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The Zorach Family papers

Creator:
Zorach Family  Search this
Names:
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Brooklyn Museum  Search this
Adams, Ansel, 1902-1984  Search this
Cunningham, Imogen, 1883-1976  Search this
Ipcar, Dahlov Zorach, 1917-  Search this
Newman, Arnold, 1918-2006  Search this
Partridge, Roi, 1888-1984  Search this
Zorach, Marguerite, 1887-1968  Search this
Zorach, Tessim  Search this
Zorach, William, 1887-1966  Search this
Extent:
4.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Prints
Articles
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Drawings
Scrapbooks
Notes
Writings
Date:
1900-1987
Summary:
The Zorach Family papers measure 4.4 linear feet and consist of materials relating to the lives and careers of sculptor and painter William Zorach, his wife painter and weaver Marguerite, and their children, painter and multi-media artist Dahlov Ipcar and collector and art dealer Tessim Zorach. The bulk of the papers consists of letters to Tessim regarding his parent's artwork. Additional materials include scattered letters to William Zorach; writings and notes by William, Marguerite, and Tessim; a sketchbook and drawings by William; prints by Marguerite; Marguerite's scrapbook; printed materials; and photographs of the Zorach family and of William Zorach in his studio and at work.
Scope and Content Note:
The Zorach Family papers measure 4.4 linear feet and consist of materials relating to the lives and careers of sculptor and painter William Zorach, his wife painter and weaver Marguerite, and their children, painter and multi-media artist Dahlov Ipcar and collector and art dealer Tessim Zorach. The bulk of the papers consists of letters to Tessim regarding his parent's artwork. Additional materials include scattered letters to William Zorach; writings and notes by William, Marguerite, and Tessim; a sketchbook and drawings by William; prints by Marguerite; Marguerite's scrapbook; printed materials; and photographs of the Zorach family and of William Zorach in his studio and at work.

The majority of correspondence is between Tessim Zorach and various museums and galleries concerning exhibitions and donations of his parents' works of art. There are scattered letters to William Zorach among the correspondence. Business records consist of materials relating to the Collection of the Zorach Children, including lists of works of art by the Zorach's, a file relating to an exhibition of Zorach artwork at the Brooklyn Museum, and photographs of works of art considered for donation.

Writings and Notes include a typescript of an article written by Marguerite Zorach, writings by William Zorach, a typescript of Young Poems by William and Marguerite, as well as articles written by others about the Zorachs. Artwork by Marguerite Zorach includes two prints and a tracing. Also found is one sketchbook, and additional drawings by William Zorach. There is one unsigned lithograph.

The majority of exhibition announcements, catalogs, and clippings concern William and Marguerite Zorach although there are two announcements for Dahlov Ipcar. There is one scrapbook of clippings about Marguerite.

The papers include photographs of Marguerite and William Zorach, their parents, baby photos of Tessim and Dahlov, family pictures of the Zorachs, and of Marguerite and William in their studios. There are several folders of William Zorach working in his studios and additional photos of him carving a relief sculpture and a sculpture for the Southwest Bank. Most of these photographs contain detailed annotations written by William Zorach about the work. There is one folder of photographs of William in France in 1910-1911, including one of Zorach in Roi Partridge's studio. There is one photograph of Zorach taken by Ansel Adams in Yosemite, a photo of Zorach working by Arnold Newman, and several taken by Imogen Cunnigham.

Other photographs are of works of art, most of which depict William's works.

Artifacts include Marguerite's batik tools and approximately fifty commercially made printing blocks.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 9 series:

Series 1: Biographical Information, circa 1907-1969 (Box 1, 6; 3 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1922-1982 (Box 1-2; 1.75 linear feet)

Series 3: Business Records, 1967-1971, circa 1960s-1970s (Box 2-3; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 4: Writings and Notes, circa 1930s-1973, 1987 (Box 3; 8 folders)

Series 5: Artworks, 1900-circa 1920s (Box 3, 6; 12 folders)

Series 6: Scrapbooks, 1922-1953 (Box 3; 1 folder)

Series 7: Printed Material, 1912-1982 (Box 3; 0.25 linear feet)

Series 8: Photographs, 1908-1966 (Box 3-5; 1.0 linear feet)

Series 9: Artifacts, circa 1910s, circa 1950s (Box 4; 0.5 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
William Zorach (1887-1966) was a modernist painter and sculptor working primarily in New York city, along with his wife Marguerite (1887-1968) who worked as a fauvist painter, printmaker, and textile artist. Their children were painter Dahlov Ipcar (1917-) and art collector Tessim Zorach (1915-1995.)

