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Elizabeth S. Navas papers, 1939-1963

Creator:
Navas, Elizabeth S., 1885-1979  Search this
Navas, Elizabeth S., 1885-1979  Search this
Subject:
Bacon, Peggy  Search this
Bouché, Louis  Search this
Brice, William  Search this
Burchfield, Charles Ephraim  Search this
Burlin, Paul  Search this
Callahan, Kenneth  Search this
Copley, John Singleton  Search this
Cowles, Russell  Search this
Curry, John Steuart  Search this
Davis, Stuart  Search this
De Creeft, José  Search this
Dehn, Adolf  Search this
Dehner, Walt  Search this
Demuth, Charles  Search this
Dove, Arthur Garfield  Search this
Pène Du Bois, Guy  Search this
Eakins, Thomas  Search this
Glackens, William J.  Search this
Gleitsmann, Raphael  Search this
Grosz, George  Search this
Heliker, John  Search this
Homer, Winslow  Search this
Hopper, Edward  Search this
James, Alexander  Search this
Kinigstein, Jonah  Search this
Kirsch, Frederick D. (Frederick Dwight)  Search this
Kuhn, Walt  Search this
Kuniyoshi, Yasuo  Search this
Lachaise, Gaston  Search this
Lechay, James  Search this
Marin, John  Search this
Marsh, Reginald  Search this
Mattson, Henry E. (Henry Elis)  Search this
Morris, Carl  Search this
Morris, George L. K.  Search this
Moyer, Roy  Search this
Murdock, Louise Caldwell  Search this
Murdock, Roland P.  Search this
Oscar, Charles  Search this
Penney, James  Search this
Poor, Anne  Search this
Poor, Henry Varnum  Search this
Ryder, Albert Pinkham  Search this
Schnakenberg, H. E. (Henry Ernest)  Search this
Shahn, Ben  Search this
Sheeler, Charles  Search this
Sloan, John  Search this
Smith, Houghton Cranford  Search this
Sparhawk-Jones, Elizabeth  Search this
Watkins, Franklin Chenault  Search this
Weber, Max  Search this
Williamson, Clara McDonald  Search this
Zerbe, Karl  Search this
Zorach, William  Search this
Wichita Art Museum  Search this
Topic:
Art, American -- Kansas -- Witchita  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Theme:
The Art Market  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)8075
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)210246
AAA_collcode_navaeliz
Theme:
The Art Market
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_210246

Marlene Park and Gerald E. Markowitz research materials on New Deal Art, 1931-1999

Creator:
Park, Marlene, 1931-  Search this
Markowitz, Gerald E., 1944-  Search this
Park, Marlene, 1931-  Search this
Subject:
Palmer, William  Search this
Magafan, Ethel  Search this
Markowitz, Gerald E.  Search this
Reisman, Philip  Search this
Rothschild, Lincoln  Search this
Burchfield, Charles Ephraim  Search this
Refregier, Anton  Search this
Van Veen, Stuyvesant  Search this
Solman, Joseph  Search this
Sternberg, Harry  Search this
Walton, Marion  Search this
Alston, Charles Henry  Search this
Bolotowsky, Ilya  Search this
Barnet, Will  Search this
Brooks, James  Search this
Cadmus, Paul  Search this
Cronbach, Robt. (Robert M.)  Search this
Citron, Minna Wright  Search this
Gottlieb, Adolph  Search this
Gellert, Hugo  Search this
Bouché, Louis  Search this
King, Roy E.  Search this
Katz, Leo  Search this
Lanning, Edward P.  Search this
Kotin, Albert  Search this
National Personnel Records Center (U.S.)  Search this
United States  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Transcripts
Photographs
Topic:
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Theme:
Government Sponsorship of the Arts  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)6277
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)216622
AAA_collcode_parkmarl
Theme:
Government Sponsorship of the Arts
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_216622
Online Media:

The End of the World and Time Will Be No More; Hell Is In God's Jail House

Recording artist:
Gates, Rev. J. M.  Search this
Manufacturer:
Okeh  Search this
Physical Description:
shellac (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 10 in; x 25.4 cm
Object Name:
sound recording
Place made:
United States: New York, New York
Recording date:
1927
Related Publication:
Discography of American Historical Recordings
ID Number:
1996.0320.16563
Label number:
8547
Catalog number:
1996.0320.16563
Accession number:
1996.0320
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Entertainment
Religion
Music & Musical Instruments
Popular Entertainment
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746ac-0980-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1320465

The City Where Comes No Strife; I Will Have a New Life

Recording artist:
Goodwill Family  Search this
Manufacturer:
White Church  Search this
Physical Description:
shellac (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 10 in; x 25.4 cm
Object Name:
sound recording
Place made:
United States: Illinois, Chicago
ID Number:
1996.0320.16842
Label number:
1065
Catalog number:
1996.0320.16842
Accession number:
1996.0320
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Entertainment
Religion
Music & Musical Instruments
Popular Entertainment
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746ab-f388-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1320486

