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Poa paucispicula Scribn. & Merr.

Collector:
J. M. Gillett  Search this
James Alexander Calder  Search this
Microhabitat Description:
Along creek bed among mud and stones.  Search this
Place:
Duncan Creek near village of Keno Hill 28 miles NE of Mayo., Yukon, Canada, North America
Collection Date:
5 Aug 1949
Common name:
Alaska bluegrass
Taxonomy:
Plantae Monocotyledonae Poales Poaceae Pooideae
Published Name:
Poa paucispicula Scribn. & Merr.
Barcode:
01260217
USNM Number:
1982489
See more items in:
Botany
Flowering plants and ferns
Data Source:
NMNH - Botany Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/361cd9189-88da-417d-ad27-521dfbfde6ab
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhbotany_13794748

Totem pole in deserted Tlingit village on Fox Island, Alaska

Collection Creator:
Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952  Search this
Extent:
1 Photographic print
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Scope and Contents:
Curtis no. 454.
Collection Restrictions:
Viewing of the photographic negatives and transparencies requires advance notice and the permission of the Photo Archivist.

Access to the Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Identifier:
NAA.2010-28, Item ESCalbum.2
See more items in:
Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs
Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs / Series 9: Photographs / 9.2: Photograph album / Harriman Alaska Expedition:
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3b9c67850-9c4d-4802-949d-9b60fcadf1c3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2010-28-ref2640

Buildings and totem poles in deserted Tlingit village on Fox Island, Alaska

Collection Creator:
Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952  Search this
Extent:
1 Photographic print
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Scope and Contents:
Curtis no. 447.
Collection Restrictions:
Viewing of the photographic negatives and transparencies requires advance notice and the permission of the Photo Archivist.

Access to the Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Identifier:
NAA.2010-28, Item ESCalbum.4
See more items in:
Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs
Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs / Series 9: Photographs / 9.2: Photograph album / Harriman Alaska Expedition:
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw382bf1243-4e64-4d7d-aa65-9f32acc3fe14
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2010-28-ref2642

Inuit village at Plover Bay, Siberia

Collection Creator:
Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952  Search this
Extent:
1 Photographic print
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Scope and Contents:
Curtis no. 376.
Collection Restrictions:
Viewing of the photographic negatives and transparencies requires advance notice and the permission of the Photo Archivist.

Access to the Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Identifier:
NAA.2010-28, Item ESCalbum.13
See more items in:
Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs
Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs / Series 9: Photographs / 9.2: Photograph album / Harriman Alaska Expedition:
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3c34a463f-e1ef-4707-b6d0-e82fe782f7f1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2010-28-ref2650

Rocket Motor, Liquid Fuel, Thruster, Attitude, 0.1 Pound, for ATS-F Satellite

Manufacturer:
Rocket Research Corporation, Redmond, Washington  Search this
Materials:
Thrust chamber, CRES 347 stainless steel; feed tube, Inconel 600; heat shield, CRES 304; nozzle with red rubber protective cap; propellant inlet tubes with black plastic protective wrappings on ends; six strands of wires with transpararent, orange-hue plastic insulation around them tied to ten other wire strands with gray and purple plastic insulation; these strands with electrical clips on ends and with blue plastic protective wrappings above prongs.
Dimensions:
Overall (cylinder): 2 1/2 in. wide x 4 in. long x 1 1/2 in. diameter (6.35 x 10.16 x 3.81cm)
Other (wire bundle): 2 ft. 6 in. long (76.2cm)
Other (nozzle): 3/16 in. diameter (0.51cm)
Type:
PROPULSION-Rocket Engines
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Credit Line:
Transferred from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Inventory Number:
A19761833000
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Location:
Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA
Exhibit Station:
Rockets & Missiles
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nv9f60979fc-22bb-4789-97f2-8b2201ce104c
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nasm_A19761833000

Inuit village at Plover Bay, Siberia

Collection Creator:
Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952  Search this
Extent:
1 Photographic print (platinum)
Container:
Box 14
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Photographic prints
Collection Restrictions:
Viewing of the photographic negatives and transparencies requires advance notice and the permission of the Photo Archivist.

Access to the Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Identifier:
NAA.2010-28, Item HAE376
See more items in:
Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs
Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs / Series 9: Photographs / 9.2: Photograph album / Loose Harriman Alaska Expedition photographs:
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3302a5224-63a9-4517-86ee-674de8286367
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2010-28-ref2715

Photographs

Collection Creator:
Fedoroff, George  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet (Box 2)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1940-circa 1960
Scope and Contents:
Fedoroff's personal photographs include portraits, snapshots of Fedoroff with others including Senator Ted Stevens, his workshop, and his homes. Also found are photographs of Alaska Native craftsmen at work carving totems and other pieces at the Mt. Edgecumbe School, Edgecumbe, Alaska; Sitka, Alaska, and Mekoryuk Village, on Nunivak Island, Alaska.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center.
Collection Citation:
George Fedoroff papers, 1939-1980. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.fedogeor, Series 6
See more items in:
George Fedoroff papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw93682bafe-a1b8-4df4-9862-bb5b68b1cc56
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-fedogeor-ref66

JOURNALS AND NOTEBOOKS OF EDWARD WILLIAM NELSON, 1877-1930 AND UNDATED

Type:
Archival materials
Note:
This series consists of journals and notebooks documenting field work and official travel of Edward William Nelson. Especially well documented is his ethnological and natural history field work in Alaska, 1877-1881; his participation on the Corwin Expedition, 1881; and his field explorations of Mexico with Edward Alphonso Goldman, 1892-1902. The journals from his Mexico work, 1903-1906, are missing. The Alaska and Mexico journals offer a narrative of day-to-day activities and include information on specimens collected; observations on native peoples and their folklore, legends, religion, vocabulary, and other aspects of their culture; sketches of people, villages, fauna, and natural phenomena; and notes on the fauna, flora, and physiography of regions explored. There are typescript copies of the Mexico journals, 1892-1895.

Also included are journals and notebooks kept by Nelson on many official trips taken for the Bureau of Biological Survey; a journal from the Death Valley Expedition, 1890-1891; and miscellaneous notebooks and address books.

Arranged (mostly) alphabetically.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7364, Edward William Nelson and Edward Alphonso Goldman Collection
Identifier:
Record Unit 7364, Series 2
See more items in:
Edward William Nelson and Edward Alphonso Goldman Collection
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7364-refidd1e2354

Ralph S. and Rose L. Solecki papers

Creator:
Solecki, Ralph S.  Search this
Solecki, Rose L.  Search this
Extent:
107 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Shanidar Cave (Iraq)
Date:
1904-2018
bulk 1951-1999
Summary:
The papers of Ralph S. and Rose L. Solecki, 1904-2017 (bulk 1951-1999) primarily document their archaeological excavations and subsequent analysis of Near East sites including Shanidar Cave and Zawi Chemi Shanidar in northern Iraq; Yabroud, Syria; and Nahr Ibrahim and El Masloukh, Lebanon primarily during the 1950s-1980s. The papers also include their work at other sites throughout the Near East and North America and files relating to the professional careers at the Smithsonian Institution, Columbia University, and Texas A and M University. The collection consists of field notes, data and analysis, manuscript drafts, publications, correspondence, illustrations and maps, photographic prints, negatives, slides, and recorded film.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Ralph S. and Rose L. Solecki document their archaeological excavations and subsequent analysis of Near East sites including Shanidar Cave and Zawi Chemi Shanidar in northern Iraq; Yabroud, Syria; Nahr Ibrahim and El Masloukh, Lebanon primarily during the 1950s-1980s. The papers also reflect their academic careers as students and faculty at Columbia University, staff at the Smithsonian Institution, and adjunct faculty at Texas A&M University.