Born in Lithuania, William Zorach immigrated to the United States where his family settled in Cleveland, Ohio. An early interest in art led to a printmaking apprenticeship. He then moved to New York City and enrolled in the National Academy of Design where he studied painting and drawing. In 1910, Zorach traveled to Paris to study and where he met his wife Marguerite Thompson at the La Palette art school. Marguerite grew up in Fresno, California and studied art at Stanford University. Both artists were heavily influenced by the fauvist and cubist art movements.

Returning to America, Marguerite and William married and both continued to create and experiment with varied media. Their paintings were featured in the 1913 New York City Armory Show and they are credited with being among the first artists to introduce European modernist styles to American modernism. The Zorachs were very close both as a couple and as working active artists.

In the 1920s, Marguerite began to experiment with textiles and created large, fine art tapestries and hooked rugs. Also, she used batik dying techniques on fabrics. William also expanded his genre by creating direct sculpture in 1918, which would become his primary medium.

In 1915, William and Marguerite started a family with their son, Tessim. Two years later, their daughter Dahlov was born. The Zorachs divided the year and lived in New York City, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts. In 1923, the family bought a farm on Georgetown Island, Maine where they lived, worked, and entertained friends.

Dahlov and Tessim were exposed to art from an early age. Dahlov showed artistic promise as a child and her parents supported her creativity by allowing her to express herself without formal training. Dahlov pursued painting and later became an illustrator for children's books. Additionally, she wrote fantasy novels and short stories. Dahlov married Adolf Ipcar in 1936. Like the rest of his family, Tessim Zorach developed an interest of art and along with his wife Peggy, he amassed a large private collection of ancient to modern art.

William and Marguerite continued to sculpt and paint until their deaths in 1966 and 1968, respectively.

Together, Dahlov and Tessim established the Collection of the Zorach Children which coordinated donations of their parents' art to many museums throughout the United States and the world. The artwork of both artists is found in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Brooklyn Museum, Whitney Museum of American Art, Delaware Art Museum, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Farnsworth Art Museum, Portland Museum of Art, National Gallery of Art, National Portrait Gallery and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, The Philips Collection, and educational institutions such as Colby College, University of Vermont, Williams College, Bowdoin College, and the University of Virginia. In addition William has works associated with many public buildings, among them: Radio City Music Hall, New York City Municipal Court, the U.S. Post Office in Washington D.C. as well as Farleigh Dickinson University.
Related Material:
The Archives of American Art holds the Dahlov Ipcar papers, 1906-1997. Also found is one oral history interview with William Zorach conducted by by John D. Morse on April 2, 1959 and an oral history interview with Dahlov Ipcar conducted by Robert F. Brown on November 13, 1979.

The bulk of William Zorach's papers are held by the Library of Congress.
Separated Material:
The Archives of American Art also holds material lent for microfilming on reels NY59-1-NY59-4 and NY59-19. Loaned materials were returned to the lender and are now held by the Library of Congress, Manuscript Division. This material is not described in the collection container inventory or finding aid.
Provenance:
William Zorach lent papers for microfilming to the Archives of American Art in 1959. Tessim Zorach donated materials between 1976-1987.
Restrictions:
Use of originals requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Zorach Family papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Weavers  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Art dealers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Artist couples  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Women painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Artists' studios -- Photographs  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Prints
Articles
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Drawings
Scrapbooks
Notes
Writings
Citation:
The Zorach Family papers, 1900-1987. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.zorazora
See more items in:
The Zorach Family papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-zorazora

Oral history interview with Karl Laurell, 1971 Sept. 7

Interviewee:
Laurell, Karl  Search this
Interviewer:
Cummings, Paul, 1933-1997  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Textile design -- United States  Search this
Designers -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12922
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)212822
AAA_collcode_laurel71
Theme:
Craft
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_212822

Oral history interview with Jack Lenor Larsen, 1971 Apr. 26-May 3

Interviewee:
Larsen, Jack Lenor, 1927-2020  Search this
Interviewer:
Cummings, Paul, 1933-1997  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Textile design -- United States  Search this
Designers -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)11609
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)212818
AAA_collcode_larsen71
Theme:
Craft
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_212818