What a Gathering That Will Be; No Never Alone

Recording artist:
McGhee, John  Search this
Welling, Frank  Search this
Manufacturer:
Supertone  Search this
Physical Description:
shellac (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 10 in; x 25.4 cm
Object Name:
sound recording
Place made:
United States
Recording date:
1929
Related Publication:
Russell, Tony. Country Music Records: A Discography, 1921-1942
ID Number:
1996.0320.17334
Label number:
9678
Catalog number:
1996.0320.17334
Accession number:
1996.0320
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Entertainment
Music & Musical Instruments
Popular Entertainment
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746ac-0686-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1321303

Will Judge Reveal "Stealth" Secrets?

Author:
Broder, Jonathan  Search this
Collection Creator:
Hardesty, Von, 1939-  Search this
Extent:
2 Documents
Container:
Box 39, Folder 19
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Documents
Date:
June 1993
Scope and Contents:
Jonathan Broder, "Will judge reveal 'Stealth' screts?", We/Мы 2, 12 (June 14-27, 1993): 1, 3. Newspaper articles (2 complete newspapers).
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Collection Citation:
Russian Aeronautical Collection, ACC. 2006-0034, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Russian Aeronautical Collection
Russian Aeronautical Collection / Series 4: Soviet Union and Russia (post World War II, 1946-Onwards)
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-2006-0034-ref1355

I. I. Sikorsky Retires

Collection Creator:
Hardesty, Von, 1939-  Search this
Extent:
1 Document
Container:
Box 47, Folder 10
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Documents
Date:
May 24, 1957
Scope and Contents:
"I. I. Sikorsky Retires But Will Continue Here As Consultant," "Pictorial Highlights of a 50-Year Career," The Sikorsky News 9, 8 (May 24, 1957): 1-2, 3. (complete issue)
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Collection Citation:
Russian Aeronautical Collection, ACC. 2006-0034, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Russian Aeronautical Collection
Russian Aeronautical Collection / Series 5: Designers & Designs / 5.2: Designers & Design - Sikorsky
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-2006-0034-ref1485

Moscow - Various

Collection Creator:
Hardesty, Von, 1939-  Search this
Container:
Box 26, Folder 1
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
1941-1988
Scope and Contents:
Photocopies of various articles related to the battle for Moscow (1941). Includes:

Marshall Cavendish, ed. -- Illustrated Encyclopedia of World War II -- , Vol. 5, Chap 42: "Target Moscow" (New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp, 1972). (2 copies; photocopy)

Life -- . various articles, 1941-1942 (photocopies)

J. Neumann, "Lack of Appreciation of Past Meteorological Data as an Important Factor in the Failure of the German Army in the Battle for Moscow," paper presented at the 13th International Colloquy on Military History, Helsinki, May 31-June 6, 1988. (photocopy).

"The Soviet Air Force," -- Flight -- , July 3, 1941. (photocopy).

И. Михайленко [I. Mikhaĭlenko], "Из опыта управления войсками противовоздушной оборны Москвы" ["Iz opyta upravlenii͡a voĭskami protivovozdshnoĭ oborony Moskvy"], -- Военно-исторический Журнал -- 1977, 12:27-34. Russian language paper (photocopy).

Н. Н. Дмитревский [N. N. Dmitrevskiĭ], -- Защитники неба столицы -- [ -- Zashchitniki neba stolit͡sy -- ] (Moscow: Voennoe Izdetel'stvo, 1962). Russian language monograph (photocopy).

Robert Jackson, -- The Red Falcons - The Soviet Air Force in Action, 1919-1969 -- (London: Clifton Books, 1970). English language monograph (extracts, Chap. 6; photocopy).

Alexander Werth, -- Russia At War, 1941-1945 -- (New York: Avon Books, 1964_. English landuage monograph (extracts, Chaps.5, 10-12; photocopy).

H. Salisbury, -- The Unknown War -- (New York : Bantam, 1978). (extracts, pp.68-113; photocopy).

"Such an Army Will Win!", -- Soviet Life -- , December 1981. English language reprint of articles from December 1941 issue (photocopy).
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Collection Citation:
Russian Aeronautical Collection, ACC. 2006-0034, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Russian Aeronautical Collection
Russian Aeronautical Collection / Series 3: Soviet Union (World War II, 1941-1945)
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-2006-0034-ref871

Bristow McIntosh [Gullah informant]

Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Collection Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 3.5 x 2.5 in.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Gullahs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
Georgia
United States
Date:
circa 1931-1933
Scope and Contents:
Lorenzo Dow Turner took this image while doing research in the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia between 1931 and 1933.
Historical:
The settlement of Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia, began when on September 2, 1865, Margaret M. Harris donated her land to Robert Dolegal (the name is also spelled as Delegal and Denegal), who she had formerly enslaved. According to Mrs. Harris' will, she had raised Robert and trusted him to take care of her and of her mentally disabled son Bright Harris until their death in exchange for the lands. Mrs. Harris appears in the 1850 Census slave schedule as being the enslaver of 59 individuals. In the 1860 Census slave schedule, she appears as the enslaver of 66 persons.

