Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
244 documents - page 1 of 13

MS 2372 Garrick Mallery Collection on Sign Language and Pictography

Creator:
Mallery, Garrick, 1831-1894  Search this
Extent:
41.29 Linear feet (22 boxes, 29 folders, 3 mounted drawings, and 3 rolled items)
Note:
Some materials, especially in series 3, are stored in the NAA artwork collection.
Culture:
Arctic peoples  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pictographs
Place:
Oceania
Date:
1849-1902
bulk 1870-1895
Summary:
Garrick Mallery (1831-1894) was an ethnologist with the Bureau of American Ethnology who focused primarily on Native American sign language and pictography. This collection reflects Mallery's research interests and methods. Much of the collection is comprised of correspondence and notes relating to sign language and pictography and is organized chiefly by either the cultural or geographic region to which the material belongs. Bound volumes of several of his publications are included, along with annotated draft copies from collaborators. In the case of Mallery's work on pictography, the collection includes several oversize items including original works and reproductions.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains Garrick Mallery's research and writings as a BAE ethnologist and is largely comprised of correspondence and preparatory materials for publications on Native American sign language and pictography. The geographic scope of the material is chiefly the present-day United States and Canada, though other areas of the world are represented less comprehensively. Correspondence and research notes include verbal descriptions of signs, sometimes with illustrations included. Bound volumes of Mallery's publications are included, along with annotations from collaborators. In addition, this collection includes notecards, drawings, illustrations, photographs, articles, and art objects. Art objects (mostly oversize) deal chiefly with Dakota winter counts and other artifacts.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged into 3 series: 1) Research Notes, undated; 2) Materials on Sign Language, 1843-1849, 1873-1894; 3) Materials on Pictographs and Petroglyphs, 1849-1902, undated
Biographical Note:
Garrick Mallery (1831-1894) was born in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania and practiced law in Philadelphia from 1853 until the outbreak of the American Civil War. While serving in the army, he became interested in Native American sign language and pictography, perhaps while performing his duties in frontier areas. After retiring from the military in 1879, Mallery was appointed to the newly created Bureau of American Ethnology as one of its first ethnologists. In his work with the Bureau, Mallery pioneered the study of sign language and pictographs, examining them as a universal human phenomenon with a direct link to spoken language.

In his work, Mallery collected and examined sign language vocabulary from Native American groups throughout the U.S. and Canada and regularly solicited contributions from collaborators. He also related his findings to examples from the wider world, comparing the formation of Native American signs to those in other areas by hearing individuals and by the deaf. Mallery completed several publications on the topic throughout the 1880s, notably Introduction to the Study of Sign language Among the North American Indians (1880), A Collection of Gesture- Signs and Signals of the North American Indians (1880), and "Sign-language among North American Indians Compared with that Among other People and Deaf-mutes," which appeared in the BAE 1st Annual Report (1881).

While most widely known for his work with sign language, Mallery also undertook extensive research into Native American pictography. Like his work with sign language, he both conducted original research and solicited assistance from collaborators. He was especially interested in the representational images in Dakota winter counts and petroglyphs in the United States and throughout the world.

Sources Consulted

Fletcher, Robert. "Garrick Mallery, President of the Philosophical Society of Washington, in 1888." In Brief Memoirs of Colonel Garrick Mallery, U.S.A., Who Died October 24, 1894, 3-8. Washington: Judd & Detweiler, 1895.

Fletcher, Robert. "Colonel Garrick Mallery, U.S.A." American Anthropologist 8, no. 2 (1895): 79-80.

Chronology

1831 -- Born in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, on April 25

1850 -- Graduates Yale College

1853 -- Earns LL. B. from the University of Pennsylvania Admitted to the Pennsylvania bar

1853-1861 -- Practices law in Philadelphia

1861 -- Enters the volunteer army of the United States

1862 -- Severely wounded in the battle of Peach Orchard, Virginia Captured and held prisoner at Libby prison in Richmond, Virginia

1866 -- Completes service with volunteer army of the United States Accepts commission in regular army of the United States

1870 -- Marries Helen W. Wyckoff

1879 -- Retires from the United States army due to disability Appointed to the Bureau of American Ethnology

1880 -- Publishes Introduction to the Study of Sign-Language Among the North American Indians as Illustrating the Gesture-Speech of Mankind and A Collection of Gesture-Signs and Signals of the North American Indians With Some Comparisons

1881 -- Publishes "Sign Language Among North American Indians, Compared with that Among Other Peoples and Deaf-Mutes"

1894 -- Dies after a short illness in Washington, D.C., on October 24
Related Materials:
See MS 2322 A collection of gesture-signs and signals of the North American Indians for more of Garrick Mallery's work on sign language.
Provenance:
MS 2372 was transferred from the Bureau of Ethnology Archives to the Smithsonian Office of Anthropology Archives with the merger of the BAE and the Department of Anthropology of the National Museum of Natural History in 1965. The Smithsonian Office of Anthropology Archives was renamed the National Anthropological Archives in 1968.
Restrictions:
Manuscript 2372 is open for research.

Access to Manuscript 2372 requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Sign language  Search this
Picture-writing  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Anthropology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Pictographs
Citation:
Manuscript 2372, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2372
See more items in:
MS 2372 Garrick Mallery Collection on Sign Language and Pictography
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw367638eb8-dce6-4d4e-bea5-2204e49134ef
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2372
Online Media:

Takzi drawings

Creator:
Takzi, b. ca. 1862  Search this
Collector:
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Collection Creator:
Mallery, Garrick, 1831-1894  Search this
Extent:
5 Drawings (graphite, crayon, and ink on cardboard and paper, 11 x 29 cm.-27 x 36 cm.)
Container:
Box 11
Culture:
Apache  Search this
Plains Apache  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Drawings
Ledger drawings
Date:
1884
Scope and Contents:
Four drawings on cardboard with scenes of hunting, warfare, and mounted warriors, plus one leaf with partial copy of a drawing on each side, probably produced for publication (NAA INV 08746400).

One of the drawings was removed from a brittle substrate; see conservation files for more information.

NAA INV 08746400 is a copy of NAA INV 08742200 done by an anonymous copyist and is filed with a set of otherwise unidentified American Indian drawings also in MS 2372, Box 11. The identification of this drawing as a copy of a drawing by Takzi was made by Candace Greene.
Biographical / Historical:
Albert S. Gatschet was educated in his native Switzerland and in Germany (University of Bern; University of Berlin, Ph.D., 1892). Early in his career he pursued antiquarian research in European museums and wrote scientific articles. Among his projects was the study of the etymology of place names in Switzerland. After coming to the United States in 1869, he worked on the American Indian vocabularies collected by Oscar Loew of the United State Geographical Survey West of the 100th Meridian (Wheeler Survey); and eventually he was employed as an ethnologist with the United States Geographical and Geological Survey of the Rocky Mountain Regions (Powell Survey). He joined the staff of the Bureau of American Ethnology when it was founded in 1879 and continued there until he retired in 1905.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS.2372, Box 11
Place:
United States -- Indian Territory -- Anadarko.
United States -- Oklahoma -- Anadarko.
Album Information:
MS 2372-11 Takzi-000
Collection Restrictions:
Manuscript 2372 is open for research.

