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Speeches

Collection Creator:
Ya-Ching, Lee  Search this
Container:
Box 15, Folder 4
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
1940 - 1945
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Collection Citation:
Lee Ya-Ching Papers, NASM.2008.0009, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Lee Ya-Ching Papers
Lee Ya-Ching Papers / Series 2: Professional
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg2834c8d49-a046-4aad-8f4c-60f3d801b422
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-2008-0009-ref134
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Correspondence

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology  Search this
Extent:
112.75 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1897-1965
Scope and Contents:
This series constitutes the administrative correspondence of the BAE, and is the largest series in the collection. It is divided into twenty subseries. The first subseries, Indices and Registers of Letters Sent and Received, is arranged chronologically and then, therein, alphabetically by correspondent. These records provide the date of receipt, name of sender and a brief description of subject discussed. There is a substantial gap in these records from 1902 to 1949.

Bound copies of outgoing letters comprise the second subseries, Letterbooks. Letterbooks are arranged categorically by kind and then, therein, chronologically. Letterbooks in the "general series" include outgoing letters sent chiefly by John Wesley Powell, James C. Pilling, Garrick Mallery, H.C. Rizer, WJ McGee, Frederick W. Hodge and William Henry Holmes. Matters discussed in these letters relate to the preparation and distribution of publications issued by the BAE; formal instructions relating to staff research projects; the maintenance and reproduction of manuscripts and photographs within the BAE collection; the collection and distribution of material objects obtained on BAE field expeditions; the appointment of BAE staff and arrangements made with outside collaborators; requests for appropriations; plans of operation; summaries of expenditures; Indian legislation; laws for the preservation of antiquities; execution of the Antiquities Act; and cooperation with other government agencies. Also discussed are routine housekeeping matters such as the acquisition and return of materials borrowed from the Library of Congress and other institutions or the purchase of supplies and equipment. Lettersbooks comprising letters of "transmittal" discuss the distribution of publications, manuscripts or anthropological information. Letterbooks regarding "requisitions for printing and binding" include letters sent to the Public Printing Office. Letterbooks pertaining to "annual reports" include complete or partial reports addressed to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. They differ slightly in content from those published in the BAE Annual Report series. Letters filed and bound under "library" mostly concern the borrowing or lending of library material, and the purchase of library supplies. "Editorial" letterbooks includes letters to authors, editors and printers, expressing editorial or printing concerns. Letterbooks relating to "accounts" pertain generally to BAE accounts and the conveyance of vouchers.

The letterbooks of William Henry Holmes include letters concerning his charge as Chief Officer of the BAE. Many discuss BAE accounts, plans of operation, staff changes, staff instructions and proposed federal laws for the preservation of antiquities. Others discuss the archaeological work of the BAE, especially the mound surveys carried out by the Division of Mound Explorations. They include replies to requests for information pertaining to Indian mines, quarries and caves, as well as the methods used in excavating these sites. Also included are acknowledgements for the receipt of specimens, photographs and manuscripts. The letterbook of Frank M. Barnett includes letters relating primarily to BAE accounts. Letters in Frank Hamilton Cushing's letterbooks concern, by and large, the collection of specimens in Florida for the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Pennsylvania.

The letterbooks of WJ McGee include letters relating to BAE scholarly work and the Bureau's dealings with the American Geological Society, the Columbia Historical Society, the Joint Commission of the Scientific Societies of Washington (later the Washington Academy of Science), the National Geographic Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Anthropological Association, the Washington Chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America and the International Archaeological Commission. Other letters document McGee's professional relationship with fellow ethnologists and geologists, his personal relationship with William Henry Holmes, and his role as the executor of the estate of Alexander H. and Maria Matilda Evans (parents of Matilda Coxe Stevenson). Others document his position as vice president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and his role as the American representative to the preliminary conferences responsible for forming the International Archaeological Commission. Discussed elsewhere is the preparation and distribution of McGee's own publications, his involvement in a series of public lectures hosted by the Smithsonian Institution, and his observances on the death of John Wesley Powell. Of particular interest is a letter dated July 10, 1896 concerning charges of fraud brought against Frank Hamilton Cushing and another dated November 18, 1902 describing John Wesley Powell's last years as a scholar and administrator of the BAE. McGee's letterbooks also include typescript articles, lectures and similar works. Worthy of note is an article by Matilda Coxe Stevenson relating to a Zuni Scalp ceremony (November 27, 1894). Other articles include, "Primitive Trephining Illustrated by the Munis Peruvian Collection" (January 26, 1894), "The Antiquity of Man in America" (April 13, 1894), "The Expedition to Seriland" (February 14, 1896), "The Papago Time Concept" (July 22, 1896), "A Proposed American Anthropologic Association" (June 21, 1902), "Powell as Anthropologist" (April 11, 1902) and "Progress toward an International Archaeolgic and Ethnologic Commission".

The third subseries, Letters Received 1878, relates exclusively to the work of the US Geographical and Geological Survey of the Rocky Mountain Region. The series is arranged in no particular order. The fourth subseries, Letters Received 1879-1887, is arranged alphabetically by correspondent or institution. Attached to many of these letters are official copies of BAE outgoing replies. Letters deserving special attention include Alexander Graham Bell's letter and chart pertaining to Powell's phonetic alphabet; Franz Boas' rationale and plan for publishing material relating to Northwest Coast Indians; Cushing's sketch map of ruins and caves in the vicinities of San Juan and Wingate, Arizona; Dorsey's wordlist of "Shasti or Klamath"; Gatschet's 1884 "Map of Creek Country in the Eighteenth Century: Names and Sites Restored from the Contemporaneous Documents"; Gatschet's "Affinities between Tehwa and Shoshonian Dialects"; and Cyrus Thomas' report regarding the Traona manuscript.

The fifth subseries, Letters Received 1888-1906, is arranged alphabetically by correspondent or institution. Attached to many of these letters are official copies of BAE outgoing replies. Letters deserving special mention include Dinwiddie's explanation of the fraud charges brought against Frank Hamilton Cushing; Washington Matthews' discussion of the pueblo names in Chaco Canyon; Shelley's transcription of Quanah Parker's statements regarding James Mooney; Mooney's letters concerning his Arapaho photographs; Franz Boas' list of Chinook place names; Abbe's letter concerning the origin of the term "Chinook winds"; and Ashenhurst's letter including a copy of "The Lord's Prayer in Millipama (Mith-hhlama, Tenino).