The bulk of the collection consists of materials relating to the Soleckis' archaeological excavations at Shanidar Cave and Zawi Chemi Shanidar in northern Iraq (1951-1960); Yabroud, Syria (1963-1965, 1981, 1987-1988); Nahr Ibrahim and El Masloukh, Lebanon (1969-1973). These materials include field notebooks, excavation catalogs, research notes, data analysis, manuscript drafts, publications, correspondence, illustrations, maps, photographs, slides, sound recordings, and film. Similar materials from other expeditions and projects include aerial photography projects in the 1950s-1960s; expeditions to Alaska in 1949 and 1961; expeditions to Sudan, Iran, and Turkey through the Columbia University Near East expeditions (or C.U.N.E.) throughout the 1960s-1970s; and various archaeological projects elsewhere in North America such as Ralph's work with the River Basin Surveys in the 1940s-1950s, New York, and elsewhere in the eastern United States, contain similar materials.

The papers also contain research and teaching files in the form of annotated publications, course materials, student theses, and other files from their time as students and faculty at Columbia University, staff at the Smithsonian Institution, and adjunct faculty at Texas A&M University. Correspondence and administrative files such as grant applications, daybooks, and departmental forms and files from their professional careers are also within the collection. Personal files, while sparse, are also represented.

Please note that the collection contains images of human remains.
Arrangement:
The Ralph S. and Rose L. Solecki papers are divided into 7 series:

• Series 1: Shanidar Cave and Zawi Chemi Shanidar, Iraq, 1947-2017 (bulk 1951-1990)

• Series 2: Yabroud, Syria and Other Localities, 1950-2017 (bulk 1964-1988)

• Series 3: Nahr Ibrahim and El Masloukh, Lebanon, 1968-1998 (bulk 1969-1973)

• Series 4: Other Expeditions and Projects

• Series 5: Research and Teaching Files

• Series 6: Correspondence and Administrative Files

• Series 7: Personal Files
Biographical / Historical:
Ralph S. Solecki (1917-2019) and Rose L. Solecki (b. 1925) are archaeologists that worked in the Near East at Shanidar Cave and Zawi Chemi Shanidar in northern Iraq (1951-1960); Yabroud, Syria (1963-1965, 1981, 1987); and Nahr Ibrahim and El Masloukh in Lebanon (1969-1973). Ralph Solecki also conducted archaeological field work in North America at sites in Nebraska, Alaska, and New York as well as with the Smithsonian Institution's River Basin Surveys. From 1958-1988, Ralph Solecki was a professor of anthropology at Columbia University. The Soleckis became adjunct faculty at Texas A&M University.

Stefan Ralph Solecki was born on October 15th, 1917 in Brooklyn, New York. After graduating from Newtown High School in 1936, he attended the City College of New York from 1936-1941 and received a B.S. in Geology in 1942. Solecki then served in the US Army and fought in World War II. He was discharged in 1945. In 1946, Solecki enrolled at Columbia University to study Anthropology, and he received a M.A. degree in 1950. During this time, Solecki worked for the River Basin Surveys at the Smithsonian Institution. He also accompanied a geological survey to northern Alaska in 1949. In 1951, he became an associate curator of archaeology at the Smithsonian Institution. In that same year, he traveled to Iraq to survey prehistoric sites and began Season I of excavation at Shanidar Cave. Solecki then received a Fulbright fellowship to return to Iraq in 1953-1954 to continue excavations at Shanidar Cave (Season II) and conduct research at the Iraq Museum in Baghdad. In 1958, he received his PhD in Anthropology from Columbia University and accepted a faculty position within the Department of Anthropology at Columbia University. Following the final two seasons of excavation at Shanidar Cave (see below for details on Season III and IV), Solecki led a number of Columbia University expeditions to various locations around the Middle East, Africa, and Europe. He also spent three seasons (1963-1964, 1981, 1987) surveying and excavating the site of Yabroud in Syria and three field seasons excavating the sites of Nahr Ibrahim (1969, 1970, 1973) and El Masloukh (1969) in Lebanon. Solecki retired from Columbia University in 1988.

Rose Muriel (née Lilien) Solecki was born on November 18th, 1925 in New York City, New York. She completed her undergraduate studies in Anthropology from Hunter College in 1945, and she went on to receive her M.A. and PhD degrees in Anthropology from Columbia University. While at Columbia, she studied under William Duncan Strong and joined Strong's excavations in Peru from 1952-1953. Rose Solecki acted as a research associate within the Department of Anthropology at Columbia University until Ralph Solecki's retirement in 1988.

Ralph and Rose met at Columbia University as students and married in 1955. In 1956-1957, both Ralph and Rose Solecki travelled to Iraq, where Ralph conducted a third season of excavation at Shanidar Cave and Rose excavated the nearby Zawi Chemi Shanidar village site. In 1960, the Soleckis returned for a fourth and final field season of excavation at Shanidar Cave and Zawi Chemi Shanidar, where they were accompanied by Smithsonian Institution curator of Physical Anthropology, T. Dale Stewart. Ralph and Rose Solecki both held positions at Columbia University until Ralph's retirement in 1988. In 1990, Ralph and Rose served as adjunct professors at Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas. In 2000, they left Texas A&M University and moved to South Orange, New Jersey.

Ralph Solecki died in Livingston, New Jersey on March 20, 2019.