Access to Manuscript 2372 requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Ledger drawings
Collection Citation:
Manuscript 2372, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
MS 2372 Garrick Mallery Collection on Sign Language and Pictography
MS 2372 Garrick Mallery Collection on Sign Language and Pictography / Series 3: Materials on Pictographs and Petroglyphs / 3.3: Correspondence, drawings, and photographs filed by Native American tribe or subject / Unidentified Drawing and Picture Writing / 5 Drawings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw34c13ae7b-1956-453c-a64f-49dc81be5bd9
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-ms2372-ref1338

Robert Rankin papers

Creator:
Rankin, Robert Louis, 1939-  Search this
Extent:
31.77 Linear feet (55 boxes, 1 map folder)
196 Sound recordings
Culture:
Quapaw Indians  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Field notes
Date:
1886, 1914, 1956-2011
Summary:
The Robert Rankin papers, 1886, 1914, 1956-2011, document his field work, research, and professional activities, primarily in relation to his work studying American Indian languages. Rankin was professor of linguistics at the University of Kansas from 1969 until his retirement in 2005. The collection consists of sound recordings, field notebooks, vocabulary lists and bibliographies, dictionaries, research files, slip files, word lists, correspondence, ephemera, notes, readings and reprints, writings, drafts, and teaching materials. This includes materials from Rankin's work with the last native speakers of the Quapaw and Kaw (Kansa, Kanza) languages and subsequent research, writings, and collaborations with tribes and fellow linguists.
Scope and Contents:
The Robert Rankin papers, 1886, 1914, 1956-2011, document his field work, research, and professional activities, primarily in relation to his work studying American Indian languages. The collection includes sound recordings, field notebooks, vocabulary lists and bibliographies, dictionaries, research files, slip files, word lists, correspondence, ephemera, notes, readings and reprints, writings, drafts, and teaching materials.

The 196 sound recordings include material from Rankin's work with the last native speakers of both the Quapaw and Kaw (Kansa, Kanza) languages. The collection includes extensive research on these languages along with research on other facets of the Siouan language family. Rankin's close collaboration with colleagues and tribes is well documented, especially his work with linguists John E. Koontz and W.L. Ballard, as well as his contributions to language documentation efforts including the Handbook of North American Indians, the Annotated Dictionary of Kaw (Kanza), and the Comparative Siouan Dictionary. The collection also includes sound recordings and notes from Rankin's study of the Romanian language as part of his graduate study.
Arrangement:
The Robert Rankin papers are arranged in 9 series: Series 1. Quapaw, 1972-1991, undated; Series 2. Kaw (Kansa, Kanza), circa 1970-2011, undated; Series 3. Field notebooks, 1981-1983, 1995, undated; Series 4. Subject and correspondence files, 1886, 1956-2007, undated; Series 5. Conferences and professional associations, 1974-2010; Series 6. Writings, 1975-2010, undated; Series 7. Teaching and academic files, 1973-2006, undated; Series 8. Romanian study, 1914, 1962-1972, undated; Series 9. Sound recordings, 1963-1987, undated.
Biographical Note:
Chronology

1939 -- Born January 17

1960 -- Graduated from Emory University with a B.A. in Romance Languages

1966-1968 -- Fulbright Fellowship in Romania researching Romanian dialects

1968 -- M.A. in Linguistics, University of Chicago

1969 -- Started at the University of Kansas as an Acting Assistant Professor of Linguistics

1972 -- Ph.D. in Linguistics, University of Chicago

1972 -- Became an Assistant Professor of Linguistics at the University of Kansas

1973 -- Language work with the Quapaw

1973-1974 -- Began work with the Kaw (Kansa, Kanza) language that continued for the rest of his life

1986 -- Became a Professor of Linguistics at the University of Kansas

2005 -- Retired from the University of Kansas

2014 -- Died on February 24

Robert Rankin was a professor of linguistics at the University of Kansas who spent the majority of his career working with American Indian languages in the Siouan language family. He began his career studying romance languages as part of his undergraduate and graduate work and completed a Fulbright Fellowship in Romania (1966-1968) examining regional linguistic differences. He began teaching at the University of Kansas in 1969 and was introducted to the Choctaw language in Summer 1972 while teaching a field methods course. He became fascinated with American Indian languages and started working with the remaining native speakers of the Quapaw tribe in early 1973. When there were no more native speakers left, he started working with the Kaw (Kansa, Kanza) language. When he began this research in 1973-1974, there were only four fluent speakers of Kaw (Kansa, Kanza) left. He continued studying the language until well after his retirement from the University of Kansas in 2005. Rankin died on February 24, 2014 in Kansas City, MO.

Sources consulted: "Robert L. Rankin obituary," Lawrence Journal-World, March 1-5, 2014 http://obituaries.ljworld.com/obituaries/ljworld/obituary.aspx?pid=169905179
Provenance:
This collection was transferred to the National Anthropological Archives by Robert Rankin's wife, Carolyn Rankin, in 2014.
Restrictions:
The Robert Rankin papers are open for research.

Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.

Computer disks are currently restricted due to preservation concerns.

Access to the Robert Rankin papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Southern states  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Kansa Indians  Search this
Kansa language  Search this
Yuchi language  Search this
Yuchi Indians  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Field notes
Citation:
Robert Rankin papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2014-16
See more items in:
Robert Rankin papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3257614ac-03d5-427a-a906-23acf35a60c6
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2014-16

Records Relating to State Names, Province Names, and Other Geographical Names

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Haas, Mary R. (Mary Rosamond), 1910-1996  Search this
Siebert, Frank T. (Frank Thomas), 1912-1998  Search this
Voegelin, C. F. (Charles Frederick), 1906-1986  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
20 Boxes
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Manuscripts
Place:
California
Massachusetts
Missouri
Québec (Province)
Taiwan
Truk Lagoon (Micronesia)
Central America
South America
West Indies
United States
Canada
Date:
1938-1959
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Notes and writings on special linguistic studies series primarily contains files on the origin of state names which Harrington compiled during a study spanning the years 1938 to 1959. It also encompasses some material on areas outside the United States, as well as a portion of the detailed records on California placenames which Harrington accumulated throughout his career and organized in a more systematic fashion in 1947 and again during his retirement years.

The first major section of material on geographic names includes linguistic, historical, and ethnological notes related to each individual state and to certain possessions or protectorates of the United States. A less extensive Canadian section forms part of this group. The origin of a small number of placenames is included for some of the states and Canada.

A file of writings includes drafts and related materials for seven proposed papers based on these data. They vary in length from a paragraph or two on specific states to typescripts presenting more comprehensive treatments of names in the United States and Canada.

Additional sections contain more extensive notes and drafts relating to the names "California," "Massachusetts," "Missouri," and "Quebec." Detailed surveys of placenames in southern California are also filed here.

