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The Tragic Truth Behind Wampanoag, Squanto, & the Thanksgiving Story | Smithsonian Channel

Creator:
Smithsonian Channel  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2021-11-22T17:00:25.000Z
YouTube Category:
Entertainment  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianchannel
Data Source:
Smithsonian Channel
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianchannel
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_N-uE7cbH1-I

How The Meaning of Thanksgiving Changes to Match the Times | Smithsonian Channel

Creator:
Smithsonian Channel  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2021-11-23T17:00:23.000Z
YouTube Category:
Entertainment  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianchannel
Data Source:
Smithsonian Channel
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianchannel
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_hxU3Rr1IwzA

(Re)Telling the American Story | Youth in Action

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Lectures
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2021-01-08T21:13:45.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_cJLRGcNsOwc

Alfred Tamarin photographs for We Have not Vanished

Creator:
Tamarin, Alfred H.  Search this
Extent:
425 Negatives (photographic) (black and white, 35mm, 120 film)
65 Photographic prints (black and white, 8x10)
Culture:
Passamaquoddy  Search this
Mashpee Wampanoag  Search this
Narragansett  Search this
Cayuga [Six Nations/Grand River (Brantford, Ontario)]  Search this
Mohawk [Akwesasne (St. Regis), Hogansburg, New York]  Search this
Seneca  Search this
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Nanticoke  Search this
Nanticoke [Six Nations/Grand River (Brantford, Ontario)]  Search this
Pamunkey  Search this
Chickahominy  Search this
Eastern Band of Cherokee  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Southeast  Search this
Mid-Atlantic  Search this
Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Copy prints
Date:
1970-1971
Summary:
The Alfred Tamarin photograph collection consists of negatives and contact prints shot by Tamarin in 1971 during research for his publication We Have not Vanished: Eastern Indians of the United States. Tamarin made photographs among the Passamaquoddy, Mashpee Wampanoag, Narragansett, Cayuga [Six Nations/Grand River (Brantford, Ontario)], Mohawk [Akwesasne (St. Regis), Hogansburg, New York], Seneca, Lenape (Delaware), Nanticoke, Pamunkey, Chickahominy and Eastern Band of Cherokee communities, capturing both events and craftspeople at work.
Scope and Contents:
The Alfred Tamarin photograph collection consists of negatives and contact prints shot by Tamarin during research for his publication We Have not Vanished: Eastern Indians of the United States. In addition to Tamarins own photographs there are also 8x10 black and white prints from other sources used in the same publication.

Series 1: Reasearch Negatives includes photographic negatives made by Tamarin which were shot on 35mm film and 120 (6x6) film and have accompanying contact sheets. Most of the negatives were shot in 1971 along the east coast of the United States in Maine, Rhode Island, New York, New Jersey, Maryland, Virginia as well as in Ontario, Canada and at the Heard Fair in Phoenix, Arizona. Tamarin made photographs among the Passamaquoddy, Mashpee Wampanoag, Narragansett, Cayuga [Six Nations/Grand River (Brantford, Ontario)], Mohawk [Akwesasne (St. Regis), Hogansburg, New York], Seneca, Lenape (Delaware), Nanticoke, Pamunkey, Chickahominy and Eastern Band of Cherokee communities, capturing both events and craftspeople at work.

Events of note photographed include--the Monroe Powwow sponsored by Lenape (Delaware) Chief Earl Two Bears and a Narragansett anniversary celebration. There are also several photographs featuring Chief Jake Thomas (Ha-da-jib-ghen-ta [Descending Cloud]/Jacob Ezra Thomas) and his daughter Donna Thomas during a mask making demonstration in Brantford, Ontario. At the time, Chief Thomas was a museum preparator at the Mohawk Indian Woodland Indian Cultural.