Oral history interview with Lenore Tawney, 1971 June 23

Interviewee:
Tawney, Lenore, 1907-2007  Search this
Interviewer:
Cummings, Paul, 1933-1997  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Assemblage artists -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12309
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)213161
AAA_collcode_tawney71
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_213161
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Jack Lenor Larsen, 2004 February 6-8

Interviewee:
Larsen, Jack Lenor, 1927-2020  Search this
Interviewer:
Fisch, Arline M., 1931-  Search this
Subject:
Rossbach, Ed  Search this
Adamson, Glenn  Search this
University of Washington  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Textile crafts  Search this
Textile industry -- Japan  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13092
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)247149
AAA_collcode_larsen04
Theme:
Craft
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_247149
Online Media:

Jack Lenor Larsen papers, 1941-2003

Creator:
Larsen, Jack Lenor, 1927-2020  Search this
Subject:
Noguchi, Isamu  Search this
Constantine, Mildred  Search this
Drutt, Helen Williams  Search this
Tillich, Hanna  Search this
Wood, Beatrice  Search this
Mondale, Walter F.  Search this
Abakanowicz, Magdalena  Search this
Josef Albers Foundation  Search this
Type:
Audiocassettes
Photographs
Sound recordings
Interviews
Video recordings
Topic:
Textile design -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Modernism (Art)  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)11580
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)248960
AAA_collcode_larsjack
Theme:
Lives of American Artists
Craft
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_248960
Online Media:

Jack Lenor Larsen papers

Creator:
Larsen, Jack Lenor, 1927-2020  Search this
Names:
Josef Albers Foundation  Search this
Abakanowicz, Magdalena  Search this
Constantine, Mildred  Search this
Drutt, Helen Williams  Search this
Mondale, Walter F., 1928-  Search this
Noguchi, Isamu, 1904-1988  Search this
Tillich, Hanna  Search this
Wood, Beatrice  Search this
Extent:
3.7 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiocassettes
Photographs
Sound recordings
Interviews
Video recordings
Date:
1941-2003
Summary:
The Jack Lenor Larsen papers measure 3.7 linear feet and date from 1941-2003. Larsen was a renowned weaver and designer, entrepreneur, and a scholar who wrote and lectured on modernist design. His career in the New York design world is documented by biographical materials, correspondence, writings by and about him, various printed materials and photographs.
Scope and Content Note:
The Jack Lenor Larsen papers measure 3.7 linear feet and date from 1941-2003. Larson was a renowned weaver and designer, entrepreneur, and a scholar who wrote and lectured on modernist design. His career in the New York design world is documented by biographical materials, correspondence, writings by and about him, various printed materials and photographs.

Found are biographical materials and artifacts including items from his early years, 4 volumes of daily planners and numerous awards. Correspondence includes letters from notables such as Isamu Noguchi, Walter F. Mondale, and various craft artists such as Helen W. Drutt English, Magdalena Abakanowicz, and Beatrice Wood, and author Hannah Tillich, widow of Paul Tillich. Business correspondence is from museums, professional societies, magazines and other organizations such as the Josef Albers Foundation. Larsen also curated textile exhibitions and there are records pertaining to these exhibitions.

There are a substantial number of writings, lectures and speeches by Larsen, and proofs of a book he co-authored with Mildred Constantin, Beyond Craft: The Art of Fabric. Also found are writings about Larsen and 3 interviews with him including a 1965 videotaped interview, 2 transcribed interviews, and an audio tape of Larsen's talk "Personal Perspective," presented at a conference of the American Craft Council.

Photographs show Larsen and his employees at work and at professional events. Photographs removed from albums retain their original order. Lastly, there are printed materials include catalogs and announcements, newspaper and magazine clippings, and press and promotional materials.
Arrangement:
The Jack Lenor Larsen papers are organized into 7 series based primarily on record type and arranged chronologically.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1941-2001, (Box 1, 5; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1958-2003, (Box 1; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 3: Exhibition Records, 1986-1990, (Boxes 1-2; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 4: Writings, 1950-2003, (Boxes 2-3; 1.3 linear feet)

Series 5: Photographs, 1970-1992, (Box 3, 5; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1972-2002, (Boxes 4-5; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 7: Audio Recordings, 1965, (Box 4; 0.1 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Jack Lenor Larsen (b. 1927), based in New York and of international reputation, has been deeply involved in the design of hand woven fabric and its application to modernist interior design. An international entrepreneur, Larsen also has written books on design and has been a frequent lecturer.