Robert Dolegal must have sold parcels of his land immediately after he took possession of it. In the Census of 1870, there were 87 African American households and 21 white households in Harris Neck.
Biographical:
Bristow McIntosh appears in the 1870 census as a 14-year old working as a farm laborer and living in the household of Martha Woodruff. According to the interview he gave to Dr. Turner in 1933, beginning in 1866, he had attended school for a few months each year and had been able to learn how to read and write.

By 1880 Bristow McIntosh was married to Nancy King Mctinosh (also known as Annie and Nannie), and they had two children and owned 20 acres of land valued at fifty dollars. The previous year his farm had produced corn, peas, and beans. Bristow also owned milk cows and chickens. The value of his production in 1879 had been $100.

During his life, Bristow worked his land, which was valued at $200 in 1930. He also, at some point, ran a store and kept a mail route. By 1930 he was already in his seventies but still working as a family servant.

Bristow and Nancy would have eleven children, and only three survived childhood. Nancy passed away in 1922 after a long illness, and two of her surviving children followed her within a few years. Leonard passed away in 1926 and James in 1928.

Bristow McIntosh was one of Dr. Turner's principal informants when he came to Harris Neck in 1933. He passed away four years later, on November 25, 1937. Thus, Bristow McIntosh was not alive when the Federal government took the land at Harris Neck through eminent domain to build a military airport. The residents were given two weeks to move out. On July 27, 1942, all the community's houses were bulldozed and burned down.
General:
Bristow (also Brister or Bristol); Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers,Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-017, Item ACMA PH2003.7064.310
See more items in:
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers / Series 5: Photographs, circa 1890–1974 / 5.4.3: Research: United States of America / Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-017-ref1390

Lizzie Grant [Gullah informant]

Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Collection Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 3.5 x 2.5 in.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Gullahs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
Georgia
United States
Date:
1933
Scope and Contents:
Lorenzo Dow Turner took this image while doing research in the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia between 1931 and 1933.
Historical:
The settlement of Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia, began when on September 2, 1865, Margaret M. Harris donated her land to Robert Dolegal (the name is also spelled as Delegal and Denegal), who she had formerly enslaved. According to Mrs. Harris' will, she had raised Robert and trusted him to take care of her and her mentally disabled son Bright Harris until their death in exchange for the lands. Mrs. Harris appears in the 1850 Census slave schedule as being the enslaver of 59 individuals. In the 1860 Census slave schedule, she appears as the enslaver of 66 persons.

Robert Dolegal must have sold parcels of his land immediately after he took possession of it. In the Census of 1870, there were 87 African American households and 21 white households in Harris Neck.
Biographical:
Lizzie McIntosh married Sandy Grant on January 21, 1902. They had at least one son named Harry and later in life raised several nephews and nieces.

Sandy Grant owned his farm at Harris Neck, which was worth $200.00 in 1930. Both Sandy and Lizzie had been able to attend two years of school when they were children.

We have no information about Lizzie's passing. Sandy died in 1961 in his 80s. Thus he was alive and most likely witnessed when Harris Neck was destroyed to build a military airport. The residents were given two weeks to move out. On July 27, 1942, all the community's houses were bulldozed and burned down.
General:
Summer of 1933, Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American women  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers,Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-017, Item ACMA PH2003.7064.314
See more items in:
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers / Series 5: Photographs, circa 1890–1974 / 5.4.3: Research: United States of America / Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-017-ref1393

John (Johnnie) Campbell [Gullah informant]

Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Collection Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 3.5 x 2.5 in.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Gullahs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
Georgia
United States
Date:
1933
Scope and Contents:
Lorenzo Dow Turner took this image while doing research in the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia between 1931 and 1933.
Historical:
The settlement of Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia, began when on September 2, 1865, Margaret M. Harris donated her land to Robert Dolegal (the name is also spelled as Delegal and Denegal), who she had formerly enslaved. According to Mrs. Harris' will, she had raised Robert and trusted him to take care of her and her mentally disabled son Bright Harris until their death in exchange for the lands. Mrs. Harris appears in the 1850 Census slave schedule as being the enslaver of 59 individuals. In the 1860 Census slave schedule, she appears as the enslaver of 66 persons.