The sixth and seventh subseries, Letters Received 1907 and Letters Received 1908, are arranged alphabetically by correspondent or institution. Attached to many of these letters are official copies of BAE outgoing replies. Material largely concerns special projects being conducted by the BAE at the time, including the study of various aboriginal languages spoken throughout Indiana, Fewkes' work at Casa Grande, and Frachtenberg's work among the Tutelo. Letters regarding the preparation of various BAE publications, such as the second volume of Hodge's Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico, are also included in these subseries.

The eighth and ninth subseries, Letters Received 1909-1949 and Letters Received 1950-1965, are arranged alphabetically by correspondent or institution with the exception of those letters filed by subject or project. Letters received include requests for information regarding Native American languages, customs, relics or lands surveyed by the BAE. Inquiries were received from museum curators, geologists, military officials, professional anthropologists, students and members of the general public. The majority of outgoing letters were composed by BAE administrative staff fielding these queries; however, some were composed by members of the BAE research staff themselves. Other incoming letters concern personnel matters; research proposals; the BAE budget; the acquisition or distribution of specimens, manuscripts and photographs; legislation affecting BAE activities; and BAE publications. Also found among these letters are official reports concerning the progress of field work being carried out by BAE staff and collaborators. Noteworthy material found among Letters Received 1909-1949, include Boas' "Memorandum on the Changes of the Human Body under the Influences of American Life"; Densmore's "Native Songs of Two Hybrid Ceremonies among the American Indians"; Fenton's photographs taken while on the Tonawanda Reservation; John Peabody Harrington's photographs of his informants; Thomas M. Galey's print of the Osage Indian Non-pe-wa-the; and Kelsey's photograph of Kuanui of the Palolo Valley, Oahu, Hawaii; and the Latin American Expedition's photographs of the Tule. Material deserving special mention in Letters Received 1950-1965 is William S. Laughlin's preliminary report of the archaeological work being conducted on the Aleutian Islands during the summer of 1952; William Reeder's report on the biological investigations carried out on the Kodiak Islands; and Alice Larde de Venturino's "Astonishing Stone Inscriptions of North Chile".

The tenth and eleventh subseries, Letters Sent, Photocopies and Transcripts 1879-1902 and Letters Received, Photocopies and Transcripts 1879-1906, are arranged in no particular order. Reasons behind the duplication or transcription of these letters are unknown. The twelfth subseries, Letters Received, Temporary Correspondence 1949 to 1965, follows two ordering schemes: material dating from 1949 to 1952 is arranged alphabetically by correspondent or institution and material dating from 1953 to 1965 is arranged chronologically. Letters in this subseries appear to have been culled from two separate accumulations of correspondence (one maintained between 1949 and 1952; the other between 1953 and 1965), and unified as a sampling of the various types of requests that were received by the Bureau during this period.

The remaining eight subseries comprise the correspondence of specific individuals, institutions or organizations that worked directly or indirectly with the BAE. They are arranged chronologically and then, therein, alphabetically. The decision to isolate this correspondence from the larger, chronologically ordered unit of BAE correspondence (described above) is unknown. Also unknown is when the separation occurred; it may have occurred at the archival processing level or earlier at the BAE administrative level. It should be noted that the separation process was not comprehensive and, thus, BAE correspondence with these individuals, institutions and organizations may also be found elsewhere in the series.
Arrangement:
Subseries: Indices and Registers of Letters Sent and Received. Subseries: Letterbooks Subseries: Letters Received 1878 Subseries: Letters Received 1879-1887 Subseries: Letters Received 1888-1906 Subseries: Letters Received 1907 Subseries: Letters Received 1908 Subseries: Letters Received 1909-1949 Subseries: Letters Received 1950-1965 Subseries: Letters Sent, Photocopies and Transcripts 1879-1902 Subseries: Letters Received, Photocopies and Transcripts 1879-1906 Subseries: Letters Received, Temporary Correspondence 1949 to 1965 Subseries: Letters Received, S. F. Baird, 1879-1887 Subseries: Letters Received, Franz Boas, 1889-1947 Subseries: Letters Received, Matilda Coxe Stevenson, 1890-1918 Subseries: Letters Received, Smithsonian Institution, 1889-1907 Subseries: Letters Received, Matthew Stirling 1925-1950 Subseries: Letters Received, US Government Agencies 1888-1908 Subseries: Letters Received, US Government Agencies 1909-1950 Subseries: Letters Received, US National Museum Smithsonian Institution 1889-1909 Subseries: Letters Received, Charles D. Walcott 1907-1909
Collection Restrictions:
The Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology are open for research.

Access to the Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.XXXX.0155, Series 1
See more items in:
Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3f9ffe440-6983-4444-b64f-177e18139cb9
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-xxxx-0155-ref13

Oral history interview with Denise Scott Brown, 1990 October 25-1991 November 9

Interviewee:
Scott Brown, Denise, 1931-  Search this
Interviewer:
Reed, Peter  Search this
Subject:
Kahn, Louis I.  Search this
Korn, Arthur  Search this
Scott Brown, Robert  Search this
Venturi, Robert  Search this
Architectural Association (Great Britain)  Search this
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston  Search this
National Gallery (Great Britain)  Search this
University of Pennsylvania  Search this
Venturi Scott Brown and Associates  Search this
Venturi, Rauch, and Scott Brown  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Quotes and excerpts must be cited as follows: Oral history interview with Denise Scott Brown, 1990 October 25-1991 November 9. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Architecture -- Study and teaching  Search this
Architecture, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Architecture, Postmodern -- United States  Search this
City planning  Search this
Women architects  Search this
Architects -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia -- Interviews  Search this
Theme:
Architecture & Design  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13059
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)215692
AAA_collcode_scottb90
Theme:
Architecture & Design
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_215692
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Denise Scott Brown