Larsen was born in Seattle, Washington to parents of Canadian/Scandinavian descent; his father was a building contractor. Larsen studied architecture at the University of Washington and became interested in materials design, receiving his M.F.A. from Cranbrook Academy of Art in Michigan in 1951. Following graduation, he opened a studio in New York and established Jack Lenor Larsen Incorporated. Just months later, Larsen successfully competed for the commission to design draperies for the important glass walled Lever House building on Park Avenue designed by Skidmore, Owings and Merrill.

Larsen was highly successful in marketing his ideas and innovations, which included combining metallic thread with natural polished linen and hand woven fabrics consisting of varied yarns in random and repeating patterns. This later style of fabric became known as the "Larsen Look" and was synonymous with modern design. Larsen's firm successfully adapted technological advances to fabric design but also used ancient techniques; they were first to design fabrics for jet air planes, stretch upholsestry and printed velvets.

In 1958-1960, Larsen represented the United States Department of State in Vietnam and Taiwan, studying those countries' crafts with the goal of developing industry to create jobs and products for export. Larsen then saw the opportunity for international fabric design and production. He travelled to Latin America, Africa and Asia to study local crafts and weaving with an eye towards business opportunites, focusing on hand spun and hand woven silks. By the 1990s Larsen was producing fabric in over 30 countries. In 1997, Jack Lenor Larsen, Inc. merged with the British fabric house, Cowtan and Tout and became the United States subsidiary of the British company, Colefax and Fowler.

Many museums have collected and/or exhibited Larsen fabrics. Notable among them are The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Musee des Arts Decoratifs (in the Louvre Museum), Museum of Modern Art, Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam, and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. In addition, Larsen is the author of several books relating to fabric and fabric design including Material Wealth: Living with Luxurious Fabrics (an international survey of contemporary fabric design) and an autobiography, Jack Lenor Larsen: A Weaver's Memoir.
Provenance:
The records were donated to the Archives in 2004 by Jack Lenor Larsen in connection with the Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Jack Lenor Larsen papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Weavers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Textile design -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Modernism (Art)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiocassettes
Photographs
Sound recordings
Interviews
Video recordings
Citation:
Jack Lenor Larsen papers, 1941-2003. Archives of America Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.larsjack
See more items in:
Jack Lenor Larsen papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-larsjack
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Jack Lenor Larsen

Interviewee:
Larsen, Jack Lenor, 1927-2020  Search this
Interviewer:
Fisch, Arline M.  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
University of Washington -- Students  Search this
Adamson, Glenn  Search this
Rossbach, Ed  Search this
Extent:
78 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2004 February 6-8
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Jack Lenor Larsen conducted 2004 February 6-8, by Arline M. Fisch, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in Longhouse, East Hampton, N.Y.
Larsen speaks of his childhood in Seattle, Washington; his parents and other adults who had a positive impact on his development; building things with his friends; attending the University of Washington to study architecture and deciding to study textiles instead; visiting Dorothy Liebes's textile studio; leaving school and moving to Los Angeles; attending the University of Southern California and eventually returning to the University of Washington; becoming a teaching assistant to Ed Rossbach; getting a Masters degree at Cranbrook Academy of Art; meeting many influential people in San Francisco and New York; moving to New York and setting up a studio; working on commission for several companies including Thaibok; expanding his offices to include larger looms and a showroom; setting up a branch of production in Haiti; working in the fashion industry and designing home decor; and working in Southeast Asia developing handcrafted woven exports. He also speaks of his involvement with the American Craft Council and the World Crafts Council, re-organizing and building the new campus at the Haystack Mountain School of Crafts; traveling to Central Asia, Africa, Europe, and his desire to travel more; working and exhibiting in Japan; experiencing the Japanese textile industry; writing numerous books on fiber arts including, "The Dyer's Art," often collaborating with other fiber artists; developing a classification system for interlacing; collecting art; gardening and its relation to art and design; building Round House and the inspiration behind it; building LongHouse using the Japanese Ise Shrine as a model and plans for further expansion; retiring and difficulties writing, "A Weaver's Memoir." Larsen also recalls Dorothy Liebes, Marianne Strengell, Florence Knoll, Edgar Kaufman, Ed Rossbach, Toshiko Takaezu, Francis Merritt, Mary Bishop, Garth Clark, Issey Miyake, Mildred Constantine, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Jack Lenor Larsen (1927-2020) was a weaver and textile designer from East Hampton, N.Y. Arline M. Fisch (1931- ) is a jeweler from San Diego, Cailfornia.
General:
Originally recorded on 7 sound discs and 1 sound cassette. Reformatted in 2010 as 19 digital wav files. Duration is 6 hrs., 23 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Textile designers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Textile crafts  Search this
Textile industry -- Japan  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.larsen04
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-larsen04