Chronology of the Life of Ralph S. Solecki

1917 October 15 -- Born in Brooklyn, New York, USA

1942 -- B.S. in Geology from City College of New York

1942-1945 -- Served in the United States Army during World War II

1948 -- Started working with the Smithsonian Institution's River Basin Surveys

1948-1949 -- Accompanied a United States Geological Survey party to the upper Kokpowruk and Kokolik rivers at the Brooks Range in northwestern Alaska

1950 -- M.A. in Anthropology from Columbia University

1951 -- First field season at Shanidar Cave, Iraq

1953-1954 -- Fulbright fellowship to conduct fieldwork in Iraq Second field season at Shanidar Cave, Iraq Shanidar Child skeleton discovered

1955 -- Married Rose M. Lilien

1956-1957 -- Third field season at Shanidar Cave, Iraq Shanidar I, II, and III skeletons discovered

1958 -- Appointed Associate Curator of Archaeology at the Smithsonian Institution PhD in Anthropology from Columbia University Accepted post at Columbia University as Associate Professor of Anthropology

1960 -- Fourth field season at Shanidar Cave Shanidar IV, V, VI, VII (or IV-VII), and VIII skeletons discovered

1961-1962 -- Columbia University Nubian Expedition to Sudan

1963 -- Columbia University Near East (C.U.N.E.) Expedition to Seberde, Turkey and Yabroud, Syria

1964-1965 -- Columbia University Near East (C.U.N.E.) Expedition to Yabroud, Syria

1969-1973 -- Three field seasons at Nahr Ibrahim and El Masloukh, Lebanon

1971 -- Authored Shanidar: The First Flower People

1981 -- Archaeological survey at Yabroud, Syria

1987-1988 -- Field season at Yabroud, Syria

1988 -- Retired from Columbia University

1990-2000 -- Served as Adjunct Professor of Anthropology at Texas A&M University

2004 -- Coauthored The Proto-Neolithic Cemetery in Shanidar Cave with Rose L. Solecki and Anagnostis Agelarakis

2019 March 20 -- Died in Livingston, New Jersey

Chronology of the Life of Rose L. Solecki

1925 November 18 -- Born in New York City, New York

circa 1945 -- B.S. in Anthropology at Hunter College

1946 -- Enrolled at Columbia University

1950 -- Joined the American Museum of Natural History's Second Archaeological Expedition to Afghanistan

1952-1953 -- Field season in Peru under William Duncan Strong

1956 -- PhD from Columbia University

1956-1957 -- Field season at Zawi Chemi Shanidar, Iraq

1960 -- Field season at Zawi Chemi Shanidar, Iraq

1990-2000 -- Served as Adjunct Professor of Anthropology at Texas A&M University

2004 -- Coauthored The Proto-Neolithic Cemetery in Shanidar Cave with Ralph S. Solecki and Anagnostis P. Agelarakis
Related Materials:
The Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History's Department of Anthropology contains archaeological and ethnographic collections relating to the work of Ralph and Rose Solecki including accession numbers 202536, 209544, 217009, 220078, 220920, 224956, 232170, 242336, 249217, 356696.

Accession 220078 contains archaeological and archaeobiological material excavated by Ralph and Rose Solecki at Shanidar Cave and Zawi Chemi Shanidar. An accretion transferred in 2016 was cataloged as part of the Ralph S. and Rose L. Solecki Papers and Artifacts Project (2017-2019) and cross-references excavation and artifact analysis within the Solecki papers.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Ralph and Rose Solecki and their sons, John and William, in 2016, 2018, and 2019.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Occupation:
Women archaeologists  Search this
Topic:
Excavations (Archaeology)  Search this
Archaeology -- Iraq  Search this
Archaeologists  Search this
Early man -- Neanderthal  Search this
Human evolution  Search this
Citation:
Ralph S. and Rose L. Solecki papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2016-29
See more items in:
Ralph S. and Rose L. Solecki papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw31877394a-46ab-49fa-b941-094b0f6e3760
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2016-29
Online Media:

Takelma

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
0.87 Linear feet ((3 boxes))
Culture:
Takelma (Rogue River Indians)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Maps
Place:
Siletz Indian Reservation (Or.)
Rogue River (Klamath County-Curry County, Or.)
Illinois River (Or.)
Oregon
Date:
1933
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Alaska/Northwest Coast series contains Harrington's Takelma research. His linguistic, ethnographic, and biographical notes contain information from Frances Johnson, Molly Orcutt, and, to a lesser extent, Aneti Scott. Vocabulary consists primarily of animal names, with descriptions of animals and comments on their range and habits. There are many annotations regarding pronunciation, comparisons between forms in various dialects, and several references to myths. Much of the data from Johnson was elicited for comparison with vocabulary she had provided years earlier for Edward Sapir's (1922) study of Takelma. There are smaller sections covering tribe names, material culture, and miscellaneous vocabulary. Considerable biographical information on the residents of the Siletz area and elsewhere is included.

There are also notes that reflect information recorded separately from Frances Johnson and Molly Orcutt on trips to the Rogue and Illinois Rivers area in Oregon. Harrington also obtained an appreciable amount of data from whites he interviewed. George and Evelyn Baker traveled with him and the Indian women from Siletz. White residents they met along the way include Mr. Crow, Mr. Holst, Mr. Emanuell, Miss Savage, Mr. Lyman, J. T. Tuffs, and Mr. Murphy. Harrington's preferred method of operation was to take several people on sidetrips with his linguistic informant to places with which these people were familiar. He noted car mileage from the starting point and recorded the specific location of each important place, its various names in Takelma and English, its history, and past or present significance to Indians and whites. Sketch maps were made of some areas with the assistance of a number of the informants. Much of the placename data were rechecked upon return to Siletz. Among the Takelma lands covered are places along the Rogue River, the south fork of the Umpqua River, Grants Pass, Table Rock, Jacksonville, Gold Hill, Ashland, Medford, Cow Creek, and Galice Creek. The outlying regions around the Klamath River and Coos Bay are also mentioned.
Biographical / Historical:
After recording Shasta and Konomihu in northern California during the early fall of 1933, John P. Harrington crossed the state border into Oregon to work on Takelma. He worked first with Frances Johnson (referred to as Frances, Fr., Frz., F.J., Phr.), an elderly native of a village on Jump-off-Joe Creek, who had worked with Edward Sapirt at Siletz Reservation in the summer of 1906. He began interviewing her in October and then took her on a placename trip to former Takelma territory on November 2nd through the 4th.

After his return to the Siletz area, Harrington worked with two other people. On November 5th he spoke with Aneti (Mrs. Spencer) Scott, a bedridden woman in her eighties. She gave him vocabulary in her native Applegate as well as words in Takelma which she had learned from her first husband, Evans Bill. Molly Orcutt (sometimes referred to as Orton, abbreviated as Molly, Moy., Mo.), mentioned as a speaker of the Table Rock Dialect, also gave him considerable linguistic data. On November 13th through the 19th Harrington again returned to the original tribal lands to record placenames from her. It appears that Harrington made a final check on the tribenames and placenames he had obtained with Aneti and Orcutt in Siletz before returning to California.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Takelma language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Zoology  Search this
Toponymy  Search this
Animals -- Classification  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Maps
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 1.14
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 1: Native American History, Language, and Culture of Alaska and the Northwest Coast
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw33163e8ce-23fd-4ff1-8ab2-25a6614371b4
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref13099

Coast Miwok

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
0.21 Linear feet ((1 box))
Culture:
Mewuk (Miwok)  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Place:
California -- History
Date:
1939
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Northern and Central California series contains Harrington's research on Coast Miwok.

The majority of the data obtained from Julia Elgin and Marion Miranda consists of comments on the names of old village sites recorded by Samuel A. Barrett (1908). Harrington used extracts from the chapter on Moquelumnan (Miwokan) as a basis for eliciting data from Elgin, then reviewed her information with Miranda. The arrangement of the placenames follows that used by Barrett in his sections on western and southern dialects (pages 303-314).