There is another group of records relating to Central and South America and to West Indian island names. Two very brief but unpublished articles were prepared on the names "Formosa" and "Truk."

The last section is a file of short articles on placenames and geographical terminology. It also includes reviews of several books and articles which Harrington read in conjunction with this study.
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington's attention was drawn to the subject of state names when, in his capacity as ethnologist at the Bureau of American Ethnology, he was called upon to respond to many inquiries regarding the origin of names given to various states. By the summer of 1938, Harrington had plans to undertake a comprehensive study of all the state names. In July he began the intermittent collection of relevant data during interviews with colleagues at the B.A.E. and with several American Indians who were employed in Washington, D.C. In a letter of January 22, 1939, to his nephew Arthur, Harrington stated that his superiors wanted him "to prepare a book on the meaning of state names." He reported, further, that he had already worked out the etymologies of several names. That Spring, he was authorized by bureau chief Matthew W. Stirling to travel to California, Oregon, Idaho, Arizona, Mexico, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Wisconsin for the purpose of completing a publication on state names. Harrington obtained relevant linguistic data from C. F. Voegelin in Washington, D.C., just before leaving for the field, and from Leonard Bloomfield en route. From June through October of 1939, he collected information from native speakers of Papago, Delaware, Shawnee, Caddo, Lakota, Chippewa, and Navaho.

Later in 1939, Harrington compiled primary data regarding Canadian provinces during fieldwork with Cree, Sarsi, and Chippewan speakers in Alberta and British Columbia. In April of 1940 he requested permission to make another trip to Oklahoma. On this occasion he met with linguists Mary R. Haas, Carl Voegelin, and Frank T. Siebert, Jr., and a number of informants. A trip to study the Aleut language in Unalaska in 1941 encompassed work on the name "Alaska." Then, in 1949, 1950, and 1951, Harrington made trips to Maine, Oklahoma, and the Yucatan, obtaining data on the names "Massachusetts" and "Missouri" and the state names of Mexico.

Information which Harrington ultimately drew together into discrete files on California placenames was gleaned from numerous native speakers during fieldwork throughout the 1930s and 1940s and from the mid-to-Iate 1950s. Most of the data he gathered was on the Chumash and Uto-Aztecan languages.

Beginning in 1938, Harrington also initiated an extensive correspondence regarding the etymology and historical background of state names of both Indian and non-Indian origin. In the 1940s and early 1950s he broadened the scope of this exchange of letters to include his search for information on Canada, Mexico, and the U.S. protectorates.

During his emeritus years the focus of Harrington's correspondence was on California placenames, particularly those in the Los Angeles area. His files indicate that he wrote over two hundred letters to such sources of information as Chambers of Commerce, postmasters, and old-time California residents, searching out the location of numerous places and the origin of their names.

From 1939 through his retirement years, Harrington envisioned the publication of a number of short articles and longer papers on various aspects of his study of geographic names. However, only three appeared in print: "The Origin of Our State Names" appeared in the Journal of the Washington Academy of Sciences in 1944; "Peculiarly Difficult Names in North and South America" was published in the July 1945 issue of Acta Americana; and "Our State Names" was included in the Smithsonian Report for 1954, Publication 4205, in 1955.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Names, Geographical  Search this
Toponymy  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 8.14
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw34bc03b4a-2130-4bf0-8345-e91b28bf1d69
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15501
Online Media:

Duwamish

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
0.63 Linear feet ((2 boxes))
Culture:
Duwamish (Dwamish)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Lecture notes
Maps
Place:
King County (Wash.)
Date:
1910
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Alaska/Northwest Coast series contains Harrington's Duwamish research. The materials primarily consist of field notes and lecture notes.

The field notes consist of small slips and 8" x 10" sheets on which Harrington recorded notes on phonetics, vocabulary, and some short sentences. A general vocabulary section--mostly nouns--covers geographical terms, animal names, material culture objects, and terms for age, sex, and religion. Each Duwamish (Duw.) word is followed by the English translation; a few comparisons are given in Snohomish and Clallam. There are larger vocabulary sections dealing with tribenames and placenames. The tribenames are Duwamish terms referring to the neighboring tribes of Puget Sound and the Olympic Peninsula--mostly other Salish groups. The placename category includes many etymologies as well as sketch maps and references to a "Big map" of Seattle Harbor.

Miscellaneous packets of field notes include biographical information on the Duwamish speakers he worked with and others, a partial bibliography, and notes labeled "< Meany." The latter were apparently personal communications from a professor at the university.

Harrington's lecture notes, evidently used for the course on "The Indians of the Northwest," contain a good deal of original field data. The notes, which were found in great disarray; have been arranged to follow fourteen categories outlined by Harrington on a heading sheet. The sections on history, potlatches, and material culture, in particular, include numerous excerpts from articles by Arthur A. Denny, Myron Eels, and Joseph A. Costello. Much of this secondary source data was checked over with an unspecified person, presumably William Rogers. His comments, labeled "Duw.," frequently appear at the bottom of a page. Notes on "The Indian placenames of King County," consist entirely of original data on places in the vicinity of Lake Washington, White River, and Cedar River. As in the corresponding vocabulary section, etymologies and sketch maps are included.
Biographical / Historical:
Johnn P. Harrington investigated the language and culture of the Duwamish (currently grouped with speakers of other Puget Sound Salish dialects as "Lushootseed") during the period June 17 to August 15, 1910 while residing in Seattle, Washington. He had come there to teach courses on "The Indians of the Northwest" and "The Science of Language" at the University of Washington summer school and to give a series of six popular lectures on "The Siberian Origin of the American Indian" under the auspices of the American Institute of Archaeology.

He studied the Duwamish language with Chief William Rogers at the reservation at Suquamish each weekend during the session. After its close, he made trips with Rogers and a man named Moore to Seattle and Renton ("homeland of the Duwamish") to record placenames. His interpreter in the work was Edward Percival.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Puget Sound Salish languages  Search this
Snohomish language  Search this
Clallam language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Lecture notes
Maps
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 1.6
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 1: Native American History, Language, and Culture of Alaska and the Northwest Coast
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3457aa78d-ee93-4b1b-af72-c4dbcee95cd1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref12636