Oral history interview with Jack Lenor Larsen

Interviewee:
Larsen, Jack Lenor, 1927-2020  Search this
Interviewer:
Cummings, Paul  Search this
Extent:
22 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1971 Apr. 26-May 3
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Jack Lenor Larsen conducted 1971 Apr. 26-May 3, by Paul Cummings, for the Archives of American Art.
Biographical / Historical:
Jack Lenor Larsen (1927-2020) was a designer and a weaver from New York, N.Y.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound tape reel. Reformatted in 2010 as 2 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hrs., 6 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives' Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Occupation:
Weavers -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Weavers  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Textile design -- United States  Search this
Designers -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.larsen71
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-larsen71

The Zorach Family papers, 1900-1987

Creator:
Zorach family  Search this
Subject:
Zorach, Tessim  Search this
Ipcar, Dahlov Zorach  Search this
Cunningham, Imogen  Search this
Adams, Ansel  Search this
Zorach, Marguerite  Search this
Zorach, William  Search this
Partridge, Roi  Search this
Newman, Arnold  Search this
Brooklyn Museum  Search this
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Prints
Articles
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Drawings
Scrapbooks
Notes
Writings
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Art dealers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Artist couples  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Women painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Artists' studios -- Photographs  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)6932
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)209061
AAA_collcode_zorazora
Theme:
Diaries
Sketches & Sketchbooks
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_209061
Online Media:

Gloria Ross papers, circa 1924-1998

Creator:
Ross, Gloria F., 1923-1998  Search this
Subject:
Bearden, Romare  Search this
Avery, Milton  Search this
Frankenthaler, Helen  Search this
Davis, Stuart  Search this
Nevelson, Louise  Search this
Motherwell, Robert  Search this
Noland, Kenneth  Search this
Pace Editions  Search this
Pinton Atelier  Search this
Denver Art Museum  Search this
Dovecot Studios  Search this
Temple Emanu-El  Search this
Atelier Raymond Picaud  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Paintings
Video recordings
Photographs
Topic:
Tapestry -- Design  Search this
Tapestry -- Production control  Search this
Tapestry -- Technique  Search this
Women artists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Designers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Navajo weavers  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)16163
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)366323
AAA_collcode_rossglor
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_366323
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Lenore Tawney

Interviewee:
Tawney, Lenore  Search this
Interviewer:
Cummings, Paul  Search this
Extent:
32 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1971 June 23
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Lenore Tawney conducted 1971 June 23, by Paul Cummings, for the Archives of American Art.
Biographical / Historical:
Lenore Tawney (1907-2007) was a weaver and assemblage artist from New York, N.Y.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound tape reel. Reformatted in 2010 as 2 digital wav files. Duration is 1 hr., 21 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Occupation:
Weavers -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Weavers  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Assemblage artists -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.tawney71
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-tawney71

Oral history interview with Karl Laurell

Interviewee:
Laurell, Karl  Search this
Interviewer:
Cummings, Paul  Search this
Extent:
57 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1971 Sept. 7
Scope and Contents:
Interview of Karl Laurell conducted 1971 Sept. 7, by Paul Cummings, for the Archives of American Art.
Biographical / Historical:
Karl Laurell is a designer and weaver from New York, N.Y.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound tape reel. Reformatted in 2010 as 2 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hrs.
Provenance:
These interviews are part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
For information on how to access this interview contact Reference Services.
Occupation:
Weavers -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Weavers  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Textile design -- United States  Search this
Designers -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.laurel71
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-laurel71

Newspaper articles

Collection Creator:
Junkin, Hattie Meyers, 1896-1985  Search this
Container:
Box 3, Folder 27
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
1932 - 1936
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
See more items in:
Hattie Meyers Junkin Papers
Hattie Meyers Junkin Papers / Series 2: Soaring and Gliding
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-xxxx-0171-ref104
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Gloria Ross papers