Robert Dolegal must have sold parcels of his land immediately after he took possession of it. In the Census of 1870, there were 87 African American households and 21 white households in Harris Neck.
Biographical:
John Campbell was born about 1877, the son of Isaac Campbell and Rose Bacon Campbell. On December 27, 1900, John married Georgia Stevens.

The couple had at least five children but by 1910 had lost one of them. The surviving children were Ophelia, James, Agnes, and Johnnie. John was working as a boatman for the oyster industry. Georgia worked as a cook for a private family. They owned their house. After appearing in the 1910 population census, both John and Georgia disappear from the record. However, we know that Dr. Lorenzo Dow Turner interviewed John Campbell at Harris Neck in the summer of 1933.

It is possible that both John and Georgia Campbell were living when the Federal government took the land at Harris Neck through eminent domain to build a military airport. The residents were given two weeks to move out. On July 27, 1942, all the community's houses were bulldozed and burned down.
General:
Summer of 1933 Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers,Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-017, Item ACMA PH2003.7064.319
See more items in:
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers / Series 5: Photographs, circa 1890–1974 / 5.4.3: Research: United States of America / Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-017-ref1397

James (Napoleon) Rogers and Adeline (Annie) Rogers [Gullah informants]

Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Collection Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 3.5 x 2.5 in.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Gullahs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
Georgia
United States
United States of America -- Georgia -- Harris Neck
Date:
1933
Scope and Contents:
Lorenzo Dow Turner took this image while doing research in the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia between 1931 and 1933.
Historical:
The settlement of Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia, began when on September 2, 1865, Margaret M. Harris donated her land to Robert Dolegal (the name is also spelled as Delegal and Denegal), who she had formerly enslaved. According to Mrs. Harris' will, she had raised Robert and trusted him to take care of her and her mentally disabled son Bright Harris until their death in exchange for the lands. Mrs. Harris appears in the 1850 Census slave schedule as being the enslaver of 59 individuals. In the 1860 Census slave schedule, she appears as the enslaver of 66 persons.

Robert Dolegal must have sold parcels of his land immediately after he took possession of it. In the Census of 1870, there were 87 African American households and 21 white households in Harris Neck.
Biographical:
James (Napoleon) Rogers was born in Liberty County, Georgia, around 1859. He was never able to attend school, and thus when Dr. Lorenzo Dow Turner interviewed him in the Summer of 1933 in Harris Neck, Georgia, he informed him that he could neither read nor write. Dr. Turner considered him one of his principal informants in Harris Neck.

By 1880 Rogers had moved to Harris Neck and was working as a laborer living in the household of John J. Curry. On September 30, 1905, Rogers married Adeline (also spelled as Adline) Houston. Adeline was much younger than Rogers. She was 30, being born at Ways Station, Bryan County, on March 15, 1875. Rogers was at least 46 years old. They had two children Anna Lee (also spelled as Analee and Analie) and James.

James Rogers owned his farm, which was worth $500.00 in 1930. He informed Dr. Turner that he had always been a farmer, but around 1910 he was working as a carpenter. Adeline Rogers mainly took care of the family, but around 1910 she was working as a seamstress.

James Rogers passed away between 1933 when he was interviewed by Dr. Turner and 1940 when he disappeared from the record. Adeline Rogers appears in the 1940 census as a widow living with her niece Emma Tate, the cook at the local school. Adeline must have been already sick on April 12, 1940, when the census was taken. A little bit over a month later, on May 25, she passed away from heart failure due to renal and cardiovascular disease. She had gone back to live where she had been born in 1875, Ways Station (today Richmond Hill), Bryan County, Georgia. Her daughter, Anna Lee, was married and living in New York City with the married surname of Callaway and was the person who informed on her mother data for the death certificate.

Thus, neither James nor Adaline Rogers were alive when the Federal government took the land at Harris Neck through eminent domain to build a military airport. The residents were given two weeks to move out. On July 27, 1942, all the community's houses were bulldozed and burned down.
General:
Summer of 1933, Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
African American women  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers,Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-017, Item ACMA PH2003.7064.337
See more items in:
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers / Series 5: Photographs, circa 1890–1974 / 5.4.3: Research: United States of America / Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-017-ref1399

Sandy Grant [Gullah Informant]

Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Collection Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 3.5 x 2.5 in.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Gullahs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
United States
Georgia
Date:
1933
Scope and Contents:
Lorenzo Dow Turner took this image while doing research in the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia between 1932 and 1933.
Historical:
The settlement of Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia, began when on September 2, 1865, Margaret M. Harris donated her land to Robert Dolegal (the name is also spelled as Delegal and Denegal), who she had formerly enslaved. According to Mrs. Harris' will, she had raised Robert and trusted him to take care of her and her mentally disabled son Bright Harris until their death in exchange for the lands. Mrs. Harris appears in the 1850 Census slave schedule as being the enslaver of 59 individuals. In the 1860 Census slave schedule, she appears as the enslaver of 66 persons.

