red pencil on the title page. Loew, Oscar. "Gohun (Tonto-Apaches)" [Yavapai] vocabulary. Arizona. September, 1873. Autograph document signed. 10 pages. Recorded in Smithsonian Institution Comparative Vocabulary. Identified as Yavapai by Albert Schroeder, February 29, 1956. Note on title page reads,"Received from Dr O. Loew. May 1874." Note on first page reads, "This tribe call themselves "Gohun;" by white men they are called: Tonto-Apaches, a very erroneous denomination, as there is no relation whatever in the respective languages of the Apaches and Gohuns. They are on the San Carlos and Camp Verde reservations." The Number "27" on the title page refers to vocabulary Number 27 in George M. Wheeler, Report upon United States Geographical Surveys West of the One Hundredth Meridian, v. VII, Washington, 1879, page 405, and 424-465, which was taken from either this vocabulary or another copy of the same by Loew, also bound in Manuscript Number 1870.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1870
Local Note:
Manuscript document
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Navaho  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 1870, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1870
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1870

Native Americans

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
The continuing traditions of the original inhabitants of this nation were presented in the Native Americans area by representatives of the more than 200 Native American communities throughout the United States. Working with the Smithsonian, they had examined their traditions and created the programs, speaking to their way of life today and their hopes for the future.

The Native Americans area was designed with Native traditions in mind. The entire area lay within a circle that represented the wholeness of life, emphasizing that, in Native philosophy, everything is interrelated. A corn field formed the outlying circle; corn, the contribution of Native Americans to the peoples of the world, is regarded as the gift of Mother Earth. With squash and beans sharing the field, the entire area was thus surrounded by the three staple foods of the Southwest, the "three sisters" of the Iroquois. The Learning Center, designed by architect Dennis Sun Rhodes, Arapaho, faces East, the direction of sunrise and of life, and visitors were intended to proceed inside sunwise, in a circle. In its design and in its presentations of music, crafts, dance, and discussion, the Native Americans area honored the first Americans.

Building upon six years of programming during preceding Festivals, the Bicentennial presentations presented a region-by-region overview of American Indian folklife:

June 16-20, Northeast (Six Nations, Iroquois, Mohawk, Seneca, Onandaga, Tuscarora, Algonkian, Passamaquoddy, Penobscot, Shinnecock, Hassanamisco, Nanticoke, Susquehanna, Wampanoag, Narragansett, Gay Head, Mohegan, Schaghticoke)

June 23-27, Great Lakes (Oneida, Ojibwa)

July 1-5, Southeast (Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, Seminole, Tuscarora, Muskogee, Tunica-Biloxi of Louisiana, Mattaponi, Houma Tribe of Louisiana, Alabama Creek, Lumbee)

July 7-11, Southern Plains (Comanche, Kiowa, Kiowa Apache, Omaha, Pawnee, Ponca, Southern Cheyenne)

July 14-18, Prairie (Sac and Fox)

July 21-25, Northern Plains (Northern Cheyenne)

July 28-August 1, Northwest Coast (Alaska Federation of Natives, Confederated Tribes of Siletz, Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation)

August 4-8, Southwest (San Juan Pueblo, Navaho, White Mountain Apache, Comanche)

August 11-15, Plateau (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakima Indian Nation, Ute, Klamath)

August 18-22, Basin (Northern Paiute, Southern Paiute, Washo, Western Shoshone, Walker River Paiute)

August 25-29, Northern California (Miwok, Wintun, Pomo, Yurok, Karok, Tolowa, Hupa, Klamath, Tchinook, Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla, Quileute)

September 2-6, Arctic (Alaska Federation of Natives)

Lucille Dawson served as program coordinator, assisted by Thomas Kavanagh. The multi-year program was shaped by the Native Americans Advisory Group, including Louis Bruce, Rayna Green, Dell Hymes, Clydia Nahwooksy, Alfonso Ortiz, and William Sturtevant.
Participants:
Northeast