A little miscellaneous vocabulary and several pages giving biographical information on the informants and on other Miwok are also included. On one page, reference is made to a word seen on the flyleaf of Henry W. Henshaw's San Rafael vocabulary (1888). A partial copy of that manuscript was found elsewhere in the notes, although none of the vocabulary itself was reheard.

In addition to linguistic data, Harrington obtained historical and ethnographic information while in the Coast Miwok region. His major source was Rose Gaffney of Salmon Creek. She provided him with details on the natural history of the area, the lives of the residents and various historical events. Harrington was particularly interested in accounts of Russian influence in the area. While on sidetrips with Gaffney, he made a number of sketch maps of such sites as Fort Ross. Interfiled with his field data are extracts from "The Russians in California" (1933). This section of notes also includes records of Harrington's brief interviews with Mr. Shields of Marshall and Mrs. E. S. Karlson, introduced to him by Rose Gaffney in Sebastopol. As in the linguistic notes, a number of references are made to Isabelle Kelley's' field work in the area.
Biographical / Historical:
The early summer of 1939 found Harrington in San Francisco, California, attending the World's Fair. His proximity to Miwok and Maiduan territory prompted him to work briefly on those languages. Interviews concerning Coast Miwok took place during several weeks in mid-June; the dates June 15, 16, and 25 are specifically mentioned.

Harrington worked with Julia Elgin, a speaker of the Marin dialect, and Marion (Mariano) Miranda, who provided both Bodega and "Nicaseno" [Marin?] forms, and a few Pomo terms. Information of a nonlinguistic nature was furnished by Gib Elgin, Julia's husband; Rose and Bill Gaffney, at whose house Harrington stayed; Mrs. E. S. Karlson of Sebastopol; and Mr. Shields of the Marshall hotel and post office.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Miwok languages  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 2.4
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 2: Papers Relating to the Native American history, language and culture of northern and central California
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3f23d7506-fd07-4d0c-be4d-98527b409ede
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref13239

Karok/Shasta/Konomihu

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Maddux, Phoebe  Search this
Roberts, Helen H. (Helen Heffron), 1888-1985  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
49 Boxes
Culture:
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Karuk (Karok)  Search this
Shasta  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Field notes
Vocabulary
Songs
Narratives
Date:
circa 1925-1933
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Northern and Central California series contains Harrington's research on Karok, Shasta, and Konomihu. Materials include notes on vocabulary, grammar, placenames, and basketry; biographical data on various Karok people; texts consisting of stories, myths, formulas, songs, and ethnographic accounts; notes from rehearings of secondary sources; and notes and drafts of Harrington's writings. There are also notes from his interviews with Sandybar Jim, Francisco Capitan, Fritz Hanson, Mrs. Grant, and Fannie Orcutt.

The section of Karok vocabulary is extensive and includes terms for cosmography/minerals, plants, animals, kinship, geography, material culture, and tribenames. The list of plant names also include information on botanical specimens that Harrington collected in the field. A mixture of Shasta and Karok vocabulary can be found elsewhere in the subseries, covering natural history, material culture, kinship and rank, tribenames, and placenames. Etymologies and ethnographic data can be found in both sections for some of the vocabulary.

The section on Karok grammar is also fairly large. The notes include observations he made on the language while working with Fritz Hanson and Sylvester Donohue in 1926. Most of the notes were rechecked with Phoebe Maddus in 1928-1929. There are also miscellaneous vocabulary and short sentences with glosses and translations, elicited to illustrate a variety of phonetic and grammatical principles.

Harrington's notes on placenames include a set of diaries of trips he made throughout Karok territory. He also conducted a detailed study of the Konomihu region of Salmon River. Information that he gathered include etymologies, physical descriptions, locations, and related ethnographic data.

The scope of subjects covered in Harrington's ethnographic notes is broad and mostly reflect his work with Maddux. There are descriptions of life in the living house and sweat house, dress, and food preparation. Various ceremonies, dances, doctoring songs, and formulas are discussed. A wide variety of customs, practices, and beliefs, are mentioned as well as biographical information and anecdotes relating to Maddux and fellow members of her tribe.

Maddux also dictated in Karok stories, myths, formulas, and ethnographic accounts. Some include English translations or summaries. The stories include numerous tales about Coyote and other mythical figures. The formulas include prayers and recitatives, as well as chants used as medicine. The ethnographic texts concern such topics as gathering sugarpine nuts, bear hunting, and marriage customs. Partial transcriptions of Karok and Konomihu songs also form a substantial part of the textual material.
Biographical / Historical:
Much of John P. Harrington's major work of recording Karok vocabulary and ethnographic notes was undertaken during an uninterrupted period of six and one-half weeks from late March to early May 1926. Part of the work was conducted in cooperation with Helen H. Roberts, the ethnomusicologist. The principal Karok speaker that Harrington worked with at the time was Fritz Hanson, a speaker of the Katimin dialect, who was considered to be especially knowledgeable regarding material culture and tribenames. Sylvester Donohue acted as interpreter. Lesser amounts of data were given by Donohue's younger brother, Ben, and a number of other speakers.

Harrington first officially requested permission to work on the ethnology of the Karok in May 1928. In August of that year he returned to the Klamath and Salmon River area. It was at this time that he began working extensively with Phoebe Maddux. Maddux, whose mother was a native doctor, had been raised at Ishipishrihak (Ishi Pishi), a village on the northwest bank of the Klamath River opposite Katimin. While in the region, Harrington obtained sizable vocabularies of the Shasta and Konomihu languages from a Mrs. Grant (further unidentified) and her older sister, Susan Brizelle, both of whom worked with Roland B. Dixon, Jaime de Angulo, and Helen H. Roberts. Daughters of a Konomihu mother and a French father, the women apparently had also learned some Shasta from their maternal grandmother, a Cherokee, who, after her capture, had adopted the "Etna language" (Scotts Valley Shasta).

In October 1928 Harrington brought Phoebe Maddux back with him to Washington, D.C., where she remained until July of the following year when they began the return trip to the west coast via Chaco Canyon, New Mexico. During this lengthy period, Maddux reheard the Karok notes obtained from Hanson, furnished much grammatical information, dictated numerous texts, and examined many artifacts and specimens in the collections of the U. S. National Museum. In addition, she commented upon the Shasta and Konomihu notes, particularly the placename data. In April, Harrington and Maddux were authorized to meet with Franz Boas in New York City for the purpose of making several wax cylinder recordings of the Karok language. En route to Maddux's home in late July 1929, Harrington and Maddux stopped at Eureka, California, to work briefly with Fannie Orcutt, an Orleans Karok woman.

Harrington returned briefly to his study of the Shasta and Konomihu languages in October 1933 when his presence in Takelma territory facilitated a second visit with Brizelle. At that time he "touched up" his earlier notes by adding language identifications and once again rechecked the material. Brizelle's brother, Henry, and her son, Johnny, were also present at these sessions.

