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Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Contracts
Notes
Video recordings
Videotapes
Slides (photographs)
Memorandums
Sound recordings
Correspondence
Negatives
Audiotapes
Plans (drawings)
Digital images
Audiocassettes
Business records
Photographic prints
Place:
Caribbean Area
Bermuda Islands
Date:
June 27-July 8, 2001
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 5 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: Bermuda Connections

Series 3: Masters of the Building Arts

Series 4: New York City at the Smithsonian

Series 5: Special Events
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival was produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
More so than monuments, buildings, museum-quality artifacts, historical facts, or even valued performances, the Festival celebrates the people who make them, hold them in esteem, and debate their meaning. The Festival represents a wonderful range and diversity of voices and human experiences. The 2001 Festival featured programs on the building arts, New York City, and Bermuda.

The Masters of the Building Arts program brought together expert craftspeople in the building trades, including many who use traditional arts to restore our monuments and historic sites. Among them visitors could find many of the artisans who have worked on the Washington Monument, the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial, Acoma Pueblo, historic Charleston, and Native Hawaiian sites - all important monuments protected by the National Park Service, the Smithsonian's partner in the Festival since 1973.

The New York City program highlighted the way in which that city has become the global village. Broadway, the fashion industry, the Apollo Theater, and Wall Street were all featured. So too was the vital cultural creativity that has come about as people from the world over have settled in New York. The Festival provided a contemporary look at immigration and its importance to our culture. The fact that so many people from every corner of the earth have come to our shores through New York in order to build their lives and our nation has inspired generations, and the Festival offered the opportunity to encounter those communities and experience their cultural heritage.

Bermuda, though separated from the United States by hundreds of miles of ocean, has long played a role in our history. Bermuda was settled by colonists on their way to Jamestown, Virginia, where they rescued starving survivors of that colony. ln the last century, Bermuda, always entrepreneurial and self-reliant, has developed tourism and financial industries in a symbiotic relationship with the United States. Bermudians foster strong community connections within their own island society, as well as those of commerce, culture, and cooperation with the people of nations whose shores touch the Atlantic Ocean. Festival visitors could transport themselves to a tiny island of Bermuda within the Festival site on the National Mall, experiencing its cultural traditions through interaction with Bermudian participants.

The Festival always depends on solid research. Several dozen Bermudian scholars, educators, and artists working with Smithsonian curator Diana Baird N'Diaye interviewed hundreds of tradition-bearers, documenting everything from gardening to house-building to music-making. That documentary archive of tapes, photographs, field notes, and videos constitutes a snapshot of Bermudian culture and provided the basis for the Festival program, as well as a resource for the future. A similar effort took place New York City, where folklorist Nancy Groce directed the curatorial work - selecting the traditions to feature at the Festival and the people to present them - aided by cultural organizations in the city, among them the Center for Traditional Music and Dance, City Lore, and the Museum of American Financial History, a Smithsonian affiliate. Masters of the Building Arts grew from the vision of the Smithsonian's Marjorie Hunt, guided by her own long-term research on the stone carvers of the National Cathedral.

The 2001 Festival took place during two five-day weeks (June 27-July 1 and July 4-8) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 9th Street and 13th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan). It featured three programs, with several special events including the Ralph Rinzler Memorial Concert.

The 2001 Program Book included schedules and participant lists for each program; keynote essays provided background on the Festival and on each of the programs.

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage.

Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage

Richard Kurin, Director; Richard Kennedy, Deputy Director; Diana Parker, Festival Director; Daniel Sheehy, Director, Smithsonian Folkways Recordngs; James Early, Director, Cultural Heritage Policy; Olivia Cadaval, Chair, Research & Education; Jon Kertzer, Project Director, GlobalSound Network; D.A. Sonneborn, Assistant Director, Smithsonian Folkways Recordings; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist Emeritus; Betty J. Belanus, Nancy Groce, Marjorie Hunt, Diana Baird N'Diaye, Peter Seitel, Cynthia Vidaurri, Curators, Folklorists, Education and Cultural Specialists; Frank Proschan, Project Director, Save Our Sounds; Carla M. Borden, Program/Publications Manager; John W. Franklin, Program Manager; Jeffrey Place, Archivist; Stephanie Smith, Assistant Archivist; Arlene L. Reiniger, Program Specialist; Charlie Weber, Media Specialist; Frank Bechter, Roland Freeman, Ivan Karp, Alan Lomax, Worth Long, Rene Lopez, Jemima Pierre, Kate Rinzler, Ana Patricia Rodriguez, Fellows & Research Associates

Folklife Advisory Council

Jane Beck, Kurt Dewhurst, Anthony Gittens, Pat Jasper, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Judy Mitoma, Bernice Johnson Reagon, Gilbert Sprauve, Jack Tchen, Ricardo Trimillos

Folkways Advisory Board

Michael Asch, Phyllis Barney, Don DeVito, Ella Jenkins,

National Park Service

Denis P. Galvin, Acting Director; Jack Schamp, Director, National Capital Region
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Folk music  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folk art  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folklore  Search this
World music  Search this
Genre/Form:
Contracts
Notes
Video recordings
Videotapes
Slides (photographs)
Memorandums
Sound recordings
Correspondence
Negatives
Audiotapes
Plans (drawings)
Digital images
Audiocassettes
Business records
Photographic prints
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2001
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-2001

Bermuda Connections

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Approaching Bermuda by air or sea, one notices first that the isles are opulently landscaped and impeccably adorned with lush gardens and pastel architecture. For its 300,000 yearly visitors and 60,000 islanders alike it is a land that is small in area but rich in culture. Bermuda is at once a geographic place and cultural space - a creation of human enterprise, artistry, and effort.

Bermuda's local culture grew out of the island's strategic location. From its very early settlement this tiny archipelago was a central navigational landmark between the British lsles, mainland America, the Caribbean, and later the Azores. Patterns of travel and exchange have continued to rejuvenate the cultural fabric of the island colony. These patterns have been a source of material goods, population, and culture. People, ideas, and goods, along with music, foods, and other forms of culture, flow out and back from Bermuda with the regularity of the ocean tides. Bermudian folklife is the creative, pragmatic, and unique fusion of these cosmopolitan trends - a fusion that was vividly on display to visitors at the 2001 Festival.

Bermudians value the resourcefulness with which they turn circumstances to their own use. In keeping with their perception of constant risk yet relative good fortune, they are realists, opportunists, and yet careful to acknowledge divine providence (there are more local religious establishments per person than most places in the world). They endeavor to use every resource; to watch what and who enters and leaves the island; to foster, nurture, and manage connections between family and community. They maintain clear borders between insiders and outsiders. These values permeate Bermudian experience. Bermudian culture shapes the island, and the island shape Bermudian culture. Festival visitors could share in this Bermudian experience, if only for a few hours, as it was transported to the National Mall for two weeks during the Festival.

Diana Baird N'Diaye was Curator, with Jackie Aubrey as Program Coordinator for Bermuda, and Yulette George as Program Coordinator for the U.S. The Bermuda Coordinating Committee included: Heather Whalen, Cultural Affairs Officer; Geneva Humdy-Woodley, Development and Sponsorship Relations; Linda Smith, Public Relations.

An Advisory Roundtable included: Charlotte Andrews, Johnny Barnes, R. Bruce Barritt, Jolene Bean, Geoff Bell, Joanne Brangman, Gary Burgess, Alan Burland, The Hon. Dale Butler, J.P., M.P., Karen Cabral, Colin Campbell, George Cook, Eddy DeMello, Connie Dey, Caroldey Douglas, Llewellyn Emery, Richard Fell, Glenn Fubler, Eloise Furbert, LaVerne Furbert, Sylvie Gervais, Joe Gibbons, Jennifer Gray, Joyce D. Hall, Edward Harris, Randolph Hayward, Carol Hill, Eva Hodgson, Sharon Jacobs, Elizabeth Kawaley, Ed Kelly, Stanley Kennedy, Fanon Khaldun, Ronald Lightbourne, Elsie Martin, Clarence Maxwell, Florenz Webbe Maxwell, Conchita Ming, Frederick Ming, Marshall Minors, Beverley Morfitt, Stanley Oliver, Amanda Outerbridge, Elise Outerbridge, Graeme Outerbridge, John Payne, Shirley Pearman, Ira Phillip, M.B.E., J.P., Liz Pimental, Robert Pires, Patricia Pogson, Grace Rawlins, Anthony Richardson, Veronica Ross, Dennis Sherwin, Llewellyn Simmons, Senator Calvin Smith, James Smith, Mary Talbot, Ruth Thomas, Shangri-La Durham Thompson, James Tucker, Yvona Vujacic, Jack Ward, Mary Winchell, and James Zuill.

The program was produced in partnership with the Bermuda Government Departments of Community and Cultural Affairs within the Ministry of the Environment, Development & Opportunity and The Bermuda Connections Smithsonian Folk life Festival Charitable Trust. The Leadership Committee was chaired by The Honourable Terry E. Lister, J.P., M.P. Major contributors included the Bank of Bermuda Foundation, the Bermuda Hotel Association, BELCO, Cable a Wireless, Tyco International Ltd., ACE Limited, The Argus Group, and Centre Solutions. Major in-kind support was provided by the Bermuda Container Line, the Bermuda Hotel Association, Appleby, Spurling a Kempe, Bermuda Export Sea Transfer, Stevedoring Services, XL Capital Ltd., and Deloitte & Touche.
Researchers, Presenters, and Curatorial Committee:
Marcelle Beach, Bonnie Exell, Rawle Frederick, Joe Gibbons, Nan Godet, Ronald Lightbourne, Diana Lynn, Florenz Webbe Maxwell, Elizabeth Pedro, Gary Phillips, Patricia Phillips, Robert Pires, Llewellen Simmons, Ruth Thomas, Lynne Thorne, James Tucker, Joy Wilson Tucker, Cynthia Vidaurri, Shirley White, James Ziral, John Zuill, William Zuill
Presenters:
Jolene Bean, Llewellyn Emery, Bonnie Exell, Rawle Fredrick, Joe Gibbons, Nan Godet, Randy Horton, Ron Lightbourne, Fred Ming, Elizabeth Pedro, Gary Phillips, Patricia Phillips, Llewellyn Simmons, Vejay Steede, Ruth Thomas, Lynne Thorne, James Tucker, Joy Wilson Tucker, Judith Wadson, Shirley White
Participants:
Arts of the Sea

Chris Flook, specimen collector, Smith's, Bermuda

Lisa Haynes, Seagull racer, boat builder, Hamilton, Bermuda

Llewellyn Hollis, fisherman, Pembroke, Bermuda

Michael Hooper, model boat maker, Warwick, Bermuda

Nick Hutchings, diver, Somerset, Bermuda

Royle Kemp, sailor, Southampton, Bermuda

Anson Nash, boat builder, Bermuda

George Outerbridge, glass bottom boat guide, St. George's, Bermuda

Amanda Petty, Seagull racer, boat builder, Warwick, Bermuda

Andrew Petty, Seagull racer, Pembroke, Bermuda

Mike Tatem, fitted dinghy sailor, Sandys, Bermuda

Tim Ward, Seagull racer, boat builder, St. George's, Bermuda

Alexandra West, sail maker, repairer, Shelly Bay, Bermuda

Arts of the Land, Bermuda

Joanne Adams, herbalist, Southampton, Bermuda

Teddy Burgess, builder, Paget, Bermuda

Eddie Cattell, home gardener, Flatts, Bermuda

Tony DaCosta, builder, Bermuda

Coleridge Fubler, builder, Southampton, Bermuda

Randy Furbert, beekeeper, Crawl, Bermuda

Andre Hubbard, furniture maker, restorer, Flatts, Bermuda

Altino Lopes, builder, Paget, Bermuda

Larry Mills, builder, Southampton, Bermuda

Trevor Mills, builder, Southampton, Bermuda

Julian Van Lowe, builder, Warwick, Bermuda

Tom Wadson, farmer, Southampton, Bermuda

Elizabeth Wingate, ornamental home gardener, Warwick, Bermuda

Arts of Hospitality

Betty Grant, floral arranger, Bermuda

Jane Greene, guest house owner, manager, Southampton, Bermuda

Shawn Lekki, show bartender, Hamilton, Bermuda

Fred Ming, chef, Hamilton Parish, Bermuda

Fernanda Pacheco, cook, St. David's, Bermuda

Muriel Richardson-Greaves, guest house manager, Pembroke, Bermuda

Laquita Trew, home baker, Somerset, Bermuda

Carvel Van Putten, bell captain, perfumer, Hamilton, Bermuda

Judith Wadson, foodways, Sandys, Bermuda

Shirley White, candy maker, Paget, Bermuda

Arts of Play

Matilda Caines, doll maker, Smith's, Bermuda

Judith James, teacher, children's games, Paget, Bermuda

Florenz Webbe Maxwell, storyteller, Warwick, Bermuda

Al Seymour, Jr., kite maker, Sandys, Bermuda

Al Seymour, Sr., kite maker, cricketer, Devonshire, Bermuda

Antoine Simons, kite maker, Somerset, Bermuda

Vincent Tuzo, kite maker, Paget, Bermuda

Family and Community Connections

Joe Almeida, Portuguese home decorating, Flatts, Bermuda

Lisa Almeida, Portuguese holiday crafts, Flatts, Bermuda

Jolene Bean, genealogist, family folklorist, Somerset, Bermuda

Violet Brangman, lodge traditions, oral historian, Pembroke, Bermuda

Carlos Brum, Azorean home, holiday traditions, Paget, Bermuda

Natalia Brum, Azorean home, holiday traditions, Paget, Bermuda

Yeaton Outerbridge, family business, foodways, family historian, Hamilton, Bermuda

Gloria Pearman, home, holiday decoration, home hospitality, Somerset, Bermuda

Joy Wilson Tucker, Bermudian community traditions, Pembroke, Bermuda

Crafts

Ronnie Chameau, banana doll maker, St. David's, Bermuda

Llewellyn Emery, cedar carver, Hamilton, Bermuda

Genevieve Escolastica, crochet artist, Paget, Bermuda

Fred Phillips, furniture maker, restorer, Warwick, Bermuda

Chesley Trott, cedar carver, Southampton, Bermuda

Janice Tucker, Gombey costume maker, herbalist, Pembroke, Bermuda

Arts of Performance

Gita Blakeney, vocals, Hamilton, Bermuda

Geneman (Marvin Stovell), reggae singer, Warwick, Bermuda

Leyoni Junos, vocals, Hamilton, Bermuda

Runksie (Philando Hill), reggae singer, Flatts, Bermuda

Gene Steede, Calypsonian, Pembroke, Bermuda

APEX 4 QUARTET, HAMILTON PARISH -- APEX 4 QUARTET, HAMILTON PARISHEric Whitter, group leader, vocals, Hamilton Parish, BermudaGary Bean, vocals, Hamilton Parish, BermudaHarry Bean, vocals, Hamilton Parish, BermudaRobert Symonds, vocals, Hamilton Parish, Bermuda

BERMUDA STROLLERS -- BERMUDA STROLLERSTed Ming, leader, Southamption, BermudaHerman Burch, bass guitar, Warwick, BermudaJohn Burch, lead guitar, Warwick, BermudaMichael Cupidore, steel pan, Devonshire, BermudaJames Martinez, steel pan, Devonshire, BermudaGladstone Ming, congas, Southampton, Bermuda

JAZ -- JAZMike Stowe, leader, Bailey's Bay, BermudaStephan Ahknaton, keyboard, Hamilton, BermudaDennis Francis, bass, Southampton, BermudaJade Minors, saxophone, St. George's, BermudaDayton Wharton, guitar, Smith's, Bermuda

MOSAIC -- MOSAICGary Phillips, spoken word, Paget, BermudaGrace Rawlins, spoken word, St. David's, BermudaRuth Thomas, spoken word, Southampton, Bermuda

NOT THE UM-UM PLAYERS -- NOT THE UM-UM PLAYERSBruce Barritt, satirist, spoken word, Devonshire, BermudaFred Barritt, satirist, spoken word, Pembroke, BermudaChris Broadhurst, satirist, spoken word, Hinson's Island, BermudaPeter Smith, satirist, spoken word, Warwick, BermudaTim Taylor, satirist, spoken word, Devonshire, Bermuda

PLACE'S GOMBEYS -- PLACE'S GOMBEYSAndre Place, captain, dancer, Devonshire, BermudaDion Ball, Jr., drums, Crawl, BermudaGlenville DeShields, dancer, BermudaKyree A. Dillas, dancer, Pembroke, BermudaJahdeko Fubler, dancer, Hamilton, BermudaTafari Mallory, dancer, Devonshire, BermudaAndre Parsons, lead drum, Shelly Bay, BermudaLeoshawon Place, dancer, Smith's, BermudaShaun Place, dancer, drums, Warwick, BermudaStevon Somersall, 2nd chief, dancer, Crawl, BermudaDelmair D. Trott, chief, dancer, Pembroke, BermudaDenton Trott, bow and arrow leader, dancer, Pembroke, Bermuda

