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Porcelain for Emperors

Creator:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2012-12-21T14:30:51.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, Asian  Search this
See more by:
FreerSackler
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
YouTube Channel:
FreerSackler
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_e3ckTvhBAg4

Timothy Asch papers

Creator:
Asch, Timothy, 1932-1994  Search this
Correspondent:
Albert, Bruce  Search this
Andrews, Scott  Search this
Balikci, Asen, 1929-  Search this
Beidelman, Tom  Search this
Bermudez, Beatrice  Search this
Brigard, Emilie de  Search this
Cardozo, Jesus  Search this
Carpenter, Edmund, 1922-2011  Search this
Chagnon, Napoleon A., 1938-  Search this
Connor, Linda  Search this
Fox, James  Search this
Freeman, Derek  Search this
Harrison-Pepper, Sally  Search this
Heider, Karl  Search this
Homiak, John P. (John Paul), 1947-  Search this
Jules-Rosette, Benneta  Search this
Kamerling, Lenny  Search this
Lewis, Doug  Search this
Lizot, Jacques  Search this
Loizos, Peter  Search this
Mead, Margaret, 1901-1978  Search this
Mello, James F., 1936-  Search this
Middleton, John  Search this
Piault, Collette  Search this
Preloran, Jorge, 1933-2009  Search this
Rouch, Jean  Search this
Ruby, Jay  Search this
Smith, Patrice  Search this
Storas, Frode  Search this
Tax, Sol, 1907-1995  Search this
Wayang, Mark  Search this
Wayang, Mary  Search this
Young, Tao  Search this
Extent:
62 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Correspondence
Manuscripts
Photographs
Place:
Venezuela
Date:
1947-1995
Summary:
Timothy Asch was an anthropologist and ethnographic film maker who devoted his professional life to using film as a recording and teaching medium. His papers cover the period from 1966 until his premature death in 1994 and reflect his active career in the field. A large portion of the files relates to his work among the Yanomami people of Venezuela and to his concern with bias in film making.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Timothy Asch document his career as an anthropologist, educator, photographer and filmmaker through correspondence, photographs, research files (articles and notes), and teaching materials (course information and lecture notes). The files relating to Asch's film projects include articles, field notes, and reviews. The major correspondents in this collection are Patsy Asch, Tom Beidelman, Napoleon Chagnon, James Fox, Robert Gardner, Douglas Lewis, Peter Loizos, David & Olga Sapir, and Minor White.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into the following 13 series:

Series 1) Correspondence (1953-1994)

Series 2) College and graduate School (1955-1965)

Series 3) Teaching materials (1964-1993)

Series 4) Film projects (1964-1991)

Series 5) Articles and reviews (1972-1994)

Series 6) Alpha-Subject (1955-1989)

Series 7) Conferences, film festivals, and film organizations (1963-1993)

Series 8) Grants (1962-1993)

Series 9) Other people's work (1952-1995)

Series 10) Personal and family (1951-1994)

Series 11) Photographs (1947-1991)

Series 12) Sound recordings (bulk 1960s-1970s)

Series 13) Note slips, rolodexes, and business cards (1987, undated)
Biographical note:
Asch studied photography at the California School of Fine Arts in San Francisco. While serving in the United States Army in Japan from 1951-55 he spent his off-duty hours photographing rice production and household activities in remote Japanese villages. After his military service, he enrolled in Columbia University graduating in 1959 with an undergraduate degree in Anthropology. After graduation, he went to work at the Peabody Museum at Harvard as an assistant editor to John Marshall on the Kung Bushmen film project. In 1964, he received a Masters Degree in Anthropology from Boston University where he studied in the African Studies Progam and read Anthropology with T.O. Beidelman at Harvard. In 1968, Asch and Marshall founded Documentary Educational Resources, a film distribution company. Anthropologist Napoleon Chagnon approached Asch in 1968 to film among the Yanomammmi people of Venezuela. This collaboration led to a major project resulting in over thirty films.

Chronology

1950-1951 -- California School of Fine Arts and Apprenticeships with photographers Minor White, Edward Weston and Ansel Adams

1953-1954 -- Military Service in Korea

1959 -- B.S. in Anthropology Columbia University

1959-1962 -- Ethnographic film consultant, Harvard University's Peabody Museum

1964 -- M.A. in Anthropology Harvard University

1965-1966 -- Curriculum Consultant, Ethnographic studies and the Bushmen Social Studies Curriculum Project (initially Educational Services, Inc., later called Educational Development Center)

1966-1968 -- Lecturer in Anthropology and Theater Arts, Brandeis University

1966-1968 -- Anthropology Curriculum and Media Consultant to the Newton Public Schools

1967-1994 -- Co-Founder and Director of Documentary Educational Resources, Watertown, Massachusetts, a non-profit curriculum development corporation distributing educational media

1968-1970 -- Visiting Assistant Professor, Anthropology Department, New York University

1969-1973 -- Lecturer, Department of Anthropology, Brandeis University

1973-1979 -- Research Fellow in Ethnographic film, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University

1974-1976 -- Lecturer, Department of Anthropology, Harvard University

1975 -- Research Cinematographer, National Anthropological Film Center, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.

1976-1981 -- Senior Research Fellow, Department of Anthropology, Institute of Advanced Studies, the Australian National University, Canberra, Australia

1982 -- Visiting Research Scholar, Department of Anthropology at Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia

1983-1994 -- Director, Center for Visual Anthropology, Department of Anthropology, University of Southern California
Related Materials:
The Human Studies Film Archives holds 93,000 feet (43 hours) of original film footage and the accompanying sound as well as the edited films from the 1968 and 1971 film projects by Timothy Asch and Napoleon Chagnon documenting the Yanomamo Indians of southern Venezuela and northern Brazil (between the Negro and Upper Orinoco rivers).
Provenance:
Donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Patsy Asch in 1996.
Topic:
Anthropology  Search this
Film -- theory  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Correspondence -- 1953-1994
Manuscripts
Photographs -- 1947-1991
Citation:
Timothy Asch papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.1996-16
See more items in:
Timothy Asch papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3ebe64d9d-33d2-4af7-9417-8f21f639c754
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1996-16