Creator:
Ross, Gloria F.  Search this
Names:
Atelier Raymond Picaud  Search this
Denver Art Museum  Search this
Dovecot Studios  Search this
Pace Editions (Firm)  Search this
Pinton Atelier  Search this
Temple Emanu-El (Bayonne, N.J.)  Search this
Avery, Milton, 1885-1965  Search this
Bearden, Romare, 1911-1988  Search this
Davis, Stuart, 1892-1964  Search this
Frankenthaler, Helen, 1928-2011  Search this
Motherwell, Robert  Search this
Nevelson, Louise, 1899-1988  Search this
Noland, Kenneth, 1924-  Search this
Extent:
14.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Paintings
Video recordings
Photographs
Date:
circa 1924-1998
Summary:
The papers of New York tapestry éditeur Gloria Ross measure 14.5 linear feet and date from circa 1924-1998. The bulk of the papers consist of project files that document her collaborations with artists to make tapestries of their paintings and collages. Also found are scattered biographical material, professional correspondence, exhibition files, professional activity files, personal business records, printed material, photographs, and artwork.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of New York tapestry éditeur Gloria Ross measure 14.5 linear feet and date from circa 1924-1998. The bulk of the papers consist of project files that document her collaborations with artists to make tapestries of their paintings and collages. Also found are scattered biographical material, professional correspondence, exhibition files, professional activity files, personal business records, printed material, photographs, and artwork.

Biographical material includes resumes and career summaries, as well as an interview of Ross on one videocassette, and a few Frankenthaler family documents. Correspondence is with artists, weavers, workshops, publications, and galleries and is of a professional nature.

Project files document Ross's collaborations with prominent artists such as Helen Frankenthaler, Robert Motherwell, Romare Bearden, Louise Nevelson, Milton Avery, Stuart Davis, and others. Project files may include correspondence, contracts, invoices, notes, photographs, yarn samples, and a few maquettes and cartoons. Also of note are extensive files regarding her collaborations with Navajo weavers to create tapestries based on geometric paintings by Kenneth Noland. Other project files include a commissioned tapestry for Temple Emanu-El in New York.

Exhibition files document various solo and group exhibitions of Gloria Ross tapestries and includes one videocassette from a 1978 exhibition. Records of her professional activities include her participation in symposia, lectures, and public events. Files may include correspondence, draft lectures, programs, and event publicity. Two short documentaries found on two videocassettes were produced for the Denver Art Museum. Personal business records document Ross's business relationships with weaving workshops and art galleries, most notably Atelier Raymond Picaud, Pinton atelier, Edinburgh Tapestry Company (Dovecot Studios), and Pace Editions, the major sales agent of Gloria Ross tapestries.

Printed material consists of catalogs, announcements, press releases, and other publications regarding exhibitions of Gloria Ross tapestries and Navajo tapestries. Photographs depict Ross, the Frankenthaler family, Ross's tapestries, weaving studios, and Navajo weavers. Artwork includes one painting by Paul Jenkins and unidentified textile and yarn samples.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as 9 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, circa 1926-1998 (5 folders; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1965-1998 (0.7 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 3: Project Files, 1960-1998 (7.3 linear feet; Boxes 1-7, 14-15, 17-19, OVs 20, 22-24, Artifact)

Series 4: Exhibition Files, 1967-1994 (0.8 linear feet; Boxes 7-8, 17)

Series 5: Professional Activities, 1955-1997 (0.7 linear feet; Box 8)

Series 6: Personal Business Records, 1964-1998 (1.8 linear feet; Boxes 8-10, OV 21)

Series 7: Printed Material, 1970s-1990s (0.8 linear feet; Boxes 10-11, 14)

Series 8: Photographs, circa 1924-1990s (1.1 linear feet; Boxes 11, 16)

Series 9: Artwork, circa 1970s-1990s (1.1 linear feet; Boxes 11-14, 17, 19)
Biographical / Historical:
Gloria F. Ross (1923-1998) was a tapestry éditeur in New York, New York.