Nonlinguistic information was provided by Carl Langford, Harrington's host in the area, and F. B. McCann, as well as by a variety of specialists in the natural sciences. He was assisted in much of the work by George W. Bayley of Santa Barbara, a friend who had helped in the excavation of the Burton Mound some years earlier.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Karok language  Search this
Shasta language  Search this
Konomihu language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnomusicology  Search this
Basket making  Search this
Karuk  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Field notes
Vocabulary
Songs
Narratives
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 2.9
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 2: Papers Relating to the Native American history, language and culture of northern and central California
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3b50a622a-9dd7-4522-86af-da98ecd43cc0
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref13272

Hopi

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Boxe
Culture:
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Place:
Arizona
Date:
1913-1946
Scope and Contents:
This set of files contains Harrington's Hopi research. The materials consist of Oraibi linguistic notes, Walpi linguistic notes, notes on phonetics, writings, and miscellaneous notes.

His Oraibi notes include geographical terms provided by Bert Fredericks in slipfile format, a short etymology of the village name Awatobi, and a small rudimentary file of phonetic sounds. While at Elden Pueblo, Harrington also elicited several Oraibi terms from Otto Lomavitu, described as an educated Indian associated with the Moravian missionaries. Kuyawaima, an elderly Oraibi, provided information on basket-making during another interview in August 1926. The majority of the early records in the Oraibi dialect consist of numbered pages of Harrington's handwritten notes which emerge as a combination of vocabulary, phrases, and grammar in the early stages of development, followed by a brief text on Coyote with interlinear translation. Pages 38, 39, and 40 contain a selected number of terms in Zuni.There is one brief mention of an individual named Ignacio but it is not clear whether the vocabularies originated with him. The elicitation was based partly on a rehearing of a typed "Oraivi Vocabulary" found accompanying the handwritten notes. Harrington was in California in 1912 and early 1913 and was engaged in various projects, one of which was copying manuscripts at the Bancroft Library, a possible source of this material.

Harrington's Walpi data from the work in 1926 and 1939 are of a much less systematic nature. A pocket-sized notebook which he used while at the Grand Canyon contains notes from a brief survey of Walpi speakers, random vocabulary items from Percy Hilling, and an outline of the sequence of songs performed by kutKa, the chief of Walpi, and others. Also recorded during this period are additional lexical items, possibly obtained from a man named Sam, and five pages describing a placename trip which Harrington made from Polacca to Holbrook.

The material from 1939 consists of notes from several brief interviews with Walpi speakers encountered in the Fort Defiance area. On September 27, 1939, Harrington recorded one page of placenames from the son of Tom Polacca, an interpreter at First Mesa in the 1880s and 1890s. Additional placename data were obtained from an unidentified Hopi speaker at the home of Jack Snow. Following each of the vocabularies are copies which Harrington made of the names in 1944 in order to locate them on a map by Van Valkenburgh (1941). Three pages of miscellaneous vocabulary from an unidentified source also date from the 1939 period.

His notes on phonetics were likely made during his comparative study of Hopi and other Uto-Aztecan languages. Harrington made a number of observations on the phonetics of the language. These were recorded in the form of a "Hopi Mouthmap." Secondary sources referred to were Parsons (1936), Trubetskoi (1939), Whiting (1939), and Whorf (unspecified works). The mouthmap appeared in Hewett, Dutton, and Harrington's The Pueblo Indian World (1945).

His Hopi writings consist of preparatory notes and drafts in various stages of completion. From 1945-1946 are notes, handwritten drafts, and finished typescripts of his review of The Hopi Way by Laura Thompson and Alice Joseph, as well as the article "Note on the Names Moqui and Hopi." Both of these were published in the American Anthropologist. There is also a typed draft of an unpublished note, intended for release in Indians at Work, titled "Hopi Discovered To Be Most Nearly Akin to Northern Paiute."

Dating from both the periods around 1922 and 1939 are a number of pages of miscellaneous notations. These contain observations of an ethnographic nature, bibliographies, and brief extracts from secondary sources. One set, consisting of comments on seven "landnames," was obtained from an informant referred to as "Hopi at Jack Snow's." Also included is correspondence dated 1914 requesting information on Hopi rocks and a related photograph (originals in files of correspondence and photographs).

There are few field notes relative to the Hopi recordings Harrington made with Fewkes and Prescott and the related sound recordings have not been located.
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington's field notes indicate that he worked on the Hopi language as early as 1913 and reviewed his material as late as 1944. Although he published a short article on Hopi in 1945 and a review of The Hopi Way (1944) in 1946, his notes on this language are not extensIve.

His first contact with speakers of Hopi evidently occurred in 1913, as suggested by his heading "Hopi Language. 1913." A more precise date and location are not given, but it is possible that Harrington made a side trip to the Third Mesa during February when he was working at a number of other pueblos or that he located a speaker of the Oraibi dialect at one of those locations.

From May through September of 1926, Harrington was called away from fieldwork in northern California to assist J. Walter Fewkes, head of the Bureau of American Ethnology, in archeological excavations at Elden Pueblo near Flagstaff, Arizona. According to The B.A.E. Annual Report for 1925 -1926 (p. 5), prior to the excavations, Harrington and J. O. Prescott assisted Fewkes in the recording of Hopi songs. Four of the older Hopi were brought from Walpi to the Grand Canyon, where they performed 11 katcina songs.

Harrington had a second opportunity to record several short vocabularies in the dialect of First Mesa in 1939 when he and Robert W. Young were beginning joint work on Athapascan in the Fort Defiance area of Arizona. His interest in Hopi was renewed again in March of 1944 when he made a comparative study with other Uto-Aztecan languages of the Takic subfamily.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Hopi language  Search this
Zuni language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Toponymy  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Basket making  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 4.3
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 4: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Southwest
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw393ae4ea4-0c10-483e-8b23-9634516d98f2
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14601

Hidatsa/Mandan/Crow

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
5 Boxes
Culture:
Numakiki (Mandan)  Search this
Minitari (Hidatsa)  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Manuscripts
Date:
1950-1951
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Plains series contains Harrington's Mandan, Hidatsa, and Crow research. The materials primarily consist of comparative vocabulary, comparative grammar, ethnographic notes, texts, and grammar. Small selections of Oto, Quapaw, Shawnee, Arikara, and Sioux terms are interspersed among the vocabulary and grammatical notes.

The vocabulary section (former B.A.E. ms. 6009pt.) is semantically arranged and covers eighteen categories. Carl R. Sylvester (abbreviated "Syl.") provided the Hidatsa terms and the Mandan came from Mark Mahto. There are comparatively few Crow terms. The material contains substantial linguistic elaborations; some ethnographic observations are also included, particularly in the plant vocabulary. While in Billings, Montana, Harrington evidently planned to rehear a Crow clan and relationship vocabulary copied from Robert H. Lowie's Notes on the Social Organization and Customs of the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Crow Indians (1917). Few expressions, however, were reheard (former B.A.E. ms. 6003). Hidatsa material is sometimes identified by the term "Hir." Presumably Harrington was using Hira'tsa, an orthography variously applied in his notes to the language, people, or "ancient" village of Hidatsa. This interchange of "d" and "r" occurs elsewhere in the field notes--Chiwe-dhe for Chiwere, for example. The etymology of the name Hidatsa is apparently vague; there are some pertinent references to this subject among the mythology and tradition notes.