SHINE HAYWARD, HAMILTON -- SHINE HAYWARD, HAMILTONWendell "Shine" Hayward, saxophone, Hamilton, BermudaAnthony Bicchieri, piano, Hamilton, BermudaEugene Joell, guitar, Hamilton, BermudaVernon Tucker, drums, Hamilton, BermudaEugene Tuzo, bass, Hamilton, BermudaJohnny Woolridge, piano, Hamilton, Bermuda

TRUNEH AND FIRES OF AFRICA, DEVONSHIRE -- TRUNEH AND FIRES OF AFRICA, DEVONSHIREDeverux "Truneh" Flood, lead vocals, percussion, Devonshire, BermudaMaxinne Burch, vocals, Devonshire, BermudaKristos Ingham, vocals, Devonshire, BermudaStamford Jackson, drums, Devonshire, BermudaCarlos Richardson, keyboardist, lead guitar, Devonshire, BermudaSidney Simmons, bass, Devonshire, Bermuda

WARNER GOMBEYS -- WARNER GOMBEYSAllan Warner, captain, dancer, St. David's, BermudaBilal Binns, dancer, Sandys, BermudaEldridge Burrows, 2nd vice-captain, Hamilton, BermudaDavid Darrell, drums, Pembroke, BermudaWilfred Furbert, drums, dancer, Pembroke, BermudaGerkimo Gardiner, dancer, Devonshire, BermudaAndre Simons, vice-captain, dancer, Pembroke, BermudaWillis A. Steede, dancer, Pembroke, BermudaWillis 0. Steede, drums, Pembroke, BermudaMarcus Tucker, dancer, Paget, BermudaWilliam L. Warner, drums, dancer, Sandys, BermudaRobert Wilson, captain, dancer, Hamilton, Bermuda

Arts of Celebration

BERMUDA PIPE BAND, ST. GEORGE'S -- BERMUDA PIPE BAND, ST. GEORGE'SDavid Frith, leader, St. George's, BermudaJoel Cassidy, St. George's, BermudaGeorge Cooke, St. George's, BermudaJosh Simons, St. George's, Bermuda

BERMUDA REGIMENT BAND -- BERMUDA REGIMENT BANDBarrett Dill, bandmaster, BermudaDeonnie Benjamin, BermudaAllan Brown, BermudaNeilson DeGraff, BermudaAndre Esdaille, BermudaAlfred Furbert, BermudaStyles Furbert, BermudaWayne Furbert, BermudaPhilip Pitman, BermudaJohn Richards, BermudaOrin Simmons, BermudaMaclarien Smith, BermudaAidan Stones, BermudaCarmen Trott, BermudaJohn Van-Lowe, BermudaDwayne Williams, BermudaStanley Ward, Bermuda

CRICKET LEGENDS -- CRICKET LEGENDSColin Blades, captain, batsman, radio commentator, Paget, BermudaGladstone Brown, opening batsman, Southampton, BermudaAllan Douglas, cricket coach, wicket keeper, St. George's, BermudaDarin Lewis, all-rounder, Warwick, BermudaAllan "Forty" Rego, Sr., crown and anchor, Warwick, BermudaMansfield "Bojangles" Smith, groundskeeper, St. George's, BermudaWendell Smith, cricket coach, St. George's, BermudaDennis Wainwright, wicket keeper, opening batsman, St. George's, BermudaC.V. Woolridge, cricket commentator, Smith's, BermudaWarrington "Soup" Zuill, cricket storyteller, St. George's, Smith's, Bermuda

ST. GEORGE'S CRICKET CLUB, ST. GEORGE'S -- ST. GEORGE'S CRICKET CLUB, ST. GEORGE'SLouis DeSilva, president, St. George's, BermudaJason Anderson, St. George's, BermudaAnkoma Cannonier, St. George's, BermudaMaxwell Crane, St. George's, BermudaEugene Foggo, St. George's, BermudaGregory Foggo, St. George's, BermudaKameron Fox, St. George's, BermudaSinclair Gibbons, St. George's, BermudaKenny Phillips, St. George's, BermudaMark Ray, St. George's, BermudaAndrew Richardson, St. George's, BermudaDetroy Smith, St. George's, BermudaRyan Steede, St. George's, Bermuda

SOMERSET BRIGADE BAND, SOMERSET -- SOMERSET BRIGADE BAND, SOMERSETMajor Leslie Lowe J.P., leader, Somerset, BermudaEllsworth Bean, Somerset, BermudaWilbur Brangman, Somerset, BermudaDwayne Bulford, Somerset, BermudaGaren Bulford, Somerset, BermudaClayton De Roza, Somerset, BermudaHiram Edwards, Somerset, BermudaRobert Lambe, Somerset, BermudaMaxwell Maybury, Somerset, BermudaElliott Perinchief, Somerset, BermudaDawnette Smith, Somerset, BermudaHenry Smith, Somerset, BermudaAllan Tucker, Somerset, BermudaAndrea Tucker, Somerset, BermudaReginald Tucker, Somerset, Bermuda

SOMERSET CRICKET CLUB, SOMERSET -- SOMERSET CRICKET CLUB, SOMERSETDexter Basden, Somerset, BermudaTony Cheeseman, Somerset, BermudaCurtis Jackson, Somerset, BermudaEugene Johnson, Somerset, BermudaKenneth Maybury, Somerset, BermudaStephen Outerbridge, Somerset, BermudaLeon Place, Somerset, BermudaShaun Roberts, Somerset, BermudaJacobi Robinson, Somerset, BermudaLynn Wade, Somerset, BermudaShannon Warner, Somerset, BermudaWendell White, Somerset, Bermuda
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2001, Series 2
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2001-ref18

Masters of the Building Arts

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
From the soaring skyscrapers of New York City to the adobe churches of New Mexico, from the sturdy stone walls of New England to the majestic monuments of the nation's capital, master craftworkers in the building arts have brought enduring beauty to our built environment. Working in wood, stone, brick, and metal, in plaster, paint, glass, and clay, they transform designs on paper into three-dimensional works of art. Much depends on their workmanship and skill: on their deep understanding of raw materials, their careful selection and use of tools, their mastery of technique. The final product is the result not only of their knowledge and abilities, but also their creativity and care - their will to excellence.

Artisans in the building trades share a deep appreciation for the aesthetic value and expressive power of technical perfection. They delight in skill and find meaning and pleasure in the poetic qualities of workmanship - in their ability to craft objects of beauty and strength through their special touch. Their great pride and creative spirit, their love for their work, and their commitment to excellence are manifested in a lasting legacy of architectural achievement left behind for generations to come.

The 2000 Festival program celebrated the extraordinary artistry of craftspeople in the building arts and explored the many challenges they face today as they work to preserve our nation's past and build for the future. The Festival brought together a selection of master artisans - stone carvers, masons, carpenters, terra cotta artisans, plasterers, blacksmiths, stained glass artisans, and adobe builders - who have enriched our world with the work of their hands, and who educated and informed Festival visitors not only with their skills but also with their knowledge and lore.

Marjorie Hunt was Curator and James Deutsch was Program Coordinator; Betty Belanus was Education Specialist and Family Activity Guide Coordinator. An Advisory Committee included: J. Bryan Blundell, Kurt Dewhurst, William Dupont, Cynthia Field, Henry Glassie, Norman Koonce, Betty Monkman, Peter Nabokov, Joanna Reagan, Rex Scouten, William Seale, Chris Sturbaum, John Michael Vlach, and Ed Worthy.

The program was produced in collaboration with the International Union of Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers and the International Masonry Institute, the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the National Building Museum, the American Institute of Architects, and the Preservation Trades Network. Major funding was provided by Homestore.com, the Marble Institute of America, Allied Stone Industries, the Building Stone Institute, the Indiana Limestone Institute, and the National Building Granite Quarries Association. Major contributors included Target Stores, the Associated General Contractors of America, the National Association of Realtors, and the Smithsonian Women's Committee. Additional donors included the School of the Building Arts, Duron, Inc., the Brick Industry Association, the Laborers' International Union of North America, the Smithsonian Educational Outreach Fund, and the Copper Development Association, Inc.
Researchers:
Jane Beck, Betty Belanus, Ray Brassieur, Amanda Dargan, James Deutsch, Kurt Dewhurst, Karen Duffy, Lynn Martin Graton, Dwight Pauahi Kauahikaua, Winnie Lambrecht, Tim Lloyd, Gregory Sharrow, Gary Stanton, David Taylor, Elaine Thatcher, John Michael Vlach
Presenters:
Betty Belanus, Barry Bergey, Ray Brassieur, Olivia Cadaval, Amanda Dargan, William Dupont, Brian Finnegan, Lynn Martin Graton, Tim Lloyd, Philip "Pete" Pederson, Clift Seferlis, Peter Seitel, Gregory Sharrow, Angelo Simone, Nick Spitzer, Gary Stanton, David Taylor, Elaine Thatcher, Cynthia Vidaurri, John Michael Vlach
Participants:
David Adams, historic preservation specialist, Portsmouth, New Hampshire

Robert Alger, stone carver, sculptor, Spencerville, Maryland

Joseph Alonso, stone mason, Vienna, Virginia

Onofre Anguiano, terra cotta hand presser, mold maker, Lincoln, Calif.

Walter S. Arnold, stone carver, Skokie, Illinois

Sam Baca, program director, Cornerstones Community Partnerships, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Earl A. Barthe, 1932-2010, plasterer, historian and consultant, New Orleans, Louisiana

Hurchail Barthe, plasterer, New Orleans, Louisiana

Terry Barthe, plasterer, historic housing specialist, New Orleans, Louisiana

Nick Benson, stone carver, letterer, Newport, Rhode Island

Johan Bjurman, decorative painter, Cheshire, Connecticut

Anna Bowen, stone carver, letterer, Newport, Rhode Island

Dan Boyle, timber framer, Dover, New Hampshire

Rory Brennan, historic plaster specialist, Putney, Vermont

Ron Brooks, decorative painter, Rockville, Maryland

John Canning, decorative painter, Cheshire, Connecticut

Jacqueline Canning-Riccio, decorative painter, Cheshire, Connecticut

Jesus Cardenas, terra cotta modeler, mold maker, Lincoln, California

Charles Cardine, architectural blacksmith, Chantilly, Virginia

Patrick Cardine, architectural blacksmith, Chantilly, Virginia

Carson Christian, timber framer, Wooster, Ohio

Rudy Christian, timber framer, Burbank, Ohio

Peter "Billy" Cleland, 1921-2010, stone mason, Clinton, Maryland

William R. Cleland, Jr., stone mason, Dunkirk, Maryland

Rose Concha, -- enjarrodoro -- (adobe plasterer), Taos, New Mexico

Brian Cox, carpenter, Lyndhurst, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Tarrytown, New York

John Drew, carpenter, St. Leonard, Maryland

William Dupont, Graham Gund Architect of the National Trust, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Washington, D.C.

Cane Fields, Hawaiian dry stack mason, Kailua-Kana, Hawaii

Billy Fields, Hawaiian dry stack mason, Kailua-Kana, Hawaii

David Flaharty, ornamental plasterer, sculptor, Green Lane, Pennsylvania

lsidoro Flaim, stone mason, Camp Springs, Maryland

Tom Glynn, timber framer, South Berwick, Maine

Dieter Goldkuhle, 1938-2011, stained glass artisan, Reston, Virginia

Giles Harper, preservation carpenter, Lyndhurst, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Tarrytown, New York

Adam Heller, stone carver, letterer, Newport, Rhode Island

Randy Herald, sheet metal craftsperson, Bethesda, Maryland

Randy Herald, Jr., sheet metal craftsperson, Bethesda, Maryland

Hans Herr, coppersmith, Holtwood, Pennsylvania

John Paul Huguley, president, School of the Building Arts, Charleston, South Carolina

Judy Jacob, architectural conservator, National Park Service, New York, New York

Raymond Johnson, terra cotta modeler, draftsman, Lincoln, California

Dean Kalomas, decorative painter, Washington, D.C.

Vikki Keys, deputy superintendent, National Park Service, Washington, D.C.

Rick King, dry stone wall mason, Holderness, New Hampshire

Scott King, dry stone wall mason, Holderness, New Hampshire

Naomi Kroll, architectural conservator, National Park Service, New York, New York

Wade Lawrence, assistant director, Drayton Hall, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Charleston, South Carolina

Elmo Leonardelli, scaffold erector, Baltimore, Maryland

Stephen Lorenzetti, chief of resource management, National Park Service, Washington, D.C.

Amber Lucero, -- enjarrodoro -- (adobe plasterer), Taos, New Mexico

Rick Lykins, restoration carpenter, Bloomington, Indiana

George McDaniel, director, Drayton Hall, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Charleston, South Carolina

Richard Marks, architectural conservator, Charleston, South Carolina

Antonio Martinez, community leader, Upper Rociada, New Mexico

David Martinez, terra cotta draftsman, Roseville, California

David Mason, dry stone wall mason, Starksboro, Vermont

Rick Mason, dry stone wall mason, Hinesburg, Vermont

John O'Connor, engineer, Universal Builders Supply, Cheverly, Maryland

David Overholt, restoration project manager, Lyndhurst, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Tarrytown, New York

Albert D. Parra, adobe builder, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Theodore Pierre, Jr., brick mason, New Orleans, Louisiana

Konstantinos Pilarinos, Byzantine-style woodcarver, Astoria, New York

Panagiota Pylarinos, architect, Astoria, New York

Dennis Playdon, program manager, Cornerstones Community Partnerships, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Patrick Plunkett, stone carver, Takoma Park, Maryland

Joseph Pringle, blacksmith, Charleston, South Carolina

Nol Putnam, artist blacksmith, The Plains, Virginia

Clay Raley, restoration carpenter, Norman, Indiana

Brad Robinson, architectural blacksmith, Chantilly, Virginia

Steve Roy, historic preservation specialist, Portsmouth, New Hampshire

Brett Rugo, president, Rugo & Carosi, Woodbridge, Virginia

Laura Saeger, timber framer, Burbank, Ohio

George Salvador, restoration crew leader, Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico

Eduardo Seara, vice-president, Lorton Contracting Company, Lorton, Virginia

Manuel Seara, president, Lorton Contracting Company, Lorton, Virginia

Tony Segreti, architect, Bethesda, Maryland

Carlton Simmons, blacksmith, Charleston, South Carolina

Philip Simmons, 1912-2009, blacksmith, Charleston, South Carolina

Louis Soublet, plasterer, New Orleans, Louisiana

Larry E. Stearns, coppersmith, Westford, Vermont

Ben Sturbaum, restoration carpenter, Owensburg, Indiana

Chris Sturbaum, restoration carpenter, Bloomington, Indiana

Arran Sturgis, timber framer, Eliot, Maine

Daniel Szwed, construction manager, Waldorf, Maryland

Mark Tamara, structural engineer, James Madison Cutts, Washington, D.C.

Lonn Taylor, historian, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.

Lloyd Tortalita, Adult, Higher Education director, former governor, Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico

Roman Troyer, timber framer, Wooster, Ohio

Dexter Trujillo, adobe builder, mud preserver, Abiquiu, New Mexico

Mark Tsirigos, president, Universal Builders Supply, Cheverly, Maryland

George Void, masonry crew, Washington National Cathedral, Washington, D.C.

Chuck Wagner, owner, Wagner Roofing Company, Hyattsville, Maryland

Sheila Wagner, owner, Wagner Roofing Company, Hyattsville, Maryland

Tom Weddle, restoration carpenter, Bloomington, Indiana

Bob Wooldridge, slater, Mercersburg, Pennsylvania

Jeff Wooldridge, slater, project manager, Bethesda, Maryland

Bill Yeingst, curator, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.

Pauli Zmolek, decorative painter, Takoma Park, Maryland

INTERNATIONAL UNION OF BRICKLAYERS AND ALLIED CRAFTWORKERS (BAC), INTERNATIONAL MASONRY INSTITUTE (IMI)

Frank Baiocchi, marble mason, Mt. Airy, Maryland

Ed Bellucci, IMI deputy director of Apprenticeship and Training, Jefferson, Maryland

Robert Bernardon, marble mason, Suitland, Maryland

Lewis Carrara, mosaic worker, Fortville, Indiana

Raoul Cervantes, bricklayer, Claremont, California

Kurt Colo, bricklayer, New Baltimore, Michigan

Laird Donaldson, IMI regional director, Auburn, Washington

James Farris, stone mason, Stafford, Virginia

Richard Francescon, marble mason, South Easton, Massachusetts

Greg Hartseil, IMI Job Corps regional director, Lorida, Florida

Dennis Holloway, IMI Scola Training Center director, West Babylon, New York

Mike Kassman, IMI pointing, cleaning, and caulking instructor, Waynesboro, Pennsylvania

Tony Kassman, IMI National Safety, pointing, cleaning, and caulking coordinator, Tonawanda, New York

John Kitchen, bricklayer apprentice, Dryden, New York

Frank Koletar, refractory bricklayer, Orchard Park, New York

Annette Ludwig, tile layer, Bellevue, Washington

Nelson McMath, BAC Local 9 Michigan field representative, Saline, Michigan

Tom McQuaid, BAC Local 1 DC, MONA secretary, treasurer, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

Steve Martini, IMI Strategic Programs director, Cascade, Maryland

Steve Mason, terrazzo apprentice, Washington, D.C.