Ross was born Gloria Frankenthaler in New York in 1923. She graduated from Mount Holyoke College in 1943 and married Alfred Ross. They had three children: Alfred, Beverly, and Clifford. In 1954, Gloria Ross made her first needlepoint work from a design by her sister, abstract painter Helen Frankenthaler, and by the mid-1960s, she was exhibiting her tapestries and hooked rugs in New York. She established Gloria F. Ross Studio in 1966 and began regularly collaborating with artists such as Robert Motherwell, Louise Nevelson, Jack Youngerman, and Jean Dubuffet to make their works into tapestries. She created business partnerships with weaving workshops in Scotland and France to produce the works. In 1973 she had her first exhibition at Pace Editions, Inc., beginning a long relationship with the gallery as her main sales agent.

In 1979, Ross first traveled to the Navajo Nation to find weavers for a collaborative project with artist Kenneth Noland. She continued to visit the Southwest at least once a year until 1994, and she donated her collection of Navajo rugs and other textiles to the Denver Art Museum. Throughout the 1980s Ross traveled extensively for projects, exhibitions, and symposia. Her final commissioned project, completed in 1997, was a tapestry designed by artist Mark Podwol for Temple Emanu-El in New York. That same year she established the Gloria F. Ross Center for Tapestry Studies in Tucson, Arizona.
Provenance:
Donated in 2013 by the Gloria Ross estate via Michael I. Katz, executor, with assistance from the Gloria F. Ross Tapestry Program, University of Arizona, via Ann Lane Hedlund, director.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Gloria Ross papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Tapestry -- Design  Search this
Tapestry -- Production control  Search this
Tapestry -- Technique  Search this
Women artists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Designers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Navajo weavers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Paintings
Video recordings
Photographs
Citation:
Gloria Ross papers, circa 1924-1998. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.rossglor
See more items in:
Gloria Ross papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-rossglor

Dorothy Liebes papers

Creator:
Liebes, Dorothy  Search this
Names:
Morin, Relman, 1907-1973  Search this
Extent:
25 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Date:
circa 1850-1973
bulk 1922-1970
Summary:
The papers of weaver, textile designer, and businesswoman Dorothy Liebes are dated circa 1850-1973 (bulk 1922-1970), and comprise 25 linear feet. Biographical information, subject files, correspondence, writings, artwork, financial records, scrapbooks, textile samples, printed material, sound recordings, and photographs document Liebes' career and personal life. Her second husband, Associated Press Reporter Relman "Pat" Morin, is also represented in the collection, although to a much lesser extent.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of weaver, textile designer, and businesswoman Dorothy Liebes are dated circa 1850-1973 (bulk 1922-1970), and comprise 25 linear feet. Biographical information, subject files, correspondence, writings, artwork, financial records, scrapbooks, textile samples, printed material, sound recordings, and photographs document Liebes' career and personal life. Her second husband, Associated Press Reporter Relman "Pat" Morin, is also represented in the collection, although to a much lesser extent.

Biographical material consists of awards, biographical notes, membership and identification cards, passports, and a will. Dorothy Liebes' correspondence documents her personal life and career, including the operation of her studios in San Francisco and New York City.

Subject files contain correspondence, printed material, photographs, and miscellaneous items in varying combinations. They relate to businesses, organizations, individuals, and topics of interest to Liebes.

Writings by Dorothy Liebes include notes, drafts, and manuscripts of published and unpublished writings. Artwork by Dorothy Liebes consists of designs, feather weavings, a small hooked composition, and tapestry samples. Financial records are comprised of financial summaries, investment statements, and personal and business tax returns. Thirty-three bound scrapbook volumes contain printed and publicity materials, photographs, and a small number of documents relating to Dorothy Liebes' professional achievements.

Samples consist primarily of textile swatches designed by Dorothy Liebes and printed material includes articles, exhibition catalogs, press releases, and reproductions about or mentioning Dorothy Liebes and her work, as well as reproductions of artwork.

Also found are calendars, a transcript of a 1945 interview with Liebes on Nancy Craig's radio show "Woman of Tomorrow" and a circa 1956 sound recording on 5" magnetic tape from the Milwaukee Journal Radio Station.

Photographs are of artwork (not by Liebes), people, including Liebes, Relman "Pat" Morin, and Frank Lloyd Wright, places and textiles.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 11 series:

Series 1: Biographical Information, 1934-1970 (Box 1, OV 22; 6 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1922-1973 (Boxes 1-3; 2.4 linear ft.)

Series 3: Subject Files, 1896-1971 (Boxes 3-10, 19; 7.2 linear ft.)