Valor in Black and White: War Stories of Horace Poolaw

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Conversations and talks
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2016-11-17T15:43:57.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_Npi_Nrw-B9o

Memory in Black and White: Race, Commemoration, and the Post Bellum Landscape by Paul A. Shackel

Author:
Ruffins, Fath Davis  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Year:
2007
Citation:
Ruffins, Fath Davis. 2007. [Book review] "Memory in Black and White: Race, Commemoration, and the Post Bellum Landscape by Paul A. Shackel." Visual Anthropology Review, 23, (2), 178–179. https://doi.org/10.1525/var.2007.23.2.177.
Identifier:
108218
DOI:
https://doi.org/10.1525/var.2007.23.2.177
ISSN:
1058-7187
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries and Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:slasro_108218

John Marshall Ju/'hoan Bushman film and video collection

Collaborator:
McElwee, Ross  Search this
Blitz, Daniel  Search this
Bishop, John Melville  Search this
Baker, Peter  Search this
Ritchie, Claire  Search this
Young, Robert  Search this
Terry, John  Search this
Galvin, Frank  Search this
Bestall, Clifford  Search this
Gardner, Robert  Search this
Asch, Timothy, 1932-1994  Search this
Marshall, Lorna  Search this
Creator:
Marshall, John, 1932-2005 (ethnographic filmmaker)  Search this
Extent:
2 Boxes (map drawers)
3 Video recordings (published videos or video series)
99 Linear feet (714,405 feet (332 hours) 16mm film, 435 hours video tape, 309 hours audio tape, 21 published film and video titles, 29 unpublished film and video titles, 14 linear feet paper records)
Culture:
San (African people)  Search this
Bushman  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Video recordings
Documentary films
Place:
Namibia
Date:
1950-2000
Summary:
The John Marshall Ju/'hoan Bushman Film and Video Collection contains full film and video projects (outtake material), film production elements and edited films and videos, audio tapes, still photographs, negatives, transparencies, slides, published and unpublished writing by John Marshall and others, study guides for edited films, Nyae Nyae Development Foundation and Advocacy files, maps, and production files that include letters, shot logs, translations, transcriptions, editing logs, treatments, and proposals spanning from 1950-2000. This material comprises Marshall's long-term documentary record of the Ju/'hoansi of the Nyae Nyae region of the Kalahari Desert in northeastern Namibia. A great deal of the film and video footage focuses on one particular extended family, that of Toma Tsamko, whose ancestral home is at /Gautcha, an area with a large salt pan and a permanent waterhole. The life stories of some family members are captured in the footage; appearing as children in the 1950's, middle-aged parents in the 1980's, and pensioners in the final years of visual documentation. The Marshall Collection also documents other Ju/'hoansi living in Nyae Nyae and elsewhere, their relationships with neighboring ethnic groups, and national politics that affected Ju/'hoansi. Marshall also documented the local political body (the Nyae Nyae Farmers' Cooperative, or NNFC), the foundation he started (the Nyae Nyae Development Foundation of Namibia, or NNDFN), and the ways in which both groups worked with and were affected by international development organizations and foreign aid during the 1990's.
Scope and Contents:
The John Marshall Ju/'hoan Bushman Film and Video Collection contains full film and video projects (outtake material), film production elements and edited films and videos, audio tapes, still photographs, negatives, transparencies, slides, published and unpublished writing by John Marshall and others, study guides for edited films, Nyae Nyae Development Foundation and Advocacy files, maps, and production files that include letters, shot logs, translations, transcriptions, editing logs, treatments, and proposals spanning from 1950-2000.

This material comprises Marshall's long-term documentary record of the Ju/'hoansi of the Nyae Nyae region of the Kalahari Desert in northeastern Namibia. A great deal of the film and video footage focuses on one particular extended family, that of Toma Tsamko, whose ancestral home is at /Gautcha, an area with a large salt pan and a permanent waterhole. The life stories of some family members are captured in the footage; appearing as children in the 1950's, middle-aged parents in the 1980's, and pensioners in the final years of visual documentation. Beginning in 1978, Marshall often conducted lengthy and in depth interviews with many family members, in which they reflect on past, present, and future, and often comment on specific film footage from earlier years which was shown to them during the interviews. The collection is not limited to the /Gautcha family, however; it also documents other Ju/'hoansi living in Nyae Nyae and elsewhere, their relationships with neighboring ethnic groups, and national politics that affected Ju/'hoansi. Marshall also documented the local political body (the Nyae Nyae Farmers' Cooperative, or NNFC), the foundation he started (the Nyae Nyae Development Foundation of Namibia, or NNDFN), and the ways in which both groups worked with and were affected by international development organizations and foreign aid during the 1990's. The collection also documents changes to the landscape and wildlife of the Nyae Nyae region.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 13 series: (1) Unedited Film and Video Projects, 1950-1978, 1981-2003; (2) Published Films and Videos, 1952-2002; (3) Unpublished Films and Videos, 1959-1962, circa 1965; (4) Audio, 1950s, 1978-1990; (5) Field Notes, Shot Logs, Translations, 1951-2000; (6) Production Files, 1952-2004; (7) Correspondence, 1968-2003 [bulk 1993-2000]; (8) Nyae Nyae Development Foundation & Advocacy Files, 1975-2003 [bulk 1984-2003]; (9) Published and Unpublished Writing, 1957-1958, 1980-1999, 2007; (10) Study Guides, 1974, 1982; (11) Writings by Others & Press, 1952-1953, 1965-2005; (12) Photographs, 1930s, 1946-2003; (13) Maps, 1872, 1879, 1914, 1933-1989.
Biographical / Historical:
John Marshall, filmmaker and activist, was born on November 12, 1932 in Boston, Massachusetts. He grew up in Cambridge, Massachusetts and on his family's farm in Peterborough, New Hampshire. Marshall first picked up a camera in 1950, at the age of 18, during the first of several expeditions to the Kalahari organized by his father, Laurence Marshall, the founding president of the Raytheon Corporation. The whole Marshall family - including John's mother, Lorna, and sister, Elizabeth Marshall Thomas - became engaged in a multi-disciplinary study of the Ju/'hoansi. Marshall's father assigned him the task of making a documentary film record of Ju/'hoan life and culture. Between 1950 and 1958, he shot over 300,000 feet of 16mm film (157 hours).