Six Nations, Iroquois

Mohawk

Mary Adams, basket maker

Mike Adams, basket maker

Sally Ann Adams, basket maker

Richard Hill, headdress maker

Stan Hill, bone carver

Tammy Hill, craft sales

Mary Longboat, cornhusk worker

Margaret Torrence, basket maker

Cam Wilson, silversmith

Mark Wilson, craft sales

Wanda Wilson, dancer

Oneida

Eula Chrisjohn, cornhusk worker

Irving Chrisjohn, cornhusk worker

Richard Chrisjohn, Sr., wood carver

Richard Chrisjohn, Jr., wood carver

Onondaga

Andrea Jimerson, dancer

Marty Jimerson, dancer

Huron Miller, project coordinator

James Skye, wood carver

Guy Williams, dancer

Ruby Williams, dancer

Tim Williams, dancer

Seneca

Helen Harris, dancer

Linda Harris, dancer

Philman Harris, drum and rattle maker

Steve Harris, dancer

Hazel Jimerson, dancer

Lester Jimerson, dancer

Mamie Jones, dancer

Paul Jones, dancer

Kevin Johnny John, dancer

Mike Johnny John, dancer

Vera Miller, beadworker

Rodney Pierce, dancer

Marlene Thomas, dancer

Hazel Thompson, gancer

Phillip Thompson, dancer

Natie Watt, basket maker

Ruth Watt, basket maker

Tuscarora

Louise Henry, beadworker

Oscar Moses, Lacrosse stick maker

Kevin Patterson, Lacrosse stick maker

Wes Patterson, Lacrosse stick maker

Edward Sayer, finger weaving

Wilmer Wilson, 1925-2002, craft sales manager

Algonkian

Chuck Comanda, canoe maker

Mary Comanda, canoe maker

William Comanda, canoe maker

Ojibwa

Audrey Pawis, quill worker

Discussants

Asenith D. Vogt, coordinator

Joseph A. Nicholas, discussant, Passamaquoddy

Andy Akins, discussant, Penobscot

Charles Jennings, discussant, Penobscot

Brian Miles, discussant, Pequot

Eva Smith, discussant, Shinnecock

Diane Bess, discussant, Shinnecock

Lois Wilcox, discussant, Hassanamisco

Kenneth Clark, discussant, Nanticoke

Kathy Clark, discussant, Nanticoke

Jody Hale, discussant, Susquehanna

Lydia Hale, discussant, Susquehanna

Edith Andrews, discussant, Wampanoag

Naomi Andrews, discussant, Wampanoag

Alberta Wilcox, discussant, Narragansett

Lloyd Wilcox, discussant, Narragansett

Helen Attaquin, discussant, Gay Head, Aquinnah Wampanoag

Mother Helen Attaquin, discussant, Gay Head, Aquinnah Wampanoag

Stilson Fands, discussant, Mohegan

Trudy Lamb, discussant, Schaghticoke

George Mitchell, Commissioner of Indian Affairs for the State of Maine

Southeast

Cherokee

Wanda Barr, dance leader

Mike Daniels, pottery

Cecil Hall, discussant

Don Mabray, discussant

Frank Mclemore, discussant

Eva Nordwell, discussant

Eunice Old Field, weaver

Knohovtee Scott, jewelry, silversmith

Ross Swimmer, discussant

Dick Spahr, head cook

Mary Lou Spahr, cook

Mrs. Ross Swimmer, discussant

Anicl Barr, dancer

Sheila Barr, dancer

Brenda Johnson, dancer

Jeanette Reese, dancer

Gina Pritchett, dancer

Michelle Ummtukee, dancer

Chickasaw

Aaron Christy, guide

Hazel Christy, dancer, beadwork

Overton James, discussant

Emma Mose, dancer

Buster Ned, dancer

Calvin Ned, dancer

Rhonda Ned, dancer

Wanda Ned, dancer, beadwork

Bienum Pickens, dancer, stickball, drummer

Adam Sampson, singer, dancer, stickball

Richard Sampson, dancer, stickball

Junior Thomas, dancer

Mary Wallace, dancer

Mrs. Overton James

Choctaw

Clelland Billy, stickball

Glendale Billy, food, cook

David Gardner, discussant

Lucinda Gibson, arts and crafts

Eula Goings, cook

Hugh Jefferson, stickball, discussant

Ray Jefferson, stickball

Louise Isscomer, beading

Myrtle Lowman, basket weaving

Sherrin Matlock, discussant

Mrs. David Gardner, discussant

Creek

Claude Cox, discussant

Paul Culley, 1925-, dancer

Wynena Evans, beadwork, singer

Brian Fife, dancer, discussant

Margaret Freeman, cook

Hepsey Gilroy, looming, dancer

Solomon McCombs, artist

Buddy Scott, silversmith, dancer

Genda Scott, basket weaving, dancer

Gene Timothy, discussant, food, Lacrosse

Mrs. Claude Cox, discussant

Seminole

Beulah Bemo, arts and crafts

Mallene Davis, singer, dancer; Miss Indian Oklahoma

Kelly Haney, artist, dancer, stickball

Samantha Hooper, education guide, dancer

Ida Little, food, shell shaker, dancer

Terry Little, cook

H. T. Miller, stomp dancer, stickball

Tom Palmer, stomp dancer, stickball

Ida Lee Redbird, shell shaker, dancer

Jennie Lee Rice, shell shaker, dancer

Ed Tanyan, discussant

Mrs. Ed Tonyan, discussant

Cherokee

William Crow, wood carver

Betty Crow, bead worker

Tuscarora

Ernest Carter, discussant

Benjamin Maynor, discussant

Muskogee

Angela Lyles, discussant

Ann Taylor Tate, discussant

Tunica-Biloxi of Louisiana

Rose Marie Gallardo, discussant

Mary Vercher, discussant

Mattaponi

Chief Curtis Custalow, discussant

Gertrude Custalow, discussant

Houma Tribe of Louisiana

Steve Cheramie, discussant

Randolph Francis, discussant

Alabama Creek

Connie S. Tullis, discussant

Buford L. Rolin, discussant

Lumbee

Donna Chavis

Sonya Allen

Southern Plains

Carla Allrunner, dancer

Richard Asenap, program coordinator

Joe Attocknie, 1911-1984, singer, flute player

Rosalie Attocknie, 1926-2011, artist

Bobbi Bradley, artist

Hawana Bradley, artist

Ronald Burless, artist

Ed Chappabitty, singer

Evelyn Chappabitty, singer

Florence Chasenah, beadworker

Gerald Chasenah, dancer

James Chasenah, singer

Kim Chasenah, dancer

Wallace Coffey, narrator, dancer

James Cox, narrator, tribal chairman

Marie Cox, craftsperson

Sam Devenney, historian, photographer

Jamie Franklin, dancer

Rita Franklin, dancer

Patty Hall

Carol Hall

Melvin Kerchee, singer, dancer

Melvin Kerchee, Jr., dancer

Nettie Kerchee, 1921-2003, dress maker, bead worker

Diane Motah, craftsperson

Lee Motah, historian, narrator

Haddan Nauni, singer

Rose Nauni, craftsperson

Leslie Niedo, bead worker

Frank Oberly, narrator

Mary Oberly, craftsperson

Sam "Doc" Peweardy, singer

Bill Poafpybitty, graphics, sculptor

Richard Ralph Poafpybitty, 1963-1996, actor

Sarah Pohosucut, historian

Henry Pratt, flute player, dancer, singer