Antoine Matthews, bricklayer, Baltimore, Maryland

Michael Menegazzi, IMI terrazzo instructor, South Gate, California

Bob Mion, IMI tile, marble, and terrazzo instructor, Binghamton, New York

Guillermo Moreno, stone mason, Hyattsville, Maryland

Colleen Muldoon, coordinator of Education Programs, bricklayer, Baltimore, Maryland

Clarence Nichols, IMI deputy director of Apprenticeship and Training, Cumberland, Maryland

Angela Olszewski, tile layer, Jersey City, New Jersey

Lester Parnell, bricklayer, Detroit, Michigan

Bob Perry, IMI regional director, Culver City, California

Darren Raines, tile layer, Chicago, Illinois

Matthew Redabaugh, IMI coordinator of Special Projects, Cascade, Maryland

Butch Rovder, BAC stone craft director, South Riding, Virginia

Joe Stewart, BAC pointing, cleaning, and caulking craft director, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Gene Stinner, IMI director of Apprenticeship and Training, Cascade, Maryland

Dennis Studley, IMI Job Corps regional director, Yucaipa, California

Harold Sugg, refractory bricklayer, West Seneca, New York

Jimmy Ternent, marble mason, Westminster, Maryland

John Totten, IMI plaster instructor, Clintondale, New York

Drew Vecchione, IMI stone instructor, Flourtown, Pennsylvania

Battista Yon, bricklayer, Hyattsville, Maryland
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2001, Series 3
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2001-ref26

New York City at the Smithsonian

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
At first, it might seem like an oxymoron to talk about the "folklore" or "folklife" of one of the world's most modern cities, but daily life in New York would be impossible without this body of shared urban traditions, of collective community knowledge, customs, historical memories, and cultural understandings that constitutes the folklife of the city. lt provides the basic ground rules that shape how New Yorkers interact with their families, their colleagues, and their fellow New Yorkers. From subway etiquette to local street food to stickball games, these traditions give New York City its unique sense of place.

ln addition to a shared urban culture, most New Yorkers also have one or more reservoirs of specialized traditional knowledge, which they have acquired from their ethnic and/or religious upbringing, working in a particular occupation, or living in a specific area of the city. The innumerable, multifaceted ways in which these factors interact are what make New York and New Yorkers so fascinating. Of course, it was impossible to cover all aspects of New York's culture in a single event, but by approaching city culture thematically, and by carefully selecting examples that highlight different aspects of work, life, and leisure in New York, New York City at the Smithsonian sought to acquaint Festival visitors with both the ordinary and extraordinary aspects of life in Gotham.

What gives New York a sense of being different is not merely tbe myriad ethnic and interest groups that are found in the city, but the complex ways in which they overlap and interact. The physical landscape of New York - the lack of space, the reliance on mass transit by people of vastly differing backgrounds, neighborhoods which are home to both the very rich and the extremely poor - makes it impossible for New Yorkers to ignore the influence of "others." From kosher Chinese restaurants to lrish hip-hop groups to Mexican pizzas, cultures from all corners of the globe have influenced one another in New York, in part because of their physical proximity.

The 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival celebrated just a few of the innumerable manifestations of traditional culture in New York City. More importantly, fieldwork leading up to the Festival allowed the Smithsonian, working in close collaboration with city-based cultural organizations and ethnic and occupational communities, to document daily life in New York City at the turn of the millennium. Material collected during the course of this research, as well as information recorded during and after the Festival, will significantly enrich the Smithsonian's archival holdings about New York City. A century from now, when scholars and writers want to know what it was like to live in New York in 2001, to work on Broadway, to drive a taxi, to trade stocks on Wall Street, or teach English in a school filled with recent immigrants, they can turn to the documentation collected by this project. That body of documentation - and the recordings and photographs made during the Festival itself - took on increased importance with the events of September 11, 2001, barely three months after the Festival had closed, which emphasized to all observers how the cultural values of New Yorkers, vividly on display to Festival visitors, also provided them a reservoir of resiliency to surmount those tragic events.

Nancy Groce was Senior Curator for the program, supported by several Area Curators: Ray Allen, music; Marion Jacobson, urban fashion; Annie Hauck-Lawson, foodways; Cathy Ragland, music; Ethel Raim, music; Henry Sapoznik, media; Brian Thompson, Wall Street; Kay Turner, Wall Street; and Steve Zeitlin, neighborhood. Arlene Reiniger was Program Coordinator.

An Advisory Committee included: Ruth Abram, Director, Lower East Side Tenement Museum; Gladys Pena Acosta, Director, RAICES; Ray Allen, Director, American Studies Program, Brooklyn College/CUNY; Gage Averill, Chair, Music Department, New York University; Fatima Bercht, Chief Curator, El Museo del Barrio; Melody Capote, Executive Director, Caribbean Culture Center/African Diaspora Institute; Barbara Cohen-Stratyner, Curator, New York Public Library for the Performing Arts; Cara De Silva, Food Historian; Miriam De Uriarte, Director of Education, El Museo del Barrio; Howard Dodson, Director, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture/NYPL; Sharon E. Dunn, Senior Assistant for the Arts, New York City Board of Education; Juan Flores, Professor, Black and Puerto Rican Studies, Hunter College/CUNY; Laura Hansen, Director, Place Matters, Municipal Art Society; John Haworth, Assistant Director, National Museum of the American Indian; Ellie Hisama, Director, Institute for Studies in American Music, Brooklyn College/CUNY; Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Professor, Performance Studies Department, NYU; Leah Krauss, Program Officer, The New York Community Trust; Susana Torruella Leva!, Executive Director, El Museo del Barrio; Robert MacDonald, Executive Director, Museum of the City of New York; Fay Chew Matsuda, Executive Director, Museum of Chinese in the Americas; Ethel Raim, Executive Director, Center for Traditional Music and Dance; Jan Seidler Ramirez, Vice President of Public Affairs, New York Historical Society; Frances A. Resheske, Vice President of Public Affairs, Consolidated Edison Company; Joseph Sciarra, Academic Programs, Calandra Italian American Institute, Queens College; Gabrielle Shubert, Director, New York Transit Museum; Pravina Shukla, Assistant Professor, Folklore Department, Indiana University; John Kuo Wei Tchen, Director, Asian/Pacific/American Studies Program & Institute, NYU; Brian Thompson, Director, Museum of American Financial History; Michael Wallace, Historian and Author, CUNY; Steve Wheeler, Archivist, New York Stock Exchange; Theodora Yoshikami, Multicultural Program, American Museum of Natural History; Steven Zeitlin, Executive Director, City Lore: The Center for Urban Culture.

The program was produced in collaboration with New York's Center for Traditional Music and Dance and City Lore, with major funding from the New York City Council, the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, Howard P. Milstein, and the New York Stock Exchange. The Leadership Committee was co-chaired by The Honorable Daniel Patrick Moynihan and Elizabeth Moynihan and corporate chairman Howard P. Milstein. Major support was provided by Amtrak, Con Edison, the Recording Industries Music Performance Trust Funds, Arthur Pacheco, and the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Major contributors included The New York Community Trust, The Coca-Cola Company, The Durst Foundation, the May & Samuel Rudin Family Foundation, Leonard Litwin, Bernard Mendik, and Stephen and Judy Gluckstern. Additional donors included Emigrant Savings Bank, Jeffrey Gural, Lester Morse, Richard Schwartz, Michael Bloomberg, Keyspan Energy, Martin Segal, and Earle Mack.
Researchers:
Jerald Albarelli, Ray Allen, Emily Botein, Lori Branston, Kathleen Condon, Martha Cooper, Amanda Dargan, Andrew Davis, Tony DeNonno, Sonia Estreich, Makale Faber, Kwali Farbes, Michael Greene, Laura Hansen, Annie Hauck-Lawson, Marion Jacobson, Denise Lynn, Elena Martinez, Cathy Ragland, Ethel Raim, Henry Sapoznik, Roberta Singer, Les Slater, Scott Spencer, Brian Thompson, Kay Turner, Tom Van Buren, Li Wangsheng, Bill Westerman, Lois Wilken, Steven Zeitlin
Presenters:
Judy Adamson, Ray Allen, Dwight Blocker Bowers, Kathleen Condon, Andrew Davis, James Early, Makale Faber, Juan Flores, Annie Hauck-Lawson, Marion Jacobson, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Wangsheng Li, Elena Martinez, Cathy Ragland, Ethel Raim, Kristin Richard, Henry Sapoznik, Les Slater, Brian Thompson, Kay Turner, Tom Van Buren, Meg Ventrudo, Cynthia Vidaurri, George Zavala, Steve Zeitlin
Participants:
Arts & Artists

Wilfreda "Bio" Feliciano, muralist, Tats Cru

Hector "Nicer" Nazario, muralist, Tats Cru

Sotero "BG 183" Ortiz, muralist, Tats Cru

Gaspar Ingui, neon sign maker

Robbie Ingui, neon sign maker

Theresa Ingui, neon sign maker

Backstage Broadway

Judy Adamson, costume maker, Barbara Matera

Jarred Aswegan, costume maker, Barbara Matera

Gary Brouwer, theatrical milliner

Kimberly Cea, actress

Edie Cowan, director, choreographer

Brian Healy, prop maker, armorer, Costume Armour

Bob Kelly, wig maker, make-up artist

Polly Kinney, costume maker, Barbara Matera

Janice Lorraine, actress

Terry Marone, Gypsy Robe, Actors' Equity

Barbara Matera, costume maker

Nino Novel lino, prop maker, Costume Armour

Peter Ray, prop maker, Costume Armour

Woody Regan, rehearsal pianist

Linda Rice, wig maker, Bob Kelly

Tom Rocco, actor

Tom Schneider, theatrical milliner

Scott Sliger, make-up artist, Bob Kelly

Josephine Spano, costume maker, Barbara Matera

Patricia Sullivan, costume maker, Barbara Matera

Brian Wolfe, prop maker, Costume Armour

Leslie Wolfe, prop maker, Costume Armour

Building Trades

George Andrucki, sheet metal worker, Local 28

Stan Bernstein, sheet metal worker, Local 28

William Bush, water tank builder

Adonis Cegisman, water tank builder

Ryszard Danielewski, water tank builder

John DeGeorge, water tank builder

Robin Delk, sheet metal worker, Local 28

Nicholas Maldarelli, sheet metal worker, Local 28

Leah Rambo, sheet metal worker, Local 28

Andrew Rosenwach, water tank builder

Thomas Schlitz, sheet metal worker, Local 28

George Treanor, sheet metal worker, Local 28

Arthur Tyburski, sheet metal worker, Local 28

Urban Fashion & Garment Industry

Britt Bowers, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Vanessa Burgos, needle trade worker, Garment Industry Development Corporation

Lidia Carrera, needle trade worker, UNITE! Local 23-25

Esther Cheung, needle trade worker, Garment Industry Development Corporation

Mary Costantini, mannequin sculptor

Linda Dworak, director, Garment Industry Development Corporation

Shiniji Horimura, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Elizabeth Jacobsen, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Anne Kong, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Anne Liu, needle trade worker, Garment Industry Development Corporation

Nicole Mata, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Adrienne Muken, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Ana Perez, needle trade worker, Garment Industry Development Corporation

Ramon Roman, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

Isabel Toledo, fashion designer

Ruben Toledo, fashion designer

Monica Williamson, window display and design, Fashion Institute of Technology

May Xian, needle trade worker, Garment Industry Development Corporation

Foodways

Salvator Bartolomeo, Italian cook

Kam-Chung Chan, Chinese cook

Cara De Silva, food researcher, writer

Makale Faber, West African cook

Mark Federman, Jewish appetizing

Trevor Fraser, West Indian, Caribbean cook

Theresa lngui, Polish, German cook

Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, food historian

Alana Grace Lawson, Polish cook

Vertamae Grosvenor, African-American cook

Molly O'Neill, food writer and chef

Ming Hua Qian, Chinese cook

Donald Ross, bagel and bialy maker

Esta Ross, bagel and bialy maker

Steve Ross, bagel and bialy maker

Community Media

Clay Berry, producer, African-American radio

Kathleen Biggins, host, Irish-American radio

Joe Franklin, host, entertainment community

Debi Jackson, producer, African-American radio

Hal Jackson, host, African-American radio

Bill Jaker, 1939-, radio historian

René Lopez, host, Latino radio

Henry Sapoznik, host, Yiddish radio

Music, Dance & Performance

Wrickford Dalgetty, Caribbean song

Julio Diaz, Latin dancer

Tony DeMarco, Irish fiddle

Linda Hickman, Irish flute

D.J. Angola, turntablist

D.J. Rehka, turntablist

ABDOULAYE DIABATE & SUPER MANDEN -- ABDOULAYE DIABATE & SUPER MANDENAbdoulaye Diabate, director, vocals, guitarChiek Barry, bassMoussa Cissoko, n'goni, guitarAboubakar Diabate, djembeMamadou Diabate, 1975-, koraTapani Sissoko, vocalsAbou Sylla, bala

APOLLO THEATRE, AMATEUR NIGHT AT THE APOLLO -- APOLLO THEATRE, AMATEUR NIGHT AT THE APOLLOVanessa Brown, Amateur Night assistantJoseph Gray, lead vocalsJane Harley, Kemet ProductionsMonteria Ivey, hostSteve Jones, production managerC.P. Lacey, The ExecutionerShirley Matthews, coordinating producerMoni-J, hostessDavid Rodriguez, executive director

RAY CHEW & THE CREW -- RAY CHEW & THE CREWRay Chew, musical directorMike Ciro, guitarBobby Douglas, keyboardArtie Reynolds, bassRalph Rolle, drums

CHERISH THE LADIES -- CHERISH THE LADIESSean Conner, step dancerDeirdre Connolly, tin whistle, vocalsMary Coogan, guitar, banjo, mandolinKatie Fox, step dancerDonna Long, piano, fiddleJoanie Madden, director, tin whistle, flute, vocalsPaul McKeown, sound engineerMary Rafferty, accordion, tin whistleMarie Reilly, fiddle

CHERES UKRAINIAN FOLK ENSEMBLE -- CHERES UKRAINIAN FOLK ENSEMBLEAndriy Milavsky, leader, woodwindsVictor Cebotari, accordionGeorge Cheremush, violinAlexander Fedoriouk, cymbaly (hammered dulcimer)Oleh Ivanyschuk, contrabass

DAVID DAVID -- DAVID DAVIDLauterio Polanco, director, lead vocals, accordionAdriel Espaillat, guieraAdelso Fernandez, bajoKenny Fernandez, tamboraMenecio Martinez, pianoHector Mota, saxophoneFernando Rodreguez, conga

FRISNER AUGUSTIN AND LA TROUPE MAKANDAL -- FRISNER AUGUSTIN AND LA TROUPE MAKANDALFrisner Augustin, 1948-2012, lead drums, vocalsRaymond Charles, third drumSteve Deats, second drumSmith Destin, dancerKethelyne Jean-Louis, dancerKesler Pierre, percussionSandy St. Cyr, dancer

HANGUK: SOUNDS OF KOREA (KOREAN TRADITIONAL PERFORMING ARTS ASSOCIATION) -- HANGUK: SOUNDS OF KOREA (KOREAN TRADITIONAL PERFORMING ARTS ASSOCIATION)Gee Soak Back, percussionHyung Joan Kim, percussionChii-Seung Kwon, percussionJi-Young Park, dancer, percussionSue Yeon Park, dancer, percussionKathy Soh, dancer, percussionMaggie Soh, percussion

LOS AFORTUNADOS -- LOS AFORTUNADOSFelix Sanabria, director, congas, bata, percussionFrancisco Cotto, bassPedro Domeich, dancer, vocalsAlbert Lusink, trumpetAbraham Rodriguez, vocals, percussionMichael Rodriguez, percussionBrandon Rosser, percussionSusan Richardson Sanabria, dancerAdam Tully, tres guitar

LOS MACONDOS -- LOS MACONDOSJorge L. Marquez, bajoEugenio R. Ortega, accordion, lead vocalsJuan A. Ortega, caja vallenata, vocalsDavid Pacheco, timbalesGuillermo E. Penate, guieroMario A. Rodriguez, congas