Marshall formed a close bond with many of his Ju/'hoan subjects, particularly with Toma "Stumpy" Tsamko, leader of the /Gautcha band. Amongst Ju/'hoansi, Marshall was known as Toma Xhosi, Toma "Longface". Probably because of this close relationship, he was forced to leave South West Africa in 1958 after his visa expired, and was not allowed back for twenty years.

During the 1960's and 1970's, Marshall became well-established as a cinema vérité filmmaker. After leaving the Film Study Center at Harvard, which he had co-directed with Robert Gardner, he worked briefly with Robert Drew and D.A. Pennebaker, and later collaborated with Fredrick Wiseman on Titicut Follies (1967). He forged friendships with leading documentary and ethnographic filmmakers, including Timothy Asch, Ricky Leacock, and Jean Rouch.

Throughout these years, Marshall continued to work with his extensive footage of Ju/'hoansi. He completed 15 short films, as well as the award-winning Bitter Melons. In 1968, Marshall partnered with Tim Asch to found Documentary Educational Resources (DER), to distribute and support the creation of ethnographic and educational film.

In 1978 Marshall was allowed to return to Nyae Nyae to shoot N!ai, the Story of a !Kung Woman. Finding his Ju/'hoan friends beset by illness, poverty, and growing social ills, John turned his attentions to development and advocacy work. Virtually abandoning his filmmaking career, Marshall started a foundation to assist Ju/'hoansi and spent most of the 1980's helping them establish water access, subsistence farming, and a local government. He began using film as an advocacy tool, and released several urgent, issuefocused videos to raise awareness of the Ju/'hoan struggle for self-determination.

Marshall continued his documentary record of Ju/'hoansi, directing his final shoot in 2000. A Kalahari Family (2002), his epic six-hour series, tells the story of the Ju/'hoansi from 1950-2000 and charts Marshall 's evolution from filmmaker to activist. He made his final visit to Nyae Nyae in 2004, and continued his advocacy work right up to his final days. John Marshall died due to complications from lung cancer on April 22, 2005.

John Marshall Chronology

1932 -- Born in Boston, Massachusetts

1950-1958 -- Marshall Family expeditions to study the Ju/'hoansi of Nyae Nyae

1957 -- Awarded B.A. in Anthropology from Harvard University The Hunters released

1958-1960 -- Associate Director (with Robert Gardner) of the Film Study Center, Peabody Museum, Harvard University

1960 -- Awarded G.S.A.S. in Anthropology from Yale University

1960-1963 -- Director, Bushmen Film Unit, Harvard University

1962 -- Sha//ge Curing Ceremony (early version of A Curing Ceremony), A Group of Women and Joking Relationship screened at Flaherty Seminar

1964-1965 -- Cameraman for NBC covering civil war in Cyprus

1966 -- Awarded M.A. in Anthropology from Harvard University

1967 -- Cameraman and Co-Director of Fredrick Wiseman's Titicut Follies

1968 -- Founded Documentary Educational Resources (DER) with Timothy Asch (first known as CDA, Center for Documentary Anthropology)

1968-1969 -- Cameraman and Director of film shoots for the Pittsburgh Police series, produced through the Center for Violence Studies at Brandeis University

1970-1974 -- Edited and released numerous short films, from both Ju/'hoan (!Kung) and Pittsburgh Police series

1972 -- Collaborated with Nicholas England (musicologist) on a film project documenting a family of drummers in Ghana (this film was never completed)

1972-1973 -- Travel to Botswana to film National Geographic's Bushmen of the Kalahari, produced by Wolper Productions

1974 -- If It Fits, documentary on failing shoe industry in Haverhill, MA, released

1976 -- Director and cameraman of film shoots for Smithsonian Festival of American Folklife

1978 -- Film shoot in Nyae Nyae for N!ai, The Story of a !Kung Woman

1980 -- N!ai, The Story of a !Kung Woman released and broadcast on PBS as partof the Odyssey series

1980-1982 -- Conducted genealogical survey in Nyae Nyae with Claire Ritchie

1982 -- Founded the Ju/wa Cattle Fund (later known as the Nyae Nyae Development Foundation of Namibia)

1985 -- Pull Ourselves Up or Die Out, Marshall's first "field report" edited on video, released

1989 -- Returns to Boston after Namibian independence

1991 -- To Hold Our Ground, another "field report" is aired on Namibian television shortly before a national Land Rights Conference

1993 -- The Cinema of John Marshall published

1995 -- Awarded Honorary M.F.A. from Rhode Island School of Design

2000 -- Final video shoot in Nyae Nyae

2002 -- A Kalahari Family premieres at the Margaret Mead Film Festival in New York City; released for general distribution in 2003

2004 -- Makes final visit to Nyae Nyae; presents proposal for water point protections

2005 -- Dies in Boston, Massachusetts
Orthography Note:
Ju/'hoansi are the speakers of the Ju/'hoan language. Various cultural descriptors used over the years include !Kung which is a language group containing three dialect groups, one of which is the Ju/'hoansi; San, which is now regarded by the Ju/'hoansi to have negative connotations; and Bushman, which ironically (given the derogatory history of this term) is now preferred by the Ju/'hoansi as a term of dignity. (Orthography information provided by Dr. Polly Wiessner, University of Utah anthropologist and longtime field worker among and researcher of the Ju/'hoansi.)

The orthography of the Ju/'hoan language has changed many times, though an official orthography was agreed upon and accepted by the Namibian government in 1991. The finding aid, cataloging records, and shot logs for the Marshall collection at Human Studies Film Archives continue to use the orthography used by the Marshall family beginning in 1950. These spellings are usually anglicized versions of the official orthography. For example, the name ≠Oma was usually rendered by the Marshalls as Toma; the place name /Aotcha as /Gautcha or Gautscha.