Chimakim/Clallam/Makah/Quileute

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Names:
Swan, James Gilchrist  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1.04 Linear feet (3 boxes)
Culture:
Chimakum  Search this
Klallam (Clallam)  Search this
Makah  Search this
Quileute  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Date:
1942
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Alaska/Northwest Coast series contains Harrington's research on Chimakum, Clallam, Makah, and Quileute. The bulk of the notes consist of a comparative vocabulary for the four languages. A minimal number of equivalences in Quinault and Snohomish also appear. Other kinds of vocabulary were recorded, but the emphasis was placed on obtaining placenames. There are also notes containing observations by Harrington on the phonetics of the languages, as well as charts of morphemes he devised for Clallam, Makah, and Quileute. These are supplemented by notes on the relationships of the languages and on Edward Sapir and Morris Swadesh's (1939) Nootka Texts. In addition, Harrington collected biographical data on those he worked with in the field and James G. Swan. Swan was a collaborator for the Smithsonian Institution and a collector for the United States National Museum who lived at Shoalwater Bay and Port Townsend. Of ethnographic interest are comments on excerpts from T. T. Waterman's (1920) "The Whaling Equipment of the Makah Indians." A flood legend, historical figures, and events of significance to Washington tribes are mentioned. Other materials in these files include a miscellany of notes Harrington made to himself during his work in northwestern Washington and annotated extracts from Manuel J. Andrade's (1931) "Quileute Texts" and E. S. Curtis' (1911, 1913) The North American Indian.
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington conducted fieldwork in April 1942 in Clallam, Jefferson, and Kitsap Counties in northwestern Washington. His main linguistic sources were Louise Adams Butler Webster Buttner (Louise, Lou.); her daughter-in-law, Emily Webster (Emily, Eml., or rarely Em.); Louise's grandson, Cy Webster (Cy); Joe Sly (Sly); and Mrs. Washington Howeattle.

Louise Buttner, a long-time resident of the Little Boston Reservation near Port Gamble, spoke Chimakum, Clallam, some Makah, and Chinook jargon. She and her brother, George Adams, were probably the same people Boas worked with to elicit Chimakum in 1890.

Emily Webster was married to Louise's son, James Webster, Jr. Her native language was Clallam, but she also spoke Chimakum and Makah.

Cy was the son of James Webster, Jr., although it is not clear if Emily was his mother. His grandmother, Louise, raised him and is probably the main source of his knowledge of Chimakum. In addition to this language, he spoke Clallam and had some knowledge of Makah and Quileute.

Joe Sly was the son of a Clallam father and a Makah mother. In 1942 he lived at Neah Bay and was ninety years old. Another speaker of Makah was Mrs. Washington Howeattle of Tahola. She also knew Quileute.

Emma Luscier (Em.) was the main source of Lower Chehalis data, she also commented on the more northerly Salishan languages. Her first husband was a Quileute, from whom she probably gained her knowledge of Quinault and possibly Quileute.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Clallam language  Search this
Makah language  Search this
Quileute language  Search this
Chimakuan languages  Search this
Quinault language  Search this
Snohomish language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 1.7
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 1: Native American History, Language, and Culture of Alaska and the Northwest Coast
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw32bb549d0-c05e-4b89-8af9-86e7dd47ed18
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref12678

General and Miscellaneous Materials

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Waterman, T. T. (Thomas Talbot), b. 1885  Search this
Greiner, Ruth H.  Search this
Marr, John Paul  Search this
Garfield, Viola Edmundson, 1899-1983  Search this
Gunther, Erna, 1896-1982  Search this
Young, Robert W., 1912-2007  Search this
Names:
Angulo, Jaime de  Search this
Bloomfield, Leonard, 1887-1949  Search this
Boas, Franz, 1858-1942  Search this
Frachtenberg, Leo Joachim, 1883-1930  Search this
Hoijer, Harry, 1904-1976  Search this
Jacobs, Melville, 1902-1971  Search this
Ray, Verne Frederick, 1905-2003  Search this
Swadesh, Morris, 1909-1967  Search this
Voegelin, C. F. (Charles Frederick), 1906-1986  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1.83 Linear feet ((6 boxes))
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Coos (Kusan)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Maps
Place:
Olympic Peninsula (Wash.)
Wishram (Wash.)
Northwest Coast of North America
Oregon
Puget Sound (Wash.)
Date:
1933, 1938-1943
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Alaska/Northwest Coast series consists of materials pertaining to the area Alaska / Northwest Coast as a whole and those which are too limited in scope to constitute a full subseries in themselves. Included are writings by Harrington, notes from his conversations with others, notes from secondary sources, and field notes and writings he collected from others. Some items date as early as 1933; most are from the period 1938 to 1943.

The writings represent Harrington's attempt to synthesize the results of his years of work in the Northwest--particularly with regard to his Athapascan studies. There are several typed drafts of an untitled paper [former B.A.E. ms. 4360] dated April 4, 1943 on the tribal distribution along the Oregon coast. This work, accompanied by a map, describes tribal boundaries in detail and makes reference to the geographical and cultural setting. There follow notes, outlines, rough and final drafts of three papers of varying length relating to Harrington's theories on the origin and relationship of the Athapascan languages. Two of these were published (1940, 1943). Illustrations sent to the printer are also included here. The section of writings also contains several pages of notes and very rough drafts of short articles on the etymology of the term "Athapascan."

The notes from conversations vary in length and content. Information from Franz Boas consists of two undated pages concerning phonetics in Coast Salish and Chinook. From a March 1933 discussion with Joe Maloney, Harrington obtained data on tribes of southwestern Oregon, predominently on the Coos. W. O. Thorniley of the Puget Sound Navigation Company provided biographical and general information of the Olympic Peninsula, with special attention to the Ozette and Queets areas. Thomas Yallup spoke on Wishram, the tribal boundaries and practices of neighboring tribes, and possible informants.

Most significant are records of Harrington's meetings with Melville Jacobs in December 1939. Those discussions referred to Jacobs' own studies and included comments on the work of other linguists and anthropologists such as Jaime de Angulo, Leonard Bloomfield, Franz Boas, Leo J. Frachtenberg, Harry Hoijer, Verne F. Ray, Morris Swadesh, and C. F. Voegelin. The notes also reflect a mutual interest in orthographies, the relationship of Athapascan languages (particularly Kwalhioqua and Tlatskanai), and the theory of the Siberian origin and migration of the North American Indian. This section includes a few interspersed notes from Erna Gunther and Viola Garfield.

Notes from secondary sources consists of a few pages on each of several miscellaneous topics. The notes reflect Harrington's attempt to locate a speaker of Cayuse, and his interest in the early voyages to the Northwest Coast. Also included are comparative data on Athapascan languages compiled into a chart from a variety of manuscript and published sources.

Notes and writings from others include a small set of sketch maps and field data collected for Harrington by his assistant John Paul Marr. These notes were obtained while Harrington was in Washington, D.C. and unable to get to the field himself. There is also a section of original field notes on Puget Sound ethnogeography obtained from Thomas Talbot Waterman. They cover his collection of placename data in Clallam and in the Shoalwater Bay area in the period 1919-1921 and are supplemented by original notes from Ruth H. Greiner dated 1920-1921. Her records consist of lists of numbered placenames in a variety of Puget Sound Salish languages, with translations, etymologies, and brief commentaries. These field data were part of the basis for a manuscript Waterman prepared for the Bureau of American Ethnology (Waterman 1922) and are keyed to a number of large maps contained therein. Harrington also collected a short typed paper by his co-worker Robert W. Young dated 1938. This article, relevant to their study of Navaho, puts forward a theory on the origin and dispersion of a branch of Athapascan languages. It contains charts and numbered examples of linguistic features in Navaho, Carrier, Sekani, Chipewyan, Hare, and Hupa, among other languages.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Athapascan languages  Search this
Chinook language  Search this
Puget Sound Salish languages  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Maps
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 1.15
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 1: Native American History, Language, and Culture of Alaska and the Northwest Coast
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw381bdc6ea-ff32-4acc-9764-681613663942
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref13103
Online Media:

Acoma/Laguna/Santo Domingo (Keresan)

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Laird, Carobeth, 1895-1983  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Boxe
Culture:
Keresan Pueblos  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Laguna Indians  Search this
Pueblo  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Date:
1909-1949
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southwest series contains Harrington's research on Keresan, focusing on Acoma, Laguna, and Santo Domingo dialects. The materials consist of vocabulary, notes, and drafts.