LOS PLENEROS DE LA 21 -- LOS PLENEROS DE LA 21Juan J. Gutierrez, leader, tamboreroAlberto Cepeda, güiro, tamboreroRoberto Cepeda, vocals, bailador de bomba, güiro, maraca, tamboreroJose Lantigua, keyboardHector Matos, vocals, tamboreroEdgardo Miranda, cuatroDonald Nicks, bassJose Rivera, vocals, tamboreroDomingo Tanco, vocalsNellie Tanco, vocals, bailadora de bomba, tamboreraVictor Velez, vocals, tamborero

MERITA HALILI & THE RAIF HYSENI ORCHESTRA -- MERITA HALILI & THE RAIF HYSENI ORCHESTRAGezim Halili, clarinet, saxophoneMerita Halili, vocalsRaif Hyseni, accordionArtan Kushi, dajreTome Lleshaj, bass guitarEdmond Xhani, laouta

MESAOUDA JUDEO-ARABIC ENSEMBLE -- MESAOUDA JUDEO-ARABIC ENSEMBLEMarc Hazan, vocalsJoshua Levitt, naiHaig Manoukian, oudTomer Tzur, percussion

MUKTHAMBAR FINE ARTS, INC. -- MUKTHAMBAR FINE ARTS, INC.A. Balaskandan, violinBala Ganesh, mrudangist (Asian Indian drum)Aarati Ramanand, dancerSaavitri Ramanand, vocals

MUSIC FROM CHINA -- MUSIC FROM CHINASusan Cheng, director, daruanChung Bun Chiu, percussionWai Wah Law, vocalsGao Renyang, dizi, xiaoGuowei Wang, erhu, zhong hu, daohuTienjou Wang, gou hu, zhong huHerman Wong, concert managerMin Xiaofen, pipaHelen Yee, yang qinYing Ying Zhu, vocals

SAU FAMILY ORCHESTRA -- SAU FAMILY ORCHESTRAZoran Muncan, keyboardErnie Sau, button accordionMichael Sau, button accordionVinnie Sau, violin

SHASHMAQAM BUKHARAN JEWISH CULTURAL GROUP -- SHASHMAQAM BUKHARAN JEWISH CULTURAL GROUPAbokhay Aminov, vocals, doyra (drum)Tavriz Aronova, ensemble memberDavid Davidov, tarFiruza Junatan, dancerShumiel Kuyenov, doyra (drum)Boris Kuknariyev, accordionIzro Malakov, vocals

SIMON SHAHEEN & QANTARA -- SIMON SHAHEEN & QANTARASimon Shaheen, director, oud, violinOlga Chirino, keyboardsBilly Drewes, soprano saxJamie Haddad, world percussionFrancois Moutin, contrabassAdam Rogers, acoustic and electric guitarBassam Saba, flute, naiLuis Santiago, Latin percussionNajib Shaheen, oudSteve Sheehan, world percussionSoraya, vocalsMartin Zarzar, world percussion

SON MUNDANO -- SON MUNDANOBobby Allende, bongosJimmy Bosch, 1962-, tromboneNelson Gonzalez, Cuban tresNelson Gonzalez, Jr., lead vocalsOscar Hernandez, electric pianoRene Lopez, Jr., congasLuis Rosa, vocalsJoe Santiago, upright bass

VISION BAND

X-ECUTIONERS -- X-ECUTIONERSD.J. AngolaTotal EclipsePeter KangRoc RaiderMista SinistaRob Swift

YURI YUNAKOV ENSEMBLE -- YURI YUNAKOV ENSEMBLELauren Brody, keyboard, vocalsCatherine Foster, clarinetIvan Milev, accordionGeorge Petrov, drumsCarol Silverman, vocalsYuri Yunakov, 1958-, saxophone

Neighborhood & Community Life -- Neighborhood & Community LifeLori Brandston, urban sports and gamesSam Chwat, speech therapist, dialect coachMichael E. Clark, Citizens Committee for New York CitySonia Estreich, Citizens Committee for New York CityMichael Greene, urban sports and gamesLaura Hansen, Place Matters, Municipal Art SocietyRoberta Jones, storytellerJessica Katz, Citizens Committee for New York CityAnnie Lanzilloto, storyteller, performance artistMoe Maloney, community activist, "Mayor of Windsor Terrace"Rosalyn Perry, storytellerLiz Sevcenko, Memory Map, Lower East Side Tenement Museum

Street Life, Festival, Celebration

Mikey Enoch, steel pan tuner

Richie Richardson, Caribbean carnival costume maker

Les Slater, Caribbean carnival culture

Transit

Carissa Amash, New York Transit Museum

Bruce Alexander, subway engineer, MTA

Chris Creed, subway engineer, MTA

Sandra Lane, subway operator, MTA

Anthony Palombella, bus operator, MTA

Luz Montano, New York Transit Museum

Tarin Reid, subway operator, MTA

Charles Sachs, Sr., curator, New York Transit Museum

Gabrielle Shubert, director, New York Transit Museum

Mark Watson, New York Transit Museum

Wall Street

Richard Anderson, Jr., stock market investor, speaker

Richard Anderson, Sr., stock market investor, analyst

Richard Baratz, caricaturist, stock certificate engraver, American Bank Note Company

Madeline Boyd, trader, New York Stock Exchange

Victoria Chukwuka, New York Metro Coordinator, Stock Market Game

Joseph Cicchetti, trader, New York Mercantile Exchange

Anthony DeMarco, trader, New York Board of Trade

Joe Gabriel, engineer, plant manager, New York Stock Exchange

Michael Geoghan, clerk, New York Mercantile Exchange

John E. Herzog, founder, Museum of American Financial History

Scott Hess, trader, New York Mercantile Exchange

Myron Kandel, senior financial editor, CNN

Michael LaBranche, specialist, New York Stock Exchange

Gary Lapayover, trader, New York Mercantile Exchange

Michel Mark, New York Mercantile Exchange

Mark Tomasko, financial printer, engraving historian

Nancy Norton Tomasko, financial printer

Steve Wheeler, archivist, New York Stock Exchange

Jason Zweig, columnist, -- Money -- Magazine

Generations: a centennial tribute to Margaret Mead

THE FLOWERS FAMILY SINGERS -- THE FLOWERS FAMILY SINGERSRev. James N. Flowers, Jr., director, vocals, Ft. Washington, MarylandAnthony Flowers, vocals, keyboard, Seat Pleasant, MarylandYolanda Flowers, vocals, Capital Heights, MarylandMarie Hickson, vocals, Capital Heights, MarylandDorothy McDowell, vocals, Upper Marlboro, MarylandMargie Pickett, vocals, Landover, MarylandErma Reed, vocals, Landover, MarylandMildred Scruggs, vocals, Capital Heights, Maryland

WALKER CALHOUN AND THE RAVEN ROCK DANCERS -- WALKER CALHOUN AND THE RAVEN ROCK DANCERSWalker Calhoun, director, vocals, drum, rattle, Cherokee, North CarolinaAndrew Calhoun, dancer, Cherokee, North CarolinaJennifer Calhoun, dancer, Cherokee, North CarolinaChris Mahan, dancer, Cherokee, North CarolinaVelma Mahan, dancer, Cherokee, North CarolinaDelana Smith, dancer, Cherokee, North CarolinaPatrick Smith, dancer, vocals, Cherokee, North Carolina

THE SAU FAMILY ORCHESTRA, RIDGEWOOD, QUEENS, NEW YORK -- THE SAU FAMILY ORCHESTRA, RIDGEWOOD, QUEENS, NEW YORKZoran Muncan, keyboard, Ridgewood, Queens, New YorkAksenti Sau, piano accordion, Ridgewood, Queens, New YorkErnie Sau, button accordion, Ridgewood, Queens, New YorkMichael Sau, button accordion, Ridgewood, Queens, New YorkNikica Sau, keyboard, Ridgewood, Queens, New YorkVinnie Sau, violin, Ridgewood, Queens, New York
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2001, Series 4
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2001-ref34

Opening Ceremony [Low Level]

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 June 29
Scope and Contents:
Help us ring in the opening of the Festival's 50th anniversary! Visitors will get the first glimpse of Circus Arts and On the Move, with short performances by aerialist Dolly Jacobs, UniverSoul Circus, Circus Juventas, taiko players PJ and Roy Hirabayashi, and conjunto band Los Texmaniacs. We'll also hear remarks from staff the Smithsonian and the National Park Service, including Secretary David Skorton, longtime Festival director Richard Kurin, and Festival co-founder Jim Morris.The ceremony ends with a circus parade through the rest of the Festival grounds.
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2017, Item SFF2017_0629_Special_Events_Big_Top_0001
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Special Events / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref1008

Opening Ceremony [Alternate]

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 June 29
Scope and Contents:
Help us ring in the opening of the Festival's 50th anniversary! Visitors will get the first glimpse of Circus Arts and On the Move, with short performances by aerialist Dolly Jacobs, UniverSoul Circus, Circus Juventas, taiko players PJ and Roy Hirabayashi, and conjunto band Los Texmaniacs. We'll also hear remarks from staff the Smithsonian and the National Park Service, including Secretary David Skorton, longtime Festival director Richard Kurin, and Festival co-founder Jim Morris.The ceremony ends with a circus parade through the rest of the Festival grounds.
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2017, Item SFF2017_0629_Special_Events_Big_Top_0001_Alternate
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Special Events / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref1009

On The Move

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Description:
In a three-year cycle themed with World Migration at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival, this second year presents topics related to Migration across Generations. Visitors explore how American communities and cultures are transformed by the movements, displacements, and interactions of diverse populations over time, with the goal of obtaining insight into the growth of healthy inclusive communities across the country.

The focus this year is on the youth, young Americans whose families have arrived in this country within the last generations. These young people are Americans, raised in the United States. Some of them have been born here, others were brought here as part of a family group who immigrated. It is these first-generation Americans who live fully within a framework of biculturalism. Their parents and grandparents carry with them the language and customs of their country of origin, while the children spend their days in the local schools, becoming integrated as citizens of the United States.

Building on a small but innovative program from 2016, the 2017 program foregrounds the perspectives of youth, past and present. It invites intergenerational conversations about the interplay of migration, creativity, and culture, highlighting the social power of tradition and art. It focuses on how young people assume responsibility as bridge builders among communities, generations, and into the future. Today's generation of young people—ranging from their mid-teens into their mid-thirties—are the most racially diverse population in American history. As young Americans, they have a particular stake in the world they inherit together.

For this program, the National Mall became a space for performances, workshops, sports, visual arts demonstrations, and discussions. Themes of multilingualism, diversity and identity within and across cultural communities are addressed. These themes highlight the shifting notions of the sense of belonging, communication in both high-tech and traditional methods, and the disruptive and generative impacts of migration.
Production and Participants:
PRODUCTION

Director: Sabrina Lynn Motley

Curators: Olivia Cadaval, Amalia Cordova, Sojin Kim

Curatorial Advisors: Alissa Stern, Sebi Medina-Tayac

Project Interns: Michelle Aranda Coss, Juan Goncalves Borrega, Maryam Parhizkar, Jessie Riddle

American Anthropological Association Interns: Inigo Acosta, Demilde Adebayo, Addison Marry, Lauren Paniati

Lead Volunteer: Kenneth Robinson

Presenters: Citlalli Álvarez, Quique Avilés, Diana Baird N'Diaye, Camila Bryce-LaPorte, Regie Cabico, Norma Cantú, C. Daniel Dawson, Eduardo Díaz, Julia Garciá, Theo Gonzalves, Perla M. Guerrero, Mary S. Linn, Samir Meghelli, Mark Puryear, Toni Shapiro-Phim, Daniel Sheehy, Je Naè Taylor, Leslie Walker, Ranald Woodaman, Steve Velásquez, Steve Zeitlin

Advisory Committee: Quique Avilés, Christylez Bacon, Carline Brice-Mesilus, Caitlin Buckley, Ashesh Dangol, James Early, Lubna Ejaz, Julia García, Natalia Gardullo, Kumera Genet, Ted Gong, Perla M. Guerrero, Noelle Terefe Haile, Jada Hampton, Mary Houston, Isaia King, Lilia Knight, Hollis "Flash" Lashley, John Leguizamo, Ed Liebow, Von Martin, Suzanne Matthews-Williams, Phyllis May-Machunda, Eva McIntyre, Rebecca Medrano, Natalie Michel, Michael Morris, Alexis Neblett, Darren Neblett, ThienVinh Nguyen, Brenda V. Pérez Amador, Mark Puryear, Dayanita Ramesh, Anil Ranjit, Maribel Rodriguez, Hatum Saenz-Painemilla, Usman Sarwar, Joseph Sciorra, Andy Shallal, Khandeya Sheppard, Doreen Thompson, Amelia Tseng, Leslie Walker, Dennis Zotigh

Smithsonian Collaborators: Anacostia Community Museum, ARTLAB+ at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Asian Pacific American Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Latino Center

ARTISTS and ENSEMBLES

• Sheila Kay Adams, Ballad singer, storyteller

• Noa Baum, Storyteller, educator

• Caporales Unidos, Washington, D.C., Bolivian Dance Troupe

• Capturing Fire, Washington, D.C., International Queer Poetry Summit and Slam

• CHELOVE, Muralist, visual Artist

• Chinese Youth Club of Washington, D.C., 9-Man volleyball team

• Christyles and Washington Sound Museum, Hip-hop artist; collaborative concert series

• City Lore and International Storytelling Center, Arts organizations of New York, Jonesborough, Tennessee

• DC Caribbean Collective, Music, dance, and history of the Caribbean

• DJ VicoVibes, DJ

• Fugees Family, Inc., Soccer drills, scrimmages

• Gandhi Brigade Youth Media, Media arts program

• Mestre João Grande, Capoeira Angola master

• PJ and Roy Hirabayashi, Japanese American taiko players

• House of Angklung, Indonesian music ensemble

• Ledward Kaapana, Ukulele and slack-key guitar player

• Kichwa Hatari, Indigenous language radio collective

• Kino Musica, Afro-soul band

• Los Pleneros de la 21, Music ensemble and cultural center

• Los Treinta, Salvadoran American artists

• MasPaz, Visual artist, muralist

• Muslim Community Center, Faith-based organization of Silver Spring, Maryland

• Philadelphia Folklore Project, Independent public agency, event producer

• Artemio Posadas, Master son huasteco musician

• San Francisco Kulintang Legacy, Filipino percussion ensemble

• Roberto "Professor Busho" Tapia, Roda Movements capoeira teacher

• Viajeros de las Americas, Alfombra artists

• Mestre Jelon Vieira, Capoeira master

• The Wong People, Kung fu and lion dance association
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2017, Series 4
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref27

Capturing Fire: Queer Spoken Word Summit

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 June 30
Scope and Contents:
Regie Cabico (presenter); Nyuma Waggeh; Jerrica Escoto; Gowri K; and Día Bùi ;Capturing Fire is an international trans and queer poetry slam organized by National Poetry Slam champion Regie Cabico. Now in its seventh year, the D.C. event has galvanized queer poets of color around a poetry slam where workshops, reading, and panels foster professional and social justice awareness. This session features poets who participated in the 2017 event: Nyuma Waggeh, Jessica Escoto, Gowri K, and Día Bùi.
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2017, Item SFF2017_0630_OTM_Story_Circle_0004
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 4: On The Move / 4.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref931
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Active Morning with Capoeira

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 July 01
Scope and Contents:
Amalia Cordova (presenter); Roberto Tapico ;This is an capoeira class open to all visitors, from beginners to experts. Roberto Tapia, aka Professor Busho, began teaching the art of capoeira in 1999 in Santiago, Chile, and continued to practice and teach once he moved to the Washington, D.C., area in 2005. He is the owner and founder of Roda Movements, a fitness and dance academy in Takoma Park, Maryland.
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2017, Item SFF2017_0701_OTM_Story_Circle_0001
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 4: On The Move / 4.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref939

Active Morning with Capoeira

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 July 04
Scope and Contents:
Amalia Cordova (presenter); Roberto Tapico ;This is an capoeira class open to all visitors, from beginners to experts. Roberto Tapia, aka Professor Busho, began teaching the art of capoeira in 1999 in Santiago, Chile, and continued to practice and teach once he moved to the Washington, D.C., area in 2005. He is the owner and founder of Roda Movements, a fitness and dance academy in Takoma Park, Maryland.
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2017, Item SFF2017_0704_OTM_Story_Circle_0001
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 4: On The Move / 4.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref970

Active Morning with Capoeira

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 July 07
Scope and Contents:
Amalia Cordova (presenter); Capoeira Group; Roberto Tapia ;This is an capoeira class open to all visitors, from beginners to experts. Roberto Tapia, aka Professor Busho, began teaching the art of capoeira in 1999 in Santiago, Chile, and continued to practice and teach once he moved to the Washington, D.C., area in 2005. He is the owner and founder of Roda Movements, a fitness and dance academy in Takoma Park, Maryland.
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2017, Item SFF2017_0707_OTM_Story_Circle_0001
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 4: On The Move / 4.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref988

Circus Arts

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Description:
The modern circus has been a form of public entertainment since the late 18th century; President George Washington attended John Bill Ricketts' circus in Philadelphia in 1793. In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the circus introduced towns and cities across the country to a wider world through the dazzling sights, sounds, and stunts of the circus artists.