Interviewee:
Scott Brown, Denise, 1931-  Search this
Interviewer:
Reed, Peter  Search this
Names:
Architectural Association (Great Britain) -- Students  Search this
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston  Search this
National Gallery (Great Britain)  Search this
University of Pennsylvania -- Faculty  Search this
University of Pennsylvania -- Students  Search this
Venturi Scott Brown and Associates  Search this
Venturi, Rauch, and Scott Brown  Search this
Kahn, Louis I., 1901-1974  Search this
Korn, Arthur, 1891-  Search this
Scott Brown, Robert  Search this
Venturi, Robert  Search this
Extent:
188 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1990 October 25-1991 November 9
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Denise Scott Brown conducted 1990 October 25-1991 November 9, by Peter Reed, for the Archives of American Art.
Scott Brown discusses her family background and growing up in South Africa; her education at the University of Witwatersrand, the Architectural Association, London, a summer school in Venice, sponsored by Congres Internationale d'Architecture Moderne, and the University of Pennsylvania, recalling some of her teachers (including Arthur Korn and Louis Kahn); her first husband, Robert Scott Brown, and their travels throughout Europe and experiences in Pennsylvania; her teaching philosophy and experiences at the University of Pennsylvania, Yale, Harvard, UCLA, and Berkeley; the architecture program at Penn from her perspective as a student and as a member of the faculty; meeting Robert Venturi, their work together, the firm and the difficulties encountered in the 1970s and 1980s, some of their projects such as the National Gallery, London, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and planning work; publications such as "Complexity and Contradiction," "Urban concepts," "Worm's Eye View," and "Learning from Las Vegas;" postmodern architecture; critics; and her experiences as a woman in the field.
Biographical / Historical:
Denise Scott Brown (1931- ) is an architect of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
General:
Originally recorded on 10 sound cassette. Reformatted in 2010 as 19 digital wav files. Duration is 13 hr., 45 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
Architecture -- Study and teaching  Search this
Architecture, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Architecture, Postmodern -- United States  Search this
City planning  Search this
Women architects  Search this
Architects -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia -- Interviews  Search this
Function:
Architectural firms -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.scottb90
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw99f626da7-523f-443a-8493-096e9242adaa
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-scottb90
Online Media:

American Academy in Rome records

Creator:
American Academy in Rome  Search this
Names:
American Academy in Rome  Search this
American School of Architecture in Rome  Search this
American School of Classical Studies in Rome  Search this
Aldrich, Chester Holmes, 1871-1940  Search this
Boring, William, 1859-1937  Search this
Breck, George, 1863-1920  Search this
Dinsmoor, William B.  Search this
Egbert, J. C. (James Chidester), 1859-1948  Search this
Ely, Theo. N.  Search this
Faulkner, Barry, 1881-1966  Search this
Guernsey, Roscoe  Search this
Hewlett, James Monroe  Search this
Kendall, William M.  Search this
La Farge, C. Grant (Christopher Grant), 1862-1938  Search this
Marquand, Allan, 1853-1924  Search this
McKim, Charles Follen, 1847-1909  Search this
Mead, William Rutherford, 1846-1928  Search this
Millet, Francis Davis, 1846-1912  Search this
Morey, Charles Rufus, 1877-1955  Search this
Mowbray, H. Siddons (Harry Siddons), 1858-1928  Search this
Platt, Charles A. (Charles Adams), 1861-1933  Search this
Pope, John Russell, 1874-1937  Search this
Roberts, Laurance P.  Search this
Smith, James Kellum, 1893-1963  Search this
Stevens, Gorham Phillips, 1876-  Search this
Vedder, Elihu, 1836-1923  Search this
Vitale, Ferrucio, 1875-1933  Search this
Ward, John Quincy Adams, 1830-1910  Search this
Extent:
65.9 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Date:
1855-2012
Summary:
The records of the American Academy in Rome measure 65.9 linear feet and date from 1855 to 2012. The collection documents the history of the institution from its inception in 1894 as the American School of Architecture in Rome, through the end of World War II, and chronicles the contributions the academy has made to America's cultural and intellectual development. Nearly one-half of the collection consists of an unprocessed addition received in 2014 containing records that mostly post-date World War II and include correspondence and subject files of officers and executives based in the New York office of American Academy in Rome.
Scope and Content Note:
The records of the American Academy in Rome measure 65.9 linear feet and date from 1855 to 2012. The collection documents the history of the institution from its inception in 1894 as the American School of Architecture in Rome, through the end of World War II, and chronicles the contributions the academy has made to America's cultural and intellectual development. Nearly one-half of the collection consists of an unprocessed addition received in 2014 containing records that mostly post-date World War II and include correspondence and subject files of officers and executives based in the New York office of American Academy in Rome.

Items predating the 1894 founding of the American School of Architecture in Rome are personal papers and memorabilia of individuals associated with the institution.

Series 1: Predecessor Institutions, is composed of the records of the American School of Architecture in Rome, 1894-1898, and the American School of Classical Studies in Rome, 1895-1913. Records of the American School of Architecture in Rome include records of its Managing Committee, correspondence, financial records, and printed matter. Among the Managing Committee's records are notes and correspondence relative to the founding of the institution, minute books and reports; also, legal documents including records concerning its dissolution prior to being reorganized as the American Academy in Rome. Correspondence is mostly that of Vice President Charles F. McKim who handled administrative matters. Financial records include capital stock certificates, invoices and receipts. Printed matter consists of scholarship competition announcements.

Records of the American School of Classical Studies in Rome include records of its Managing Committee, Committee on Fellowships, publications, printed matter, and treasurers' records. The Managing Committee's records consist of the proposed resolution concerning its merger with the American Academy in Rome. Committee on Fellowship records are comprised of correspondence, reports, and fellowship applications. Publications records include correspondence and invoices. Printed matter includes general information, annual reports of the Managing Committee and Director, annual reports of the Committee on Medieval and Renaissance Studies, fellowship applications and examination questions, and the proposed consolidation agreement. Treasurers' records include the files of Alex. Bell and Willard V. King. Bell's sparse records consist of a budget, receipts for salary payments, an invoice, canceled checks, and correspondence. King's files, while more substantial than those that survive from Bell's tenure, are quite incomplete. They include correspondence, banking records, budgets and financial statements, investment records, invoices, and receipts for salaries and expenses.

Series 2: Board of Trustees Records, is comprised of legal documents, minutes, and reports; records of Trustee committees; records of officers; and records of individual Trustees. Legal documents, 1897-1926 and undated, consist of by-laws and amendments, certificate of incorporation, and constitution and amendments. Minutes and reports of the Board of Trustees, 1897-1947 and 1957, including those of its annual meetings, are carbon copies rather than the official minute books, and are incomplete. Reports of officers are incomplete, as well. Also included are reports of Officers'/Trustees' visits to Rome, and reports of the Director and Secretary in Rome submitted to the Board of Trustees.