Leonard Riddles, artist

Kenneth Saupitty, narrator

Gene Sovo, war dancer

Junior Sovo, war dancer

Margie Sovo, moccasin maker

Jerome Tahawah, singer

Edmond Tate, dancer

Joyce "Doc" Tate Nevaquaya, 1932-1996, flute player, dancer, artist

Jermone Tahawah, singer

May Tonips, beadworker, graphics, sculptor

Rick Tosee, dancer

George Wallace, singer

Juanita Wallace, singer

Eva Watchataker, beadworker

George "Woogee" Watchataker, dancer, flute player

Junior Weryackwe

Eva Weryackwe

Patricia Whitewolf, shawl maker

Sheryle Whitewolf, dancer

Elmer Winnerchy, 1917-1986, singer

Evelyn Winnerchy, 1917-1996, dancer

Prairie

Sac & Fox Tribe

Bill Grass

John Gakey

Shannon Franklin

Omer Jefferson, Jr.

Kate Walker

Winnie Gibson

Delphine Foreman

Sarah Riley

Sharon Byers

Bill Foreman

Jerry Nanaeto

Kimberly Nanaeto

Harriet Nanaeto

Barbara Hawkins

Kartherine Franklin

Ronnie Harris

Sandy Harris

R.J. Harris

Merle Boyd

Tammy Boyd

Pamela Boyd

Mabel Harris

George Harris

Leona Starr

Jimmy Starr

James L. Starr

Leota Black

Carl Butler

Cecil Littlehead

Clarissa Littlehead

Oma Patrick

Irene Harris

Georgianna LeClair

Teresa LeClair

Larry Blanchard

Linda Standing

Karen "Candy" Hunter

Henry O. Hunter

Douglas Franklin

Dino Riley

George Switch

Jessica Patterson

Muriel Patterson

Valerie Patterson

Carol Patterson

Frances Coker

Richard Mullake

Kay Kay Goodeagle

Mary Clark

Donald Marland

Mary Mack

Guy Wakalee

Huge Wakalee

Marilyn Thurman

Herschel Tiger

Jack Thorpe

Lee Bass, Jr.

Elmer Manatowa, Jr.

Northern Plains

Northern Cheyenne

Harry Littlebird, Sr., gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Annie Joyce Littlebird, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, cook

Richard Littlebird, dancer, gourd dance, hand game

Serena Littlebird, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts

Limona Littlebird, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts

Rose Ann Littlebird, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts

Ginger Littlebird, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts

Theresa Brady, dancer, gourd dance, arts & crafts, cook

Curtis Brady, dancer, gourd dance, hand game

Steve Brady, dancer, gourd dance, hand game

Eggonn Brady, dancer, gourd dance, hand game

Elsie Wick, hand game, arts & crafts, cook

Donna Wick, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, cook

Christine Wick, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts

James Wick, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts

Dennis Wick, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts

Ernest King, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Grover Wolfvoice, 1890-1978, hand game, arts & crafts

Dale Brady, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts

Joe Lonewolf, dancer, gourd dance, arts & crafts, singer

Crawford Lonewolf, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, singer

Charles Brady, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Arnie Brady, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, cook

Hilda Manley, dance, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, cook

James Littlebird, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Harriet Littlebird, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, cook

Geofredo Littlebird, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, singer

Clinton Birdhat, dancer, hand game, singer

Marlene Belly Mule, dancer, gourd dance, arts & crafts, cook

Ruth Littlebird, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, cook

Stacey Gwen Littlebird, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts

Rose Medicine Elk, hand game, arts & crafts, cook

John Medicine Elk, Sr., gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

John Killsontop, Sr., gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Rose Killsontop, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, cook

Mike Bearcamesout, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Robert Bearchum, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Robert Redwoman, hand game, arts -- & -- crafts, singer

Mary Redwoman, hand game, arts & crafts, cook

Elmer Fightingbear, dancer, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Tommy Rockroads, dancer, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Dave Glenmora, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Wilson Brady, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Tim Littleboy, dancer, hand game, arts & crafts

Webby Runsabove, dancer, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Billy Runsabove, dancer, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Fernando Littlebird, dancer, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer

Steve Littlebird, gourd dance, hand game, arts & crafts, singer, coordinator

Northwest Coast

Les Houck

Merle Holmes

Charles Rick

Charles McKnight

Edmund Ben

Delores Pigsley

Archie Ben

Paul Jackson

Shirley Walker

Raymond Ben

Judy McKnight

Melvin McKnight

Bunni Houck

Jerry Running Foxe

Paulene Rick

Joe McKnight

Randy Rick

Boby Dumont

Victoria Ben

Dave Harley

Carlene Easter

Delbert Bell

Caroline Easter

Alaska Federation of Natives

Judy Brady

Herman Davis

Ruth Farquhar

Sharon Frank

Larry Garrity

Laura Eliz Joseph

Larry Judy

Alice Kitka

Marla Kitka

Donna Lang

Dorothy Lord

Tim McGraw

Lillian Nielsen

Mike Spoon

Martin Strand, Jr.

Martina Strand

Marlene Thomas

Cynthia Williams

Ethel Williams

Karin Williams

Janice Williams

Isabella Brady

Ethel Makinen

George Ramos

Marie Thiemeyer

Margy Johnson

Southwest

Amos Beatty

Jimmy Thompson

Charles Henry

Ron Quay

Wilkie Dazen

John Chissay

Mike Cooley

Pat Cooley

Bruce Cooley

Theresa Truesdell

Myrna Tessay

Wilfred Peaches

Manuelita Early

Jerry Lupe

Mike Truesdell

Bernice Endfield

Lula Machuse

Azlie Lupe

Pheobe Gooday

Nelson Lupe, Sr.