Robert Dolegal must have sold parcels of his land immediately after he took possession of it. In the Census of 1870, there were 87 African American households and 21 white households in Harris Neck.
Biographical:
Sandy Grant was born at Harris Neck around 1876, the son of Alexander (Sandy) and Frances (Fannie) Grant. Alexander was an early settler of Harris Neck. Sandy Grant married Lizzie McIntosh on January 21, 1902. They had at least one son named Harry and later in life raised several nephews and nieces.

Sandy Grant owned his farm at Harris Neck, which was worth $200.00 in 1930. Both Sandy and Lizzie had been able to attend two years of school when they were children.

We have no information about Lizzie's passing. Sandy died in 1961 in his 80s. Thus he was alive and most likely witnessed when Harris Neck was destroyed to build a military airport. The residents were given two weeks to move out. On July 27, 1942, all the community's houses were bulldozed and burned down.
General:
Summer of 1933, Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers,Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-017, Item ACMA PH2003.7064.326
See more items in:
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers / Series 5: Photographs, circa 1890–1974 / 5.4.3: Research: United States of America / Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-017-ref1405

Bristow McIntosh [Gullah Informant]

Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Collection Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 3.5 x 2.5 in.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Gullahs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
United States
Georgia
Date:
circa 1931-1933
Scope and Contents:
Lorenzo Dow Turner took this image while doing research in the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia between 1931 and 1933.
Historical:
The settlement of Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia, began when on September 2, 1865, Margaret M. Harris donated her land to Robert Dolegal (the name is also spelled as Delegal and Denegal), who she had formerly enslaved. According to Mrs. Harris' will, she had raised Robert and trusted him to take care of her and of her mentally disabled son Bright Harris until their death in exchange for the lands. Mrs. Harris appears in the 1850 Census slave schedule as being the enslaver of 59 individuals. In the 1860 Census slave schedule, she appears as the enslaver of 66 persons.

Robert Dolegal must have sold parcels of his land immediately after he took possession of it. In the Census of 1870, there were 87 African American households and 21 white households in Harris Neck.
Biographical:
Bristow McIntosh appears in the 1870 census as a 14-year old working as a farm laborer and living in the household of Martha Woodruff. According to the interview he gave to Dr. Turner in 1933, beginning in 1866, he had attended school for a few months each year and had been able to learn how to read and write.

By 1880 Bristow McIntosh was married to Nancy King Mctinosh (also known as Annie and Nannie), and they had two children and owned 20 acres of land valued at fifty dollars. The previous year his farm had produced corn, peas, and beans. Bristow also owned milk cows and chickens. The value of his production in 1879 had been $100.

During his life, Bristow worked his land, which was valued at $200 in 1930. He also, at some point, ran a store and kept a mail route. By 1930 he was already in his seventies but still working as a family servant.

Bristow and Nancy would have eleven children, and only three survived childhood. Nancy passed away in 1922 after a long illness, and two of her surviving children followed her within a few years. Leonard passed away in 1926 and James in 1928.

Bristow McIntosh was one of Dr. Turner's principal informants when he came to Harris Neck in 1933. He passed away four years later, on November 25, 1937. Thus, Bristow McIntosh was not alive when the Federal government took the land at Harris Neck through eminent domain to build a military airport. The residents were given two weeks to move out. On July 27, 1942, all the community's houses were bulldozed and burned down.
General:
Bristow (also Brister or Bristol); Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers,Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-017, Item ACMA PH2003.7064.330
See more items in:
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers / Series 5: Photographs, circa 1890–1974 / 5.4.3: Research: United States of America / Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-017-ref1409

David (Davey) Grant [Gullah informant]

Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Collection Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 3.5 x 2.5 in.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Gullahs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
United States
Georgia
Date:
1933
Scope and Contents:
Lorenzo Dow Turner took this image while doing research in the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia between 1931 and 1933.
Historical:
The settlement of Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia, began when on September 2, 1865, Margaret M. Harris donated her land to Robert Dolegal (the name is also spelled as Delegal and Denegal), who she had formerly enslaved. According to Mrs. Harris' will, she had raised Robert and trusted him to take care of her and her mentally disabled son Bright Harris until their death in exchange for the lands. Mrs. Harris appears in the 1850 Census slave schedule as being the enslaver of 59 individuals. In the 1860 Census slave schedule, she appears as the enslaver of 66 persons.

Robert Dolegal must have sold parcels of his land immediately after he took possession of it. In the Census of 1870, there were 87 African American households and 21 white households in Harris Neck.
Biographical:
David (Davey) Grant was born around 1874, the son of Alexander (Sandy) Grant and Frances (Fannie) Grant and the older brother of Sandy Grant, another of Dr. Lorenzo Dow Turner's informants, by two years.