Records of Trustee committees, 1905-1946 and undated, consist of reports and/or minutes arranged alphabetically by committee; these, too are incomplete, with many committees represented by a single report. Committees represented are: Building Committee, Carter Memorial Committee, Endowment Committee, Executive Committee, Finance Committee, Library Committee, McKim Memorial Committee, Nominating Committee, Committee on Publications. Committee on the School of Classical Studies records consist of its own minutes and reports, reports of its Advisory Council and the Jury on Classical Fellowships. Committee on the School of Classical Studies also include reports of officers and staff of the School of Classical Studies to the Committee on the School of Classical Studies as follows: Director, Professor in Charge, Annual Professor, Director of the Summer Session, Professor of Archaeology, Curator of the Museum, Editor, Librarian, and Committee on the Welfare of Women Students. Committee on the School of Fine Arts records consist of its own minutes and reports, reports of its Special Committee on the Plan and Expense of a Department of Music in the School of Fine Arts, and report of Fine Arts Program, Triptych Project with the Citizens Committee for the Army and Navy, Inc.; also, reports of officers and staff of the School of Fine Arts to the Committee on the School of Fine Arts as follows: Director, Professor in Charge, Associate in Charge, Annual Professor, Professor in Charge of the Department of Musical Composition. In addition, there are minutes and/or reports of the Committee of Twelve and Subcommittee of Five and the Special Committee on Villa Aurelia.

Records of Officers. 1898-1957 and undated, consist mainly of correspondence files and reports, with large numbers of transcriptions and carbon copies. Included are records of: Presidents Charles F. McKim, William R. Mead, Charles A. Platt, John Russell Pope, and James Kellum Smith; Vice Presidents Theodore N. Ely, George B. McClellan, and Henry James; Secretaries H. Siddons Mowbray (Secretary/Treasurer), Frank D. Millet, C. Grant La Farge, William B. Dinsmoor, and H. Richardson Pratt; and Treasurers William R. Mead, William A. Boring, Leon Fraser, and Lindsay Bradford Office files of President Mead, Secretaries Millet and La Farge, and Treasurer Boring are the most complete; files of other individuals, the Vice Presidents in particular, are often quite sparse.

Records of individual Trustees, 1902-1946 and undated, consist of material relating to official Academy business that was created or maintained by each in his capacity as trustee. (Note: many of these individuals also served as officers or staff of the Academy, and their records documenting those functions will be found in the appropriate series.) Included in this subseries are the records of: Chester H. Aldrich, Gilmore D. Clarke, James C. Egbert, Barry Faulkner, Allan C. Johnson, William M. Kendall, C. Grant La Farge, Edward P. Mellon, Charles Dyer Norton, Charles A. Platt, John Russell Pope, Edward K. Rand, John C. Rolfe, James Kellum Smith, S. Breck Trowbridge, Ferruccio Vitale, John Quincy Adams Ward, Andrew F. West, and William L. Westerman. These records tend to be sparse; files maintained by James C. Egbert, Barry Faulkner, Allan C. Johnson, and Ferruccio Vitale are notable exceptions.

Series 3: New York Office Records, consists of records of staff, rosters, printed matter, photographs, personal papers, Association of Alumni of the American Academy in Rome, and miscellaneous records.

Records of staff, 1919-1950 and undated, include the office files of Executive Secretaries Roscoe Guersney, Meriwether Stuart, and Mary T. Williams; Librarian George K. Boyce; and Endowment Fund Campaign Secretaries Phillilps B. Robinson and Edgar I. Williams.

The rosters, 1895-1939 and undated, are printed forms completed by fellows and students, with occasional attachments (usually correspondence or photographs). Included are the rosters of the School of Fine Arts, School of Classical Studies, and School of Classical Studies Summer Sessions.

Printed matter, 1905-[1981?] and undated, has been classified as Academy produced and produced by others. Items produced by the Academy, 1905-[1981?], include general information including act of incorporation and by-laws, fundraising brochure, constitution, Directory of Fellows and Residents, histories of the institution, newsletter of the Director, and printed items relating to special events. Printed matter specifically relating to the School of Classical Studies includes annual announcements, the consolidation agreement, a directory, fellowship announcements and applications, lecture announcements, newsletters, and brochures about summer sessions. School of Fine Arts printed matter includes annual announcements, concert programs, exhibition checklists and catalogs, fellowship announcements and application forms, history, and newsletters.

Printed matter produced by others, 1905-1940 and undated, consists of three scrapbooks of news clippings and photographs compiled by the American Academy in Rome, extensive clipping files, and articles from miscellaneous publications. All of these items are about the American Academy in Rome, or by or about individuals associated with the institution. Also included is a poster for Leave Courses offered at the Academy for U. S. servicemen.

Photographs, 1891-1941 and undated, are organized into the categories of works of art, people, buildings, places, events, and miscellaneous. Works of art are by visiting students and fellows, Frank D. Millet, collaborative problems, Rome Prize Competitions in Architecture, Rome Prize Competitions in Landscape Architecture, and Prix de Rome Competition exhibitions. Photographs of people are both of individuals and groups; among the groups are summer school students and fellowship winners.

Buildings depicted are American Academy properties. Among them are the "New Building," including interior and exterior construction views; studios; and Villas Aurelia, Mirafiore, and Richardson. Also included is a group of photographs of Academy architecture students measuring buildings in Rome and Florence. Places pictured are views of the Academy property and surrounding areas.

Photographs of events include cricket games, Thanksgiving and Fourth of July dinners, Architectural League exhibition, and inauguration of the Manship Fountain. Miscellaneous photographs are of an architectural drawing for a proposed building.

Personal Papers, Memorabilia, and Ephemera, 1855-1923 an undated, were donated to the American Academy in Rome or otherwise left on its premises. None are official records generated by the institution. Included are: Ernest Lewis' photograph album/scrapbook; Allan Marquand's papers; Charles F. McKim's memorabilia, photographs, printed matter, and artifacts; Charles R. Morey's correspondence; and Elihu Vedder's Bible.

Records of the Association of the Alumni of the American Academy in Rome, 1913-1945 and undated), consist of a small number of scattered records including correspondence, fellows' war/government service information (compiled by Sidney Waugh), membership lists, and a newsletter.

Miscellaneous records, 1899-1926 and undated, are writings and architectural records. Writings consist of published and unpublished manuscript material about the American Academy in Rome and its history, and article by H. Siddons Mowbray advising on ornamentation, and text and illustrations for the Art and Archaeology issue on the Academy. Also included are fragments of unidentified letters. Architectural records [oversize] include property and floor plans of Villas Aurora, Chiaraviglio, Ferrari, and Ludovisi.

Series 4: Rome Office Records, consist of records of staff and personal papers. Records of staff, 1903-1947 and undated, include the office files of Directors H. Siddons Mowbray, George Breck, Jesse Benedict Carter, Gorham Phillips Stevens, James Monroe Hewlett, Chester H. Aldrich, Amey Aldrich [Acting Director, very briefly, perhaps unofficially], Charles R. Morey, and Laurance P. Roberts; and records of two members of the School of Fine Arts faculty, Frank P. Fairbanks, Professor of Fine Arts, and Felix Lamond, Professor of Music. Records of Carter, Stevens, Hewlett, and Aldrich appear to be fairly complete; records of early directors are sparse; those of Morey and Roberts appear to be missing significant portions; and those of Professors Fairbanks and Lamond consist of a few scattered items.