Shirleen Bullock

Beverly Machuse

June Marie Dale

Ophelia Peaches

Maria Endfield

Umatilla

Traditional Long House Group from Pendleton, Oregon

Edith K. McCloud, narrator, bead worker

Lillian E. Hoptowit, craftsperson, bead worker

Terry L. Hoptowit, dancer

Rosie McCloud, dancer

Eliza B. Nez, dancer

Joseph P. Tias, dancer

Bernadette B. Nez, dancer

Anthony G. Hoptowit Sr., crafts

Anna Marie Brown, buckskin worker

James Hoptowit, dancer

Donna B. Nikolaide, dancer, assist.

Willard D. Showay, singer

Arthur Williams, singer, crafts-beadwork

Lonnie R. Selam Sr., singer

William A. Johnson Sr., feather worker

Mrs. Arthur Williams, bead worker

Phillip Jackson, dancer, assist.

Eliza Bill, coordinator

Norma June Mosquito, dancer

Beksee Mosquito, singer, drummer

John Willard Hoptowit, dancer

Maisie McCloud, dancer

David Dean McKay, dancer

Babette Cowapoo, dancer

Ellen Taylor, dancer

Julie Taylor, dancer

Alberta Taylor, dancer

Ellen Johnson, bead worker

Cidric Bill, dancer

Anthony G. Hoptowit Jr., dancer

Emile Bill, dancer

Robert Bill, dancer

Sheila Bill, dancer

Sonny Gail McCloud, dancer

Angie McCloud, dancer

Raphael Bill, dancer, assist.

Veva E. Bill, storyteller

Sylvester Selam, dancer

Gabriel Selam, singer

Sandy Sampson, dancer, narrator, sign language

The Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakima Indian Nation of Toppenash, Washington will also be featured. Simon Sampson is the coordinator.

We will feature the Ute Reservation led by Gwen Mojado, the Inter-Tribal Council of Nevada led by Harold Wyatt, and the Klamath Tribe of Oregon led by Leonard Norris.

Northern California

Miwok Tribe

William Franklin, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

Cora Franklin, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

Margaret Villa, dancer, lecturer, jewelry maker

Theresa Coy, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

Carl Mathiesen, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

Inez Mathiesen, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

David Franklin, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

Ronnie Franklin, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

James Franklin, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

Norman Franklin, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

Robert Coy, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

Elaine Barber, dancer, lecturer, hand game player

Dorothy Stanley, food demonstration, lecturer

Dwight Zutchke, dancer, lecturer

Wintun Tribe

Mary Norton, food sales

Frances McDaniel, basket maker

Pomo Tribe

Elsie Allen, 1899-1990, basket maker, Ukiah, California

Yurok Tribe

Elaine Glairy, jewelry maker

Mary Birchfield, food sales

Ollie Foseide, 1921-, basket maker, Hoopa, California

Warren Abbott, food sales, dancer

Lareta James, dancer, singer

Dewey George, 1899-1985, boat maker, dance leader, McKinleyville, California

Rosie Silva, dancer, singer

Julius Aubrey, boat making assistant, dancer

Oscar Taylor, net maker, singer, dancer

Eileen Figueroa, basket maker, singer

Sam Jones, 1913-1996, stick game player

Mark Sundberg, stick game player, dancer, canoe assistant

Lisa Sundberg, dancer, jewelry maker

Joy Sundberg, Northern California coordinator, lecturer

Karok Tribe

Charlie Tom, singer, drummer, dancer

Jo Peters, 1923-, jewelry maker, basket maker, lecturer, Hoopa, California

Tammy Peters, dancer, jewelry maker

Laura George, guide, assistant

Lorna Dodge, lecturer, guide, assistant

Tolowa Tribe

Billy Richards, dancer

Mark Richards, dancer

Nicole Richards, dancer

Loren Bommelyn, 1956-, lead singer, Fort Dick, California

Fred Moorehead, lead singer

Betty Green, dance assistant

Kim Richards, dancer

Tanya Richards, dancer

Ronnie Richards, dancer

Marvin Richards, dancer

Denise Lopez, dancer, guide

Denise Richards, dancer, guide

Pam Mattz, dancer

Joan Richards, food sales

Darlene Richards, food sales

Lorene Richards, dancer

William Richards, food sales

Viola Richards, food sales

Bill Bommelyn, dancer

Walter Richards, singer

Lila Moorehead, sand bread maker, cook

Hupa Tribe

Merve George, band leader, dancer

Eleanor Abbott, language class leader

Andy Andrioli, lecturer, guitar player, dancer

Kim Yerton, dancer, learning center assistant

Janice Yerton, learning center assistant

Endora Saxson, dancer

Mike Waterman, drummer

Doug Duncan, lead guitar player

George Disdy, guitar player

Ann Taylor, assistant

Pat Andrioli, assistant

Paiute Tribe

Joseph Saulque, lecturer, historian

Film and Video Presentation

Vern Korbe

Carol Korbe

Dick O'Rourke

Lorraine O'Rourke

Brian Tripp

Dolly Tripp

Daniel O'Rourke

Klamath Tribe

Leonard Norris, Jr., Coordinator

Cecil L. Gallagher

Nick Kimbal

Charlie Bates

Rhonda Jimenez

LaNell L. Jackson

Rose Mary Tree Top

Jean Tina Bates

Bill L. Jackson

Anna Marie Jackson

Valgene Teeman

Marc McNair

Tchinook Tribe of Oregon

Karleen F. McKenzie

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla

Leslie Minthorn, Coordinator

Quileute Tribe

Robert Bojorcas, 1943-, Coordinator, Eugene, Oregon
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1976, Series 6
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1976-ref44

Volume 14

Collection Creator:
Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1922
Scope and Contents:
Volume 14 was published in 1924 with the title The Kato. The Wailaki. The Yuki. The Pomo. The Wintun. The Maidu. The Miwok. The Yokuts.
Collection Restrictions:
Viewing of the photographic negatives and transparencies requires advance notice and the permission of the Photo Archivist.