Harrington's field notes include data from an individual identified only as "L. A. Alb," copies of Acoma slips lent to Harrington by Father Jerome in 1913, and a Keresan vocabulary copied by Carobeth Harrington Laird. He also assembled a small group of miscellaneous lexical items relative to the Keresan migration story from Edward Hunt, probably recorded at Chaco Canyon in June 1929. The most substantive body of material from a linguistic point of view is a comparative vocabulary, for which the principal source was James Johnson.

Harrington extracted tribenames and placenames from a number of sources to provide bases for the various rehearings. Because of the comparative nature of the material, a number of the works dealt with languages other than the Keresan dialects. Among the principal sources consulted were Keresan Texts (1925, 1928) by Franz Boas, and Part I of Frederick W. Hodge's "Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico" (1907). For Navajo he relied on his own notes and those accumulated with the collaboration of Robert W. Young. He compared some Southern Paiute terms collected by Edward Sapir and turned again to Benjamin Whorf's additions to Elsie Clews Parsons' Hopi Journal (1936).

This material is arranged semantically and each page represents two or more rehearings recorded at different intervals. The basic Laguna and Acoma terms are compared with Santo Domingo and Zia, and with such non-Keresan languages as Hopi, Navaho, and Kiowa. There are a few words from the Hano, Queres, Luisenio, Teton, Tewa, and Zuni languages.

Among his notes and drafts is a questionnaire, based on information provided by Hunt, that he used in his work with Johnson. There are also notes without linguistic annotations which relate to Boas' Keresan publications. Included among the papers is an early draft of Harrington's published work on the origin of the name "Acoma." The sixteenth-century sources mentioned in the draft notes are taken directly from Hodge's "Handbook." Johnson, Solimon, and the Navajo speaker Sam Acquilla provided further linguistic information. A typed draft on Acoma phonetics and the meaning of the name "Queres" was evidently prepared in 1947. Another manuscript with accompanying notes and bibliography was titled ''Quirix Equals Kastica." It is undated. Neither paper was published.

Also in this subseries are some of the correspondence, phonetic notes, and word lists that Bertha P. Dutton sent Harrington. There are also handwritten condensations by Harrington (not annotated) of George H. Pradt (1902) and excerpts of miscellaneous ethnographic information from Matilda Coxe Stevenson (1894).
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington's interest in Keresan is documented as early as 1909, when he worked with Mrs. L. S. Gallup on a Cochiti census (see Cochiti subseries). In 1919, and again in 1929, he sought to establish a relationship among Keresan, Kiowa, and Zuni. He was among those who lectured on Acoma at the Chaco Canyon Field School of the School of American Research in July 1929. From July to October of 1939, Harrington was detailed to assist the Office of Indian Affairs at Fort Wingate, where he may have met James Johnson, an Acoma Indian who provided a great deal of material. Between February 1944 and August 1945, Harrington and Bertha P. Dutton exchanged Laguna information in the course of their collaboration with Edgar L. Hewett on the 1945 publication entitled The Pueblo Indian World, for which Harrington wrote the two appendices. Dutton supplied Harrington with the names of several Keresan speakers who were in military service in the Washington, D.C. area. Among these speakers were Calvin Solimon, a Laguna Indian who spoke both Laguna and Acoma dialects; Joe A. Mina and Santiago Pacheco, Santo Domingo men; and Perry A. Keahtigh, who worked at The United Nations Service Center in Washington and was frequently consulted for Kiowa comparisons. Harrington's last Keresan monograph, "Haa'k'o, Original Form of the Name of Acoma," was published in 1949.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Keres language  Search this
Acoma dialect  Search this
Laguna dialect  Search this
Navajo language  Search this
Southern Paiute language  Search this
Hopi language  Search this
Kiowa language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Santo Domingo (Kewa)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 4.5
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 4: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Southwest
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw37a6c48d3-1c29-4393-bff4-21619e9dd415
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14637

Massachusett

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Names:
Eliot, John, 1604-1690  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (box)
Culture:
Massachusett  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Place:
Maine
Date:
circa 1907-circa 1957
Scope and Contents:
This small subseries of the Northeast/Southeast series contains John P. Harrington's Massachusett research. The section of writings (former B.A.E. ms. 6018pt.) is based principally on the works of the seventeenth-century missionary John Eliot. An article titled "Two Massachusetts Texts with Interlinear Translation" was intended for submission to the International Journal of American Linguistics but was not published. The material includes a typescript and two preliminary drafts with related notes. It covers biographical information on Eliot and lists his writings according to those containing translations and those without translations. The texts Harrington chose for the paper are the Beatitudes and the Lord's Prayer from the Gospel of St. Matthew. Much of the biographical and historical information comes from James C. Pilling's Bibliography ofthe Algonquian Languages (1891). Also consulted was James Trumbull's "Natick Dictionary" (1903). Harrington provided C. E. Lauterbach of Pasadena with an interlinear translation of Eliot's version of the 23rd Psalm. This subseries also contains a copy of Massachusett language placenames excerpted from the Dictionary of American-Indian Place and Proper Names in New England (1909) by R. A. Douglas-Lithgow (D.-L.). There are no linguistic annotations. (Former B.A.E. ms. 6029pt.).
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Wampanoag language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 6.4
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 6: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Northeast & Southeast
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3ee8d7678-08c6-49bc-988b-e41f6a12b571
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14950