Series 2: Publication Prints includes 65 8x10 black and white photographic prints and copy prints. Subseries 2.1 includes 19 prints from Tamarin's negatives that can be found in Series 1. Subseries 2.2 includes copy prints requested from outside photographer and institutions for use in We Have Not Vanished. These include photographs from the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Florida News Bureau, Indian Arts and Crafts Board, Maine State Highway Commission, and National Anthropological Archives (Smithsonian Institution).
Arrangement:
Arranged in two series. Series 1: Research Negatives and Series 2: Publication Prints.
Biographical / Historical:
Alfred Tamarin (1913-1980) was born in New York to parents Abraham and Fannie. Tamarin worked in publicity and advertising for theatre and film until the 1960s. During that time he worked for the Theatre Guild, United Artists Corporation and was also a founder and vice president of In Flight Motion Pictures Inc. After marrying his second wife Shirley Glubok in 1968, Alfred began his second career as a photographer for a series of art books written by Shirley. Alfred also wrote several books himself including We Have not Vanished: Eastern Indians of the United States (1974). We Have not Vanished was illustrated with photographs taken by Alfred in 1970-1971 among several Native American communities along the East Coast of the United States. Other books written by the Tamarins include Ancient Indians of the Southwest (1975), The Art of the Plains Indians (1975), Voyaging to Cathay (1976), among many others. Shirley Glubok Tamarin donated Alfred's materials related to We Have not Vanished to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye foundation in 1985 following Alfred's death in 1980.
Provenance:
Gift of Shirley Glubok Tamarin, 1985.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.

Images in Subseries 2.2: Copy prints from other sources are not owned by the National Museum of the American Indian.
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Negatives
Copy prints
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Alfred Tamarin photographs for We Have not Vanished, image #, NMAI.AC.376; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.376
See more items in:
Alfred Tamarin photographs for We Have not Vanished
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4e3e6f8d7-c04d-46c3-989e-ccf7043e6b93
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-376

Research Negatives

Collection Creator:
Tamarin, Alfred H.  Search this
Extent:
425 Negatives (photographic) (black and white, 35mm, 120 film)
Container:
Box 1
Type:
Archival materials
Negatives
Negatives (photographic)
Date:
1970-1971
Scope and Contents:
Series 1 includes photographic negatives made by Tamarin which were shot on 35mm film and 120 (6x6) film and have accompanying contact sheets. Most of the negatives were shot in 1971 along the east coast of the United States in Maine, Rhode Island, New York, New Jersey, Maryland, Virginia as well as in Ontario, Canada and at the Heard Fair in Phoenix, Arizona. Tamarin made photographs among the Passamaquoddy, Mashpee Wampanoag, Narragansett, Cayuga [Six Nations/Grand River (Brantford, Ontario)], Mohawk [Akwesasne (St. Regis), Hogansburg, New York], Seneca, Lenape (Delaware), Nanticoke, Pamunkey, Chickahominy and Eastern Band of Cherokee communities, capturing both events and craftspeople at work.

Sheets 1-11 (35mm) include--photographs of Chief Jake Thomas (Ha-da-jib-ghen-ta [Descending Cloud]/Jacob Ezra Thomas) and his daughter Donna Thomas during a dance demonstration with Eugene Sky and a mask making demonstration in Brantford, Ontario; images of Mohawk [Awkwesasne] basket weaver Katie Thompson; views in Massachusetts at Mashpee and Martha's Vineyard and in Pleasant Point Maine on the Passamaquoddy Nation; Monroe Powwow in East Brunswick, New Jersey sponsosored by Chief Earl Two Bears.

Sheets 12-18 (120) include--Heard Indian Fair in Phoenix, Arizona; images of Nanticoke Chief Charles Cullen Clark; views on the Pamunkey and Chickahominy reservations in Virginia; views of Eastern Band of Cherokee headquarters in North Carolina.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.

Images in Subseries 2.2: Copy prints from other sources are not owned by the National Museum of the American Indian.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Alfred Tamarin photographs for We Have not Vanished, image #, NMAI.AC.376; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.376, Series 1
See more items in:
Alfred Tamarin photographs for We Have not Vanished
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4aa11cebc-0fdf-48b4-bf00-e9fb58e9a2ff
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-376-ref1

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Business records
Correspondence
Memorandums
Sound recordings
Audiocassettes
Contracts
Negatives
Video recordings
Slides (photographs)
Plans (drawings)
Videotapes
Audiotapes
Digital images
Notes
Photographic prints
Place:
Caribbean Area
Trinidad and Tobago
Puerto Rico
Date:
June 23-July 4, 1988
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1988 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 6 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: American Folklore Society Centennial