Access to the Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
See more items in:
Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs
Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs / Series 9: Photographs / 9.3: The North American Indian
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2010-28-ref1973

I-K

Collection Creator:
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.). Department of Anthropology  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. United States National Museum. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Container:
Box 43
Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents:
Includes Indians, painting of; Indians: California Maidu, Chinook, civilization of, Kansas, mythology, Mohave, Navaho, Paiute, Oregon-Washington, population, bannocks, Eastern Washington, Quinaielt, Wintun, photographs, San Luis Rey, and tribes settled in Cherokee Nation; industrial areas; insects—folklore; Irish folk ballads; Iron age in America; ivory; jargon; Java; Israel; and Kabyles.
Collection Restrictions:
Some materials are restricted.

Access to the Department of Anthropology records requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Department of Anthropology Records, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Department of Anthropology records
Department of Anthropology records / Series 17: Division of Ethnology / 17.1: Manuscript and Pamphlet File / Miscellany
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-xxxx-0311-ref14999

Manuscript and Pamphlet File

Collection Creator:
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.). Department of Anthropology  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. United States National Museum. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1840s
1860-1962
1972
1997
Scope and Contents:
For those who are searching for anthropologically substantive materials, special note should be made of the Manuscript and Pamphlet File. A potpourri of documents, the file includes correspondence, notes, drawings, maps, photographs, printed and processed materials, paper specimens, reports, writings, catalogs, motion picture film (now in the Smithsonian's Human Studies Film Archives), bibliographies, and other types of documents. Of concern is a wide variety of subjects such as anthropological specimens, museology and museums, Smithsonian history, archaeological and ethnological methods, exhibits, expeditions, history of anthropology, and so forth.

The file seems to have been maintained in the Division of Ethnology — in one document it was referred to as Herbert W. Krieger's morgue — and the subject matter is largely ethnological. Nevertheless, some documents relate to archeology and physical anthropology. The file also contains administrative materials, such as records relating to the Department of Anthropology's use of Work Projects Administration workers during the 1930s. In addition, the file is the main location of materials not generally accepted as being strictly anthropological in the modern sense. It includes, for example, material on period costumes, fish and fisheries, whaling, religions, armor, biblical studies, modern appliances, the seal industry, European music and musical instruments, lace, aeronautics, and other similar subjects. In addition, the file includes sets of papers of Edwin H. Hawley ,Walter Hough, Otis T. Mason, Talcott Williams and Thomas Wilson. Some documents, both primary and secondary research materials, concern the following cultural groups and geographic areas: Arabs, Bannock, Baubi, Blackfoot, British Columbia, Caddo, Carib, Chinook, Cochiti, Comanche, Cossacks, Cuna, Delaware, Diegueño, District of Columbia, Dyak, Eskimo, Europe, Fox, Goajira, Haida, Hawaii, Hittites, Hupa, India, Innuit, Iran, Ireland, Jamomadi, Japan, Jivaro, Kabyles, Kiowa, Kirghese, Klamath, Korea, Luiseño, Madagascar, Madiera, Maidu, Makah, Maori, Mataco, Maya, Micmac, Micronesia, Mission, Modoc, Mohave, Mongolia, Moro, Morocco, Naltunnetunne, Nanticoke, Narragansett, Navaho, New Guinea, Nez Perce, Nubia, Omaha, Onandaga, Osage, Oto, Papua, Parsee, Pawnee, Peru, Philippines, Pomo, Pueblo, Puerto Rico, Pygmies, Quichua, Quinaielt, Samoa, Sauk, Seminole, Seri, Shoshoni, Spain, Tahiti, Tesuque, Thailand, Texas, Tolowa, Tonga, Tulalip, Utah, Virginia, Washo, Wichita, Wintun, Yavapai, and Zuni.
Collection Restrictions:
Some materials are restricted.

Access to the Department of Anthropology records requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Department of Anthropology Records, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.XXXX.0311, Subseries 17.1
See more items in:
Department of Anthropology records
Department of Anthropology records / Series 17: Division of Ethnology
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-xxxx-0311-ref53

Photographs used to illustrate Alfred Louis Kroeber's "Handbook of the Indians of California"

Creator:
Kroeber, A. L. (Alfred Louis), 1876-1960  Search this
Extent:
12 Prints (silver gelatin)
Culture:
Karuk (Karok)  Search this
Whilkut (Redwood Indians)  Search this
Wintun  Search this
Yurok  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Photographs
Date:
circa 1900-1919
Scope and Contents note:
Images included in Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 78 ("Handbook of the Indians of California") and photographs of spoons and acorn gruel stirrers, some of which were also published in the volume. Among the photographs included as plates are the interior of a Yurok sweat house (plate 10), a Chilula sweat house (plate 13), a Yurok boat (plate 13), a view of the Karok center of the world (plate 22), and a Wintun cradle (plate 35).
Biographical/Historical note:
Alfred Louis Kroeber (1876-1960) was born in Hoboken, New Jersey, but his family moved to New York City shortly afterward. He received his BA (1896) and MA (1897) from Columbia University and worked as a teaching assistant there from 1897-1898. During this time, he took courses from Franz Boas who introduced him to the university's newly established Department of Anthropology. Kroeber received his PhD in Anthropology in 1901 and then accepted a position at the University of California at Berkeley, where he founded the Department of Anthropology. Kroeber conducted extensive research into California tribes and collected artifacts for museums. His "Handbook of the Indians of California," submitted in 1919, was published in the Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin in 1925. In 1923, Kroeber published "Anthropology," considered among the first general textbooks on the subject.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 66E
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Papers and notes by Kroeber can be found in National Anthropological Archives MS 2108, MS 2622, MS 2560, and MS 3134.
Correspondence from Kroeber held in the National Anthropological Archives in MS 7116, MS 4365-a, MS 1897-a, MS 4623, NAA MS 4372(4), American Ethnological Society records, Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology, Handbook of South American Indians Records, and collections of personal papers.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Buildings  Search this
Implements, utensils, etc.  Search this
Boats and boating  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo lot 66E, Photographs used to illustrate Alfred Louis Kroeber's "Handbook of the Indians of California," National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.66E
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-66e