Also surviving are the personal papers of Director Gorham Phillips Stevens, 1912-1931 and undated), consisting of correspondence, financial records, and documentation of professional and charitable activities.

Series 5: Unprocessed Addition to the American Academy in Rome Records was received in 2014 and consists of 31.6 linear feet of the New York office's records for officers, directors, and executives.
Arrangement:
It was obvious that before they came to the Archives of American Art the records had been rearranged more than once, and in such a way that materials from many different departments had been intermingled. In keeping with archival theory and practice, the records were organized to reflect the structure and operation of the institution that created the records, making them more understandable and accessible to a wide variety of researchers.

In general, the records of each officer and staff member are arranged alphabetically, with general correspondence preceding the alphabetical sequence; arrangement within each file is chronological, unless noted otherwise.

Records of the American Academy in Rome are organized into five major series. Each series, except series 5, is divided into several subseries, with the arrangement described in detail in the series descriptions.

Missing Title

Series 1: Predecessor Institutions, 1894-1913 (box 1; 0.88 linear ft.; Reels 5749-5750)

Series 2: Board of Trustees Records, 1897-1957, undated (boxes 1-17, 35, 37; 15.25 linear ft.; Reels 5750-5777)

Series 3: New York Office, 1855-circa 1981, undated (boxes 17-32, 36; 15 linear ft.; 5777-5795)

Series 4: Rome Office, 1903-1943, undated (boxes 32-34; 3 linear ft.; 5795-5800)

Series 5: Unprocessed Addition to the American Academy in Rome Records, 1933-2002 (boxes 35-103; 31.6 linear ft.)
Historical Note:
While in Chicago to advise and work on the fine arts section of the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition, architects Charles F. McKim, Daniel Burnham, and Richard Howland Hunt, painters John La Farge and Frank Millet, and sculptors Augustus Saint-Gaudens, and Daniel Chester French, among others, met regularly. From their collaborative experience and discussions came the idea for an American school for artists in Europe. Charles F. McKim was especially enthusiastic. He strongly believed that collaborative experience should be available to future American artists, and perceived a real need for an American school in Europe--preferably in Rome, the very best place to study art, in his opinion.

By March of the following year, McKim was busy devising plans for the school and persuading like-minded architects and artists to assist. He proposed to finance the school by convincing institutions with traveling scholarships in the arts to send those students to Rome. Columbia University, University of Pennsylvania, and the Rotch Scholarship fund readily agreed to the scheme, and in ensuing years many others followed suit. In October, 1894, the American School of Architecture in Rome opened temporary quarters in the Palazzo Torlonia. The school consisted of its Director, Austin Lord, three fellows, and a visiting student; its "library" contained but one volume.

A move to the larger, more suitable Villa Aurora occurred in July 1895. Rent from two subtenants (the newly established American School of Classical Studies in Rome and the British and American Archaeological Society Library in Rome), along with a personal contribution from McKim, made this financially feasible.

The American School of Architecture in Rome was incorporated in the State of New York, 1895, and 10 shares of capital stock were issued. Despite substantial fundraising efforts in Chicago, New York, and Boston, severe financial problems continued. The American School of Classical Studies in Rome vacated the Villa Aurora in 1896--and with it went a sizeable portion of the School of Architecture's income. McKim frequently made up the deficit from his own pocket.

Eventually, it was decided that the American School of Architecture in Rome must be reorganized along the lines of the French Academy and that national sponsorship needed to be obtained through an act of Congress. In June of 1897, the American School of Architecture in Rome voted to dissolve itself and create the American Academy in Rome. The new institution would assume all assets and obligations, fellowships in painting and architecture were to be added to the program, and its Board of Trustees would include architects and artists. The Academy is not a school. Its fellows and visiting students, already professionally trained, go to Rome for further development and for collaboration and association with others. In the words of Director Gorham Phillips Stevens: "The object of the American Academy in Rome is not to afford opportunities for a few individuals to perfect themselves for the practice of their chosen professions. The ideal is to create an atmosphere in which a limited number of carefully selected artists and scholars may develop that synthesis of intellectual culture which will make them worthy to preserve and continue the great traditions of the past in order that the standard of art and literature may be handed on from year to year, constantly strengthened and improved."

Beginning in 1901, bills to make the American Academy in Rome a "national institution" were introduced in Congress on several occasions. A hearing was finally scheduled in 1905, and a revised bill that prohibited government funding and specified that U.S. officials may not be Trustees was signed into law. Serious efforts to create an Endowment Fund and secure better quarters were associated with the movement to obtain status as a national institution. The Academy was successful in meeting all of these objectives. In 1904, the Academy moved to the Villa Mirafiore (also known as Villa Mirafiori), which it soon purchased and renovated. The Endowment Fund raised well over a million dollars. Donors of $100,000 to the Endowment Fund, designated "Founders" of the American Academy in Rome, were: The Carnegie Foundation, Henry C. Frick, Harvard College, Charles F. McKim, J. P. Morgan, Sr., J. P. Morgan, Jr., The Rockefeller Foundation, John D. Rockefeller, Jr., William K. Vanderbilt, and Henry Walters. Other categories of donors were "Incorporators" (a new Act of Incorporation was required at the time the American Academy in Rome was chartered as a national institution) and "Life Members."

The American School of Classical Studies in Rome, which had been established by the Archaeological Society in 1895 and during its first year shared the Villa Aurora with the American School of Architecture in Rome, entered into a consolidation agreement with the American Academy in Rome in 1911. Their merger went into effect on the last day of 1912, and ever since, the American Academy in Rome has consisted of the School of Fine Arts and the School of Classical Studies, administered by a common director. The School of Classical Studies is composed of fellows and visiting scholars who are graduate students, secondary teachers, or professors engaged in research in the areas of archaeology, ancient art, philology, and humanistic studies. Women were a part of the School of Classical Studies from its beginning, but were not permitted to participate in the School of Fine Arts until well after World War II. Beginning in 1923, the School of Classical Studies instituted Summer Sessions which appealed to secondary teachers, and attracted an enrollment that was largely female.