As with the vocabulary notes, there is more information on Hidatsa and Mandan than on Crow in Harrington's grammatical material. Phonetics and morphology are covered, with subcategories labeled by Harrington. This series was formerly catalogued as part of B.A.E. ms. 6009.

Also among Harrington's files is an article titled "New Materials in the Coracle of the Mandan Indians," which he submitted for publication in the American Anthropologist. He obtained most of the information from Crowsheart on September 26, 1950, and from Crowsheart's daughter, Annie Eagle, both of whom lived on the Fort Berthold Reservation in North Dakota. The content of the final draft is almost entirely ethnographic. The notes, however, indicate an attempt to provide a linguistic treatment of the subject, with Hidatsa and Crow comparisons from Sylvester and Mahto. This article (former B.A.E. ms. 6008) was not published.The route of Harrington's trip to Crowsheart's home and a bus trip from Brunswick to Kansas City are described in detail. There is a brief section on mythology and traditions (former B.A.E. ms. 6009pt.).

There is also a small set of reading notes from Washington Matthews' Ethnography and Philology of the Hidatsa Indians (1877) that deals mainly with the name "Missouri River." Additional information covers names of persons, a bibliography, and a few unsorted notes (former B.A.E. ms. 6009pt.). Other miscellaneous material was labeled "Rejects" by Harrington, including an interview in Bismark with a Mrs. Rubia, who had a Hidatsa mother and a Mandan father.
Biographical / Historical:
Between July and December 1950, John P. Harrington spent time at the Crow Indian reservation in southern Montana and at Fort Berthold in North Dakota. He returned to Washington on December 19 and spent from then until March 9, 1951, reporting on his fieldwork. The bulk of information was elicited from Carl R. Sylvester, a Hidatsa Indian, and from Mark Mahto, a Mandan. He interviewed Mahto's ninety-four-year-old father-in-law, Crowsheart, on September 26, 1950, after which he drafted a proposed article on Mandan coracles, or bullboats. In 1951 he tried unsuccessfully to secure Bureau of American Ethnology backing for the construction of a coracle, under Crowsheart's direction, for display in the National Museum.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Mandan language  Search this
Hidatsa language  Search this
Crow language  Search this
Oto language  Search this
Shawnee language  Search this
Arikara language  Search this
Dakota language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Grammar, Comparative and general  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Mythology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Toponymy  Search this
Coracles  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 5.2
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 5: Papers relating to the Native American History, Language and Culture of the Plains
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw395fd8962-1929-42cb-9898-d79225972262
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14745
Online Media:

Pima/Papago/Seri/Opata

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
3 Boxes
Culture:
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Tohono O'odham (Papago)  Search this
Seri  Search this
Indians of Mexico  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Correspondence
Date:
1908-1946
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Mexico/Central America/South America series contains Harrington's research on Pima, Papago, Seri, and Opata. The materials consist of notes from secondary sources, notes on court cases, notes relating to Seri, records of placename trips, Pima and Papago linguistic notes, and miscellaneous notes and correspondence.

Early in his career Harrington compiled a "Pima Bibliography" and extracted ethnographic information on the Pima tribe from the writings of Edward S. Curtis--a typical citation reads "C 2 118"--and Frank Russell. In addition, he extracted animal and plant names from Russell's The Pima Indians (1908). Handwritten notes were also taken from Curtis' description of the Papago. Additional material from an unidentified source includes a 350-page series of typed texts of songs and speeches for various occasions. Categories include invitations to neighboring villages; notes on modern songs and ceremonials; and information on agricultural growth and harvest, deer hunting, salt, curing sugar, puberty, cleansing, superstitions, war and victory, pleasure and profit, and shamanism.

Notes on court cases pertain to Pueblo of Santa Rosa v. Franklin K. Lane, Secretary of Interior in 1920. The case elicited a statement from J. Walter Fewkes on the ethnological and sociological differences between the Pueblo Indians of New Mexico and the Pima and Papago Indians of Arizona and Sonora. Harrington's notes on these differences and a copy of the Fewkes report are filed with this body of material.

His Seri notes include an undated proposal for a "Lower California and Sonora Expedition" which was to be headed by Charles Sheldon for the National Geographic Society. There is also an information sheet from the American Consulate dated May 1924. Harrington did not participate in the expedition but his files contain a five-page Seri vocabulary recorded by Sheldon in December 1922, two pages of notes and sketches on baskets in the "Sheldon Collection," and a few ethnographic notes mentioning Sheldon. In addition, there are six pages of notes from conversations with Mr. [George] Heye regarding Seri artifacts.

This subseries also contains Harrington's notes from his placename trips through southern California and Arizona into Sonora, Mexico. There are excerpts from Fray Pedro Font's diary of those travels for the period October 3 to 6, 1775, as well as references to the historical studies of Bolton. In the course of his investigation, Harrington kept five notebooks which contain not only a sizable vocabulary of placenames but also a potpourri of peripheral information including data on geographical areas defined by the various Pima and Papago dialects. The diary of the trip--written in a mixture of English and Spanish--includes odometer readings, descriptions of the terrain, mentions of photographs taken, and sketch maps of the relative position of various sites. There are also notes of historical interest, as well as detailed floor plans and views of various churches which he visited. In addition to acquiring geographic and ethnographic material, Harrington also obtained a fairly extensive general vocabulary from Eduarda Majuri and Lola Bermudes. The terms elicited from them--evidently in the Opata language ("Op.")--are found in notebook number four.

Among his Pima and Papago linguistic files are notes from his interviews with Papago speakers Molly and Manual Williams. He recorded sixteen pages of random vocabulary and notes on phonetics. In addition, they responded to queries regarding placenames. This file also contains references to and excerpts from correspondence which Harrington had with "Jones" (possibly Mr. Jones Narcho, Tribal Secretary of the Papago), Father Bonaventure Oblasser (May 16, 1939), and a Mr. McFarland. The letters contain linguistic elaborations and etymologies of a brief list of placenames. There are also notes from his interview with Ernest McCray, superintendent at the San Carlos Indian Reservation. Mr. Rudolph Johnson, a Pima interpreter and warehouse keeper at Sacaton Reservation, was also present. Papago data were obtained from Roswell Manuel, described as an Indian policeman at Sells Agency and a deputy on the Papago Indian Reservation. In a separate session with Mr. Johnson, Harrington continued a discussion of placenames and tribenames and reheard data obtained from Luis Lopez. (The two men had further contact through correspondence in September 1948.) Additional information on the location of certain tribes was secured from a Pima speaker identified as Mr. King, who was an employee at Casa Grande Monument, some sixteen miles from Sacaton Agency. During the same time period, Harrington made ethnobotanical notes on an unpublished paper on the botany of Arizona by Robert H. Peebles (also spelled "Peoples"). He also made reading notes on "Southwestern Beans and Teparies" (1912) by G. F. Freeman, of the Agricultural Experiment Station. In 1946 Harrington utilized a list of Pima rancherias from Hodge's "Handbook" (1910) and a map from Herbert Eugene Bolton's Rim of Christendom (1936) as a basis for rehearing Pima placenames with informants Simon Jackson (abbreviated "Jackson") and Henry Shurz (abbreviated "Henry"). Related notes include rehearings of data from Ohue, an early informant for Chemehuevi; miscellaneous biographical references; reading notes; and a map of Arizona.