Around 1901 David married a woman named Amanda (Manda). They had one child, a boy named Roan.

Sometime before 1910, the family moved from Harris Neck to Brunswick, a coastal town in Glynn County, Georgia, where David went to work as a dockhand and Amanda as a washerwoman.

By 1920 the family was back at Harris Neck, living on South Harris Neck Road at a locality named Warboo. David was renting the place where they lived and was not working. Amanda was working at a farm.

We do not know what happened to Amanda, but David Grant lived until 1947. He died on April 11, 1947. Thus, he was alive and most likely witnessed when Harris Neck was destroyed to build a military airport. The residents were given two weeks to move out. On July 27, 1942, all the community's houses were bulldozed and burned down.
General:
Summer of 1933, Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers,Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-017, Item ACMA PH2003.7064.336
See more items in:
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers / Series 5: Photographs, circa 1890–1974 / 5.4.3: Research: United States of America / Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-017-ref1415

James (Napoleon) Rogers [Gullah informant]

Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Collection Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 3.5 x 2.5 in.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Gullahs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
United States
Georgia
Date:
1933
Scope and Contents:
Lorenzo Dow Turner took this image while doing research in the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia between 1931 and 1933.
Historical:
The settlement of Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia, began when on September 2, 1865, Margaret M. Harris donated her land to Robert Dolegal (the name is also spelled as Delegal and Denegal), who she had formerly enslaved. According to Mrs. Harris' will, she had raised Robert and trusted him to take care of her and her mentally disabled son Bright Harris until their death in exchange for the lands. Mrs. Harris appears in the 1850 Census slave schedule as being the enslaver of 59 individuals. In the 1860 Census slave schedule, she appears as the enslaver of 66 persons.

Robert Dolegal must have sold parcels of his land immediately after he took possession of it. In the Census of 1870, there were 87 African American households and 21 white households in Harris Neck.
Biographical:
James (Napoleon) Rogers was born in Liberty County, Georgia, around 1859. He was never able to attend school, and thus when Dr. Lorenzo Dow Turner interviewed him in the Summer of 1933 in Harris Neck, Georgia, he informed him that he could neither read nor write. Dr. Turner considered him one of his principal informants in Harris Neck.

By 1880 Rogers had moved to Harris Neck and was working as a laborer living in the household of John J. Curry. On September 30, 1905, Rogers married Adeline (also spelled as Adline) Houston. Adeline was much younger than Rogers. She was 30, being born at Ways Station, Bryan County, on March 15, 1875. Rogers was at least 46 years old. They had two children Anna Lee (also spelled as Analee and Analie) and James.

James Rogers owned his farm, which was worth $500.00 in 1930. He informed Dr. Turner that he had always been a farmer, but around 1910 he was working as a carpenter. Adeline Rogers mainly took care of the family, but around 1910 she was working as a seamstress.

James Rogers passed away between 1933 when he was interviewed by Dr. Turner and 1940 when he disappeared from the record. Adeline Rogers appears in the 1940 census as a widow living with her niece Emma Tate, the cook at the local school. Adeline must have been already sick on April 12, 1940, when the census was taken. A little bit over a month later, on May 25, she passed away from heart failure due to renal and cardiovascular disease. She had gone back to live where she had been born in 1875, Ways Station (today Richmond Hill), Bryan County, Georgia. Her daughter, Anna Lee, was married and living in New York City with the married surname of Callaway and was the person who informed on her mother data for the death certificate.

Thus, neither James nor Adaline Rogers were alive when the Federal government took the land at Harris Neck through eminent domain to build a military airport. The residents were given two weeks to move out. On July 27, 1942, all the community's houses were bulldozed and burned down.
General:
Summer of 1933, Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers,Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-017, Item ACMA PH2003.7064.342
See more items in:
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers / Series 5: Photographs, circa 1890–1974 / 5.4.3: Research: United States of America / Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-017-ref1420

Mitch Rogers (Rodgers) [Gullah informant]

Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Collection Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 3.5 x 2.5 in.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Gullahs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
United States
Georgia
Date:
1933
Scope and Contents:
Lorenzo Dow Turner took this image while doing research in the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia between 1931 and 1933.
Historical:
The settlement of Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia, began when on September 2, 1865, Margaret M. Harris donated her land to Robert Dolegal (the name is also spelled as Delegal and Denegal), who she had formerly enslaved. According to Mrs. Harris' will, she had raised Robert and trusted him to take care of her and her mentally disabled son Bright Harris until their death in exchange for the lands. Mrs. Harris appears in the 1850 Census slave schedule as being the enslaver of 59 individuals. In the 1860 Census slave schedule, she appears as the enslaver of 66 persons.