With a history of more than 2 centuries, Circus Arts are considered a heritage and traditional art form; its varied skills have been passed down in families through generations. More recently, troupes and circus schools have been established to train new generations in the specific skills of circus arts. This traditional art form has finally received national recognition; the NEA awarded the aerialist Dolly Jacobs the National Heritage Fellowship in 2015. She is the first circus performer to receive this prestigious NHF award.

Circus members belong to a highly distinctive occupational group, including experts in any one of several clusters of both performance and material arts. Working and performing together, they create a spectacle which induces surprise and amazement in the spectators. It is not just the single acts, it is the entire production and business of the circus that was represented in the Circus Arts program of the 2017 Folklife Festival.

Circus performance arts have focused primarily on various aspects of physical movement, strength, and endurance. The artists work on the outer boundaries of the potential for the human body and physique. These performance arts encompass five main disciplines of circus arts: acrobatics, aerials, clowning, equilibristic, and object manipulation. For each of these performance categories, teams and individuals from around the country and around the world were invited to demonstrate and perform at the festival.

The material arts of the circus include aspects of painting and drawing, design, costuming, and tent making, as well as derivative arts inspired by the circus, such as toy making and miniatures. Workshops for modeling these skills were set up around the festival grounds to enable visitors to view the intricacies of their production. Panels also discussed the interplay between the material and performance arts.

In the Circus Science tent, demonstrations and discussions presented the synergies of science and skill in different circus art forms. The circus Cookhouse was set up to display the culinary skills of circus chefs. Multiple forums were scheduled where circus stories could be shared, including topics such as the social circus, circus families, the history of the circus in American culture, and the changing circus landscape. These forums provided opportunities for experiential exploration of the life and work of circus people, encompassing both the family and community structures in which they thrive.

The emerging concept of the social circus was everywhere on display during the Circus Arts program. The training opportunities focused on the future roles of these young actors beyond their personal growth. By removing themselves from the professional/commercial entertainment arena, they have become participants in social change. This new concept brings needed revitalization to the traditional circus arts in the same year that, coincidentally, the largest American circus, Ringling Brothers, Barnum and Bailey Circus announced its closure due to business concerns.

This presentation on the National Mall spotlighted the occupational culture of Circus Arts at a critical moment in 2017. The Circus Arts program not only helped expand and elevate visitors' understanding and appreciation of a distinctive occupational group. It also championed the vitality of Circus Arts around the world, paving the way for future collaborations. It is in this exploration that myths can be displayed, tough questions can be raised, and the sharing of deep knowledge can take place between Festival participants and visitors.
Production Staff & Participants:
Production

Director: Sabrina Lynn Motley

Curator: Preston Scott

Co-curators: James Deutsch, Cristina Díaz-Carrera

Program Coordinator: Nichole Procopenko

Foodways Coordinator: Arnie Malin

D.C. Circus Day Coordinator: Marissa Walker

Interns: Isabella Barrengos, Maia Daniel, Miranda DiMase-Nordling, Taylor Heagler, Maris Jones, Michaela Podolny, Laura Yee

Lead Volunteer: Zakiya Williams

Advisors and Presenters: Hovey Burgess, David Carlyon, Janet M. Davis, LaVahn Hoh, Rodney Huey, Dominique Jando, Jennifer Lemmer Posey, Linda Simon, Deborah Walk, Matthew Wittmann Big Top Artistic Director: Pedro Reis

Big Top Production Team: Henry Barragan, Jesse Cogswell, Joe D'Emilio, Luis S. Garcia, Leigh Ketchum, Devin Nee, Amanda Scarpa, Mark Wilson, Atos Zamperla

Participants

Stars of the CircusDolly Jacobs

Rafael Palacios

Ambra Zerbini Bauer

Joseph Dominic Bauer

Marina Luna

Ella Storme

Olesya Fedotova

Rony Gomez

Diosmani Aguero

Leosvel Almeida Gutierrez

Kenneth Kenny Raskin

Circus Arts ConservatoryBarry Lubin

Diosmani Aguero

Leosvel Almeida Gutierrez

Luna Storme

Olesya Fedotova

Karen Bell

Robin Eurich

Jaime Hernandez Carranza, student

Keith Phillips, student

Big Apple CircusRay Slizewski, circus cook

Bindlestiff Family Circus

Circus BellaCarlo Gentile

Gianluca "Gianni Magi" Gentile

Gioia Mei "Tatlo" Gentile

Giulia "Trixie Love" Gentile

Giuseppina "Guisi", Gentile

Orlene Gentile

Circus CenterSteve Smith

Circus CultureAmy Cohen

Circus Harmony

Circus JuventasDan Butler

Makenna Cook

Piper Gibbs

Sophie Bauer

Circus SmirkusJacqueline Davis

Jennifer Agans

Amity Stoddard

Cirque des VoixElla Storme

Marina Luna

Pedro Reis

Dolly Jacobs

Rafael Palacios

Matuni Vaiaoga

Barry Lubin

Clowns without Borders

Happenstance Theater

Hebei Golden Eagle Acrobatic Troupe

Listo Trapeze VolantMiguel Cáceres

Medical Clown Project

New England Center for Circus Arts (NECCA)

Sailor Circus

School of Acrobatics and New Circus ArtsIan Jagel

Tyler Henry

UniverSoul CircusBone Breakers, Contorionists

Caribbean Dynasty Dancers

Chain Reaction, Acrobats

Daniel "Lucky" Malatsi, Ringmaster

Fresh the Clowns

Veronica Blair, Aerialist

Carlos Pinto Morales, Acrobatics

Sherrie Silver, Dancer

Wallenda Family TroupeAlessandro Wallenda

Tomas Wallenda

Wenatchee Youth CircusRebecca Geren

Jillian Davis

Lily-Ann Geren

Martin Talbot

Wise Fool New MexicoAmy Christian

Lisa Smith

Band of Jugglers

Unaffiliated PerformersPatrik Elmnert, Juggler

Craig Quat, Juggler

David Tetrault, Calliope

Jeffrey Raz, Clown

Kim Hawkins, Clown

Thom Wall, Juggler

Dominique Jando, Scholar

LaVahn Hoh

Sarah Chapman, Circus Cook

Tim Mack, Ringmaster
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2017, Series 2
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref17

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2015 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Culture:
Afro-Peruvian  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Videotapes
Video recordings
Photographic prints
Sound recordings
Notes
Business records
Memorandums
Slides (photographs)
Audiotapes
Audiocassettes
Digital images
Negatives
Plans (drawings)
Contracts
Correspondence
Place:
Latin America
Peru
Date:
June 24-July 5, 2015
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 2015 Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 3 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: Perú: Pachamama

Series 3: Special Events
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 2015 Smithsonian Folklife Festival was produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
Along with the usual bustle that accompanies Festival planning were questions about the Festival's use of the National Mall. Since its inception, the Festival has traveled the length and breadth of this venerable space between the Capitol and the Lincoln Memorial. What made the 2015 Festival unique was not the space - north of the National Museum of the American Indian - but the fact that it featured a single country, Peru.

As conceived by the bi-national curatorial team, the twelve case studies presented explored important questions about the nature of connectivity, the construction of a shared identity in the face of extraordinary diversity, and history's influence on contemporary cultural production. In those questions, the Peru program found common cause with previous Festivals, and the answers it uncovered will echo in coming years.

The spirit of the Festival is found in the stories people share. The artisans and cooks, dancers and musicians featured deserved the thanks of visitors, as did the many Peruvians in the United States whose enthusiasm for the Festival was a salient reminder that those stories are American stories as well.

The 2015 Festival took place for two five-day weeks (June 24-28 and July 1-5) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 3rd Street and 4th Street, north of the National Museum of the American Indian (see site plan). It featured one program and special events including the Rinzler Concert.

The 2015 guide included participant lists for each program, a site plan, and daily schedules.

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage.

Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage

Michael Atwood Mason, Director; Smithsonian Folklife Festival: Sabrina Lynn Motley, Festival Director

Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage Advisory Council

Ellen McCulloch-Lovell, Chair; Cathy Sulzberger, Co-Chair; Bill Ivey, Dawn McCall, Susan Norton, Anna Maria Ochoa, George Papagiannis, Frederik Paulsen, Jennifer Cover Payne, Ann Elizabeth Sheffer, Deborah Wong, Council Members; Libby O'Connell, J. Scott Raecker, Honorary; Patricia Shehan-Campbell, Ex officio

The Festival was supported by federally appropriated funds; Smithsonian trust funds; contributions from governments, businesses, foundations, and individuals; in-kind assistance; and food, recording, and craft sales.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2015 Smithsonian Folklife Festival forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives; please submit this form. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Folk festivals  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folk music  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Folk art  Search this
World music  Search this
Genre/Form:
Videotapes
Video recordings
Photographic prints
Sound recordings
Notes
Business records
Memorandums
Slides (photographs)
Audiotapes
Audiocassettes
Digital images
Negatives
Plans (drawings)
Contracts
Correspondence
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2015 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2015
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2015 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-2015

Perú: Pachamama

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Crisscrossed with paths connecting communities across geography and history, Peru boasts a stunning vertical landscape that integrates a diversity of ecosystems and cultures. Peru is one of the world's most biodiverse nations, containing ninety microclimates across extreme variances of altitude. The coastal, rain-forested, and mountainous environments provide abundant resources, including major exports such as fish, copper, and asparagus. Many culturally and historically significant areas are popular tourist destinations that encompass complex layered histories.

The uniqueness of Peru's diversity lies in the connectedness of its landscape in the form of rivers, roads, and pathways that existed long before the Inka Empire (fifteenth–sixteenth centuries) and Spanish colonization (sixteenth–nineteenth centuries). Across its different altitudes and climates, communities exchange commodities and practices, shaping deeply rooted but constantly changing daily customs and celebrations. The influx and movement of people between and beyond borders also influence and transform these exchanges.

The 2015 Peru program featured projects, organizations, and groups whose cultural expressions highlight these social, cultural, and economic exchanges. It demonstrated how the networks of celebration and community, crops and markets, textile and craft production, foodways and technology, and music and dance forge the diverse cultural heritage of the country.

Visitors to the Peru Festival program could experience these unique connections through cooking and craft demonstrations, music and dance performances, moderated discussions, ritual and celebratory processions, and other participatory activities. In addition, there was a robust involvement with Peruvian American and diaspora communities. The public had the opportunity to learn, to eat, to dance, to shop, to witness these vibrantly connected cultures, and to create their own connections with Peruvian artists and specialists on the National Mall and beyond.

Olivia Cadaval and Cristina Díaz-Carrera were Curators for the Smithsonian; Rafael Varón Gabai was Curator and Consultant to MINCETUR. Valentina Pilonieta-Vera was Program Coordinator; Alexia Fawcett was Community Engagement Manager, and Betty Belanus was Family Activities Curator. A Curatorial Advisory Committee included: Madeleine Burns, Marjorie Hunt, Mary Linn, Luis Guillermo Lumbreras, Giancarlo Marcone, Soledad Mujica, Diana N'Diaye, Luis Repetto, Marcela Ríos, Daniel Sheehy, Jorge Ortiz Sotelo, Milagritos Saldarriaga, Francisco Tumi, and Madeleine Zúñiga. A Community Advisory Group included: Catherine Cabel Chicas, Nelly Carrión, Billy Castillo, Kristy Chavez-Fernandez, Fabiana Chiu-Rinaldi, María del Carmen Cossu, Miguel García, Elmer Huerta, Vicky Leyva, Doris Loayza, Ana Noriega, Elena Tscherny, and Ricardo Villanueva.

The program was co-presented and co-sponsored by the Republic of Peru Ministry of Foreign Trade and Tourism (MINCETUR). Additional support was provided by the staff of the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian, directed by Kevin Gover (Pawnee), coordinated by Amy Van Allen; Washington Dulles international Airport and the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture. The program received federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center. Special media support is provided by Telemundo Washington DC, BrightYoungThings.com, Latin Opinion Baltimore Newspaper, Orange Barrel Media, WAMU 88.5, El Tiempo Latino, Washington Hispanic, Washington Blade, El Tiempo Hìspano (MD-DE-PA), CTM Media Group, El Zol 107.9, Digital Conventions, and Greater Washington Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. Support for the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage's welcoming ceremony was provided, in part, by Avocados From Peru and Pisco Portón (in-kind).
Researchers, coordinators, and presenters:
Michelle Banks, Victor Boluarte, Nilda Callañaupa, Nadia Calmet, Violet Cavicchi, Xóchitl Chávez, Rodrigo Chocano Paredes, Fabiana Chiu-Rinaldi, Eduardo Díaz, Alfredo DiNatale, James Early, Mariá Regina Firmino-Castillo, Alexandro Hernández, Ingrid Huamaní, Rosa María La Madrid, Javier León, Doris Loayza, Raúl Mancilla Mantilla, Ana Noriega, Federico Serapio Ollero Delgado, Renzo Ortega, Víctor Piminchumo, Marco Arturo Ramírez Colombier, Ana Maria Reyes Albarracin, Deisi Rivadeneira, María Angélica Rodríguez Ibañez, Silvia Salgado, Emily Socolov, Naomi Sturm, Leonardo Tello, Jaime Urrutia, Roger Valencia, Cynthia Vidaurri, Fredi Villagarcia Aquise, Alfredo Villar, Holly Wissler, Ranald Woodaman
Participants:
URBAN MUSIC AND DANCE

Pedro Tolomeo "MONKY" Rojas Meza, 1961-, artist, painter, Lima, Peru

Elliot "Túpac" Urcuhuaranga Cárdenas, 1978-, artist, muralist, Lima, Peru

Brus Mauricio Rubio Churay, 1983-, artist, Loreto, Peru

Los Wembler's de Iquitos -- Los Wembler's de IquitosElmer Alberto Sánchez Casanova, 1952-, guitarist, Iquitos, Loreto, PeruBonar Jair Sánchez León, 1969-, guitarist, Iquitos, Loreto, PeruRonald Jair Sánchez Casanova, 1949-, vocalist, Iquitos, Loreto, PeruRoger Montalván Rodríguez, 1952-, vocalist, Iquitos, Loreto, PeruCarlos Antonio Vázquez Yaicate, 1962-, conga, bongo, guiro player, vocalist, Iquitos, Loreto, PeruGelner Misael Sánchez Casanova, 1956-, timbales player, Iquitos, Loreto, PeruCalixto Alvarado Santillán, 1953-, drummer, musician, Iquitos, Loreto, PeruDanger Runer Sánchez Alvarado, 1971-, guitarist, Iquitos, Loreto, Peru

Q'ESWACHAKA BRIDGE

Basilio Puma Janampa, 1972-, Huinchiri community president, engineer, Canas, Cusco, Peru

Victoriano Arizapana Huayhua, 1963-, Huinchiri engineer, Canas, Cusco, Peru

Eleuterio Ccallo Tapia, 1959-, Huinchiri engineer, Canas, Cusco, Peru

Alejandrina Huillca Puma, 1973-, Huinchiri rope braider, Canas, Cusco, Peru

Cayetano Ccañahuire Puma, 1952-, Huinchiri Pacco ritual master, Canas, Cusco, Peru

Benecio Vilca Vilca, 1962-, Huinchiri builder, Canas, Cusco, Peru

Beltrán Eustaquio Huillca Janampa, 1969-, Choccayhua town mayor, Canas, Cusco, Peru

Jesús Huamani Zosa, 1972-, Chaupibanda builder, Canas, Cusco, Peru

Alejandrino Ponciano Mamani Armuto, 1970-, Chaupibanda builder, Canas, Cusco, Peru

Alejandrina Ayma de Mamani, 1958-, Ccollana Quehue rope braider, Canas, Cusco, Peru

Paulo Cesar Oroche Taype, 1972-, Ccollana Quehue engineer, Canas, Cusco, Peru

Tiburcio Flores Quispe, 1970-, Ccollana Quehue builder, Canas, Cusco, Peru

MARINERA DANCE

Carlos Alfredo DiNatale Hernández, 1977-, dancer, choreographer, Surquillo, Lima, Peru