Harrington's file of miscellany contains correspondence from 1947 and 1948, mostly regarding tribenames. Included are copies of letters exchanged with Louis Karpinsky of the University of Michigan; J. Alden Mason; Paul Lewis, an interpreter at the Pima Agency at Sacaton; and Rudolph Johnson, whom he had interviewed some ten years before. There are also brief notes dated 1947 on maps of the Southwest. These relate to photostatic copies of maps showing routes of the early Spanish explorers. There are two pages of notes on phonetics taken from the works of Juan Dolores.
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington's interest in the languages of the U.S.-Mexican border began in the early period of his work in the Southwest--around 1908 to 1911--when he examined the work of Frank Russell and Edward Curtis on the Pima. Early in the first year of his employment with the Bureau of American Ethnology, he expressed a desire to visit the Pima Reservation, but the proposed trip evidently did not materialize.

In 1924 Harrington hoped to participate in a National Geographic Society expedition to Lower California and Sonora for the purpose of securing linguistic and ethnographic data on the Seri. The party, headed by Charles Sheldon, was to include Harrington as linguist and his friend Paul Vogenitz as ethnologist, botanist, and zoologist. The trip did not take place, or Harrington at least did not participate in it.

It was not until six years later that Harrington first traveled through the territory of the Pima and Papago tribes. In the spring of 1930, with Henry Cervantes as his assistant and chauffeur and Joe Moore as his auto mechanic, he began a placename trip following the route of the Anza expedition of 1775 -1776. Departing from Salinas, California, on March 18, they proceeded by way of Yuma, Tubac, and Nogales, Arizona, to Sonora, Mexico. Harrington later reported that they had covered 872 miles of desert driving.

In the course of this placename trip, Harrington minutely described each day's route and often illustrated it with a roughly sketched map. Included in the itinerary were stops at Casitas, Querobabi, Chupisonora, Opodepi, Camou, and Imuris. In a letter to Matthew W. Stirling giving a detailed account of his travels, Harrington mentioned interviews with the following individuals: Jose Santallanez (nicknamed "El Huero"), Lino A. Parra, Angel Coronado, the Reverend Ubarola (elsewhere given as "Eustaquio Ebarola"), Adolfo Islas, Maria Viuda de Sanchez (possibly Nazaria Sanchez de Urias of the fieldnotes), Professor Cerapio Davila, and Rafael Curella. Expense accounts and the notes themselves list numerous other informants.

In January 1931, Harrington received authorization to follow Anza's route through Arizona, New Mexico, and Mexico. His annual reports indicate, however, that he spent most of the year in California.

At a California Exposition on Treasure Island in June 1939, Harrington had occasion to record a Papago vocabulary from Manuel and Molly Williams of the Papago Reservation at Sells, Arizona. Later in the fall he worked in the area of Arizonac Ranch and Arizonac Creek recording additional Papago terms, as well as Pima placenames. His Ietters to the B.A.E. list Harry Karns, Joe Wise, and his son Knight at Nogales; Lucio Napoleon, a ninety-year-old Papago; Cirildo T. Soto at Saric; and Captain Luis Lopez, head chief of the Papago of northern Sonora, as informants. He also mentioned making rapid progress under Mr. Jones Narcho, tribal secretary of the Papago. The notes themseives only mention Mr. and Mrs. Williams.

Harrington was again in the Southwest between February and July of 1946, in the Sacaton, Arizona, region. At this time most of his efforts were devoted to rehearings in the Pima and Papago languages.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Pima language  Search this
Tohono O'odham dialect  Search this
Seri language  Search this
Opata language  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Correspondence
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 7.1
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 7: Mexico/Central America/South America
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw37211173f-e714-4336-9666-8b3c120ba277
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15085

New York Zoological Society photographs of Tlingit totem pole and house

Creator:
Sanborn, Elwin R. (Elwin Roswell)  Search this
New York Zoological Society  Search this
Extent:
12 Photographs
Culture:
Tlingit  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Date:
September 23, 1904
Summary:
This collection contains photographs depicting the erection of a Tlingit totem pole and chief's house near the Mammals' Pond at the New York Zoological Society on September 23, 1904.
Scope and Contents:
N37501-N37505, P15989-P15995

This collection contains 7 photographs shot by Elwin R. Sanborn depicting the erection of a Tlingit [Sanya (Cape Fox)] totem pole and chief's house near the Mammals' Pond at the New York Zoological Society (now known as Bronx Zoo) on September 23, 1904 and later in the year. The collection also contains 5 copy negatives made from the original photographs by Museum of the American Indian staff in the late 1960s. E. H. Harriman collected the totem pole and house from an abandoned Tlingit village at Cape Fox, Alaska during the Harriman Alaska Expedition of 1899. He then shipped the pieces to Seattle and donated them to the New York Zoological Society for installation at the zoo.
Arrangement:
Arranged by catalog number.
Biographical / Historical:
Dedicated to the study of zoology and preservation of wildlife, New York Zoological Society opened their 265 acre zoo in the Bronx borough of New York City on November 8, 1899. The Society was later renamed the Wildlife Conservation Society and the zoo was renamed the Bronx Zoo.

The Harriman Alaska Expedition studied the Alaskan coast from Seattle to Siberia in June and July 1899. Funded by Union Pacific Railroad President Edward Henry Harriman, the expedition team consisted of prominent scientists, naturalists, photographers, artists, and writers. The expedition findings were published in the thirteen-volume Harriman Alaska Series.
Provenance:
Gift of the New York Zoological Society, 1942.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Topic:
Totem poles -- Tlingit  Search this
Photographs  Search this
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); New York Zoological Society photographs of Tlingit totem pole and house, catalog #, NMAI.AC.204; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.204
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv40511da73-7519-466f-8afc-bd33c32cdce8
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-204
Online Media:

Audio Log Sheets

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1984 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1984 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1984 Festival of American Folklife / Series 2: Alaska / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk567266ab8-dc3e-476d-9036-7625b60cc5bd
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1984-ref1757
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Sales Register

Collection Creator:
Oldman, W. O. (William Ockleford), 1879-1949  Search this
Extent:
255 Digital images
Type:
Archival materials
Digital images
Date:
1904-1910
Collection Restrictions:
Digital access only. For physical access see the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa website. https://collections.tepapa.govt.nz/agent/4913
Collection Rights:
Copyright in the business records is owned by the Estate of W. O. Oldman represented by the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, permission for commercial use of the digital images may be requested from the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Media Licensing, at: mediasalesandlicensing@tepapa.govt.nz.