Creek/Seminole/Alabama/Koasati/Choctaw

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Haas, Mary R. (Mary Rosamond), 1910-1996  Search this
Names:
Sapir, Edward, 1884-1939  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (box)
Culture:
Muskogee (Creek)  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Alabama Indians  Search this
Coushatta (Koasati)  Search this
Choctaw  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Date:
circa 1940
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Northeast/Southeast series contains Harrington's Creek, Seminole, Alabama, Koasati, and Choctaw research. These include original field notes in Creek and Seminole Harrington took from John Thompson on April 22, 1940, most of which were corrected by Haas on the same date. Another larger group of terms were extracted from Haas' typewritten unpublished manuscript (ca. 1938 -1940) and filed one term to a page in random order. There are no linguistic comments by Harrington. A still larger section labeled "Haas Orthography" contains occasional comments by Harrington. Presumably this section also stems from a then unpublished manuscript by Haas. The majority of his comparative linguistic notes involve Haas and Thompson, with Harrington sitting in as a third party. Choctaw equivalences are based on Byington (1915). A few Koasati and Alabama terms are included. Some notes apparently reflect conversations between Harrington and Haas, with some emphasis on phonetics and ethnohistory. The interview with Sylvestine presumably was brief--it yielded only a few general comments on Alabama placenames. There is a section on the etymology of the name Alabama. Harrington copied various versions from Hodge's "Handbook" (1907) and added some original annotations as well as comments from Haas, Thompson, and Sylvestine. Also in this subseries are two pages of random terms, undated, and no source given. Three Choctaw words were apparently taken from Allen Wright's Chahta Leksikon, a Choctaw in English Definition (1880). The subseries also contans excerpts from conversations Harrington had with Edward Sapir.
Biographical / Historical:
While on a Delaware language field trip centered around Bartlesville, Oklahoma, in April 1940, John P. Harrington evidently found time to be present when the linguist Mary R. Haas interviewed Creek speaker John Thompson. She also commented on notes Harrington took directly from Thompson, and she shared with him information from her unpublished manuscript of Creek vocabulary. He also interviewed James Feagin Sylvestine, a patient at the Shawnee Sanitorium in Oklahoma and an excellent Alabama speaker. Harrington also frequently consulted Cyrus A. Byington's, A Dictionary of the Choctaw Language (1915) and Frederick W. Hodge's "Handbook of the American Indians North of Mexico" (1907).
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Creek language  Search this
Seminole language  Search this
Alabama language  Search this
Koasati language  Search this
Choctaw language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Creek (Muskogee)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 6.11
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 6: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Northeast & Southeast
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw36fb7cec3-34c3-4674-a6a0-e1cbafacbe68
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15073

Records Relating to South American Languages

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Correspondent:
Steward, Julian Haynes, 1902-1972  Search this
Mason, John Alden, 1885-1967  Search this
Farfán, José M. B.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
18 Boxes
Culture:
Indians of South America  Search this
Aymara Indians  Search this
Bora Indians  Search this
Asháninka (Campa/Chuncha)  Search this
Cocama Indians  Search this
Guarani Indians  Search this
Shuar  Search this
Kaingang Indians  Search this
Mataco Indians  Search this
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Quechua Indians  Search this
Puquina Indians  Search this
Uru Indians  Search this
Witoto Indians  Search this
Yagua Indians  Search this
Yunca Indians  Search this
Zaparo Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Manuscripts
Correspondence
Vocabulary
Date:
1941-1948
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Mexico/Central America/South America series contains Harrington's records relating to South American languages. His research covered the following languages: Awishira, Aymara, Campa, Cholon, Cocama, Guarani, Jivaro, Kaingang, Mataco, Miranya, Otomi, Quechua, Uru-Puquina, Witoto, Yagua, Yunca, and Zaparo.

Harrington's records relating to Quechua are the most extensive set he compiled on a South American language. The first section of notes, labeled "Quechua Springboard," is a semantically arranged file consisting of lexical items extracted from Ernst W. Middendorf's Quechua dictionary. Harrington copied his entire dictionary, one item per page, in order to have a basic vocabulary for comparison with other languages of the region. The remainder of Harrington's Quechua records have to do with articles which he was preparing for publication. These include notes and drafts for the papers on Quechua phonetics and grammar that he coauthored with Valcarcel, a paper titled "Hokan Discovered in South America," and a review of "Poesia Folklorica Quechua" by J. M. B. Farfan.

Harrington's Witoto files also form a large section of this subseries. Materials include files of data for analysis as well as drafts of several papers. The first paper, titled "The Sounds of Witoto," is a brief undated article referring to the work of Preuss. Included are a two-page final version, a one-page carbon of a variant version, a two-page carbon of a Spanish translation, and a page of miscellaneous notes on phonetics. There are notes and rough drafts for articles on Witoto, Miranya, and Cocama. The highly unorganized records include excerpts from Harrington's "Cocama Grammarlet" and personal communications with Julian Steward and J. Alden Mason. There is also a comparative vocabulary of Witoto, Miranya, and Cocama. This so-called "analphabetikon" includes notes arranged under numerous semantic headings: age, rank, kinship, plants, animals, material culture, etc. This file was used in preparing vocabulary lists for inclusion in Harrington's second large paper on Witoto.

Harrington prepared at least four papers on Jivaro (abbreviated "Jiv."), a language which he felt was a "very divergent type of Arawakan." While most other linguists gave it an independent status, he felt that the resemblances with Arawak were genetic. The first article, "Jibaro Epitome," consists of a review of Juan Ghinassi's grammar (1938). The file continues with notes and drafts of "The Jivaro Language." Harrington presents ethnological data of the Jivaro by way of introduction and proceeds to give an outline of the language. A draft of a third paper, "Vocabulary of the Jivaro Language," actually consists of a working copy of a Jivaro vocabulary. The title page, labeled "Jivaro Spingboard" lists the dictionary by Ghinassi (Gh. or Ghin.) as the major source of the semantically arranged vocabulary. The file concludes with notes and a draft for the article "The Jivaro Indians."

The materials which Harrington compiled on the Miranya language are fairly extensive. The files begin with a comparative vocabulary organized in what he termed a "loose-leaf system." Miranya terms, as well as Witoto, Guarani, Cocama, and Arawak forms, are arranged in a number of standard semantic and grammatical categories. Extracts were taken from the works of Adam, Farabee, Kinder, Preuss, Rivet, Ruiz de Montoya, Tessman, and Whiffen. There are also three separate sections labeled "Farabee M. Voc.," "Tessman M. Voc.," and "Whiffen M. Voc." in which lexical items from these sources are listed, one word per page. Writings based on Harrington's study of the secondary sources follow. The file concludes with a short draft by Mason of a write-upon Miranya for "The Languages of the South American Indians" and a letter from Harrington to Steward dated April 4, 1943. Enclosed with the letter are pages one to four of a paper and pages 10 and 11 of a bibliography. They deal with a review of the problem of assigning Miranya to a larger linguistic stock.

The remaining materials on the other South American languages consist of notes from secondary sources, drafts of papers, and some correspondence. His notes on Otomi include field notes recorded by Harrington from Pablo Galicia, a native of San Juan Tutxtepec, interviewed in Xochimilco, Mexico in 1951. The miscellaneous notes section contains materials of a more general nature and include notes from conversations Harrington had with Mason and Steward. There are also notes on various South American languages with subsections on: Awishira (Abishira), Aymara, Arawakan, Campa, Chipaya, Cholon, Fitita, Guaranian, Mataco, Miranya, Okaina, Quechua, Resigaro, Tupi, Uru-Puquina, Witoto, Yunca, and Zaparo. Harrington's notes include general observations, bibliographic references, extracts from secondary sources, and partial drafts of papers. Of particular interest is an item filed under Quechua: a letter to Julian Steward from J. M. B. Farfan, dated July 9, 1943, enclosing a list of one hundred basic words in Quechua. The last four files of miscellany consist of drafts of various writings.
Biographical / Historical:
Harrington's earliest work in the field of South American languages resulted in a paper which he coauthored with Luis E. Valcarcel, director of the Museo Nacional in Lima, Peru. Correspondence indicates that the two men met during a visit which Valcarcel made to Washington in March 1941. By April 6 Harrington had already drafted a manuscript of the article "Quichua Phonetics. A Shortcut to the Scientific Writing of the Language of the Incas of Peru," which he then forwarded to Valcarcel in New York City for translation. In July Harrington rewrote the paper in English and sent it to Peru for publication.