The majority of the footage was shot in a region of Namibia (formerly South West Africa) known as Nyae Nyae. In the 1960's, a portion of the Nyae Nyae area was officially established as a homeland for Ju/'hoansi by the South West African administration. This area, once called Eastern Bushmanland, is now known as Eastern Otjozondjupa, however it is still referred to as Nyae Nyae by Ju/'hoansi and others. The Nyae Nyae Conservancy, which encompasses a large portion of Eastern Otjozondjupa, was established in 1996.
Filmography:
JU/'HOAN BUSHMAN FILM SERIES

1952 -- First Film [also known as !Kung Bushmen of the Kalahari] (by Lorna Marshall)

1957 -- The Hunters

1959 -- A Curing Ceremony

1961 -- A Group Of Women

1962 -- A Joking Relationship

1966 -- !Kung Bushmen Hunting Equipment (directed by Lorna Marshall)

1969 -- N/um Tchai: The Ceremonial Dance of the !Kung Bushmen

1969 -- An Argument About A Marriage

1970 -- The Lion Game

1970 -- The Melon Tossing Game

1971 -- Bitter Melons

1972 -- Debe's Tantrum

1972 -- Men Bathing

1972 -- Playing With Scorpions

1972 -- A Rite of Passage

1972 -- The Wasp Nest

1974 -- Baobab Play

1974 -- Children Throw Toy Assegais

1974 -- The Meat Fight

1974 -- Tug-Of-War

1980 -- N!ai, the Story of a !Kung Woman

1985 -- Pull Ourselves Up Or Die Out

1990 -- To Hold Our Ground: A Field Report

1991 -- Peabody Museum !Kung San Exhibit Video

2002 -- A Kalahari Family

In addition to Marshall's many published films on the Ju/'hoansi, he was also involved in a variety of other film projects. He shot and co-directed Titicut Follies, a film by Fredrick Wiseman. Working in association with the Lemburg Center for Violence Studies at Brandeis University, he shot and directed a series of short films about a police squad in Pittsburgh, PA, known as the Pittsburgh Police series. He also shot and directed If It Fits, a film about the failing shoe industry in Haverhill, MA. Marshall was also the subject of two television programs: Bushmen of the Kalahari, a National Geographic special which aired in the United States, and a Japanese program called Forty Years in the Kalahari, part of the television series, Our Wonderful World. All of these, as well as Marshall's Ju/'hoan films, are included in this filmography.

PITTSBURGH POLICE SERIES

1970 -- Inside/Outside Station 9

1971 -- Three Domestics

1971 -- Vagrant Woman

1972 -- 901/904

1972 -- Investigation of a Hit and Run

1973 -- After the Game

1973 -- The 4th, 5th, & Exclusionary Rule

1973 -- A Forty Dollar Misunderstanding

1973 -- Henry Is Drunk

1973 -- The Informant

1973 -- A Legal Discussion of a Hit and Run

1973 -- Manifold Controversy

1973 -- Nothing Hurt But My Pride

1973 -- Two Brothers

1973 -- $21 or 21 Days

1973 -- Wrong Kid

1973 -- You Wasn't Loitering

OTHER FILMS

1967 -- Titicut Follies (Co-Director, Cinematographer; film by Fredrick Wiseman)

1972 -- Ghana Drumming (uncompleted; collaboration with Nicholas England)

1974 -- Bushmen of the Kalahari (by Wolper Productions for National Geographic)

1975 -- Vermont Kids (series of short films; released in 2007)

1976 -- Festival of American Folklife (uncompleted; shot for Smithsonian Institution)

1978 -- If It Fits

1988 -- Our Wonderful World: Forty Years in the Kalahari (by Nippon A-V Productions)
Related Materials:
The Human Studies Film Archives holds several related collections, including:

• The Nicholas England Collection, which consists of audio recordings from 1951-1961. This collection contains both originals and duplicates of audio tapes recorded during the Marshall Expeditions. (2005.9) • The Journal of Robert Gesteland, kept during the Marshall !Kung Expedition VI, 1957-58. (2007.17) • Master copies of the full film record of Bushmen of the Kalahari (1974), a television program featuring John Marshall's 1973 visit to the /Gwi San of Botswana, produced by Wolper Productions for National Geographic. (2008.12) • Reference copies of the full video record of Our Wonderful World: Forty Years in the Desert, Nippon A-V's 1988 Japanese television program about John Marshall and the Ju/Wa Bushman Development Foundation. (2009.2.1) • Master copies of the videotape "library" kept by John Marshall for reference and stock footage purposes. Compiled from various sources, the videos include news programs, documentaries, and raw footage of Ju/'hoansi and other San peoples from the 1920's --1990's, as well as interviews with John Marshall and his mother, Lorna Marshall. (2009.2) • Additional audio recordings, including interviews with Ju/'hoansi made by John Marshall and others. (2009.3) • Full film record of [Ghana Drumming, 1972], an uncompleted project undertaken by John Marshall and Nicholas England, which documents a family of musicians. (2008.11)

The Papers of Timothy Asch, held at the National Anthropological Archives, contain information on Asch's work with John Marshall at Harvard University from 1959-1963, their collaboration in founding DER, and details on the use of Marshall's Ju/'hoan footage in the development of MACOS (Man, A Course of Study).

There are also several closely related collections held at the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University. These collections relate to the 1950's Marshall Expeditions and include: Expeditionary Notebooks and Journals of Lorna and Laurence Marshall; Journal of Elizabeth Marshall Thomas; the Marshall Family Photograph Collection; and the Records of the South West Africa Expeditions, 1950- 1959. The Harvard Film Archive, Harvard University, holds film prints of several of Marshall's published films on the Ju/'hoansi, including The Hunters.
Provenance:
The John Marshall Ju/'hoan Bushman Film and Video Collection was received over several years of accessioning from different parties.
Restrictions:
The John Marshall Ju/'hoan Bushman Film and Video Collection is open for research. Please contact the Archives for availabilty of access copies of audio visual recordings. Original audiovisual material in the Human Studies Film Archives may not be played. Materials relating to Series 6 Production Files are restricted and not available for research until 2048, 2063, 2072. Kinship diagrams in Series 13 are restricted due to privacy concerns. Various copyrights and restrictions on commercial use apply to the reproduction or publication of film, video, audio, photographs, and maps.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use. Information on reproduction and fees available from repository.
Topic:
Anthropology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Documentary films
Citation:
The John Marshall Ju/'hoan Bushman Film and Video Collection, 1950-2000, Human Studies Film Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
HSFA.1983.11
See more items in:
John Marshall Ju/'hoan Bushman film and video collection
Archival Repository:
Human Studies Film Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pc9837628c2-5993-4cb8-8a98-9d1139f46452
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-hsfa-1983-11
Online Media:

Evan G. Schneider Collection

Photographer:
Schneider, Gilbert, 1920-1999  Search this
Schneider, Evan G., (1949 - )  Search this
Extent:
19,304 Slides (negatives, slides, and color transpariencies)
1,400 Digital scans
Culture:
Kom (African people)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Slides
Digital scans
Place:
Cameroon
Algeria
Kenya
Sahara
Niger
Date:
1947-1999
Content Description:
Collection contains negatives, slides, and color transparencies taken by Evan Schneider or his father Gilbert in Cameroon, Nigeria, Niger, Algeria, Kenya, Tanzania, and the Sahara, from 1947 to 1999. Also contains vintage silver prints, manuscripts, letters, writings, articles (self-published and other), 16 mm film, CDs, and high-resolution digital scans.
Biographical / Historical:
Gilbert Schneider (1920-1999) and his wife Mildred Voth (1920-2016) were missionaries to Cameroon between 1945 and 1961. They were born in Oregon and married in 1944—one year before they were sponsored by the North American Baptist Commission to travel to West Africa. They worked in the Mambilla region of Cameroon, and helped build and manage the New Hope Settlement, a hospital for leprosy patients in Mbingo. While abroad, the Schneiders had two children, Evan Schneider and Linda Schneider. In 1961, the family returned to the United States, where Gilbert began graduate studies and Mildred worked as a registered nurse.

Evan Schneider was born in Cameroon in 1949, where his parents were Baptist missionaries. He grew up amid the Kom Kingdom in Mbingo, before the family moved to Ohio in 1963. In 1985, Evan received a master's degree in Visual Anthropology at Oregon State University and went on to be a professional photographer. After his father's death in 1999, he returned to Mbingo to establish a memorial fund to benefit the New Hope Settlement and construct the Schneider Memorial Vocational Rehabilitation Center. Currently, Schneider lives in Oregon and is the Chief Photographer at the Oregon Historical Society.
Related Materials:
Gilbert Schneider and Mildred Schneider family papers, 1911-2016 (Coll 570), are held at the Oregon Historical Society Research Library.
Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject ot all copyright laws.
Topic:
Missionaries -- Africa  Search this
Missions to leprosy patients  Search this
Identifier:
EEPA.2020-004
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo7f2b09629-f9a2-470f-bbc5-abc29668adeb
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-eepa-2020-004

International Congress of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences 3

Collection Creator:
Rinzler, Ralph  Search this
Container:
Box 4 (Series 6)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1973, 1976
undated
Scope and Contents note:
File consists of annotated conference program, correspondence with Sol Tax regarding World Anthropology publication project, resolution on visual anthropology, conference papers by Margaret Mead, Roger Sandall, Timothy Asch, E. Richard Sorenson and Allison Jablonko, Gerald Temaner and Gordon Quinn, Paul Hockings, Jean-Dominique Lajoux, J. Mavalawa, Asen Balicki, correspondence from N. Moise Lecourt regarding Mozes' Film Project, flier for Tamu-Tamu by Gian Carlo Menotti.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Ralph Rinzler papers and audio recordings, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.RINZ, File RINZ_06_004_026
See more items in:
Ralph Rinzler papers and audio recordings
Ralph Rinzler papers and audio recordings / Series 6: Meetings and Organizations / 6.1: General Meetings and Organizations
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5cafbfe61-9597-40c5-9688-6d9dfcbcca26
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-rinz-ref3079

Temple University Anthropological and Documentary Film Conference 1

Collection Creator:
Rinzler, Ralph  Search this
Container:
Box 7 (Series 6)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
undated
1972
Scope and Contents note:
File consists of handwritten notes, preliminary program, conference program and abstracts, diagrams of film and video equipment, charts, proposal for the founding of a society for visual anthropology, program of the American Anthropological Association in ethnographic film.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Ralph Rinzler papers and audio recordings, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.RINZ, File RINZ_06_007_021
See more items in:
Ralph Rinzler papers and audio recordings
Ralph Rinzler papers and audio recordings / Series 6: Meetings and Organizations / 6.1: General Meetings and Organizations
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk512c56fd4-95c1-4500-a776-f61518b46f74
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-rinz-ref3285

Correspondence 2

Collection Creator:
Rinzler, Ralph  Search this
Container:
Box 12 (Series 6)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1981, 1984-1985
Scope and Contents note:
File consists of correspondence, meeting memoranda, reports, proposals, handwritten notes, draft program and budget FY 1986-1987, holiday card from Herschelle Challenor. Materials relate to: medium-term plan, commission on visual anthropology, U.S. National Commission activities. Correspondents include: John E. Fobes, Elliot Abrams, James McCargar, Allan Jabbour, Ralph Rinzler, James D. Phillips, Asen Balicki, Lacy A. Wright, Jr.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Ralph Rinzler papers and audio recordings, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.RINZ, File RINZ_06_012_023
See more items in:
Ralph Rinzler papers and audio recordings
Ralph Rinzler papers and audio recordings / Series 6: Meetings and Organizations / 6.4: UNESCO
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5ac1bed97-47ce-4019-8c6b-31fb66e5584c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-rinz-ref3578

Artifact Identification Using Historical Photographs: The Case of Red Cloud's Manikin

Author:
Scherer, Joanna Cohan  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Year:
2014
Citation:
Scherer, Joanna Cohan. 2014. "Artifact Identification Using Historical Photographs: The Case of Red Cloud's Manikin." Visual Anthropology, 27, (3) 217–247. https://doi.org/10.1080/08949468.2014.884896.
Identifier:
119224
DOI:
https://doi.org/10.1080/08949468.2014.884896
ISSN:
0894-9468
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries and Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:slasro_119224

Ethnographic Photography in Anthropological Research

Author:
Scherer, Joanna Cohan  Search this
Editor:
Hockings, Paul  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Year:
1995
Citation:
Scherer, Joanna Cohan. 1995. "Ethnographic Photography in Anthropological Research." In Principles of Visual Anthropology. Hockings, Paul, editor. 201–216. Mouton de Gruyter.
Identifier:
20865
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries and Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:slasro_20865