Originally, the School of Fine Arts offered fellowships in architecture, painting, and sculpture. Fellowships in landscape architecture were added in 1915; in 1920, a Department of Music was established, and along with it fellowships in musical composition. Fellowships in art history were established in 1947. Unmarried men under age 30 were eligible to compete for the fine arts fellowships awarded annually (except for landscape architecture, awarded every third year); the duration of fellowships ranged from one to three years at various points in the institution's history. In residence along with fellows of the American Academy in Rome, might be holders of various traveling scholarships: the McKim Fellowship, the Columbia Traveling Scholarship, the Perkins Scholarship, the Robinson Traveling Scholarship (Harvard), the Rotch Scholarship, the Julia Appleton Scholarship, the Traveling Scholarship and Stewardson Memorial Scholarship (University of Pennsylvania), the Cresson Scholarship (Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts), the Drexel Institute Traveling Scholarship, the Lazarus Scholarship (Metropolitan Museum of Art), the Lowell Scholarship (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), and the Rinehart Scholarship (Peabody Institute, Baltimore). Visiting students, who remained for a much briefer period than fellows or recipients of various traveling scholarships, were admitted to all lectures and granted use the library, but resided elsewhere. The Academy opened an Atelier in downtown Rome for visiting students in 1927, which operated until financial considerations forced its discontinuation seven years later.

As the merger was being planned, J. P. Morgan, Sr., who was interested in both the American Academy in Rome and the American School of Classical Studies in Rome, began buying properties on the Janiculum, adjacent to Villa Aureilia. Villa Aurelia, built on the summit of the Janiculum in 1650, had been bequeathed to the American Academy in Rome in 1909 by Clara Jessup Heyland. Complications surrounding the gift of Villa Aurelia--including the will being contested by Mrs. Heyland's brother, and problems with unsettled tax assessments--were overcome in the interest of acquiring the outstanding building and its extensive grounds. Not long before his death in 1913, Morgan donated his neighboring land, and the American Academy in Rome continued to expand its Janiculum holdings through purchases and gifts from others. Morgan also agreed to provide a loan for construction of a new building. This building, designed by McKim, Mead, and White and known as the Main Building or Academy Building, opened in 1915; it served as the fellows' residence and work area, and included room for the library, offices, and space for exhibitions and other public events.

During World War I, the American Academy in Rome managed to remain open, although no new fellows arrived during the war years and the number of resident fellows and staff dwindled considerably. Most who remained were involved in some type of civilian war work, often with the Red Cross. In fact, Villa Aurelia was rented by the Red Cross in Italy for office space, and the Main Building was offered as a convalescent hospital, but the war ended before it could be put to that use.

After Italy declared war on the United States in 1941, the American Academy in Rome closed for the remainder of World War II. Those who had been awarded fellowships in classics just prior to the Academy's closing were given the option of using their stipends for study at home or waiting until conditions permitted travel to Rome. A very reduced staff stayed to care for the property and continue library cataloguing, coping with often severe wartime shortages of food and fuel. In addition, there were financial hardships. When bank accounts of enemy aliens were frozen and it was no longer possible to transfer funds from the United States, the Swiss Legation and Vatican arranged for loans to keep the Academy and its staff afloat. Funds that would have been awarded to new fellows during this period were put to use in other ways. In 1943, the American Academy in Rome made a grant to the Citizen's Committee for the Army and Navy, Inc. for competitions to award commissions to artists and art students throughout the country, funding more than 100 triptychs for chapels, as well as murals, medals, and sculpture. Seniors in American colleges and universities were eligible to compete for several scholarships for graduate work in classical studies awarded by the American Academy in Rome.

In 1945, the Academy was the site of Leave Courses on various aspects of Italian culture offered to servicemen. From the end of the war until the Academy reopened at the start of the 1946/47 academic year, G.I. Fellowships were offered to discharged soldiers wishing to study at the Academy, making the institution eligible to receive surplus equipment and rations. During this time intensive planning was underway for administrative changes and new programs.

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1893 -- While in Chicago to collaborate on the fine arts section for the World's Columbian Exposition, architects Charles F. McKim, Daniel Burnham, Richard Howland Hunt, painters John La Farge, and Sculptors Augustus Saint-Gaudens, and Daniel Chester French, among others, met regularly and from their collaborative experience and discussions came the idea for an American school in Europe.

1894 -- American School of Architecture in Rome opened in temporary quarters at the Palazzo Torlonia with Austin Lord, Director, three fellows, and a visiting student.

1895 -- Villa Aurora leased with 2 subtenants, the American School of Classical Studies and the British and American Archaeological Society Library in Rome American School of Architecture incorporated and 10 shares of capital stock issued (2 each to McKim and Hunt, and 1 to Burnham, Kendall, Schermerhorn, Boring, Garland, and Dill) McKim visits Rome.

1896 -- Metropolitan Museum of Art, administrator of Jacob H. Lazarus Scholarship for the study of mural painting, agrees to send the winner to Rome American School of Classical Studies in Rome vacates Villa Aurora.

1897 -- American School of Architecture in Rome dissolved and reorganized as the American Academy in Rome; the assets (including the lease on Villa Aurora) of the American School of Architecture in Rome were transferred and its program expanded to include fellowships in painting and sculpture Samuel A. B. Abbott appointed first Director Rome Prize discontinued (for 9 years) due to lack of funds.

1898 -- Incorporated in New York State; trustees begin to focus on raising an endowment.

1904 -- Move to Villa Mirafiore (also known as Villa Mirafiori); occupied until 1914.

1905 -- Chartered by the Congress of the United States; a bill signed by President Roosevelt made the American Academy in Rome a national institution (receiving no government funding and barring U.S. officials from acting as Trustees).

1906 -- Purchase of Villa Mirafiore finalized; renovations begun.

1909 -- Villa Aurelia bequeathed to the Academy by Clara Jessup Heyland (used until 1932); there were protracted problems surrounding the acquisition of the property including a brother who contested the will and unsettled taxes.

1911 -- School of Classical Studies in Rome (established by the Archaeological Institute of America in 1895) and the American Academy in Rome announce their consolidation [the merger became effective on the final day of 1912].

1912 -- Lands on the Janiculum adjacent to Villa Aurelia, recently acquired by J. Pierpont Morgan, Sr., transferred to the American Academy in Rome.

1913 -- American Academy in Rome now consists of the School of Fine Arts and the School of Classical Studies. New York office moves to the Architect's Building, 101 Park Ave., remaining at this location until 1973. By this date, largely through the generosity of J. Pierpont Morgan, Sr., nearly all of the land bounded by Via Angelo Masina, Via Giacomo Medici, Via Pietro Riselli, and the Aurelian Wall on the Janiculum had been purchased and many improvements made to the properties near the Villa Aurelia. Construction begins on the new Academy building designed by McKim, Mead, and White and situated on the grounds of Villa Aurelia; financed through a loan from J. Pierpont Morgan, Sr. (after Morgan Sr.'s death, his son offered to cancel the loan at an amount equal to funds raised by the Academy for the purpose).