Series 4: Writings, 1920-1969 (Boxes 10-11; 1.25 linear ft.)

Series 5: Artwork, 1938-1963 (Boxes 11, 19, OV 22; 0.35 linear ft.)

Series 6: Financial Records, 1947-1968 (Box 12; 0.25 linear ft.)

Series 7: Scrapbooks, 1933-1970 (Box 20, BV 24-56; 3.7 linear ft.)

Series 8: Samples, circa 1850-1855, circa 1930s-circa 1970 (Boxes 12-14, 20; 2.1 linear ft.)

Series 9: Calendars and Interviews, 1945-1971 (Boxes 14-15; 1.45 linear ft.)

Series 10: Printed Material, 1897-1970 (Boxes 15-16, 20-21, OV 23; 1.05 linear ft.)

Series 11: Photographs, 1897-1970 (Boxes 16-18, 21, BV 57; 1.5 linear ft.)
Biographical Note:
Weaver, textile designer, and businesswoman Dorothy Wright Liebes was known for distinctive textiles featuring bold color combinations and unusual textures achieved through the use of materials such as glass rods, sequins, bamboo, grass, leather, ribbon, wire, and ticker tape.

Born Dorothy Wright in Santa Rosa, California, she was the daughter of chemistry professor Frederick L. Wright and teacher Bessie Calderwood Wright. She studied art, education, and anthropology at San Jose State Teachers College and the University of California, Berkeley. During her college years, a teacher encouraged her to experiment with weaving and textile design since many of her paintings resembled textiles.

Liebes was a teacher for several years before deciding to pursue a career in textile design. She then studied weaving at Hull House in Chicago and traveled to France, Italy, Guatemala, and Mexico to learn the traditional weaving forms of those cultures. Upon her return to the United States, Liebes opened her first studio for weaving and textile design in San Francisco; Dorothy Liebes Design, Inc. was established in 1934, and eventually employed a staff of weavers.

Her first client in the industry was Goodall-Sanford Mills, with whom she worked as a consultant for more than a decade. As her client base expanded she decided to open a New York studio and maintained both studios until 1948 when she closed her San Francisco operation and relocated to New York City.

Liebes became a color and design consultant to corporations such as DuPont, Dow, and Bigelow-Sanford and tested and promoted newly developed synthetic fibers. She advised textile chemists in the development of fibers that were versatile enough to produce many different textures, and worked with engineers and technicians to develop new machines that could reproduce the irregularities of hand-loomed fabrics. Liebes became a sought-after speaker by textile industry and consumer groups, and sometimes taught workshops on color and design.

Her commissions included the United Nations Delegates Dining Room, the Persian Room at the Plaza Hotel and the King of Saudi Arabia's traveling royal throne room. Between 1937 and 1970, Liebes participated in more than thirty solo and group exhibitions at the San Francisco Museum of Art, Museum of Modern Art, de Young Museum, Cranbrook Museum, Detroit Institute of Art, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Museum of Contemporary Crafts, and other venues. She received prizes and awards from institutions and corporations such as Lord and Taylor, Neiman-Marcus, the Paris Exposition, the American Institute of Decorators, the American Institute of Architects and the Architectural League. She was also awarded the Elsie de Wolfe Award and an honorary degree from Mills College in 1948.

Liebes' other notable activities included her work as Director of Decorative Arts for the 1939 San Francisco World's Fair, and as organizer and director of "Arts and Skills," a Red Cross occupational therapy project that included training in weaving for soldiers injured in World War II. In the 1950s, she worked with the Bureau of Indian Affairs, journeying though the southwest to study Indian schools and show weaver tribes that horizontal looms were more advantageous than vertical ones.

Liebes was married to businessman Leon Liebes from 1928 until their divorce in 1940, and continued to use the name Liebes for the remainder of her life. In 1948, she married Pulitzer prize winning Associated Press special correspondent Relman "Pat" Morin.

During the last year of her life, Dorothy Liebes was semi-retired due to a heart ailment. She died in New York City on 10 September 1972.
Provenance:
Gift of the Estate of Dorothy Liebes through Relman Morin (widower), 1972, and Ralph Higbee, 1973-1974.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Dorothy Liebes papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Women textile designers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Weavers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Textile design -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Citation:
Dorothy Liebes papers, circa 1850-1973 (bulk 1922-1970). Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.liebdoro
See more items in:
Dorothy Liebes papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-liebdoro
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