Navajo and Photography: A Critical History of the Representation of an American People

Author:
Scherer, Joanna Cohan  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Year:
1998
Citation:
Scherer, Joanna Cohan. 1998. [Book review] "Navajo and Photography: A Critical History of the Representation of an American People." Visual Anthropology Review, 14, (1), 97–99.
Identifier:
20885
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries and Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:slasro_20885

Imaging the Arctic

Author:
Scherer, Joanna Cohan  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Year:
2001
Citation:
Scherer, Joanna Cohan. 2001. [Book review] "Imaging the Arctic." Visual Anthropology, 14, (4), 461–465.
Identifier:
20904
ISSN:
0894-9468
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries and Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:slasro_20904

Memory and Imagination: The Legacy of Maidu Indian Artist Frank Day

Author:
Scherer, Joanna Cohan  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Year:
2001
Citation:
Scherer, Joanna Cohan. 2001. [Book review] "Memory and Imagination: The Legacy of Maidu Indian Artist Frank Day." Visual Anthropology, 14, (4), 459–460.
Identifier:
20905
ISSN:
0894-9468
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries and Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:slasro_20905

Bibliography on 'Ethnophotography, Especially Relating to Studies of Native Americans.'

Author:
Scherer, Joanna Cohan  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Year:
1988
Citation:
Scherer, Joanna Cohan. 1988. "Bibliography on "Ethnophotography, Especially Relating to Studies of Native Americans."." Commission on Visual Anthropology Newsletter, 32–35.
Identifier:
97505
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries and Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:slasro_97505

Balikci

Collection Creator:
Preloran, Jorge, 1933-2009  Search this
Container:
Box 1
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1985-1986
Scope and Contents:
Correspondence with filmmaker Asen Balikci and the Commission on Visual Anthropology (Montreal, Canada).
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Please contact the archives for information on availability of access copies of audiovisual recordings. Original audiovisual material in the Human Studies Film Archives may not be played.

Various copyrights and restrictions on commercial use apply to the reproduction or publication of film, video, audio, photographs, and the digital books.

Access to the Jorge Prelorán collection requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
The Jorge Prelorán films, Human Studies Film Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Jorge Prelorán films
Jorge Prelorán films / Series 6: Project Files
Archival Repository:
Human Studies Film Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pc97378ada1-30d6-4172-89d9-2bd40a5fa34a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-hsfa-2007-10-ref466

Paper presented in AAA meeting 1976 Visual Anthropology II: collecting and Presenting Visual Evidence

Collection Creator:
Gibson, Gordon D. (Gordon Davis), 1915-2007  Search this
Container:
Box 117
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
1976
Collection Restrictions:
The Gordon Davis Gibson papers are open for research. Access to the computer disks in the collection are restricted due to preservation concerns. The personnel files of Smithsonian staff have also been restricted.

Access to the Gordon Davis Gibson papers requires an appointment.
Collection Citation:
Gordon Davis Gibson papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Gordon Davis Gibson papers
Gordon Davis Gibson papers / Series 7: Curatorial Files / Associated Activities
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3c392d8ac-2a84-4109-83b1-0ffa4b7ebbd7
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1984-13-ref3002

"At the Other End of the Camera", Visual Anthropology, 1992

Collection Collaborator:
McElwee, Ross  Search this
Blitz, Daniel  Search this
Bishop, John Melville  Search this
Baker, Peter  Search this
Ritchie, Claire  Search this
Young, Robert  Search this
Terry, John  Search this
Galvin, Frank  Search this
Bestall, Clifford  Search this
Gardner, Robert  Search this
Asch, Timothy, 1932-1994  Search this
Marshall, Lorna  Search this
Collection Creator:
Marshall, John, 1932-2005 (ethnographic filmmaker)  Search this
Container:
Box 1
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
1992
Collection Restrictions:
The John Marshall Ju/'hoan Bushman Film and Video Collection is open for research. Please contact the Archives for availabilty of access copies of audio visual recordings. Original audiovisual material in the Human Studies Film Archives may not be played. Materials relating to Series 6 Production Files are restricted and not available for research until 2048, 2063, 2072. Kinship diagrams in Series 13 are restricted due to privacy concerns. Various copyrights and restrictions on commercial use apply to the reproduction or publication of film, video, audio, photographs, and maps.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use. Information on reproduction and fees available from repository.
Collection Citation:
The John Marshall Ju/'hoan Bushman Film and Video Collection, 1950-2000, Human Studies Film Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
John Marshall Ju/'hoan Bushman film and video collection
John Marshall Ju/'hoan Bushman film and video collection / Series 9: Published and Unpublished Writing
Archival Repository:
Human Studies Film Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pc989316742-7df0-456e-b25b-2eea6aea3d23
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-hsfa-1983-11-ref772

Oral history interview with Robert Mangold, 2017 November 16

Interviewee:
Mangold, Robert, 1937-  Search this
Interviewer:
Lyon, Christopher, 1949-  Search this
Subject:
Albers, Josef  Search this
Chaet, Bernard  Search this
Hesse, Eva  Search this
Katz, Alex  Search this
LeWitt, Sol  Search this
Lippard, Lucy R.  Search this
Marden, Brice  Search this
Nice, Don  Search this
Welliver, Neil  Search this
Wyman, Robert  Search this
Cleveland Institute of Art  Search this
Mnuchin Gallery  Search this
Pace Gallery  Search this
Society for Visual Anthropology (U.S.)  Search this
Yale/Norfolk Summer School of Art  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Place:
Italy -- description and travel
New York (N.Y.) -- Description and travel
Citation:
Quotes and excerpts must be cited as follows: Oral history interview with Robert Mangold, 2017 November 16. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Abstract expressionism  Search this
Art -- Technique  Search this
Minimal art  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Pop art  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)17524
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)391130
AAA_collcode_mangol17
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_391130
Online Media:

Terence Turner papers

Creator:
Turner, Terence  Search this
Names:
Chagnon, Napoleon A., 1938-  Search this
Neel, James V. (James Van Gundia), 1915-  Search this
Tierney, Patrick  Search this
Extent:
56.6 Linear feet (100 document boxes, 4 half-document boxes, 21 shoe boxes, 1 oversize box, and 10 map folders)
86 Sound cassettes
72 Sound tape reels (5")
21 Sound tape reels (3")
4 Sound cassettes (microcassette)
3 Sound tape reels (7")
157 Videocassettes (VHS)
48 Videocassettes (MiniDV)
11 Videodiscs (DVD)
10 Videocassettes (U-matic)
6 Electronic discs (DVD)
2 Film reels (Approximately 3200 feet)
1 Videocassettes (VHS-C)
1 Videocassettes (Hi8)
1 Videocassettes (Video 8)
Culture:
Mebêngôkre (Kayapó/Cayapo)  Search this
Yanomami (Yanoama)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Sound tape reels
Sound cassettes (microcassette)
Videocassettes (vhs)
Videocassettes (minidv)
Videodiscs (dvd)
Videocassettes (u-matic)
Electronic discs (dvd)
Film reels
Videocassettes (vhs-c)
Videocassettes (hi8)
Videocassettes (video 8)
Place:
Amazon River Region
Date:
1938-1942
1952-2015
bulk 1964-2008
Summary:
Terence "Terry" Sheldon Turner (1935-2015) was best known for his ethnographic work among the Mebêngôkre (Kayapó) people of the Amazon rainforest and his work as an activist for the Mebêngôkre and other communities. This collection documents his interest in the Mebêngôkre and his work as a human rights activist. It includes field notes, censuses, papers, notes, correspondence, news clippings, sound recordings, films, photographs, charts and diagrams, genealogy and kinship information, and computer discs.
Scope and Contents:
The Terence Turner papers contain materials related to his work as an anthropologist and human rights activist. Turner's primary focus of research was the Mebêngôkre (Kayapó) people of the Amazon rainforest. The collection contains field notes, censuses, papers and draft manuscripts, correspondence, notes, news clippings, sound recordings, films, photographs, charts and diagrams, genealogy and kinship information, and computer discs relating to that interest. His work in human rights is also well documented; the collection contains notes, papers, correspondence, and news clippings. A significant amount of the human rights material relates to the Yanomami controversy which arose when Turner and Leslie Sponsel sent the American Anthropological Association a memo warning of the furor that was likely to result from the publication of the book Darkness in El Dorado by Patrick Tierney. The human rights materials in the collection also include materials relating to the Mebêngôkre and their environmental protection protests and demonstrations. The film and video primarily relate to the Granada Television films for which he consulted and the films produced by the Kayapo with the help of the Kayapo Video Project. There are some materials relating to courses which he taught or took.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 7 series: (1) Research, 1952-2015; (2) Human rights, ethics, and activism, circa 1964-2015; (3) Papers, conferences, and courses, 1959-2013; (4) Correspondence and contacts, 1966-2008; (5) Computer files, 1983-2010; (6) Photographs, 1938-1942, 1952, 1962-2014; (7) Sound recordings, 1962, 1976-2003; and (8) Film and video, 1975-2008
Biographical Note:
Terence "Terry" Sheldon Turner (1935-2015) was best known for his ethnographic work with the Mebêngôkre (Kayapó) people of the Amazon rainforest and his work as an activist for the Mebêngôkre and other communities. He was born in Philadelphia and raised outside of Washington, DC. He earned his A.B. from Harvard University (1957) and M.A. from the University of California, Berkeley (1959), in Modern European History. His interest in how society functions brought him to the Department of Social Relations at Harvard University for his Ph.D. (1965), where his studies turned to Social Anthropology. His interests were still in Europe, but his advisor, David Maybury-Lewis, persuaded him to study the Mebêngôkre in Brazil (Moberg). Despite his initial intentions, Turner developed a lasting relationship with the Mebêngôkre, who gave him the name Wakampu. He worked with the community for more than 50 years, visiting them over 20 times.

Turner and his then wife, Joan Bamberger, lived with the Mebêngôkre (Kayapó) from 1962 to 1964 while conducting research for their dissertations. His initial studies were on socio-cultural change, social organization, political systems, dual organization, a comparison to other Gê tribes, and mythology. Joan studied Mebêngôkre material culture, as it related to both function and significance. Turner's interest in mythology and the ties between the structure and motifs of myths to social structure led him to spend a year (1966-1967) at the University of Paris where Claude Lévi-Strauss was working on a project involving comparisons of mythology and social structure of different Central Brazilian indigenous groups.

Turner taught at Cornell University from 1966 to 1968, at the University of Chicago from 1968 to 1999, and then returned to Cornell from 1999 to 2015 where his wife, Jane Fajans, was also a professor. While teaching at the University of Chicago, Turner developed an interest in Karl Marx and the applications of his theories to anthropology (Moberg). He stated in a Guggenheim grant application that "Another main line of theoretical effort has been my attempt to generalize Marx's concept of value to account for the forms of social value generated in such forms of 'social production', in particular those of the Kayapo and other primitive, classless societies" (Terence Turner papers). In an interview for an article in the Chicago Reader, he said that "The Kayapo didn't have an economic sphere. They didn't have commodity production. Production for them in an immediate sense is production of their lives, and of course then you realize–wow!–this is a society for which the complete human being through all stages of life, right up to death, is the supreme product. It's the most complex and demanding product, and the social order is the whole process of producing that product" (Moberg). His interest in Marx led him to study Piaget, Vygotsky, Leont'ev, and Zinchenko, who "provided analytically principled ways of connecting material activity with forms of consciousness" (Terence Turner papers).

Turner was interested in visual anthropology. He assisted in the production of three British documentaries on the Mebêngôkre people: the BBC's Face Values in 1976 and Granada Television's Disappearing World series episodes "The Kayapo" and "The Kayapo: Out of the Forest" in 1987 and 1989. He also assisted the Mebêngôkre in documenting their own culture. The Mebêngôkre had obtained video cameras in 1985 and Turner encouraged them to obtain more cameras from the Granada crew in return for access to the community in 1987 (Harms). In 1990, he created the Kayapo Video Project, which funded the purchase of cameras, education for the Mebêngôkre filmmakers in filming and editing, and preserving the original footage at the Kayapo Video Archive/Arquivo de Video Kaiapo at the Centro de Trabalho Indigenista. Turner stated in a 1996 request for funding that the purpose of the project was "to generate an extensive archive of videos about all aspects of Kayapo culture and ecological knowledge, and simultaneously build up a cadre of well-trained video camerapersons and video-editors capable of continuing video-making and using activities into the future. The videos will be produced (both shot and edited) by the Kayapo themselves. They will form the backbone of a larger project of Kayapo cultural preservation, provide visual tests for use in a projected Kayapo educational program, and also generate a unique audio-visual record of the ecological knowledge and technology of a major Amazonian culture" (Terence Turner papers).