California 3 - (Wintun Cont'd[?]) - Patwin, Maidu (2)

Collection Creator:
McClellan, Catharine  Search this
Guédon, Marie Françoise  Search this
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Emmons, George Thornton  Search this
De Laguna, Frederica, 1906-2004  Search this
Collection Correspondent:
Stearns, Mary Lee  Search this
Container:
Box 2
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Some of the original field notes are restricted due to Frederica de Laguna's request to protect the privacy of those accused of witchcraft. The originals are restricted until 2030. Photocopies may be made with the names of the accused redacted.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Frederica de Laguna Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Frederica de Laguna Papers
Frederica de Laguna Papers / Series 4: Teaching / 4.1: American Indians
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1998-89-ref1586

Grace Nicholson: Correspondence, Wm. Benson

Collection Creator:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Collection Collector:
Johnson, Frederick, 1904-1994  Search this
Churchill, Frank C. (Frank Carroll), 1850-1912  Search this
Davis, Edward H., b. 1862  Search this
Churchill, Clara G.  Search this
Harrington, M. R. (Mark Raymond), 1882-1971  Search this
Harvey, Byron  Search this
Emmons, George Thornton  Search this
Gridley, Marion E. (Marion Eleanor), 1906-1974  Search this
Wildschut, William  Search this
Stiles, William F., 1912-1980  Search this
Verrill, A. Hyatt (Alpheus Hyatt), 1871-1954  Search this
Skinner, Alanson, 1886-1925  Search this
Waterman, T. T. (Thomas Talbot), 1885-1936  Search this
Harvey, Fred  Search this
Keppler, Udo J., 1872-1956  Search this
Lothrop, S. K. (Samuel Kirkland), 1892-1965  Search this
Barrett, S. A. (Samuel Alfred), 1879-1965  Search this
Pepper, George H. (George Hubbard), 1873-1924  Search this
Speck, Frank G. (Frank Gouldsmith), 1881-1950  Search this
Hodge, Frederick Webb, 1864-1956  Search this
Collection Director:
Dockstader, Frederick J.  Search this
Heye, George G. (George Gustav), 1874-1957  Search this
Collection Source:
Force, Roland W.  Search this
Burnett, Edwin K.  Search this
Container:
Box 262, Folder 5
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1903 - 1911
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from the National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation Records, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records / Series 6: Collectors
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-001-ref14851
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  • View Grace Nicholson: Correspondence, Wm. Benson digital asset number 1

MS 269 Fifteen untitled Karok stories

Creator:
Curtin, Jeremiah, 1835-1906  Search this
Extent:
197 Pages
Culture:
Karuk (Karok)  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Folklore
Date:
May, 1889
Scope and Contents:
Fourteen stories have original in Curtin's hand (difficult to read), plus a typed copy; one story has typed copy only. Typed material totals 56 pages.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 269
Local Note:
These stories had been catalogued for many years as Wintun myths recorded by Powell, and are so described in Harvey Pitkin's Wintun bibliography, International Journal of American Linguistics, Volume 28, Number 1, 1962, page 47, item 48. I recognised in 1960 that the myths were in Curtin's writing, and indicated this on the microfilm copy sent to the University of California, Berkeley, April, 1960. However, in 1966 I noticed that the names of the Karok towns of Katimin and Panomnik (Panamenik), the Karok term for Coyote (piqnefitc) and the word Karok, appear throughout the stories, and consequently recatalogued the manuscripts as Karok at that time --MCB.
Topic:
Karok language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Citation:
Manuscript 269, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS269
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms269
Online Media:

MS 841 Wintu Vocabulary in Powell's Introduction to the Study of Indian Languages

Collector:
Curtin, Jeremiah, 1835-1906  Search this
Extent:
78 Pages
Culture:
Wintun  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Wintu  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
1888-1889
Scope and Contents:
In schedule of John Wesley Powell's Introduction to the Study of Indian Languages, partly filled. Contains 670 terms.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 841
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 841, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS841
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms841