Giancarlo Julio Bozzo Cumpa, 1979-, dancer, Pasadena, California

Sonia Porras Roca, dancer

Ronald Manuel Fernández de la Rosa, 1964-, dancer, Moche, Trujillo, Peru

María Isabel "Sissy" Soria Muratta, 1972-, dancer, Peru

Giuliana del Rocio Sánchez Dávila, 1980-, dancer, Peru

Lucy de Mantilla, composer, vocalist

Guillermo Javier Martínez Vargas, 1985-, vocalist, percussionist, guitarist, Huanchaco, Trujillo, Peru

Marcelino Santiago "Coco" Linares Zegarra, 1955-, lead guitarist, Peru

Julie Anna Freundt Lopez, 1965-, lead vocalist, Surquillo, Lima, Peru

Eda Benilde Arroyo Peche, 1963-, filigree artisan, Lima, Peru

Manuela Jacquelina Ayasta Caicedo, 1964-, embroiderer, Monsefú, Lambayeque, Peru

Margarita Mechán Lluen, 1960-, belt weaver, Monsefú, Lambayeque, Peru

Margarita Guzmán de Gonzales, 1951-, hat weaver, cook, Monsefú, Lambayeque, Peru

RADIO UCAMARA

Leonardo Tello Imaina, 1975-, director, Peru

María Nieves Nashnato Upari, 1953-, Ikuari School instructor, Nauta, Loreto, Peru

José Manuel Huaymacari Tamani, 1947-, Ikuari School instructor, Nauta, Loreto, Peru

Danna Gaviota Tello Morey, 2000-, Ikuari School student, Nauta, Loreto, Peru

FIESTA DE LA VIRGEN DEL CARMEN

Víctor Germán Boluarte Medina, 1965-, Contradanza captain, Cusco, Peru

Mario Palomino Coll Cárdenas, 1949-, musician, Urubamba, Cusco, Peru

Ricardo Vargas Luna, 1973-, musician, Cusco, Peru

José Eduardo Venero Noriega, 1964-, musician, Cusco, Peru

Silverio Soto Qquehuarucho, 1968-, musician, Cusco, Peru

John Karin Del Solar Torres, 1963-, dancer, Cusco, Peru

Yuri Anibal Boluarte Medina, 1968-, dancer, Cusco, Peru

Camilo Ernesto Félix Villasante, 1976-, dancer, Cusco, Peru

Yvan Pablo Zamalloa Cornejo, 1970-, dancer, Cusco, Peru

Héctor Villasante Vega, 1982-, dancer, Cusco, Peru

Hans Eleazar Del Solar Peña, 1981-, dancer, Cusco, Peru

Socrates Bernable Villasante, 1963-, dancer, Cusco, Peru

Erick Aparicio Ramos, 1982-, dancer, Cusco, Peru

Jorge Bouroncle Villasante, 1960-, dancer, Cusco, Peru

Reinaldo Ever Rojas Corrales, 1954-, dancer, Cusco, Peru

Juan Abel Salazar Gutiérrez, 1983-, dancer, Cusco, Peru

Eliot Alcibiades Zamalloa Cornejo, 1965-, dancer, Cusco, Peru

Fabricio Yabar Morales, 1977-, dancer, Cusco, Peru

DANZA SARAWJA

Genoveva Silveria Coaila Catacora, 1951-, dancer, vocalist, Moquegua, Mariscal Nieto, Peru

Ricardina Maria Catacora Quispe, 1952-, dancer, vocalist, Moquegua, Mariscal Nieto, Peru

Marina Elena Catacora Quispe, 1955-, dancer, vocalist, Moquegua, Mariscal Nieto, Peru

Julia Dora Catacora Quispe, 1961-, dancer, vocalist, Moquegua, Mariscal Nieto, Peru

Rafael Manuel Sosa Alvarado, 1949-, dancer, charango musician, Moquegua, Mariscal Nieto, Peru

Placido Arturo Rospigliosi Zeballos, 1959-, dancer, charango musician, Moquegua, Mariscal Nieto, Peru

CABALLITOS DE TOTORA RAFTS

Ángel Antenor Piminchumo Domínguez, 1960-, artisan, fisherman, Huanchaco, La Libertad, Peru

Eduardo Mateo Valderrama Piminchumo, 1994-, artisan, fisherman, Trujillo, La Libertad, Peru

Anatalia Alejandrina Gonzalez Gutierrez, 1956-, artisan, cook, Huanchaco, La Libertad, Peru

Eloisa Margarita Piminchumo Domínguez, 1959-, artisan, cook, Huanchaco, La Libertad, Peru

CUSCO TEXTILES

Timoteo Ccarita Sacaca, 1955-, weaver, Cusco, Peru

Damian Huaman Mojonero, 1967-, weaver, cook, Cusco, Peru

Rosa Bernadeth Pumayalli Quispe, 1988-, weaver, cook, Cusco, Peru

Leandra Gutiérrez Sallo, 1983-, weaver, cook, Cusco, Peru

Delia Sallo Huaman, 1967-, weaver, cook, Cusco, Peru

Ángel Ligorio Callañaupa Alvares, 1952-, weaver, painter, Cusco, Peru

Quintina Huanca Quispe, 1959-, weaver, singer, Cusco, Peru

Epifania Choque Quispe, 1967-, weaver, farmer, Cusco, Peru

CRAFTS AND MUSIC: HUANCAYO AND AYACUCHO

Huancayo Artisans

Katya Milagros Canto Lazo, gourd carver, Cochas Grande Tambo, Huancayo, Peru

Blanca Violeta Canto Lazo, 1988-, gourd carver, Cochas Grande Tambo, Huancayo, Peru

Ayacucho Artisans

Alfonso Sulca Chávez, 1944-, weaver, Ayacucho, Peru

Jang Ludmir Araujo Ayala, 1978-, tin craftsperson, Huamango, Ayacucho, Peru

Germán Nilo Prado Mayorga, 1949-, mask maker, Peru

Alfredo López Morales, 1958-, retablo artisan, Ayacucho, Peru

Mamerto Sánchez Cárdenas, 1942-, ceramicist, Peru

Deniss Sánchez Aparicio, 1981-, ceramicist, Lima, Peru

Trío de la Estudiantina Municipal de Ayacucho

Felicitas Inés Ascarza de Cuba, 1950-, singer, Ayacucho, Peru

Estanislao Medina Ramos, 1955-, musician, Ayacucho, Peru

Pedro Cconislla Bellido, 1940-, musician, Ayacucho, Peru

AFRO-PERUVIAN MUSIC AND DANCE

Félix Roberto Arguedas Caycho, 1948-, composer, guitarist, Lima, Peru

José Antonio Ballumbrosio Guadalupe, 1976-, dancer, violinist, France

Nadia Ysabel Calmet Calmet, 1982-, choreographer, dancer, Santiago de Surco, Lima, Peru

Miguel Ángel Ballumbrosio Guadalupe, 1975-, dancer, percussionist, Dampmart, France

Wladimir Félix Coronado Enríquez, 1991-, dancer, percussionist, Chincha, Ica, Peru

Ronald Augusto Yllesca Chávez, 1986-, dancer, percussionist, Chincha, Ica, Peru

María Catalina Robles Izquierdo, 1968-, dancer, percussionist, Lima, Peru

Rosario Sonia Goyoneche Narciso, 1966-, vocalist, Lima, Peru

LA CHACRA: QUINOA FARMING

Renee Gutiérrez Quispe, 1984-, farmer, artisan, musician, Peru

Ana María Ccahuin Berrocal, 1984-, farmer, cook, artisan, singer, Ayacucho, Peru

Ives Sandra Gálvez Huamán, 1987-, farmer, cook, artisan, singer, Ayacucho, Peru

John Sayas Coras, 1983-, farmer, artisan, Ayacucho, Peru

WACHIPERI COMMUNITIES

Victorio Dariquebe Gerewa, 1962-, community leader, Pilcopata, Cusco, Peru

Odette Marlid Ramos Dumas, 1991-, artisan, cook, Pilcopata, Cusco, Peru

Nely Margot Ninantay Yonaje, 1986-, scholar, Pilcopata, Cusco, Peru

Marisabel Dumas Ramos, 1984-, trilingual interpreter, healer, Pilcopata, Cusco, Peru

Sofía Solisonquehua Untamay, 1980-, healer, Pilcopata, Cusco, Peru

Sergio Pacheco Hambeo, 1967-, healer, Pilcopata, Cusco, Peru

COMMUNITY DAY PARTICIPANTS & GROUPS

Marianella Dayan Villavicencio (Dayan Aldana), Centreville, Virginia

María Luisa Alvarado

Billy Castillo, Rockville, Maryland

Aymar Ccopacatty, 1979-, recycled art, West Kingston, Rhode Island

Kristy Chavez-Fernandez, 1980-, DJ, McLean, Virginia

Celia Coleto

Martin Correa

Miguel García, foodways, Woodbridge, Virginia

Elmer Huerta, foodways

Adela Hinostroza, 1974-, Reisterstown, Maryland

Vicky Leyva

Milagros López Loli

Wilde Moran, 1958-, Centreville, Virginia

Leandro Reyes

Brenda Salas

Víctor Ruíz, dancer

Arturo Uchima, foodways, Washington, D.C.

José Victorio, foodways, Baltimore, Maryland

Martín Zuñiga

100 Cajoneros

Abya Yala Arte y Cultura -- Abya Yala Arte y CulturaMilagros AlbrechtCarlos AnayaPatricia AranibarMillery BeltranSteve CotaquispeRosa Manozzi-BustamanteTracy MerinoElva NavarroBen Rosen, 1968-, New York, New YorkLuis Vargas

Grupo Etnia -- Grupo EtniaFernando Cabrejo, 1961-, Germantown, MarylandCarlos HurtadoLuis Enrique LevanoMariela MarineroOscar QuispeWalter Suarez

Inkarayku -- InkaraykuElva Ambia Rebatta, Brooklyn, New YorkCarlose Moises AmbiaElva Ambia Jimenez, Brooklyn, New YorkErico Benavente, 1973-, Pelham, New YorkAndres Jimenez, Rego Park, New YorkAdam Negrin, 1983-, Dix Hills, New YorkBen Rosen, 1968-, New York, New York

New Inca Son -- New Inca SonOmar ClavijoRene QuisbertWalter RojasMarianne Ruggiero

Cabanaconde City Colca – USA

Centro Cultural Peru

Papalca

Rancho San Miguel de Aquia

Sentimiento Peruano
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives; please submit this form. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2015 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2015, Series 2
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2015 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2015-ref18

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Memorandums
Audiocassettes
Sound recordings
Notes
Slides (photographs)
Negatives
Plans (drawings)
Audiotapes
Videotapes
Business records
Digital images
Photographic prints
Video recordings
Correspondence
Contracts
Date:
July 1-5, 1993
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1993 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 5 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: American Social Dance

Series 3: Kids' Stuff

Series 4: Metro Music

Series 5: U.S.-Mexico Borderlands
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1993 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
The 1993 Festival of American Folklife was the 27th since the Smithsonian's annual living cultural exhibition began in 1967. In 1993, the Festival included programs on U.S.-Mexico borderlands, American social dance, music in the Washington Metropolitan area, and urban children's culture. All pointed to how people creatively use the resources of community culture to shape life experiences in ways that celebrate and affirm social values.

The Festival's featured program, U.S.-Mexico Borderlands, was the latest in a series developed for the Columbus Quincentenary which sought to expand public knowledge about the cultural history of our hemisphere and to fortify the Smithsonian's engagement of colleagues and communities in Latin America and the Caribbean. Those programs, including Creolization in the Caribbean, Land and Power in Native American Cultures, New Mexico, Maroons in the Americas, and American Indian Soundscapes, directly reached some five million Festival visitors. Brought to fruition with the cooperation of scores of academic, cultural, and educational institutions in 18 nations, those programs engaged the efforts of some 250 different scholars and over 1,000 exemplary culture bearers from across the Americas. They generated rich documentary archives, copies of which reside both at the Smithsonian and at collaborating institutions. Additionally, the programs generated two documentary films and several books, and even contributed to the passage of cultural legislation.

The 1993 Festival took place during a single five-day week (July 1-5) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 10th Street and 13th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan).

The 1993 Program Book included schedules and participant lists for each program; essays provided background on the Festival and each of the four programs.

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Center for Folklife Programs & Cultural Studies.

Center for Folklife Programs & Cultural Studies

Richard Kurin, Director; Diana Parker, Festival Director; Anthony Seeger, Director, Smithsonian/Folkways Recordngs; Peter Seitel, Senior Folklorist; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist; Olivia Cadaval, Director, Quincentenary Projects; Richard Kennedy, Program Analyst; Vivian Chen, Diana Baird N'Diaye, Amy Horowitz, Marjorie Hunt, Folklorists/Curators; Carla Borden, John Franklin, Program Managers; Arlene L. Reiniger, Program Specialist; Jeffrey Place, Archivist; Betty Belanus, Research Associate

Folklife Advisory Council

Roger Abrahams, Jacinto Arias, Jane Beck, Pat Jasper, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Bernice Reagon, John Roberts, Carol Robertson, Gilbert Sprauve, Jack Tchen, Ricardo Trimillos, Carlos Vélez-Ibáñez

National Park Service

Roger Kennedy, Director; Robert G. Stanton, Regional Director, National Capital Region
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Folk music  Search this
World music  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Food habits  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Memorandums
Audiocassettes
Sound recordings
Notes
Slides (photographs)
Negatives
Plans (drawings)
Audiotapes
Videotapes
Business records
Digital images
Photographic prints
Video recordings
Correspondence
Contracts
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1993
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1993

American Social Dance

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
The United States is blessed with a diversity of community dance traditions and new dance forms that have developed from interactions between communities. This exciting American mix has had a profound impact on the popular cultures of nations across the world. The dance program at the 1993 Festival explored social dancing traditions in five communities - an Appalachian community in southwest Virginia, Iroquois communities in upstate New York, and African American, Bolivian, and Cambodian American communities of Washington, D.C.

Tradition-bearers taught dances to Festival visitors in workshops, participated in conversations on a variety of themes, and demonstrated skills, repertoires, and performance styles from their communities. In each of these communities, dance is centrally important in the expression of cultural identity. Dancing brings members of a community together and strengthens cohesiveness by emphasizing shared ethical and aesthetic values. Performing a common vocabulary of movement, in time to a shared repertoire of music, one participates in a culture; Festival audiences became active participants during this program and had the opportunity in so doing to experience others' cultures.

Vivien Ta-Ying Chen was Curator and Marianne Hicks and Arlene Reiniger were Program Coordinators. Program Advisors included LeeEllen Friedland, Joan Frosch-Schroder, Robert Frye, Gonzalo Gutierrez, Glenn Hinson, Anthony Hovington, Adrienne Kaeppler, Martin Koenig, Ethel Raim, Denise Richards, Sally Sommer, Jane Woodside, and Vicki Risner Wulff.

American Social Dance was made possible with the support of the recording industries Music Performance Trust Funds.
Fieldworkers:
Enrique Avilés, Sherrill Berryman-Miller, Paola Castellon, Chhomanath Chhuan, Phavann Chhuan, LeeEllen Friedland, Robert Frye, Anthony Hovington, Magaly E. Jarrad, Laura Larco, Linley Logan, Lidya Montes, Jaime Ortega, Denise Richards, Chan Moly Sam, Sally Sommer, Susan Eike Spalding
Presenters:
Marco Castellon, Gilka Wara Céspedes, LeeEllen Friedland, Robert Frye, Anthony Hovington, Magaly K. Jarrad, Linley Logan, Gail Matthews-DeNatale, Frank Proschan, Denise Richards, Chan Moly Sam
Participants:
Square Dancers from Southwest Virginia

Lois B. Buchanan, 1937-, Glade Spring, Virginia

Richard C. Buchanan, 1933-, Glade Spring, Virginia

Carl Farris, 1938-, Chilhowie, Virginia

Virginia Lee Farris, 1939-, Chilhowie, Virginia

Ernest French, Meadowview, Virginia

Nancy Haworth, 1945-, Abingdon, Virginia

William R. Haworth, 1942-, Abingdon, Virginia

Mildred Holley, Chilhowie, Virginia

Glenn Orfield, 1943-, Meadowview, Virginia

Sandra Orfield, 1942-, Meadowview, Virginia

George V. Owens, 1935-, Meadowview, Virginia

Mary D. Owens, 1939-, Meadowview, Virginia

David E. Salyer, Abingdon, Virginia

Janie Salyer, Abingdon, Virginia

Kirby Smith, 1926-2006, caller, Abingdon, Virginia

Jack Stevens, Meadowview, Virginia

Lala Stevens, Meadowview, Virginia

Evelyn W. Sturgill, 1933-, Chilhowie, Virginia

French Sturgill, Chilhowie, Virginia

Barbara Vance, 1942-, Chilhowie, Virginia

James Vance, 1939-, Chilhowie, Virginia

Southern Country Band -- Southern Country BandHoward Burchette, 1934-, mandolin, fiddle, guitar, vocals, Abingdon, VirginiaBarton Fritts, bass, Mountain City, TennesseeWilliam C. Kelly, 1925-, fiddle, Chilhowie, VirginiaAl Lambert, 1929-, guitar, mandolin, banjo, vocals, Abingdon, VirginiaWilliam H. McCall, 1925-, guitar, vocals, Abingdon, VirginiaSteve Starnes, mandolin, Abingdon, Virginia

Cambodian American Dancers

Phavann Chhuan, 1951-, Rockville, Maryland

Chhomanath Chhuan, Rockville, Maryland

John Kheav, Ft. Washington, Maryland

Vuthy Kheav, 1962-, Ft. Washington, Maryland

Sesane Ouk, 1972-, Sterling, Virginia

Sorabe Phann, 1953-, Bel Air, Maryland

Chan Moly Sam, 1953-, Reston, Virginia

Phillip Rithy Sok, 1973-, Sterling, Virginia

Nareine Sokhon, Potomac, Maryland

Sareth C. Sokhon, 1940-, Potomac, Maryland

Soum Sokhon, 1937-, Potomac, Maryland

Jammy Samnung Sun, Herndon, Virginia

Nadin Samnung Sun, Herndon, Virginia

Nady Samnung Sun, Herndon, Virginia

Sody T. Tek, 1971-, Alexandria, Virginia

Rady Tes, Ft. Washington, Maryland

Sochietah Ung, 1957-, Washington, D.C.