Series 3: Festival Music Stage

Series 4: Ingenuity and Tradition: The Common Wealth of Massachusetts

Series 5: Migration to Metropolitan Washington: Making a New Place Home

Series 6: Music from the Peoples of the Soviet Union
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1988 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Office of Folklife Programs and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
The 1988 Festival celebrated the centennial of the American Folklore Society, founded one hundred years earlier because of the need to document and study cultures that were seen as disappearing. Much of the Society's attention today, however, is engaged in the documentation and interpretation of emerging traditions and cultural expressions. Folklorists work in inner cities, conduct research on occupational groups, analyze processes of traditionalization and cooperate with other professionals in devising natural conservation and historical preservation strategies, which also promote cultural continuity, equity and integrity. Visitors to the 1988 Festival could learn about what it is that folklorists do and what impacts they have on the communities with which they work.

The other living exhibitions that made up this year's Festival also provided ample illustrations of this same view of the traditional. The Massachusetts program told a paradigmatic American story. Gay Head Wampanoag, Yankee settlers, Afro American migrants, and immigrants from Italy, Greece, Poland, the Cape Verde Islands, Puerto Rico, and Southeast Asia have not only preserved their traditions; through ingenious acts of individual and community creativity they have adapted them and endowed them with new meanings, as circumstances have changed. The Metropolitan Washington program pointed to the heightened consciousness of cultural issues associated with the migration experience. The program asked how immigrants from El Salvador, Ethiopia, China, Trinidad and Tobago, as well as domestic Anglo and Afro American groups historically migrating from nearby states, discard, reinvent, and reconstitute their traditions as they actively make a new place home. A varied contingent of musicians and performers from several republics of the Soviet Union demonstrated how truly ancient traditions nurtured in various pastoral, tribal, and religious environments have not merely survived but actually flourished in contemporary Soviet life. Also at the Festival were American musicians who, as part of a groundbreaking cultural exchange with the Soviet Union, would later travel to Moscow to participate in the International Folklore Festival in August 1988 and be reunited with the Soviet musicians participating in the Smithsonian's Festival.

The 1988 Festival took place for two five-day weeks (June 23-27 and June 30-July 4) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 10th Street and 14th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan).

The 1988 Program Book included schedules and participant lists for each program; the Program Book essays provided a larger context for the Festival presentations, extending beyond the traditions actually presented at the 1988 Festival.

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Office of Folklife Programs.

Office of Folklife Programs

Richard Kurin, Acting Director; Diana Parker, Festival Director; Anthony Seeger, Curator, Folkways Records; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist; Peter Seitel, Senior Folklorist; Marjorie Hunt, Phyllis M. May-Machunda, Heliana Portes de Roux, Frank Proschan, Nicholas R. Spitzer, Folklorists; Jeffrey Place, Assistant Archivist

National Park Service

William Penn Mott, Jr., Director; Manus J. Fish, Jr., Regional Director, National Capital Region
Shared Stewardship of Collections:
The Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage acknowledges and respects the right of artists, performers, Folklife Festival participants, community-based scholars, and knowledge-keepers to collaboratively steward representations of themselves and their intangible cultural heritage in media produced, curated, and distributed by the Center. Making this collection accessible to the public is an ongoing process grounded in the Center's commitment to connecting living people and cultures to the materials this collection represents. To view the Center's full shared stewardship policy, which defines our protocols for addressing collections-related inquiries and concerns, please visit https://folklife.si.edu/archives#shared-stewardship.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
World music  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folk art  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
Folk music  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Genre/Form:
Business records
Correspondence
Memorandums
Sound recordings
Audiocassettes
Contracts
Negatives
Video recordings
Slides (photographs)
Plans (drawings)
Videotapes
Audiotapes
Digital images
Notes
Photographic prints
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1988
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk59e9f3773-cd55-493f-94e0-c53650d914c4
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1988
Online Media:

Blind Joe Amos family photographs

Extent:
10 Photographs
Culture:
Mashpee Wampanoag  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Date:
circa 1856-1911
Summary:
This collection contains eight photographs (plus 2 copy negatives) depicting four generations of the Blind Joe Amos (1805-1869; Mashpee Wampanoag) family.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains eight photographs (and 2 copy negatives) depicting four generations of the Blind Joe Amos (Mashpee Wampanoag) family. The photographs include: "Blind Joe" Amos (1805-1869); Abigail Wickums Amos (1804-1853), the wife of Blind Joe Amos; Amos' daughter Rebecca C. Amos Hammond (1834-1922) and her eldest son Charles H. Hammond (1860-1849); Representative Watson F. Hammond (1837-1916), his daughter Ellen W. Hammond DeGrasse (1868-1948) and her husband Charles Henry DeGrasse (1869-1930) and their son Alfred DeGrasse (1890-1878).
Arrangement:
Arranged by catalog number. 
Biographical / Historical:
This collection documents four generations of a Mashpee Wampanoag family. Below are the biographies of the family, with individuals represented in the photographs in BOLD. The family were leaders in the community.

Reverend Joseph Babcock Amos, also known as "Blind Joe" or "Blind Joseph" Amos (1805-1869) , son of Jeremiah Amos (1784-1812) and Ophelia Amos, was born in 1805 in the Mashpee Wampanoag community on Mashpee Lake in Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Blind from an early age, Joseph memorized the bible and went on to become the first ordained Mashpee Wampanoag Indian minister. He served as the founder and pastor of the Wampanoag Baptist congregation at Gay Head on Martha's Vineyard. Around 1833, Amos married Abigail Wickums (1804-1853) and they had several children including Rebecca Cecorson Amos (1834-1922); Anna F. Amos Webquish (1834–1910); Isaac C. Amos (1840–1860); Sarah B. Amos (born 1843); Cordelia Amos (1845–1880). Reverend Amos died in 1869 in Edgartown, Mass.

Rebecca Cecorson Amos Hammond (1834-1922), daughter of Rev. Blind Joe Amos, was born on April 7, 1834 in Mashpee, Massachusetts. She married Watson F. Hammond (1837-1916) around 1860. In 1885, Hammond became the first Indian to serve in the Massachusetts State Legislature. Rebecca and Watson had several children including: Mary Elizabeth Hammond (1858–1925); Charles H. Hammond (1860–1949); Jeremiah Hammond (1863–1864); Laura Hammond (1866–1869); Ellen Hammond (1868–1948); Alice Hammond (1869–1893); Rebecca Hammond (born 1870); Lorenzo Tandy Hammond (1871–1959), also known as Chief Little Bear; Edith L Hammond (born 1873); and Caroline Frances Hammond (1875–1958). Rebecca Amos Hammond passed away in 1922 and Watson F. Hammond in 1916.

Charles H. Hammond (1860–1949), son of Rebecca Cecorson Amos Hammond and Watson F. Hammond (1837-1916), was born in 1873 in Mashpee, Massachusetts. He served as a Mashapee teacher and town clerk. He married Mary Elizabeth Pompey (1862–1930) on December 21, 1882. They had several children: Evelyn May Hammond (1883–1930); Charles Henry Hammond (1884–1955); Harold W. Hammond (1886–1888); Geraldine F. Hammond (1887–1967); Cynthia A. Hammond (1889–1945); Harry Clifton Hammond (1893–1893); and Mary Louisa Hammond (1894–1925).

Edith Hammond Payne (born 1873), daughter of Rebecca Cecorson Amos Hammond and Watson F. Hammond (1837-1916), was born in 1873 in Mashpee, Massachusetts. Edith married James M. Payne (born 1869) and they had two children, Mabel Rebecca Payne (born 1894) and Raymond D. Payne (1895-1896). Edith donated this collection of photographs to the Museum of the American Indian in 1955.

Ellen Hammond DeGrasse (1868-1948), daughter of Rebecca Cecorson Amos Hammond and Watson F. Hammond (1837-1916) was born in 1868 in Mashpee, Massachusetts. She married Charles DeGrasse (1869-1930) in 1889 and they had three children Alfred Leslie DeGrasse (1890-1878); Clinton F. DeGrasse (1891–1891); and Stowell Winthrop DeGrasse (1893–1906).