MS 794-b Wintun myths and legends

Creator:
Powell, John Wesley, 1834-1902  Search this
Extent:
205 Pages
Culture:
Wintun  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Wintu  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
ca. November 1880
Scope and Contents:
Partly in Powell's handwriting, most in hand of a clerk. Also 21 pages vocabularies and notes in Powell's hand, apparently Wintun, found with Curtin's Karok myths (Number 269) and added to this file (4/60).
Contents (In Powell's hand) 1 page. Introduction 49 pages. Numklactawa creates the Sacramento River 9 pages. Hot, the Great Musician 7 pages. Vegetal food provided 5 pages. Light and Darkness 10 pages. [Ages of the Wintuns] 3 pages. Thunder and Lightning 2 pages. The Wind Maker 1 page. The Origin of the Rainy Season 3 pages. Sed-it is caught in a tree: a Tar-baby Story 8 pages. Ber-rit- the Giant of Mt. Shasta 2 pages. Blue-jay, the Medicine Woman 2 pages. The Buzzard aspires to the Chief 7 pages. The Comet-Goddess 1 page. Whirlwinds 1 page. Wak-porc, the God of Fire 8 pages. Wo-mul-num-kai-a, the Red-headed Woodpecker 6 pages. To-ri-has, the Bald Eagle 3 pages. The Great Magician 8 pages. Bul-ti-hok, the Screech Owl1 page. Tul-tcu-her-ris 9 pages. [No-dal-mo-no-ko, an orphan] 11 pages. Lightning and Thunder & other stories (Powell's hand) 23 pages. [Ka-het, the Monster Bat] 1 page. Portion of paper (?) pages 17, 32, and 38 to 50 incl. (Powell's hand) 3 pages. Notes on medicine, word lists, list of Indians from whom Wintun Mythology was procured, etc. One sheet is dated November 12, 1880 7 pages. 204 pages total.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 794-b
Local Note:
Note: The second part of this file is incorrectly listed in Harvey Pitkin's Wintun bibliography, International Journal of American Linguistics, Volume 28, Number 1, 1962, page 47 at the end of entry 48 (Manuscript 269 by Curtin) instead of at the end of entry 47 (Manuscript 794-b).
Other Title:
Numklactawa creates the Sacramento River
Hot, the Great Musician
Vegetal food provided
Light and Darkness
Ages of the Wintuns
Thunder and Lightning
The Wind Maker
The Origin of the Rainy Season
Sed-it is caught in a tree: a Tar-baby Story
Ber-rit- the Giant of Mt Shasta
Blue-jay, the Medicine Woman
The Buzzard aspires to the Chief
The Comet-Goddess
Whirlwinds
Wak-porc, the God of Fire
Wo-mul-num-kai-a, the Red-headed Woodpecker
To-ri-has, the Bald Eagle
The Great Magician
Bul-ti-hok, the Screech Owl
Tul-tcu-her-ris
No-dal-mo-no-ko, an orphan
Lightning and Thunder & other stories
Ka-het, the Monster Bat
Kol-chi-bi-chi the Magician
Topic:
Folklore -- Wintun  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 794-b, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS794B
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms794b

MS 4569-a Vocabulary of "Wintoonan tribes"

Creator:
Merriam, C. Hart (Clinton Hart), 1855-1942  Search this
Extent:
92 Pages
Culture:
Wintun  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Wintu  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Includes names of persons, parts of the body, 17 pages. (also carbon copy); animal and bird names, 75 pages.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 4569-a
Topic:
Names, Personal -- Wintun  Search this
Zoology -- Wintun  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 4569-a, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4569A
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4569a
Online Media:

MS 385 "Idiomas Californias"

Creator:
Arroyo de la Cuesta, Felipe, -1842  Search this
Murray, E. F. (Edward F.)  Search this
Extent:
32 Pages
Culture:
Chumash -- Purismeno  Search this
Santa Ynez Chumash (Santa Inez)  Search this
Yokuts  Search this
San Luis Rey  Search this
Ohlone (Costano)  Search this
Salinan -- San Miguel  Search this
Chumash [San Luis Obispo Mission]  Search this
Salinan -- San Antonio  Search this
Barbareño Chumash (Santa Barbara)  Search this
Mewuk (Miwok)  Search this
Wintun  Search this
Esselen Indians  Search this
Karkin  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Chumash  Search this
Salinan Indians  Search this
Patwin  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
1821
Scope and Contents:
Copied by E.F. Murray in 1878 from the original made in 1821. It includes vocabularies of the following languages: Esselen, San Antonio (Salinan), San Miguel (Salinan), San Luis Obispo (Obispeno Chusmash), Santa Barbara (Barbareno Chumash), La Purisima (Purismeno Chusmash), Santa Inez (Inezeno Chumash), Nophrinthres of San Juan Bautista (a Yokuts dialect), Lathruunen (Yokuts), San Luis Rey (Uto-Aztecan), Karkin (Costanoan), Saclan (Miwok), Juichun (Costanoan), Huimen (Marin Miwok), and Suisen (a dialect of Patwin [Wintun]).
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 385
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Ynezeno  Search this
Antoniaños  Search this
Migueleños  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 385, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS385
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms385
Online Media:

MS 3805 Terms for divisions of time in Wintun, Hupa, and Yurok

Creator:
Curtin, Jeremiah, 1835-1906  Search this
Extent:
4 Pages
3 Items (slips )
Culture:
Wintun  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Wintu  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Includes: Wintun place names and names for other tribes. No date. Autograph document. 1 page. "Names of men in Natinug, Hupa Valley." No date. Autograph document. 2 pages. Wintun place and tribal names are recorded on a sheet torn from schedule of John Wesley Powell's Introduction to the Study of Indian Languages. (page 184).
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3805
Local Note:
autograph document
Topic:
Wintun Indians  Search this
Time -- divisions  Search this
Wintun Indians  Search this
Names, place  Search this
Wintun Indians  Search this
Names, tribal  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 3805, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3805
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3805

MS 3618 Comparison between the Wintun and Japanese languages

Collector:
Faris, Lafayette  Search this
Addressee:
Powell, John Wesley, 1834-1902  Search this
Extent:
8 Pages
Culture:
Japanese  Search this
Wintun  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Wintu  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
August 18, 1893
Scope and Contents:
Letter to Major J. W. Powell.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3618
Citation:
Manuscript 3618, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3618
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3618