Robert Dolegal must have sold parcels of his land immediately after he took possession of it. In the Census of 1870, there were 87 African American households and 21 white households in Harris Neck.
Biographical:
Mitchell Rogers was born on August 15, 1880. On August 22, 1906, he married Nancy Holmes, with whom he had three children but only one daughter, Ella, survived. By 1910 the family lived on Harris Neck Road with Jonesville Road, and Mitchell was working at odd jobs while Nancy worked as a cook for a private family.

By 1920 Mitchell and Nancy lived at South Harris Neck Road at Warbo, a locality at Harris Neck. He owned the farm in which he worked. Nancy was housekeeping. Ella was no longer living with them.

Ten years later, things had turned to worst in Mitchell's life. He was divorced from Nancy and no longer owned his farm. He was renting a home for $2 a month and working at odd jobs to survive. After that, he disappears from the record, except that we know he was interviewed and photographed by Dr. Turner in the summer of 1933.

Mitchell Rogers might not have survived to see the destruction of Harris Neck to build a military airport in 1942. The residents were given two weeks to move out. On July 27, 1942, all the community's houses were bulldozed and burned down.
General:
Summer of 1933, Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers,Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-017, Item ACMA PH2003.7064.344
See more items in:
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers / Series 5: Photographs, circa 1890–1974 / 5.4.3: Research: United States of America / Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-017-ref1422

Mitch Rogers (Rodgers) [Gullah informant]

Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Collection Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 3.5 x 2.5 in.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Gullahs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
United States
Georgia
Date:
1933
Scope and Contents:
Lorenzo Dow Turner took this image while doing research in the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia between 1931 and 1933.
Historical:
The settlement of Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia, began when on September 2, 1865, Margaret M. Harris donated her land to Robert Dolegal (the name is also spelled as Delegal and Denegal), who she had formerly enslaved. According to Mrs. Harris' will, she had raised Robert and trusted him to take care of her and her mentally disabled son Bright Harris until their death in exchange for the lands. Mrs. Harris appears in the 1850 Census slave schedule as being the enslaver of 59 individuals. In the 1860 Census slave schedule, she appears as the enslaver of 66 persons.

Robert Dolegal must have sold parcels of his land immediately after he took possession of it. In the Census of 1870, there were 87 African American households and 21 white households in Harris Neck.
Biographical:
Mitchell Rogers was born on August 15, 1880. On August 22, 1906, he married Nancy Holmes, with whom he had three children but only one daughter, Ella, survived. By 1910 the family lived on Harris Neck Road with Jonesville Road, and Mitchell was working at odd jobs while Nancy worked as a cook for a private family.

By 1920 Mitchell and Nancy lived at South Harris Neck Road at Warbo, a locality at Harris Neck. He owned the farm in which he worked. Nancy was housekeeping. Ella was no longer living with them.

Ten years later, things had turned to worst in Mitchell's life. He was divorced from Nancy and no longer owned his farm. He was renting a home for $2 a month and working at odd jobs to survive. After that, he disappears from the record, except that we know he was interviewed and photographed by Dr. Turner in the summer of 1933.

Mitchell Rogers might not have survived to see the destruction of Harris Neck to build a military airport in 1942. The residents were given two weeks to move out. On July 27, 1942, all the community's houses were bulldozed and burned down.
General:
Summer of 1933, Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers,Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-017, Item ACMA PH2003.7064.345
See more items in:
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers / Series 5: Photographs, circa 1890–1974 / 5.4.3: Research: United States of America / Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-017-ref1423

James (Napoleon) Rogers [Gullah informant]

Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Collection Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 3.5 x 2.5 in.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Gullahs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
United States
Georgia
Date:
1933
Scope and Contents:
Lorenzo Dow Turner took this image while doing research in the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia between 1931 and 1933.
Historical:
The settlement of Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia, began when on September 2, 1865, Margaret M. Harris donated her land to Robert Dolegal (the name is also spelled as Delegal and Denegal), who she had formerly enslaved. According to Mrs. Harris' will, she had raised Robert and trusted him to take care of her and her mentally disabled son Bright Harris until their death in exchange for the lands. Mrs. Harris appears in the 1850 Census slave schedule as being the enslaver of 59 individuals. In the 1860 Census slave schedule, she appears as the enslaver of 66 persons.

Robert Dolegal must have sold parcels of his land immediately after he took possession of it. In the Census of 1870, there were 87 African American households and 21 white households in Harris Neck.
Biographical:
James (Napoleon) Rogers was born in Liberty County, Georgia, around 1859. He was never able to attend school, and thus when Dr. Lorenzo Dow Turner interviewed him in the Summer of 1933 in Harris Neck, Georgia, he informed him that he could neither read nor write. Dr. Turner considered him one of his principal informants in Harris Neck.