In early 1943 Harrington was called back from the field to B.A.E. headquarters in Washington, D.C. Among his official duties at the bureau was the examination of data for the linguistic sections of the "Handbook of South American Indians." The bureau had accepted responsibility for preparing the handbook and had begun work on it in 1940 under the editorship of Julian H. Steward. J. Alden Mason of the University Museum in Philadelphia was given the task of "classifying and tabulating the languages of South America." As it was possible for Mason to make only a few independent studies of these languages himself, he relied on the assistance of scholars such as Harrington to provide information to him through correspondence. He inserted a number of Harrington's findings into his final report as notes.

For the most part Harrington's method entailed examining secondary sources, extracting and compiling linguistic and morphological data from them, and comparing these data for various languages with a view to establishing linguistic affiliations. He also had limited opportunities to obtain first-hand information from native speakers of Guarani, Quechua, and Otomi and from a non-native speaker of Jivaro.

In May 1943 Harrington undertook an extensive study of the Jivaro language. The vocabulary which he compiled and reheard was used for comparison with that of the Zaparo language. During the same year Harrington examined data on Campa and Witoto and compiled working vocabularies (which he called "springboards") for Cocama and Quechua. He also found preliminary evidence of the interrelationships of several groups of languages. He felt that Miranya was related to Tupi-Guarani, that Uru-Puquina should be grouped with Arawakan, and that Aymara should be assigned to the Hokan family. He also published "Hokan Discovered in South America," a discussion of the affinity of Quechua with Hokan in terms of phonetics, morphology, and vocabulary. Comparisons were drawn from a number of Hokan languages of North and Central America: Chimariko, Choctaw, Salinan, and Subtiaba, several of which Harrington had studied at earlier periods.

Harrington reported "winding up" a comparison of Witoto, Miranya, and Guarani in January 1944. By April he had undertaken a study of Cholon, finished a paper on Witoto ("Sobre fonetico Witoto"), and was at work on an article on Zaparo. He also prepared "a long screed on Yunca" which was later published as "Yunka, Language of the Peruvian Coastal Culture."

During the 1944-1945 fiscal year, Harrington proceeded to work on Guarani and Quechua, which he described as "the Indian languages of South America." He made use of a publication by Dr. Bertoni with whom he met briefly. In addition, he published three papers relating to Quechua: "Earliest Navajo and Quechua," "La lengua Aynlara, hermana mayor de la Quichua," and "Quechua Grammarlet."

Harrington continued to work intermittently on South American languages for the next several years. At the end of fiscal year 1947-1948 he submitted a large report on Guarani, which held official status with Spanish in Paraguay, as well as a smaller paper on Mataco which was published under the title "Matako of the Gran Chaco." He also wrote another piece on the phonetics of Quechua.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Indians of South America -- Languages  Search this
Aymara language  Search this
Bora language  Search this
Campa language  Search this
Cholon language  Search this
Cocama language  Search this
Guarani language  Search this
Shuar language  Search this
Kaingang language  Search this
Mataco language  Search this
Otomi language  Search this
Quechua language  Search this
Puquina language  Search this
Uru language  Search this
Witoto language  Search this
Yagua language  Search this
Yunca language  Search this
Zaparo language  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Phonetics  Search this
Grammar, Comparative and general  Search this
Wichi  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Manuscripts
Correspondence
Vocabulary
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 7.7
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 7: Mexico/Central America/South America
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw354659ff9-243c-4ced-89fb-c9352299bd75
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15147
Online Media:

Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
29.79 Linear feet (89 boxes)
Culture:
Indians of North America  Search this
Indians of Central America  Search this
Indians of South America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1907-1957, undated
Scope and Contents:
The arrangement of material in this section forms the basis for Vol. 8 of the microfilmed papers. The reel numbers of corresponding microfilm are listed where appropriate.

This series within the John Peabody Harrington papers represent the results of the linguistic studies which John P. Harrington conducted before, during, and after his employment at the Bureau of American Ethnology (1915 -1954). There are various materials which supplement the field notes described in the other series of his papers. The files, which are arranged by tribe or language, usually consist of only a few pages, although those for several of the California groups are more extensive. The highly miscellaneous linguistic and ethnographic notes consist of a large, unorganized block of notes, containing little or no original field data, and notes on grammatical terminology and anthropometrics. The subseries "Linguistic Questionnaires" contains many of the semantically arranged lists which he used to elicit linguistic and ethnographic information in the field. The bibliographic records indicate a variety of the secondary sources which he used in his work. Filed immediately after these materials is a set of notes which Harrington used in preparing responses to inquiries which were sent to the Bureau of American Ethnology. The responsibility of handling a portion of the bureau's reference correspondence was a major aspect of his job as ethnologist during the periods when he was not conducting fieldwork. Many of the remaining subseries reflect the diversity of topics Harrington explored during his fifty-year career in linguistics. Some studies, such as those on state names or on the origin of the American Indian, were related to his interest in American Indian languages. Others grew, perhaps, from his early training in classical and Indo-Germanic languages and philology. There are files on the etymologies of personal names, on the Arabic origin of Spanish words, and on numerous world languages. The last four subseries represent Harrington's attempts to synthesize his research and field experiences. There are notes for lectures he gave at a number of summer-school sessions from around 1910 to 1915 and records which reveal a life-long attempt to develop a standard phonetic alphabet. The files on miscellaneous writings contain drafts for over one hundred short papers on a wide variety of linguistic subjects. The final set of records, "Major Writings on Linguistics," comprises notes, drafts, and illustrative materials for a magnum opus on language, the study of which Harrington believed would provide the "masterkey to man."
Arrangement:
Series is arranged into 20 subseries: (1) Supplemental material on Alaska/Northwest Coast; (2) Supplemental material on Northern and Central California; (3) Supplemental material on Southern California/Basin; (4) Supplemental material on the Southwest; (5) Supplemental material on the Plains; (6) Supplemental material on the Northeast/Southeast; (7) Supplemental material on Mexico/Central America/South America; (8) Miscellaneous linguistic and ethnographic notes; (9) Linguistic questionnaires; (10) Bibliographic and library-related materials; (11) Memoranda prepared in response to letters of inquiry; (12) Records relating to non-American languages; (13) Records relating to Arabic origins of Spanish words; (14) Records relating to personal names; (15) Records relating to state names, province names, and other geographical names; (16) Records relating to the Siberian origin of the American Indian; (17) Records relating to lectures; (18) Records relating to phonetics; (19) Miscellaneous writings on various linguistic topics; (20) Major writings on linguistics.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Phonetics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Series 8
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw359e4a2cc-7696-4110-8d6b-888d3cc8b867
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15193