1915 -- First Fellowship in Landscape Architecture established; opening of new Academy building housing the fellows' residential quarters, work areas, library, offices, and spaces for public programs.

1917 -- Villa Aurelia rented to the Red Cross for office space, and the new Main building was slated to become a convalescent hospital, but the war ended before it could be put to use.

1919 -- New York office reorganized by Roscoe Guernsey, executive secretary; sale of Villa Mirafiore; Academic Council established in Rome.

1920 -- Department of Music and Fellowship in Musical Composition established.

1923 -- School of Classical Studies establishes summer sessions, largely attended by teachers.

1926 -- Second Fellowship in Landscape Architecture funded by Garden Club of America (later permanently endowed).

1927 -- Academy opens an Atelier in downtown Rome, providing studios for visiting students (operated until 1934).

1929 -- First Thomas Spencer Jerome lecturer appointed.

1941 -- Academy closes for duration of World War II; a skeletal staff remain behind to care for the property and continue library cataloguing; Italy declares war on the United States.

1942 -- After transfer of funds from the U.S. proved impossible and enemy aliens were prohibited from withdrawing their own funds from Italian banks, the Swiss Legation and Vatican offered assistance to the Academy by providing loans.

1943 -- Academy grant to Citizen's Committee for the Army and Navy, Inc., funded hundreds of triptychs; murals, medals, and sculptures also commissioned Academy awards scholarships in classical studies at American colleges and universities.

1945 -- "Leave courses," held at the Academy, consisting mainly of lectures by distinguished scholars still in Rome, instituted for U.S. servicemen.

1946 -- Regular program resumes at the start of the academic year.

1947 -- Fellowship in the History of Art established.

1965 -- Loan of printed matter for microfilming by the Archives of American Art (reels ITRO 2-3 and 11-13).

1973 -- New York office moves to American Federation of Arts building, 41 East 65th St. (until 1993).

1982 -- Gift of New York office records to the Archives of American Art.

1990 -- Gift of Rome office records to the Archives of American Art.

1993 -- New York office moves to Metropolitan Club, 7 East 60th St.
Related Material:
Papers of a number of former fellows, trustees, and other individuals associated with the American Academy in Rome are among the holdings of the Archives of American Art.

Chaloner Prize Foundation records, 1915-1974 (microfilm reels 5664-5669) were received with the American Academy in Rome records. They have been arranged and described as a separate collection.

Valentine, Lucia and Alan Valentine. The American Academy in Rome, 1894-1969. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1973.
Separated Material:
The Archives of American Art also holds microfilm of material lent for microfilming (reels ITRO 2-3, and ITRO 11-13) including annual reports, exhibition catalogues, a history of the American Academy in Rome, the American Academy in Rome at the World's Fair, and the Golden Gate Exposition and newsletter. Loaned materials were returned to the lender and can be found at the American Academy in Rome, Italy. This material is not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
The material on reels ITRO 2-3 and ITRO 11-13 were lent to the Archives of American Art for microfilming by the American Academy in Rome in 1965. Records of predecessor institutions, the Board of Trustees, and the New York office, including photographs and personal papers, were donated in 1982 by the Academy president, Calvin G. Rand. In 1990, Rand also gifted the Rome office records and the personal documents of Gorham Phillips Stevens. An addition of New York office records was donated in 2014 by the Academy director, Adele Chatfield-Taylor.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. research center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Architecture -- Study and teaching  Search this
Architecture, Classical -- Study and teaching  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Art schools -- Italy -- Rome  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
American Academy in Rome records, 1855-2012. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.ameracar
See more items in:
American Academy in Rome records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9eb425e5a-26de-478b-8ecc-8a9006e9dc52
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-ameracar
Online Media:

Univ. Mus. Sale of Ptngs, 1971

Collection Creator:
Sturtevant, William C.  Search this
Container:
Box 178
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1971
Scope and Contents note:
Charles Bird King and George Catlin paintings from University of Pennsylvania Univ Museum
Collection Restrictions:
Files containing Sturtevant's students' grades have been restricted, as have his students' and colleagues' grant and fellowships applications. Restricted files were separated and placed at the end of their respective series in boxes 87, 264, 322, 389-394, 435-436, 448, 468, and 483. For preservation reasons, his computer files are also restricted. Seminole sound recordings are restricted. Access to the William C. Sturtevant Papers requires an apointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
William C. Sturtevant papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
William C. Sturtevant papers
William C. Sturtevant papers / Series 2: Research Files / 2.5: Depictions of Native Americans
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw39d05b0da-0e7d-4d8a-98b2-3092bd3ba0e9
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2008-24-ref6149

George Pepper: Correspondence

Collection Creator:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Collection Director:
Heye, George G. (George Gustav), 1874-1957  Search this
Container:
Box 266, Folder 10
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1908-1909
Scope and Contents:
Correspondents: Louis Agassiz Fuentes, Henry Fairfield Osborn, Benjamin Talbot Babbitt Hyde, Otto T. Mallery, George Gustav Heye, Thomas B. Donaldson.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from the National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation Records, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records / Series 6: Collectors
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv44933c225-bcbe-4a82-8385-cebd0516d0b2
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-001-ref7447
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William Louis Abbott collection

Creator:
Abbott, William Louis, 1860-1936  Search this
Hough, Walter, 1859-1935  Search this
Kloss, Charles Boden  Search this
Mason, Otis Tufton, 1838-1908  Search this
Photographer:
Raven, Henry Cushier, 1889-1944  Search this
Extent:
13 Linear feet
Culture:
Enggano  Search this
Jakun (Malaysian people)  Search this
Borneo  Search this
Indonesians  Search this
Dyak  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Trang -- Thailand
Anambas Islands (Indonesia)
Mergui Archipelago
Enggano (Malaysia)
Sumatra
Malaysia
Mentawai Islands (Indonesia)
Nias Island (Indonesia)
Date:
1888-1919
Summary:
The papers in the Abbott collection appear to have been brought together in the Smithsonian's Department of Anthropology in order to process ethnological specimens from Malaya and Indonesia and to prepare an exhibit and publications. Included are some of Abbott's original letters, notes, maps, and a considerable number of photographs. Most of these materials concern the Enggano, Jakun, and Dyak. Many other documents in the collection consist of copies of or extracts from Abbott's letters, the originals of which are now in the Smithsonian Institution Archives. There are also letters and other materials of Otis Tufton Mason and Walter Hough accumulated as they worked on the collection, many simple lists of accessions compiled in the Department of Anthropology, and a few manuscripts. In addition, there are printed materials that were apparently used by the department's staff for reference purposes. Some of the photographs made in Borneo in 1914 are by Henry Cushier Raven, a field assistant of Abbott and, later, a collector financed by Abbott.