Alfred Leslie DeGrasse (1890-1878), son of Ellen Hammond DeGrasse and Watson F. Hammond was born in 1890 in Mashpee, Massachusetts. He enrolled in Carlisle Indian School in Pennsylvania in 1904, left for a period, reentered, and then graduated in 1911. In 1916 he married Mary Louisa Stanley (1887-1985) of Prince Edward Island, Canada. By 1917, they were living in Detroit, Michigan and had one child, Winifred Degrasse (born 1917). Alfred died in 1878 in Detroit.
Provenance:
Gift of Edith Payne, 1955.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Blind Joe Amos family photographs, image #, NMAI.AC.408; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.408
See more items in:
Blind Joe Amos family photographs
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4980ebf08-8d5b-4eb0-9913-0a9e3db020b2
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-408
Online Media:

Reverend Joseph Babcock Amos ("Blind Joe" Amos)

Extent:
2 Photographs
Culture:
Mashpee Wampanoag  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Scope and Contents:
A cased ambrotype of Reverend Joseph Babcock Amos, also known as "Blind Joe" or "Blind Joseph" Amos (1805-1869), photographed circa 1856-1865. This photograph is the left half of the case shared with a portrait of his wife Abigail Wickums Amos (image # P25300). The case was split in two at some unknown point in time.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Blind Joe Amos family photographs, image #, NMAI.AC.408; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.408, Item P25299 (N20351)
See more items in:
Blind Joe Amos family photographs
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv453c9118d-36e2-43d9-8c78-db0ee30b337c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-408-ref1

Rebecca C. Amos Hammond and Charles H. Hammond

Extent:
1 Photograph
Culture:
Mashpee Wampanoag  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Scope and Contents:
Tintype of Rebecca C. Amos Hammond (1834-1922) and her eldest son Charles H. Hammond (1860-1849) photographed circa 1885-1890. The tintype is housed in a leather case with purple velvet lining.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Blind Joe Amos family photographs, image #, NMAI.AC.408; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.408, Item P25298
See more items in:
Blind Joe Amos family photographs
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv421f58f42-21b9-4b40-9581-a0a19f3855b0
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-408-ref4

Rebecca C. Amos Hammond

Extent:
2 Photographs
Culture:
Mashpee Wampanoag  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Scope and Contents:
A cabinet card with an albumen print depicting Rebecca C. Amos Hammond (1834-1922) photographed by Putnam of Middleboro, Mass. circa 1880-1885.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Blind Joe Amos family photographs, image #, NMAI.AC.408; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.408, Item P23501 (N20348)
See more items in:
Blind Joe Amos family photographs
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4461f9201-29d1-42a5-9be6-a65324486577
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-408-ref5

Representative Watson F. Hammond

Extent:
1 Photograph
Culture:
Mashpee Wampanoag  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Scope and Contents:
A cabinet card with an albumen print depicting Representative Watson F. Hammond (1837-1916) photographed by Notman Photographic Co. of Boston, circa 1885-1890.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Blind Joe Amos family photographs, image #, NMAI.AC.408; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.408, Item P23502
See more items in:
Blind Joe Amos family photographs
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4dcdceb2e-50f2-4d5a-b756-90b052b022fc
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-408-ref6

Alfred DeGrasse

Extent:
1 Photograph
Culture:
Mashpee Wampanoag  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Scope and Contents:
A gelatin silver photograph depicting Alfred DeGrasse (1890-1878) in his Carlisle Indian School uniform, circa 1904. Alfred is the son of Ellen W. Hammond DeGrasse (1868-1948) and Charles Henry DeGrasse (1869-1930). He is the grandson of Representative Watson F. Hammond (1837-1916) and Rebecca C. Amos Hammond (1834-1922) and the great-grandson of Blind Joe Amos (1805-1869) and Abigail Wickums Amos (1804-1853).
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Blind Joe Amos family photographs, image #, NMAI.AC.408; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.408, Item P23503
See more items in:
Blind Joe Amos family photographs
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4a2da83e2-9eb9-4919-8f69-98d2072fd535
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-408-ref7