MS 3538 Several short manuscripts collected by Jeremiah Curtin

Creator:
Curtin, Jeremiah, 1835-1906  Search this
Informant:
Pitt, Jesse  Search this
Koalak'aka  Search this
Culture:
Achomawi (Pit River)  Search this
Modoc  Search this
Shasta  Search this
Wintun  Search this
Yana  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Wintu  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
In addition to Modoc materials, there are items which relate or may relate to the Shasta, Achomawi, Wintun and Yana. Possibly not all are in Curtin's handwriting.
Contents of file: (1) "Modoc Words." February 23, 1884. 34 pages total: vocabulary 24, 2 pages; myth, 2 pages (note on outside cover reads, "One Kumush story in this book"); notes on several myths which are identified by number only, 6 pages. This entire item may belong in file 2569. (2) "Customs. Information given by Jesse Pitt." Modoc. 9 pages, numbered 421-9. Marked "not to be used in "Modoc Myths;" see letter 7/8/12." This notation is crossed out. (3) "Medicine. The Doctor. This information was given by Koalak'aka. I afterward questioned the old men at Klamath Agency and found out that it was accurate." 8 pages numbered 414-20. Same notation as above, crossed out. (4) "Names of Places on the Triangle East of Redding and South of Pit River. Achomawi ? 30 pages. (5) Personal names, Achomawi ? Shasta ? Wintun ? Yana ? 15 pages. (6) Item moved to Yana vocabulary # 2060 (5/66) (7) Vocabulary. Tribe ? 6 pages. Mentions terms relating to Mt. Shasta page 2; Redding, page 3, Pit River, page 4, Maj. Redding, page 5, Stillwater, page 5. (8) Miscellaneous vocabulary notes. Tribes ? 7 pages.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3538
Other Title:
Modoc Words
Customs. Information given by Jesse Pitt
Medicine. The Doctor.
Names of Places on the Triangle East of Redding and South of Pit River
Topic:
Folklore -- Modoc  Search this
Names, place -- Achomawi  Search this
Names, Personal -- Achomawi  Search this
Social structure -- Modoc  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Achumawi  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 3538, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3538
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3538

MS 3535 Wintun stories

Creator:
Curtin, Jeremiah, 1835-1906  Search this
Extent:
218 Pages
Culture:
Wintun  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Wintu  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
ca. 1888-89
Scope and Contents:
In handwriting of a scribe. Contents: "Tirumenasa and The daughters of Tsararokkiemila." 17 pages. Places: Pitt River. "Berit loses the Daughter of Taretkiemila and his own hair by dreaming of Kahit." 6 pages. Places: Mt. Shasta. "The Journey of Sedit and Poharamasherit to the land of Puidalladekiemila. 30 pages. Places: Pitt River, Lassen Butte. "Death of Suptcit and Resurrection of the Nompatits by Winispukic." 10 pages. Places: Sacramento River. "Sedit buys three barks of Nohlospatkilis." 8 pages. Place: Stillwater. "Sulaloimis at Nelwakut." 16 pages. Places: Sacramento River, Anderson. "Sedit and Kalihuri at Dekesnorton." 10 pages. Places: Sacramento River. "Tsileuherit and the Tcitiwirik Sisters." 10 pages. Places: Sacramento River, Lassens Butte. ""Kuril splits himself and becomes the Man and Woman Kukipiwit." 7 pages. Places: Redding, Rockbridge (near Shasta City). "Memtulitkiemila and Tsuratkiemila on Puimem." 9 pages. Places: Pitt River. "Pitisherit and Klakherit." 26 pages. "The Birth of Walokitila and Tumukitila." 19 pages. Places: List of geographic locations with this myth gives "Wintun name" and translation. "The visit of Puipawinmak and Tsikipatharamas to their brother Topiwaikalalti in the land of Topitcikiemila. 23 pages. Places: Sacramento River, Redding, Pitt River, McCloud River, places near Anderson, and Shasta City, Stillwater.
"Hlutcustcinaila and Nopyarhpak's daughters." 27 pages. Places: McCloud River. Sedit "wolf" (coyote) in Wintun.--Curtin, Wintun vocabulary. Manuscript #841, recorded 1888-1889, Shasta County, California.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3535
Local Note:
These myths have been catalogued for many years as "California myths" on the basis of place-names, but have not been more specifically identified. However, three stories mention Sedit, "wolf" (or "Coyote") in Wintun (see Curtin, Manuscript Number 841, Wintun vocabulary recorded 1888-89, Shasta County, California); and one story gives the "Wintun name" in a list of geographic locations. Presumably all of the stories are Wintun.--MCB, 5/66
Other Title:
Tirumenasa and The daughters of Tsararokkiemila
Berit loses the Daughter of Taretkiemila and his own hair by dreaming of Kahit
The Journey of Sedit and Poharamasherit to the land of Puidalladekiemila
Death of Suptcit and Resurrection of the Nompatits by Winispukic
Sedit buys three barks of Nohlospatkilis
Sulaloimis at Nelwakut
Sedit and Kalihuri at Dekesnorton
Tsileuherit and the Tcitiwirik Sisters
Kuril splits himself and becomes the Man and Woman Kukipiwit
Memtulitkiemila and Tsuratkiemila on Puimem
Pitisherit and Klakherit
The Birth of Walokitila and Tumukitila
The visit of Puipawinmak and Tsikipatharamas to their brother Topiwaikalalti in the land of Topitcikiemila
Hlutcustcinaila and Nopyarhpak's daughters
Topic:
Folklore -- Wintun  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 3535, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3535
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3535

MS 2934 Wintu vocabulary

Collector:
Reading, Pierson Barton  Search this
Extent:
21 Pages
Culture:
Wintun  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Wintu  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
In Indo-American Languages form.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2934
Topic:
Wintu language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 2934, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2934
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2934
Online Media:

MS 2864 Personal names of the Wintun

Creator:
Curtin, Jeremiah, 1835-1906  Search this
Extent:
600 Items (cards )
Culture:
Wintun  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Wintu  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2864
Topic:
Wintun Indians  Search this
Names, Personal  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 2864, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2864
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2864

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