Turner was also very involved in human rights work and activism for indigenous communities. He felt it was the responsibility of anthropologists to defend the rights of the people whom they studied. He was involved in "anthropological activism," assisting the Mebêngôkre and others in their fight to protect their rights and environment. This interest began when Turner investigated the movement of miners, loggers, and poachers onto Mebêngôkre lands for FUNAI (the Fundação Nacional do Índio) (Harms). There were widespread protests against these incursions by the Mebêngôkre beginning in the early 1970s, which resulted in the Mebêngôkre gaining land rights. Despite this success, conflicts between the Mebêngôkre and Brazilian nationals, as well as within the Mebêngôkre community, continued. Turner both observed and participated in many of these protests and documented the ways in which these actions affected Mebêngôkre society and culture. Two of the most important protests concerned the planned construction of a series of hydroelectric dams on the Xingú River. The first protest, at Altamira in 1989, successfully derailed the project. The success of this protest brought international attention to the Mebêngôkre, who sent representatives to Canada in 1992 to support the Cree, who were protesting the construction of a hydroelectric dam there. The Brazilian government redesigned their original plans for the series of dams on the Xingú River; when these plans were leaked in 2008, another protest ensued. Turner and his daughter, Vanessa, documented this protest.

Turner's commitment to human rights led to him becoming a founding member of the American Anthropological Association's Ethics Committee (1969-1972) and Committee for Human Rights (1992-1997), serving as president of Survival International, U.S.A., heading the Special Commission of the American Anthropological Association to Investigate the Situation of the Brazilian Yanomami (1990-1991), and receiving the Solon T. Kimball Award from the American Anthropological Association in 1998.

Sources Cited

American Anthropological Association. "AAA Mourns the Loss of Dr. Terence Turner." Accessed June 22, 2022. https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/NewsDetail.aspx?ItemNumber=13188

Glaser, Linda B. "Anthropologist Terence Turner dies at 79." Cornell Chronicle, November 11, 2015.

Harms, William. "Terence Turner, anthropologist and human rights advocate for indigenous people, 1935-2015." UChicago News, November 17, 2015.

Moberg, David. "When Worlds Collide: Encounters with Anthropologist Terence Turner and other agents of modernity left the Kayapo of Brazil with something they'd never had before: power." Chicago Reader, October 2, 1997.

Survival International. "Terry Turner." Accessed June 22, 2022. https://www.survivalinternational.org/news/10992

Terence Turner papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

1935 December 30 -- Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

1957 -- A.B. from Harvard College in Modern European History, graduating cum Laude

1959 -- M.A. from the University of California, Berkley, in Modern European History

1961 -- Married Joan Bamberger on August 25

1962 -- Began work with Mebêngôkre (Kayapó)

1965 -- Ph.D. from Harvard University's Department of Social Relations in Social Anthropology Research associate at the Museo Nacional do Brasil

1966-1968 -- Visiting assistant professor of anthropology at Cornell University

1968-1982 -- Assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Chicago

1969-1972 -- Member of the American Anthropological Association's Ethics Committee

1976 -- Advisor for the filming of Face Values with the BBC

1980 -- Married Jane Fajans on July 25

1981 -- Daughter Vanessa Fajans-Turner born on September 26

1982-1999 -- Professor of anthropology at the University of Chicago.

1984 -- Daughter Allison Fajans-Turner born on June 15

1987 -- Advisor for the filming of Disappearing World: The Kayapo with Granada Films

1989 -- Advisor for the filming of Disappearing World: The Kayapo: Out of the Forest with Granada Films

1990-1991 -- Chair of the American Anthropological Association's Special Commission to Investigate the Situation of the Brazilian Yanomami

1992-1997 -- Member of the American Anthropological Association's Committee for Human Rights

1998 -- Received Solon T. Kimball Award from the American Anthropological Association

1999-2004 -- Adjunct professor of anthropology at Cornell University.

2004-2015 -- Visiting professor of anthropology at Cornell University.

2015 November 7 -- Died in Ithaca, New York.
Orthography:
The archivist uses Mebêngôkre (Kayapó) or Mebêngôkre to refer to the Mebêngôkre people. However, Turner and other anthropologists whose work is included in the collection used other spelling variations (Mẽbêngôkre, Mebengokre, Megengokré, Kayapó, Kayapo, Kaiapó, Kaiapo, Cayapó, Cayapo, and Caiapo) which have not be altered in folder titles or descriptions.

The archivist uses Yanomami to refer to the Yanomami (Yanoama) people. Some folder titles or contents may use the Yanomamö spelling.
Related Materials:
Materials related to the Mebêngôkre (Kayapó) in the National Anthropological Archives (NAA) can also be found in the William Lipkind papers and Photo Lot 79-1. Materials related to the Yanomami in the NAA can also be found in the Timothy Asch papers, the American Anthropological Association records, and Photo Lot 94-28. Materials related to the Yanomami in the Human Studies Film Archives (HSFA) can be found in the Timothy Asch and Napoleon Chagnon films of the Yanomamo.
Provenance:
The Terence Turner papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Turner's wife, Jane Fajans, in 2020.
Restrictions:
Audiovisual and digital materials are restricted. Please contact the archives for information on the availability of access copies.

Graded papers are restricted for 80 years from the date of their creation and grant applications are restricted for 30 years from the date of their creation. These restrictions are noted on the folder level.

Access to the Terence Turner papers requires and appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Human Rights  Search this
Ethics  Search this
Brazil  Search this
Environmental issues  Search this
Indigenous peoples -- Civil rights  Search this
Citation:
Terence Turner papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2020-03
See more items in:
Terence Turner papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3c4036e9a-bdac-4313-9fe0-b42094d645fd
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2020-03

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