Alfred DeGrasse, Ellen W. Hammond DeGrasse, and Charles Henry DeGrasse

Extent:
1 Photograph
Culture:
Mashpee Wampanoag  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Scope and Contents:
Gelatin silver photograph circa 1907-1911 depicting from left to right: Alfred DeGrasse (1890-1878), his mother Ellen W. Hammond DeGrasse (1868-1948) and his father Charles Henry DeGrasse (1869-1930).
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Blind Joe Amos family photographs, image #, NMAI.AC.408; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.408, Item P23504
See more items in:
Blind Joe Amos family photographs
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv49a14671d-dbf6-4dfe-9703-e0e8582d7311
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-408-ref8

Healing through Native Creativity: Artist Conversation with Berta Welch

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2021-08-11T20:06:43.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_5Bl-UUFcagQ

Fish hook

Culture/People:
Gay Head Wampanoag  Search this
Collector:
Dr. Frank G. Speck (Frank Gouldsmith Speck/F.G. Speck/FGS), Non-Indian, 1881-1950  Search this
Seller:
Dr. Frank G. Speck (Frank Gouldsmith Speck/F.G. Speck/FGS), Non-Indian, 1881-1950  Search this
Object Name:
Fish hook
Media/Materials:
Iron fish hooks, twine/string
Techniques:
Wrapped
Object Type:
Hunting/Fishing/Warfare
Place:
Gay Head; Dukes County; Massachusetts; USA
Island Name:
Martha's Vineyard
Catalog Number:
16/1272
Barcode:
161272.000
See related items:
Gay Head Wampanoag
Hunting/Fishing/Warfare
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws61072743b-aad6-47a5-9ec4-46da7e32c957
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_172949
Online Media:

Pestle

Culture/People:
Wampanoag  Search this
Previous owner:
Margaret Sturges Hall, Non-Indian  Search this
Seller:
Margaret Sturges Hall, Non-Indian  Search this
MAI agent:
George Gustav Heye (GGH), Non-Indian, 1874-1957  Search this
Object Name:
Pestle
Media/Materials:
Wood, stone
Techniques:
Carved
Object Type:
Food Gathering and Preparation
Place:
North Pembroke; Plymouth County; Massachusetts; USA
Catalog Number:
20/2594
Barcode:
202594.000
See related items:
Wampanoag
Food Gathering and Preparation
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws6260ad54a-fce7-40d6-b5bc-856d60f281e5
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_216455
Online Media:

Frederick Starr negatives and lantern slides

Creator:
Starr, Frederick, 1859-1933  Search this
Photographer:
Lang, Charles B.  Search this
Grabic, Louis  Search this
Extent:
152 Lantern slides
3344 Negatives (photographic)
Culture:
Zoque  Search this
San Felipe Pueblo  Search this
Mazatec [Huautla]  Search this
Zapotec  Search this
Maya  Search this
Wampanoag  Search this
Salish (Flathead)  Search this
Mazahua  Search this
Ute  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Numakiki (Mandan)  Search this
Tzotzil Maya  Search this
Taos Pueblo  Search this
Tzeltal Maya  Search this
Sac and Fox (Sauk & Fox)  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
Triqui (Trique) [San Joan Copala]  Search this
Shuar  Search this
Niimíipuu (Nez Perce)  Search this
Chol Maya  Search this
Totonac  Search this
Osage  Search this
Chaticks Si Chaticks (Pawnee)  Search this
Tonkawa  Search this
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Tlingit  Search this
Mixe  Search this
Chinantec  Search this
Mixtec  Search this
Potawatomi  Search this
Chibcha  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Mehináku (Mehinacu)  Search this
Salish (Flathead)  Search this
Apache  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Ponca  Search this
Menominee (Menomini)  Search this
Cahuilla  Search this
Haida  Search this
Karajá (Caraja)  Search this
Cherokee  Search this
Sahnish (Arikara)  Search this
Assiniboine (Stoney)  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Caddo  Search this
Kwakwaka'wakw (Kwakiutl)  Search this
Cochiti Pueblo  Search this
Teotihuacán (archaeological culture)  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Purepecha (Tarasco)  Search this
Inunaina (Arapaho)  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Macushi (Macusi)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Lantern slides
Negatives (photographic)
Negatives
Place:
Colombia
Washington
West Virginia
Kansas
Kentucky
New Mexico
Brazil
Ecuador
Missouri
Wisconsin
Oklahoma
Ohio
New York
Georgia
Mexico
Iowa
Arkansas
Illinois
Pennsylvania
Alaska
Date:
1894-1910
Summary:
The collection includes materials from cultures in the United States, Mexico, Brazil, Guatemala, Colombia, Ecuador, and Guiana: Acoma Pueblo, Apache, Arapaho, Arikara, Assiniboine, Caddo, Cahuilla, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chinantec, Chippewa (Ojibwa), Choco, Chol, Chontal, Cochiti Pueblo, Crow, Cuicatec, Eskimo, Flathead, Haida, Hopi, Huastec, Huave, Iowa, Iroquois, Isleta, Karaja, Kwakiutl, Laguna Pueblo, Macusi, Mandan, Maya, Mazahua, Mazatec, Mehinaku, Menomini, Mixe, Mixtec, Navajo, Nez Perce, Osage, Otomi, Ottawa, Pawnee, Pima, Ponca, Potawatomi, Salish, San Blas, San Felipe Pueblo, Sauk & Fox, Shuar, Sioux, Taos Pueblo, Tarasco, Teotihuacan, Tepehua, Tlaxcala, Tlingit, Tonkawa, Totonac, Triqui, Tzental, Tzotzil, Ute, Wampanoag, Zapotec, Zoque, Zuni.
Arrangement note:
Collection arranged by item number.
Biographical/Historical note:
Frederick Starr was born in Auburn, New York, on September 2, 1858. He received a Ph.D. in biology in 1884 at Coe College, where he was later appointed professor of biology. Starr did postgraduate work in anthropology at Yale. In 1889 he was appointed head of Ethnology at the American Museum of Natural History, and in 1892 he was chosen by William Harper to organize the Anthropology Department at the new University of Chicago. Starr remained at the University until his retirement in 1923. Besides his field studies with various Indian tribes in the United States, Starr traveled to Mexico, Brazil, Colombia, Guatemala, Ecuador, Guiana, Japan, the Philippines, and Africa. He died in Tokyo, Japan, on August 14, 1933. Starr was the author of several books and scholarly articles.
General note:
Starr hired professional photographers Charles B. Lang and Louis Grabic to accompany him on his field trips. One lantern slide of Moses Ladd (Menomini) was taken by William H. Jackson.
Provenance:
Dr. Frederick Starr, Purchased, circa 1929
Restrictions:
Access restricted. Researchers should contact the staff of the NMAI Archives for an appointment to access the collection.
Topic:
Indians of South America -- Brazil  Search this
Indians of Mexico  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest  Search this
Indians of South America -- Colombia  Search this
Indians of North America -- Alaska  Search this
Indians of North America -- Basin  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Indians of Central America -- Guatemala  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Midwest  Search this
Indians of South America -- Ecuador  Search this
Indians of South America -- Guiana  Search this
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Lantern slides
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.052
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv40602e9f6-8984-4da6-a139-bd97c27fa824
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-052

MS 1522 Notes on names, and linguistic notes on Siouan, Athapascan, Caddoan, Iroquoian, and Muskhogean tribes