For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not changedand the source of the image is identified as the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa/National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Citation:
William Ockleford Oldman Archive research materials, Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa and the National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.RM.001, Item CA000228/001/0001
See more items in:
William Ockleford Oldman Archive research materials
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv495851c08-25ab-46cf-bcef-f74451b11837
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-rm-001-ref1
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Collection Ledger: 1 to 33668

Collection Creator:
Oldman, W. O. (William Ockleford), 1879-1949  Search this
Extent:
899 Digital images
Type:
Archival materials
Digital images
Date:
1902-1916
Collection Restrictions:
Digital access only. For physical access see the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa website. https://collections.tepapa.govt.nz/agent/4913
Collection Rights:
Copyright in the business records is owned by the Estate of W. O. Oldman represented by the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, permission for commercial use of the digital images may be requested from the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Media Licensing, at: mediasalesandlicensing@tepapa.govt.nz.

For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not changedand the source of the image is identified as the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa/National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Citation:
William Ockleford Oldman Archive research materials, Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa and the National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.RM.001, Item CA000231/001/0001
See more items in:
William Ockleford Oldman Archive research materials
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4a6e65253-9184-400e-8ed3-57da42e8ab56
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-rm-001-ref6
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Online Media:

Deaconess Harriet M. Bedell photographs

Creator:
Bedell, Harriet M., 1875-  Search this
Extent:
233 Photographic prints (black and white)
115 Copy negatives (black and white)
Culture:
Gwich'in (Kutchin)  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Southern Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Copy negatives
Black-and-white negatives
Place:
Alaska
Oklahoma
Florida
Date:
1910-1939
Summary:
Photographs in this collection include indoor and outdoor portraits, domestic scenes, landscapes of Gwich'in (Kutchin), Seminole and Cheyenne Indians taken by Deaconess M. Bedell from her work as missionary between 1907-1939.
Scope and Contents:
The collection consists of photographs made by Deaconess Bedell while she worked as an Episcopal missionary among the Southern Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne), Gwich'in (Kutchin), and Seminole peoples in Oklahoma, Alaska, and Florida respectively. Although Bedell work in Oklahoma from 1907 to 1916, the Southern Tsitsistas/Suhtai photographs are dated from 1910 to 1915 and consist of informal group portraits of men, women, and children dressed in both traditional and Anglo American clothing; group pictures of school children--boys and girls--at the Whirlwind Mission school and the mission campus itself; and traditional and Anglo American dwellings of Southern Tsitsistas/Suhtai individuals. Among these photographs are studio portraits collected but likely not made by Bedell. Bedell worked in Alaska from 1916 to 1931; the Alaska photographs in the collection date from 1926 to 1931. Among the photographs are informal, outdoor group portraits of Gwich'in men, women, and children, and photographs depicting the landscape, dog sled teams, and Gwich'in dwellings, summer camps, and men fishing and boxing.The Florida photographs date from 1933 to 1939 and depict informal, outdoor group and single portraits of Seminole men, women, and children in traditioanl clothing, photographs depicting men rowing dugouts, Seminole dwellings (chickees), camps, and baskets. Most of these photographs were made at the Glade Cross Mission in the Everglades. The negatives are primarily copy negatives.
Arrangement note:
Prints: organized in folders; arranged by print number

Negatives: organized in envelopes; arranged by negative number
Biographical/Historical note:
Harriet Mary Bedell was born on March 19, 1875, in Buffalo, New York, to Horace Ira Bedell and Louisa Sophia Oberist. Bedell was confirmed in the Episcopalian church and graduated from Normal School in 1894. Following graduation, Bedell worked as a school teacher before deciding to enroll in the New York City Training School for Deaconesses in 1906. She also spent several months in Buffalo at a local hospital learning the rudiments of nursing. Between 1907 and 1916 Bedell was sent to the Whirlwind mission in Blaine County, Oklahoma. There, she worked as a missionary-teacher among the Cheyenne alongside Deacon Oakerhater (Cheyenne). During her time in Oklahoma Bedell contracted Tuberculosis and spent some time in Denver, Colorado recovering. By 1916 plans were made to close the Mission and Bedell was told she was to be transferred to Alaska where her teaching skills were needed. She accepted the remote post in Stevens Village, Alaska, among the Gwich'in (Kutchin) people. In 1922, Bedell left Alaska briefly to be officially ordained as a Deaconess in Portland, Oregon. During her time in Alaska, Bedell also established a boarding school in nearby Tanana but due to the stock market crash of 1929 and the scarcity of funds the boarding facility was unable to remain open. In 1931, following an unsuccessful trip to Buffalo to try and raise money, it was decided that there was no reason for Bedell to return to Alaska.

In 1933, Bedell travelled to Florida by invitation to speak and was appalled by the living conditions she witnessed among the Seminole in southern Florida. Bedell worked to reopen the Glade Cross Mission in Everglades City which had closed in 1914 as well as opening a new Mission in Collier City. In addition to focusing on health and education, Bedell encouraged the Seminole women she worked with to revive traditional doll-making, basket-weaving and intricate patchwork designs. Bedell worked in South Florida until 1960 when hurricane Donna destroyed her home and the Glade Cross Mission and she decided to retire. Bedell lived to be 94 and spent her final years at the Bishop Gray Inn in Davenport, Florida until her death on January 8, 1969. In the year 2000 Bedell was named a "Great Floridian" and in the diocese of Southwest Florida celebrate Harriet Bedell Day annually on January 8th.
Related Materials:
The Harriet Bedell Collection of 126 prints of Bedell working among the Seminole Indians in South Florida from 1933 to 1960 is located at the State Library and Archives of Florida. Information can be found here: Harriet Bedell Collection.
Provenance:
In 1940 Harriet Bedell sent her negatives to the Museum of the American Indian, via William Stiles, to be made into prints. These prints are the bulk of the collection [P14817-P14911, P14955-P15050]. Later in 1940 Bedell presented the museum with an additional 29 prints [P14913-P14941] and in 1941and 1942 Bedell sent two additional gifts totaling 13 prints [P15328-P15330, P15355-P15364].
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday - Thursday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment.
Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadbast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Gwich'in Indians -- Missions -- Photographs  Search this
Cheyenne Indians -- Missions -- Photographs  Search this
Seminole Indians -- Missions -- Photographs  Search this
Women missionaries -- United States  Search this
Women in the Episcopal Church  Search this
Genre/Form:
Black-and-white negatives
Photographic prints
Citation:
Deaconess Harriet M. Bedell photographs, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number).
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.037
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4bbe6bf3a-feb9-4284-b57c-0aa52492283a
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-037
Online Media:

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