Miscellaneous Writings on Geographical Names (includes former MS#4521pt.): "American Indian Origin of Geographical and Tribal Names of the Americas"

Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Container:
Box 1099
Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents note:
Microfilm Reel: 20
Subseries Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Subseries Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies / 8.14: Records Relating to State Names, Province Names, and Other Geographical Names
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw36edf898f-1b56-4efc-88fa-239ba97c8569
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15612

"American Indian Placenames"

Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Container:
Box 1099
Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents note:
Microfilm Reel: 20
Subseries Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Subseries Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies / 8.14: Records Relating to State Names, Province Names, and Other Geographical Names
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3497bcbf8-4a4d-4264-a07b-aa7b22a81215
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15614

Records Relating to the Siberian Origin of the American Indian

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Jochelson, Waldemar, 1855-1937  Search this
Correspondent:
Jenness, Diamond, 1886-1969  Search this
Names:
Boas, Franz, 1858-1942  Search this
Collins, Henry Bascom, 1899-1987  Search this
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Stirling, Matthew Williams, 1896-1975  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
2 Boxes
Culture:
Indians of North America  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Chukchee  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Notes
Manuscripts
Maps
Vocabulary
Place:
Bering Strait
Siberia (Russia)
Date:
1909-1957
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Notes and writings on special linguistic studies series contains material reflecting John P. Harrington's long-time interest in theories of the Siberian origin of American Indians. Materials consist of notes and drafts for his paper "Siberian Origin of the American Indian.

His early notes include handwritten and typed versions of the outline "Antiquity of Man . . . " from 1915 (dated by handwriting as well as by type of pencil and paper); copies of short early vocabularies recorded by La Perouse (Tchoka) and Father Jette (Ten'a), probably prepared by Harrington around 1922 to 1923; a mimeographed statement by the Science News Service, dated 1923; newspaper clippings on Harrington's theories from 1924; and two pages of notes which Harrington recorded during a discussion with colleague Truman Michelson in November 1926. There is also an undated typed proposal titled "Investigation of the Origin of the Native American Race." This three page document does not appear to have been written by Harrington, but the source is not indicated.

Materials accumulated during the period 1937 to 1938 are the most numerous. They include notes from interviews; copies of correspondence; records regarding the computation of tribal areas; notes on maps and photographs; and reading notes, extracts, and bibliographic references to secondary sources. The transcripts of interviews, dated February 1937 through November 1938, include information from Riley Moore, Carl Bishop, John G. Carter, and B.A.E. colleagues Truman Michelson and Matthew W. Stirling. The lengthiest set of notes is from a discussion with Smithsonian archeologist Henry B. Collins, who described fieldwork he had conducted from May to November 1936. The brief file of correspondence contains letters from Diamond Jenness and H. E. Rollins and a note from John G. Carter. The file on illustrative materials includes maps and charts showing the computation of land areas occupied by the Chukchee, Aleut, Eskimo, and Athapascan tribes. Supplementing these are notes from meetings with staff members of the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey in March and April 1937. There are also notes on maps, motion picture films, and photographs, as well as illustrations by Clark M. Garber and Joelle Danner. The notes from secondary sources include the title page and table of contents for a manuscript by Ivan A. Lopatin titled "The Cult of the Dead Among the Natives of the Amur Valley." There are also a few pages on file for another paper by Lopatin, "Material on the Language of the Natives of the Amur Region." There is also a sizable set of notes relating to the translation of various terms--mostly tribal names--into Russian. These include cut-and-pasted portions of letters which Waldemar Jochelson sent Harrington.

The material compiled after 1937 is highly miscellaneous. Items from the 1940s include a sixteen-page untitled rough draft on the migration of Siberian man; a three-page typed carbon copy of the article "Stepping Stones Between Eurasia and America" which was used in a release by the Office of Indian Affairs, Department of the Interior, on August 4, 1940; a partial draft of an article on boats; a sectional map of the Bering Strait which was mailed to Harrington by C. M. Garber on January 18, 1947; and notes from interviews with Mr. [Tappan?] Adney on March 28, 1941, with William Heslop and King Mooers later in that year, and with Henry B. Collins on December 8, 1947. There is also an Eskimo vocabulary which Harrington copied from William Thalbitzer and three pages of miscellaneous notes dating from the late 1950s.

A separate file of notes on Chukchee spans the entire period of Harrington's work on Siberia. There are a number of pages on Chukchee, Yukagir, and Eskimo mythology which he extracted from his notes for lectures at the University of Washington in 1910; brief notes from discussions with Truman Michelson, Waldemar Jochelson, and Franz Boas around 1926 to 1928; and copies made on February 23, 1937, of "Chukchee polysynthesis words" which had been compiled in an unspecified article by colleague Robert W. Young. The source of data for the latter was Waldemar Bogoras's paper "Chukchee" in the Handbook of American Indian Languages edited by Franz Boas. Later material includes a copy of a letter from Ivan Lopatin (November 23, 1947) with an enclosure titled "Discovery of the Chukchee and Derivation of the Name"; a copy by Harrington of the enclosure; and the rough beginning of a paper by Harrington titled "Short Sketch of the Grammar of the Chukchee Language," also evidently written in 1947.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Indians -- origin  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Notes
Manuscripts
Maps
Vocabulary
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 8.15
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3024e243c-0e4b-4932-b361-b91e745f9ade
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15644

Early Notes

Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Container:
Box 1100
Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents note:
Microfilm Reel: 21
Subseries Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Subseries Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies / 8.15: Records Relating to the Siberian Origin of the American Indian
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw35f51940e-1fb9-4db2-ade7-c3ba369ca2b1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15645

Notes for Manuscript

Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Container:
Box 1100
Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents note:
Microfilm Reel: 21
Subseries Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Subseries Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies / 8.15: Records Relating to the Siberian Origin of the American Indian
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3241e4550-3c52-4bc2-953c-2d728e1b629c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15647

Drafts of Manuscript

Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Container:
Box 1100
Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents note:
Microfilm Reel: 21
Subseries Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Subseries Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies / 8.15: Records Relating to the Siberian Origin of the American Indian
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3e013370f-2f73-4999-a248-2675676acb3f
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15649

Later Notes and Writings

Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Container:
Box 1101
Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents note:
Microfilm Reel: 21
Subseries Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Subseries Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies / 8.15: Records Relating to the Siberian Origin of the American Indian
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3538f0b31-de05-450f-98e4-1b06202441c9
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15651

Notes on Chukchee

Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Container:
Box 1101
Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents note:
Microfilm Reel: 21
Subseries Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Subseries Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies / 8.15: Records Relating to the Siberian Origin of the American Indian
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw317d3f95d-52ae-4cfd-ba33-a91db77edf15
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15653

Modify Your Search







or


Narrow By