Collector:
Haggadorn, Francis T.  Search this
Extent:
256 Pages
Culture:
Muskogee (Creek)  Search this
Chippewa  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Niitsitapii (Blackfoot/Blackfeet)  Search this
Pamlico  Search this
Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan)  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Eskimos  Search this
Massachusett  Search this
Wichita  Search this
Apache  Search this
Shawnee  Search this
Numakiki (Mandan)  Search this
Sahnish (Arikara)  Search this
Cree  Search this
Mi'kmaq (Micmac)  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Menominee (Menomini)  Search this
Unangan (Aleut)  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Passamaquoddy  Search this
Miami  Search this
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Caddo  Search this
Maidu  Search this
Wampanoag  Search this
Woccon  Search this
Mohegan  Search this
Natick  Search this
Openango  Search this
Pennacook  Search this
Denésoliné (Chipewyan)  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
ca. 1900
Scope and Contents:
Contents: Dakota or Sioux vocabulary, approximately 27 pages. (notebook) Various Languages- brief vocabularies. 22 pages (copy book) Wampanoag vocabulary 5 pages loose. Sioux vocabulary 3 pages. Blackfoot vocabulary 3 pages. Wichita vocabulary 2 pages. Miscellaneous vocabulary 1 page (name not given) Arikara vocabulary 1 page. Apache vocabulary 8 pages. Aleut (Aleouteans) vocabulary 1 page. Iroquois vocabulary 82 pages. Caddo vocabulary 4 pages. Creek vocabulary 2 slips. Mandan vocabulary 4 pages. Passamaquoddy or Openango vocabulary 3 pages. Micmac vocabulary 11 pages. Pamlico (North Carolina) vocabulary 2 pages. Wocon vocabulary 4 pages. Natick vocabulary 1 page. Pennacook vocabulary 1 page. Mohegan vocabulary 1 page. Number 27. Miami, Comanche and Cushna (Maidu) vocabulary 11 pages. Number 28-a Cuchan, Chippewa of St Marys, Chippewa of Traverse Bay, vocabulary 19 pages. Number 28-b Cree (Knisteneaux) Chippewa of Michigan, Chepewyan approximately 17 pages, 7 pages that are full. Creek and Seminole vocabulary 4 pages (brief notations) Creek and Seminole vocabulary 14 pages. Number 31. Chippewa (Ojibwa or Saulteux) vocabulary Approximately 17 pages. Menominee, Shawnee, and Delaware vocabularies Approximately 12 pages. Notes on the Eskimo, Iroquois, Delaware (Lenape), and Massachuset; notes on the languages of Florida, Cherokee and Sioux languages.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1522
Topic:
Siouan Indians  Search this
Vocabularies  Search this
Algonquian Indians  Search this
Athapascan Indians  Search this
Caddoan Indians  Search this
Iroquoian Indians  Search this
Muskogean Indians  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Algonquin  Search this
Lenape  Search this
Mi'kmaq  Search this
Penacook  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Athapaskan  Search this
Athabaskan  Search this
Blackfeet  Search this
Massachusett  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 1522, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1522
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3a09e9c1a-9a66-4ee1-acaa-d6fa16d57e37
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1522

Massachusetts Fieldwork: Wampanoag Clambake

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Massachusetts Program 1988 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Field worker:
Neustadt, Kathy, 1951-  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette, analog)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Wampanoag  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Massachusetts
United States
Gay Head (Mass.)
Date:
1987 June 18
Contents:
NANEPASHEMET AND BILL BENNETT, OF THE WAMPANOAG SECTION STAFF 1 OF 2
Local Numbers:
FP-1988-CT-0067
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Gay Head (Mass.), United States, Massachusetts, June 18, 1987.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
American Indian  Search this
Clambakes  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1988, Item FP-1988-CT-0067
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: Ingenuity and Tradition: The Common Wealth of Massachusetts / 4.1: Fieldwork
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5b2c55e90-d9ba-44dc-83dc-274a8e8b0bfa
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1988-ref1071

Massachusetts Fieldwork: Wampanoag Clambake

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Massachusetts Program 1988 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Field worker:
Neustadt, Kathy, 1951-  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette, analog)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Wampanoag  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Massachusetts
United States
Gay Head (Mass.)
Date:
1987 June 18
Contents:
NANEPASHEMET AND BILL BENNETT, OF THE WAMPANOAG SECTION STAFF 2 OF 2
Local Numbers:
FP-1988-CT-0068
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Gay Head (Mass.), United States, Massachusetts, June 18, 1987.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
American Indian  Search this
Clambakes  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1988, Item FP-1988-CT-0068
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: Ingenuity and Tradition: The Common Wealth of Massachusetts / 4.1: Fieldwork
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk54e41fb8e-e97b-4547-a93c-b32d5ea29705
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1988-ref1072

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