Kagnol Band -- Kagnol BandKagnol Mol, 1945-, leader, guitar, organ, Chantilly, VirginiaHamany Mol, manager, Chantilly, VirginiaSophy L. Hoeung, vocals, Alexandria, VirginiaCory Long, vocals, Silver Spring, MarylandMony Ouy, guitar, Woodbridge, Virginia

New Hello Band -- New Hello BandSamnang Sun, 1955-, leader, keyboards, Herndon, VirginiaVutha Pao, 1967-, lead guitar, Falls Church, VirginiaPhal Soeung, 1962-, vocals, Herndon, VirginiaFarom Tan, 1964-, guitar, Woodbridge, VirginiaChhin Bun Yan, 1955-, vocals, Herndon, Virginia

Bolivian Dancers

Juan Leonardo Alanes, 1956-, Riverdale, Maryland

Adela Baldarrama, Silver Spring, Maryland

Carlos Ballesteros, 1935-, Arlington, Virginia

Melody Ballesteros, Arlington, Virginia

Nancy Ballesteros, Arlington, Virginia

Marco A. Castellon, 1965-, Silver Spring, Maryland

Paola Castellon, Silver Spring, Maryland

Luis H. Fuentes, 1936-, Alexandria, Virginia

Luz Fuentes, Alexandria, Virginia

Magaly Jarrad, 1965-, Glen Burnie, Maryland

Andy Lopez, Gaithersburg, Maryland

Jhonny V. Meneses, 1964-, Alexandria, Virginia

Maria Teresa Mojica, 1946-, Oakton, Virginia

Angel F. Quinteros, 1960-, Arlington, Virginia

Leslie Quinteros, Arlington, Virginia

Lillian Quinteros, 1958-, Arlington, Virginia

Giovani Ricaldez, Arlington, Virginia

Rosemary L. Sejas, 1967-, Arlington, Virginia

Alex Urresty, Gaithersburg, Maryland

Jugo Urresty, Gaithersburg, Maryland

Generacion Luz -- Generacion LuzCharlie Barrionuevo, keyboards, vocals, Falls Church, VirginiaFermin Barrionuevo, keyboards, Falls Church, VirginiaMauricio Barrionuevo, director, percussion, vocals, Springfield, VirginiaJuan Carlos Cueto, guitar, vocals, Arlington, VirginiaLelis Cueto, percussion, Arlington, VirginiaRaul Monterrosa, piano, Arlington, VirginiaJulio Robles, bass, vocals, Arlington, Virginia

Ollantay -- OllantayEnrique Coria, charango,Alexandria, VirginiaJosé Raúl Duran, charango, flute, Silver Spring, MarylandJosé Raúl Gonzalez, charango,Alexandria, VirginiaBoris Torrico, flute, Arlington, VirginiaRodolfo Torrico, percussion, Arlington, Virginia

Iroquois Dancers

Brad Bonaparte, Mohawk Nation, Akwesasne

Sadie Buck, Seneca, Six Nations

Norman B. Hill, Jr., 1968-, Cayuga, Tonawanda

Sue Jacobs, Cayuga, Six Nations

LuAnn Jamieson, Seneca, Tonawanda

Linley Logan, Seneca, Tonawanda

Scott Logan, Seneca, Tonawanda

Mike McDonald, 1961-, Mohawk Nation, Akwesasne

Robert Shenandoah, Onondaga Nation

Keith Shenandoah, Onondaga Nation

Sherri L. Waterman-Hopper, Onondaga Nation

Hand Dancers

Florence K. Barber, 1940-, Washington, D.C.

Lawrence Bradford, 1944-, Washington, D.C.

Kenny Cheeks, Forestville, Maryland

William H. Eley, 1941-, Hyattsville, Maryland

Robert "Captain Fly" Frye, 1949-, deejay, Lanham, Maryland

Leroy Green, 1945-, Capitol Heights, Maryland

Cynthia Jefferson, 1963-, Capitol Heights, Maryland

Addie Robinson, 1947-, Washington, D.C.

Cynthia Shelton, 1949-, Hyattsville, Maryland

Luvenia Shelton, 1950-, Washington D.C.

Howard Watkins, 1938-, Fort Washington, Maryland

Hip-Hop

Anthony Hovington, Silver Spring, Maryland

John "Super Cool" Mackey, 1961-, deejay, Morningside, Maryland

Denise Richards, 1957-, Washington, D.C.

The Nasty Boys

Rosetta Fultz-Mackey, Hyattsville, Maryland

Brian Robinson, 1967-, Temple Hills, Maryland

Chuck Sanders, Washington, D.C.

Kimberly Monique Simpson, 1968-, District Heights, Maryland

Michael Smith, Washington, D.C.

Tyrone Thornton, Washington, D.C.
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1993, Series 2
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1993-ref18

Metro Music

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Washington, the capital city, has long been known for its official culture and public celebrations such as presidential inaugurations, Independence Day pageantry, military band concerts, state funerals, and embassy receptions. Yet it has another reality, one sometimes hidden behind official functions. Washington, the residential city, burgeons with cultures transplanted from beyond urban, state, and national boundaries as well as hybrid traditions newly rooted in an urban environment.

Metropolitan Washington, with over four million residents in 1993, was home to more than one million African Americans, 250,000 Hispanic Americans, nearly 250,000 Asian/Pacific Americans, and thousands of other peoples from around the world. The metropolitan area had been enriched by a continual influx of people from the South and, more recently, immigrants from Central America, the Caribbean, Southeast Asia, and the Horn of Africa. Viewing the city as an environment of distinctly American possibilities, people have flocked to Washington throughout its 200-year history, in search of refuge, a better life, and greater opportunities for freedom, education, power, respect, employment, and financial security. While some came with abundant wealth, others brought little more than themselves, their values, and their traditions to sustain themselves in their transition to a new situation.

Music was always among the most vital of the intangible traditional resources that helped to support these Washingtonians. Each community developed particular institutions and networks of support facilitating social interaction and exchange of information. Some of these communities were defined by geographical boundaries, such as a neighborhood, and traditions emerged out of that experience. Other communities might have lacked geographic definition but shared common characteristics such as age, ethnicity, occupation, social interests, or even family relationship. The sharing of values, perspectives, and experience created a basis for the existence and growth of tradition. Music provided a channel for the expression of community-based values, on display to Festival visitors in the Metro Music program.

Richard Kennedy and Thomas Vennum, Jr. were Program Coordinators. Metro Music was made possible with the support of the recording industries Music Performance Trust Funds.
Presenters:
Enrique Avilés, Philippa Jackson, Richard Kennedy, Michael Licht, Barry Lee Pearson, Jeff Place, Thomas Vennum, Jr.
Participants:
Participants

Baltimore Korean Dancers

Ji Eun Ahn, Baltimore, Maryland

Soon Hee Ahn, Baltimore, Maryland

Ayang By Chi, Baltimore, Maryland

Nanhui Kang, Baltimore, Maryland

Eun Soo Kim, Baltimore, Maryland

Hyum Joo Kim, Baltimore, Maryland

Jung Sook Lee, Baltimore, Maryland

Hye Sook Lim, Baltimore, Maryland

Jung Sook Park, Baltimore, Maryland

Chu Me Yu, Baltimore, Maryland

Ann Yim, Baltimore, Maryland

Jum Bok Yim, Baltimore, Maryland

Chu Me Yi, Baltimore, Maryland

Ann Yim, Baltimore, Maryland

Jum Bok Vim, Baltimore, Maryland

The Country Gentlemen

Charlie Waller, guitar, vocals, Gordonsville, Virginia

Jimmy Bowen, mandolin, vocals, Nashville, Tennessee

Greg Corbett, banjo, vocals, Troy, North Carolina

Ronnie Davis, bass, vocals, Charlottesville, Virginia

Ganga, Bengali Folk Music

Hitabrata Roy, 1927-, dotara, Falls Church, Virginia

Minati Basu Roy, 1931-, khamak, Falls Church, Virginia

Broto Roy, 1957-, tabla, Falls Church, Virginia

Krishnakali Roy, 1955-, ghungar, Falls Church, Virginia

The Gospel Pearls

Beatrice Cooper, Washington, D.C.

Paulette Goodlin, Capitol Heights, Maryland

Brenda Little, 1947-, Washington, D.C.

Verna Locus, 1950-, Washington, D.C.

Connie Monroe, 1946-, Washington, D.C.

Sam Hubbard and Reverb, Gospel

Sam Hubbard, 1937-, Washington, D.C.

Steve Langley, 1959-, Washington, D.C.

Reginald Moore, Washington, D.C.

Bruce O'Neal, 1966-, Washington, D.C.

Victor Pinkney, 1960-, Washington, D.C.

John Jackson, 1924-2002, Piedmont blues, Fairfax Station, Virginia

Johnson Mountain Boys

Tom Adams, banjo, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

Dudley Connell, guitar, vocals, Germantown, Maryland

David McLaughlin, 1958-, mandolin, Winchester, Virginia

Eddie Stubbs, fiddle, Gaithersburg, Maryland

Earl Yager, bass, Spring Grove, Pennsylvania

Djimo Kouyate, Senegalese griot, Washington, D.C.

Little Bit A Blues

Warner Williams, guitar, Gaithersburg, Maryland

Jay Summerour, harmonica, Poolesville, Maryland

Andy Vorhees, bass, Poolesville, Maryland

Alfredo Mojica and His Orchestra, Latin Dance Music

Alfredo Mojica, Sr., band leader, Silver Spring, Maryland

Ralph Eskenazy, 1952-, keyboards, Wheaton, Maryland

Adrianne Galler Lastra, 1954-, bass, Wheaton, Maryland

José Lopez, 1959-, percussion, Gaithersburg, Maryland

Heather McKay, 1959-, guitar, Potomac, Maryland

Alfredo Mojica, Jr., 1958-, percussion, Bethesda, Maryland

Eugene Okonsky, piano, 1965-, Silver Spring, Maryland

Scott Young, saxophone, Wheaton, Maryland

Irish Music & Dance

Winifred Horan, dancer, New York, New York

Donna Long, piano, Baltimore, Maryland

Brendan Mulvihill, 1954-, fiddle, Alexandria, Virginia

Odadaa, Ghanaian Music & Dance

Yacub Addy, master drummer, Alexandria, Virginia

Siboney, Cuban Music

Nelson Rodriguez, director, Washington, D.C.

Veltones, Doo Wop

Joe Herndon, Washington, D.C.

Larry Jordan, 1947-, Washington, D.C.

Sunny Payton, Washington, D.C.

George Spann, Washington, D.C.

Moe Warren, 1947-, Bladensburg, Maryland
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1993, Series 4
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1993-ref34

U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Based on research in the rich and dynamic living culture of the border, the Borderlands Festival program of 1993 was designed to provide a glimpse of the border - its histories, its diverse communities, local and regional identities, and its music, arts, crafts, healing practices, foodways, and narrative. The program was about community-based culture. It presented cultural practices found on the border and cultural expressions about the border, and it explored cultural patterns that were created by the border. It also addressed the cultural heritage, adaptability, and creativity of Native Americans and of the Mexican, Hispanic American, Anglo, and other immigrant communities that have played a part in creating the life that surrounds the Mexico-U.S. border - those who maintain it, those who cross it, those who are left behind, and those who dwell in the border region. The program explored the processes through which such groups create, adapt, and preserve culture to meet the challenges of life on the border. It sought to present and understand community codes of behavior that evolved on the border including confrontation, evasion, violence, and romance, especially as these have been transformed into narrative and other forms of artistic expression.

Music performances at the Festival included emergent forms such as the conjunto, which grew out of the interaction between different cultural communities; older forms, such as the corrido, which has been used to preserve a historical vision in the defense of disputed territory; and adapted forms such as the string band music now incorporated into the traditional repertoire of the Tohono O'odham Native American communities. Also featured in the program were five muralists, whose work reflects the traditions of Mexican cholo and United States Chicano muralism. Murals continue to be touchstones of common historical experiences, archaeologies of sociocultural movements, and powerful statements of identity, ethical principles, and community aspirations. The unique fusion of border aesthetics and handcrafted technology was embodied for Festival visitors in lowriders - distinctively customized automobiles. These lowslung, hopping cars complemented the iconography of murals as statements of cultural identity.

Vaqueros of south Texas demonstrated their skills, crafts, and foodways associated with their cowboy tradition, which dates back to the Spanish colonial era. A fisherman from the port of Brownsville demonstrated shrimping techniques. A Laredo blacksmith forged stirrups, belt buckles, and other implements of vaquero life, along with a number of traditional and contemporary decorative objects. A ropemaker demonstrated the use of the local fiber called lechuguilla (a fibrous plant of the agave family). While fine craft traditions like guitar- and furniture-making are not specific to the border, craftspeople have incorporated motifs and instruments native to the region, like the bajo sexto guitar. Other occupational groups characteristic of the border environment included federal Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) agents who regulate movement across the border; coyotes and polleros, who help migrants evade immigration regulations; and workers in maquiladora assembly line industried. Narrative sessions focused on the culture of craft and occupation in the context of the border.

Artisans also demonstrated crafts used in the home and for special celebrations, including quilt-making, flower- and piñata-making, candlemaking, and reverse-painted glass. Participants prepared regional specialties, traditional foods served for fiestas, and offered a sampling of typical vaquero outdoor cooking. Finally, the Festival presented members of the Mixteco Indian community in Tijuana, a recent migrant group, which preserves its cultural identity and contributes to the economy at the border by maintaining ties with other Mixteco communities in Oaxaca and California.

The United States-Mexico border has had a profound effect on the lives of millions of people. The then-pending NAFTA free trade agreement was only the latest in a long line of international socioeconomic arrangements with wide ranging local impacts. Critical attention in Mexico and the U.S. had increasingly focused on the historical consciousness created in this borderland and on its expression in traditional and other forms of art. Recognition of the vitality and value of borderland culture was growing in 1993 at the margins, among borderland populations, as well as in the centers of power and opinion in both countries. Scholars and political leaders increasingly realized that the cultural encounters, syntheses, and resistances characteristic of border life signaled similar cultural developments in the larger societies. This intensifying concern and scrutiny centered on the margin, but could it reduce the marginality in human rights, social dignity, and economic opportunity at the border? Festival organizers hoped that listening to community voices of the border from the Mexican and United States sides could better inform our thinking and decision-making.

Olivia Cadaval served as Program Curator, with Peter Seitel as Research Advisor; Héctor Antonío Corporán was Program Coordinator and Betty Belanus was Presentation Coordinator.

Collaborating institutions included Centro de Información de Historia Regional, Universid Autónoma de Nuevo León; Consejo Nacional para las Culturas y las Artes – El Programa Cultural de las Fronteras; El Colegio de la Frontera Norte (COLEF); El Paso-Hispanic Chamber of Commerce; Embajada de México en Washington, D.C.; John E. Conner Museum, Texas A & I University; Institute of Texan Cultures; Instituto Cultural de México; Instituto de Bellaas Artes del Estado de Baja California; Instituto Nacional Indigenista; Instituto Mexicano de Cultura, San Antonio; Laredo State University; Mexican Cultural Institute; Museo Regional de la Universidad Autónoma de Baja California en Mexicali; National Museum of the American Indian; New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico; Pimería Alta Historical Society, Arizona; Texas A & I University; Texas Folklife Resources; Tumacácori National Historical Park, Arizona; University of Arizona Library's Southwest Folklore Center; University of Arizona – Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology; University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; University of Texas – Brownsville; University of Texas, Center for Mexican-American Studies; University of Texas – Pan American; and U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service.