By 1880 Rogers had moved to Harris Neck and was working as a laborer living in the household of John J. Curry. On September 30, 1905, Rogers married Adeline (also spelled as Adline) Houston. Adeline was much younger than Rogers. She was 30, being born at Ways Station, Bryan County, on March 15, 1875. Rogers was at least 46 years old. They had two children Anna Lee (also spelled as Analee and Analie) and James.

James Rogers owned his farm, which was worth $500.00 in 1930. He informed Dr. Turner that he had always been a farmer, but around 1910 he was working as a carpenter. Adeline Rogers mainly took care of the family, but around 1910 she was working as a seamstress.

James Rogers passed away between 1933 when he was interviewed by Dr. Turner and 1940 when he disappeared from the record. Adeline Rogers appears in the 1940 census as a widow living with her niece Emma Tate, the cook at the local school. Adeline must have been already sick on April 12, 1940, when the census was taken. A little bit over a month later, on May 25, she passed away from heart failure due to renal and cardiovascular disease. She had gone back to live where she had been born in 1875, Ways Station (today Richmond Hill), Bryan County, Georgia. Her daughter, Anna Lee, was married and living in New York City with the married surname of Callaway and was the person who informed on her mother data for the death certificate.

Thus, neither James nor Adaline Rogers were alive when the Federal government took the land at Harris Neck through eminent domain to build a military airport. The residents were given two weeks to move out. On July 27, 1942, all the community's houses were bulldozed and burned down.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers,Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-017, Item ACMA PH2003.7064.346
See more items in:
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers / Series 5: Photographs, circa 1890–1974 / 5.4.3: Research: United States of America / Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-017-ref1424

James (Napoleon) Rogers [Gullah informant]

Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Collection Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow, 1890-1972  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , black and white, 3.5 x 2.5 in.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Gullahs  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
United States
Georgia
Date:
1933
Scope and Contents:
Lorenzo Dow Turner took this image while doing research in the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia between 1931 and 1933.
Historical:
The settlement of Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia, began when on September 2, 1865, Margaret M. Harris donated her land to Robert Dolegal (the name is also spelled as Delegal and Denegal), who she had formerly enslaved. According to Mrs. Harris' will, she had raised Robert and trusted him to take care of her and her mentally disabled son Bright Harris until their death in exchange for the lands. Mrs. Harris appears in the 1850 Census slave schedule as being the enslaver of 59 individuals. In the 1860 Census slave schedule, she appears as the enslaver of 66 persons.

Robert Dolegal must have sold parcels of his land immediately after he took possession of it. In the Census of 1870, there were 87 African American households and 21 white households in Harris Neck.
Biographical:
James (Napoleon) Rogers was born in Liberty County, Georgia, around 1859. He was never able to attend school, and thus when Dr. Lorenzo Dow Turner interviewed him in the Summer of 1933 in Harris Neck, Georgia, he informed him that he could neither read nor write. Dr. Turner considered him one of his principal informants in Harris Neck.

By 1880 Rogers had moved to Harris Neck and was working as a laborer living in the household of John J. Curry. On September 30, 1905, Rogers married Adeline (also spelled as Adline) Houston. Adeline was much younger than Rogers. She was 30, being born at Ways Station, Bryan County, on March 15, 1875. Rogers was at least 46 years old. They had two children Anna Lee (also spelled as Analee and Analie) and James.

James Rogers owned his farm, which was worth $500.00 in 1930. He informed Dr. Turner that he had always been a farmer, but around 1910 he was working as a carpenter. Adeline Rogers mainly took care of the family, but around 1910 she was working as a seamstress.

James Rogers passed away between 1933 when he was interviewed by Dr. Turner and 1940 when he disappeared from the record. Adeline Rogers appears in the 1940 census as a widow living with her niece Emma Tate, the cook at the local school. Adeline must have been already sick on April 12, 1940, when the census was taken. A little bit over a month later, on May 25, she passed away from heart failure due to renal and cardiovascular disease. She had gone back to live where she had been born in 1875, Ways Station (today Richmond Hill), Bryan County, Georgia. Her daughter, Anna Lee, was married and living in New York City with the married surname of Callaway and was the person who informed on her mother data for the death certificate.

Thus, neither James nor Adaline Rogers were alive when the Federal government took the land at Harris Neck through eminent domain to build a military airport. The residents were given two weeks to move out. On July 27, 1942, all the community's houses were bulldozed and burned down.
General:
Summer of 1933, Harris Neck, McIntosh County, Georgia
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers,Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-017, Item ACMA PH2003.7064.348
See more items in:
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers
Lorenzo Dow Turner Papers / Series 5: Photographs, circa 1890–1974 / 5.4.3: Research: United States of America / Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-017-ref1426

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