United States-Mexico Borderlands was made possible with the support and collaboration of the Consejo Nacional para la Cultura y las Artes - El Programa Cultural de las Fronteras, El Colegio de la Frontera Norte, Texas Commission on the Arts, Cerveza Tecate - Imported Beer, Texas Folklife Resources, University of Arizona Library's Western Folklore Center, Tumacácori National Historical Park, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo Léon - Centro de Información de Historia Regional, Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Gubierno de Nuevo Léon, Mexican Cultural Institute, and the recording industries Music Performance Trust Funds.
Fieldworkers:
María Eugenia de la O, Enrique Madrid, Angel Norzagaray Norzagaray, Manuel Peña, Kathy Raglan, Michael James Ritchie, Suzie Reyes, Irene Vásquez Valle, Kathy Vargas, Felipe de Jesús Valenzuela
Presenters and fieldworkers:
Enrique Avilés, Norma Cantú, Jessica Chapin, Andrew Connors, Maricela González Felix, Mary Lou Gortárez, Everardo Garduño, James S. Griffith, Celso Garza Guajardo, Ian F. Hancock, Pat Jasper, Enrique Lamadrid, Laura Larco, Francisco Javier Moreno, Daniel Sheehy, Emily Socolov, Michael C. Stone; José Manuel Valenzuela Arce, Meynardo Vásquez, Laura Velasco Ortíz, Thomas Vennum, Jr., Cynthia Vidaurri
Participants:
Tijuana, Baja California

Olga Lidia Cortés, Mixteca, hat and basket maker, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Guadalupe Isabel Flores de Estrada, 1939-, Mixteca, altar maker, cook, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Juvencio Extrada Maceda, 1936-, Mixteco, storyteller, oral historian, candlemaker, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Gloria López López, Mixteca, vendor, altar maker, cook, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Elia Ilda Maceda Flores, 1971-, Mixteca, altar maker, cook, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Ofelia Santos López, Mixteca, vendor, oral historian, hat and basket maker, altar maker, cook, weaver, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Francisco Paulino Sierra Cruz, 1955-, Mixteca, schoolteacher, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Cathedral City, California

Carmen Moreno, guitarist, singer, Cathedral City, California

Santa Catarina, Baja California

Benito Peralta González, Paipai, storyteller, oral historian, Santa Catarina, Baja California, Mexico

Tecate, Baja California

José Luis Lee Sandoval, furniture maker, Tecate, Baja California, Mexico

Mexicali, Baja California

Taller Universitario de Teatro -- Taller Universitario de TeatroAngel Norzagaray Norzagaray, 1961-, Mexicali, Baja California, MexicoHeriberto B. Norzagaray Norzagaray, 1959-, Mexicali, Baja California, MexicoLoreto Ramón Tamayo Rosas, Mexicali, Baja California, MexicoAlejandra Rioseco de la Pena, Mexicali, Baja California, MexicoAndrés García Moreno, Mexicali, Baja California, MexicoPedro Gabriel González Castro, Mexicali, Baja California, Mexico

San Simon Village, Arizona

Tohono O'odham String Band -- Tohono O'odham String BandBlaine W. Juan, 1936-, violin, dancer, San Simon Village, ArizonaJoseph Alonzo García, 1924-, violin, dancer, San Simon Village, ArizonaFrank N. Pedro, 1928-, guitar, San Simon Village, ArizonaVictor Augustine García, 1922-, violin, San Simon Village, ArizonaNacho J. Feleys, 1909-1994, snare drum, San Simon Village, ArizonaMike L. Francisco, 1926-, bass drum, dancer, San Simon Village, Arizona

Lupe Lopez, 1927-, Tohono O'odham basket maker, San Simon Village, Arizona

Marie Leon, 1930-, Tohono O'odham basket maker, San Simon Village, Arizona

Nogales, Sonora

Maria Gloria Moroyoqui de Roques, 1930-, Yaqui cook, piñata and flower maker, herbalist, Nogales, Sonora, Mexico

Imuris, Sonora

Anastasio Léon, birdcage and frame maker, Imuris, Sonora, Mexico

Francisco Silva, birdcage and frame maker, Imuris, Sonora, Mexico

Magdalena, Sonora

Felipe de Jesús Valenzuela, regional historian, Magdalena, Sonora, Mexico

Tumacácori, Arizona

María Rodríguez, 1912-2001, tortilla maker, flower maker, cook, Tumacácori, Arizona

Tucson, Arizona

Reynaldo B. Hernandez, INS border patrol, storyteller, Tucson, Arizona

Arturo Carrillo Strong, 1930-, author, oral historian, Tucson, Arizona

Los Hermanos Cuatro, Yaqui Norteño Band -- Los Hermanos Cuatro, Yaqui Norteño BandJesús Juan Yucupicio, 1965-, electric bass, Tucson, ArizonaAlbert M. Yucupicio, 1954-, accordion, Tucson, ArizonaAngel M. Yucupicio, 1966-, drums, Tucson, ArizonaPeter S. Yucupicio, 1957-, bajo sexto, Tucson, Arizona

Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua

Brigada por La Paz -- Brigada por La PazAlonso Encina Herrera, 1968-, muralist, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, MexicoJesús Alberto "Pee Wee" Rodriguez Medina, muralist, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, MexicoGustavo "Sleepy" Grado Tiscareño, 1973-, muralist, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, MexicoMiguel Angel "El Tandy" Sandoval Lira, 1971-, muralist, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico

Oscar Ramírez, 1944-, guitar maker, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico

Los Alegres del Norte, norteño band -- Los Alegres del Norte, norteño bandJosé Flores Cordova, accordion, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, MexicoDiego Hidalgo Alvarez, 1944-, bajo sexto, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, MexicoEmilio Chaírez Muñoz, tololoche, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico

El Paso, Texas

Agustín Castillo, 1950-, woodcarver, furniture maker, El Paso, Texas

Carlos Callejo, Chicano muralist, El Paso, Texas

Romulo Frías, lowrider, El Paso, Texas

El Divisidero, Chihuahua

Guadalupe Carrasco Leyva, 1923-, quilter, cook, El Divisidero, Chihuahua, Mexico

Paso de Lajitas, Chihuahua

Baltazar Rodríguez Puentes, 1942-, ranching crafts, Paso de Lajitas, Chihuahua, Mexico

Lajitas, Texas

Adolfo O. Rodríguez, 1971-, ranching crafts, Lajitas, Texas

Presidio, Texas

Richard Mark Bernholz, 1954-, INS border patrol, storyteller, Presidio, Texas

Nacimiento, Chihuahua

Gertrude Factor Vásquez, 1921-, oral historian, cook, herbalist, Nacimiento, Chihuahua, Mexico

Alice Fay Lozano, 1916-, oral historian, cook, herbalist, Nacimiento, Chihuahua, Mexico

Del Rio, Texas

Ethel I. Warrior, 1919-, oral historian, cook, Del Rio, Texas

William F. Warrior, 1927-, oral historian, storyteller, Del Rio, Texas

Laredo, Texas

Armando Flores, 1953-, blacksmith, Laredo, Texas

María Paredes de Solís, 1923-, quilter, Laredo, Texas

Monterrey, Mexico

El Palomo y el Gorrión, Norteño Band -- El Palomo y el Gorrión, Norteño BandMiguel "El Gorrión" Luna Franco, 1948-, drums, composer, vocals, Monterrey, MexicoMoisés García, guitar, Monterrey, Mexico

Hebbronville, Texas

Omar Galván, 1920-1999, vaquero, rope maker, cook, storyteller, Hebbronville, Texas

Kingsville, Texas

Joe O. Mendietta, 1961-, vaquero, horsehair braider, Kingsville, Texas

San Diego, Texas

Canuto Soliz, 1924-2006, vaquero, leatherworker, storyteller, guitarist, San Diego, Texas

Elsa, Texas

Los Hermanos Layton, Conjunto Band -- Los Hermanos Layton, Conjunto BandAntonio V. Layton, 1946-, guitar, vocals, Elsa, TexasRené Layton, drums, Elsa, TexasNorfilia Layton González, vocals, Elsa, TexasGilbert González, bass guitar, Elsa, TexasBenigno Layton, 1950-, accordion, vocals, Elsa, Texas

Brownsville, Texas

Julius Collins, 1928-, shrimper, net maker, cook, Brownsville, Texas
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1993, Series 5
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1993-ref41

Cecilia Beaux papers

Creator:
Beaux, Cecilia, 1855-1942  Search this
Names:
Andrew, A. Piatt (Abram Piatt), 1873-1936  Search this
Extent:
3.3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Poems
Diaries
Date:
1863-1968
Summary:
The papers of the painter Cecilia Beaux measure 3.3 linear feet and date from 1863 to 1968. Papers document her education, career and personal life through family and professional correspondence, twelve diaries, lectures, essays, poems, notes, clippings, catalogs, pamphlets, exhibition records, business records, photographs, certificates, diplomas, and artifacts.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of the painter Cecilia Beaux measure 3.3 linear feet and date from 1863 to 1968.

Biographical Materials include autobiographical notes written by Beaux, published biographical essays, and articles about Beaux. A lengthy correspondence from Beaux to her friend A. Piatt Andrew of Massachusetts is found, as well as correspondence with family and professional associates. Lengthy letters from Beaux to her family during trips to Europe contain scattered illustrations. Professional correspondents include other artists, teachers, patrons, critics, curators, dealers, and writers.

Writings include one early diary from the 1870s, and a series of eleven additional diaries dating from 1905 to 1913, which record daily activities related to her artwork and personal life. Numerous lectures and essays from her later career are found, often in multiple drafts, as are manuscripts of published and unpublished poems by Beaux. A single sketch, a study for a portrait, is also found.

A floor plan, lists of paintings, receipts, written bids, and other notes document the exhibition and sale of Beaux's artwork. Printed materials related to her career include exhibition catalogs and other ephemera, a scrapbook of primarily clippings related to her early career, and loose clippings related to her later career. Photographs include formal portraits of Cecilia Beaux and informal photographs of Beaux alone and with colleagues, friends, and family members in various settings including Concarneau, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Gloucester, and Malines, Belgium. Also found is a photograph of John Singer Sargent painting.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 6 series, with multiple subseries in Series 2:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Materials, circa 1893-1943 (Box 1, OV 4-5; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, circa 1863-1968 (Boxes 1-2; 1.2 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings, circa 1868-1954 (Boxes 2-3, OV 6; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 4: Personal Business Records, circa 1883-1936 (Box 3, OV 6; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 5: Printed Materials, circa 1874-1953 (Box 3, OV 6; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 6: Photographs, circa 1888-1919(Box 3; 0.3 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Cecilia Beaux was born in Philadelphia in 1855. Her mother died just days after her birth, and Beaux and her sister went to live with their grandmother and aunts. Her adoptive family exposed her to fine art throughout her childhood and, once in school, Beaux excelled in her drawing classes and began training in the studio of Catherine A. Drinker, an artist and a cousin of her uncle Will Biddle. From 1881-1883 she attended life classes directed by William Sartain, who traveled to Philadelphia from New York to give criticisms. She also counted the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts master Thomas Eakins among her early influences, though she did not receive direct instruction from him.

Her first major success in painting was a double-portrait of her sister and nephew entitled Les Derniers Jours d'Enfance, exhibited first at the American Art Association, and in 1885 at the Pennsylvania Academy, where it won the Mary Smith Prize, the first of many prizes Beaux received during her lifetime. In 1887, the painting was exhibited at the Paris salon to critical acclaim. Beaux's reputation as a Philadelphia portraitist grew steadily with the execution of several portraits her in Chestnut Street studio, and in 1888 she traveled to Europe to continue her studio education.

In Paris, she joined the Academie Julien, where she received criticisms from Tony Robert Fleury and William Adolph Bougereau. She spent the summer in Concarneau, Brittany, where Alexander Harrison and Charles Lazar critiqued her work, and returned to Paris, where she attended the Academie Colarossi under and sought out private criticisms in the atelier of Benjamin Constant. She copied paintings and classical sculpture at the Louvre, and traveled throughout Europe to view the works of old masters. In England, she painted several portraits of her friends, the Darwins, before returning to Philadelphia in August of 1889. She traveled to Europe several more times in her life, including a trip in 1896 to see six of her paintings exhibited at the Salon de Champs de Mars. At the time this was an unprecedented number of paintings shown there by an American, and their strength earned her a membership in the Societé Nationale des Beaux-Arts.

In the 1890s, Beaux earned a living painting commissioned portraits at her Philadelphia studio, while experimenting with and refining her style and technique with portraits of friends and family such as Sita and Sarita, of her cousin Sarah Leavitt with her cat, The Dreamer, of her friend Caroline Smith, and Ernesta with Nurse, of her niece, who was a favorite sitter of Beaux's throughout her life. Beaux became the first full-time female faculty member at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in 1895, and continued teaching there until 1915.

In the late 1890s, Beaux painted several works for which she would be repeatedly honored, including Mother and Daughter, a double-portrait of Mrs. Clement A. Griscom and her daughter Frances, which won four gold medals at international exhibitions, and The Dancing Lesson, a double-portrait of Dorothea and Francesca Gilder, the daughters of Richard Watson Gilder, editor of Century Magazine and himself a devoted friend and supporter of Beaux. The Gilders, and especially Dorothea, were steady companions as well as sitters for Beaux throughout her adult life. In 1901 and 1902, Beaux painted Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt and her daughter Ethel in the White House, and in 1903, she was elected to the National Academy of Design.

By 1905 Beaux was living and working primarily in New York during the winter, and at "Green Alley," a home she built in Gloucester, Massachusetts, in the summer. She was introduced to Gloucester by her friend, the Harvard economist A. Piatt Andrew, and entertained a steady stream of intellectual, literary, and artistic friends such as Isabella Stuart Gardner, William James, and Thornton Oakley. Beaux continued to amass prizes and honors for her artwork, including an honorary doctorate at the University of Pennsylvania in 1908. She had solo exhibitions at Macbeth Gallery in 1910, the Corcoran Gallery in 1912, and M. Knoedler Gallery in 1915 and 1917. She had regular public speaking appearances, published articles, and interviews on such subjects as art education, women in art, and modernist art, the pervasive influence of which she eschewed as a passing fad.

In 1919, she traveled to war-torn Europe as the official portraitist of the United States War Portraits Commission painted the portraits of three European war heroes: Cardinal Mercier, Admiral Beatty, and Georges Clemenceau. In 1924, she broke her hip in Paris, and although she continued to paint, she would never again be the prolific painter of her earlier years due to the injury. She wrote her autobiography Background with Figures in 1930, and in 1935-1936, the American Academy of Arts and Letters held the largest exhibition of her work that was mounted during her lifetime. Beaux died in 1942 in Gloucester, at the age of 87.
Related Material:
The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts holds additional papers related to Cecilia Beaux, particularly personal photographs. Portions of these papers were loaned to the Archives of American Art for microfilming in 1985 and were microfilmed on reel 3658.

The Archives of American Art also holds the Dorothea Gilder papers regarding Cecilia Beaux.
Separated Material:
The Archives of American Art also holds microfilm of material lent for microfilming (reels 3425 and 3658) including a sketchbook and other related papers. Lent materials were returned to the lenders and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
Portions of the papers were first lent for microfilming by Harrison Cultra in 1968. The bulk of the collection was donated in1970-1971 by Catherine Drinker Bowen, Beaux's niece, and by Cultra. In 1985, the sketchbook on reel 3425 was lent for microfilming by art dealer Jeffrey Brown with additional material by The Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. A palette was donated by Helen Seely Wheelwright, whose former husband, Paul Seeley, was an artist and friend of Beaux. Awards and diplomas were gifted in 1995 by Cecilia Saltonstall, a descendant of Beaux. Material and a poster reproduction of Beaux's portrait of Rear-Admiral Sampson advertising an article in Century Magazine, 1899, was donated in 1991 by Alfred J. Walker, a dealer who organized a Beaux exhibition. He received the material along with artwork he exhibited from the estate of Richard Barker, who had received them from Harrison Cultra. Cultra had inherited them from Beaux's niece, Ernesta Drinker Barlow.
Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Portrait painters -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Educators -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Art -- Economic aspects  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Poems
Diaries
Citation:
Cecilia Beaux papers, 1863-1968. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.beauceci
See more items in:
Cecilia Beaux papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-beauceci
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Cecilia Beaux papers digital asset number 1
Online Media:

General Correspondence

Collection Creator:
Beaux, Cecilia, 1855-1942  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 24
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1889 January
Collection Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Cecilia Beaux papers, 1863-1968. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Cecilia Beaux papers
Cecilia Beaux papers / Series 2: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-beauceci-ref31
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View General Correspondence digital asset number 1

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