Additional materials of Abbott and Raven are in the Smithsonian Institution Archives, and their material (often duplicate photographs) are included in several collections in the National Anthropological Archives.
Scope and Contents:
William Louis Abbott, although formally trained in medicine, chose instead to devote his time and inherited wealth to worldwide exploration and the collection of natural history specimens and ethnological artifacts. The Abbott papers in the National Anthropological Archives reflect his collecting activities in the East Indies, and the work on his collections from that region by United States National Museum personnel, especially Otis Tufton Mason, curator of ethnology. The collection includes correspondence, maps, illustrations of artifacts, manuscripts, lists of objects in the Abbott collection in the Smithsonian Department of Anthropology, and photographic prints and negatives. In addition, there is a subject file which contains information on a variety of topics relating to Indonesia and Malaysia. The materials date from the 1890s to the early decades of this century.

This archival collection forms a valuable complement to the collection of artifacts housed in the National Museum of Natural History. (Abbott's collections from Indonesia are described by Dr. Paul M. Taylor, curator of Asian ethnology, in the Museum Anthropology Newsletter, April, 1985.) The subject file and lists of objects provide data on certain specific artifacts and their uses and Abbott's correspondence contains his observations of the daily life of the various peoples from whom the objects were collected. These documents are supplemented by a generous photographic record and sketch maps which outline the routes he followed. The papers focus on the Malay Peninsula and Archipelago, the region closest to Abbott's heart and to which he dedicated over a decade before eye disease forced him to leave the tropics.

In addition to Abbott's own materials, there are notes by museum staff, including descriptions of artifacts, and manuscripts of articles mostly by Mason who was particularly interested in basketry. The bulk of the correspondence is between Abbott, Otis Mason, Walter Hough, and Cecil Boden Kloss who accompanied Abbott on several expeditions. Other correspondents include Cyrus Adler, Jesse Walter Fewkes, William H. Furness, Alfred Cort Haddon, Ales Hrdlicka, Mary Lois Kissell, Elmer D. Merrill, William Palmer, Richard Rathbun, and Charles Clark Willoughby. Most of the letters are brief and discuss proposed work on the Abbott collections, bibliographic sources, and basketry.

Additional material in the National Anthropological Archives relating to William Louis Abbott is contained in the papers of Ales Hrdlička and of Herbert W. Krieger, the Manuscript and Pamphlet File of the United States National Museum Department of Anthropology, and the photographic collection of the United States National Museum Division of Ethnology. Because Abbott donated material to a variety of departments in the Smithsonian, his original written material is located in several other Smithsonian departments as well. There are personal letters to his mother and sister as well as Smithsonian personnel in the Smithsonian Institution Archives. Field notebooks including detailed sketch maps of collecting stations are in the libraries of the departments of Mammals and of Birds.

The spelling of place names used here are those of Abbott who frequently wrote them as they sounded to him.
Arrangement:
Collection arranged into 9 series: (1) Correspondence, 1896-1919; (2) Subject file; (3) Register of accessions, 1890-1906; (4) Lists of objects by accession number and location; (5) Lists of objects by type or geographic location; (6) Drafts of unpublished articles with working materials; (7) Printed material; (8) Photographic prints; (9) Photographic negatives.
Biographical Note:
William L. Abbott studied medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and, after receiving an M.D., continued his training in London. Although a highly successful student, he seems never to have been fully committed to medicine. Instead, around 1880, using his own resources, he turned to a life of exploration and the study of natural history.

Abbott's early expeditions were in the United States, but, in time, he went abroad, at ever increasing distances, to the Greater Antilles, East Africa, Kashmir, and Turkestan. In 1896, he began work in Malaya and Indonesia that would largely occupy him until 1915. Using Singapore as a base, he sailed his ship, the Terrapin, to points on both coasts of the Malayan Peninsula, Trang in Thailand, the Anambas Islands, the Mergui Archipelago, the Nicobars and Andamans, both costs of Sumatra and the nearby islands (notably Nias, the Mentawai Islands, and Enggano), the Rhio Archipelago, and Borneo. On many of thes voyages, he collected both biologcial and ethnological specimens and photographs. At times, however, he was accompanied by an Englishman, Cecil Boden Kloss, who handled the ethnological work. Kloss retain his own notes and many of his photographs.

Abbott's later work, between 1916 and 1923, was carried out in Haiti and the Dominican Republic. After this, he retired to a farm on the Elk River in Maryland.

Abbott has been described as one of the great field naturalists of all time simply for the quantity of material he collected. Virtually the only body of work he left, in fact, is his large collection of specimens and notes, letters, and photographs that relate to them. Although he contributed to the collections of several museums, the chief benefactor of his work was the United States National Museum. Its staff and associated produced around forty publications based on his material. Abbott himself published very little.

CHRONOLOGY OF THE LIFE OF WILLIAM LOUIS ABBOTT

1860 February 23 -- Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

1880 -- Collected birds in Iowa and North Dakota

1881 -- Bachelor of Arts, University of Pennsylvania

1883 -- Collected birds in Cuba and Santo Domingo

1884 -- Doctor of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania

1884-1886 -- Postgraduate work in England Licentiate of Royal College of Surgeons and Royal College of Physicians

1886 -- Received inheritance and discontinued formal practice of medicine

1887-1889 -- Exploration of Taveta region near Mt. Kilimanjaro with William Astor Chandler. Collection donated to United States NationalMuseum

1890 -- Exploration and collection in Zanzibar, Seychelles Islands, and Madagascar

1891 -- Ethnological collections in the U.S. National Museum from Kilima-Njaro, East Africa,Annual Report of the U.S. National Museum for 1891, pages 381-398Exploration and collection in India, including Baltistan, Karachi, Kashmir, and Srinagar

1892 -- Exploration and collection in Vale of Kashmir, Baltistan, Aden, Seychelles Islands, and Aldabra Island

1893 -- Exploration and collection in Seychelles Islands; India, including Kashmir and Srinagar; Leh Ladakh; Sinkiang, China; and Eastern Turkistan

1894 -- Continued exploration and collection in region of Eastern Turkistan, Pakistan, India, and Ceylon

1895 -- Exploration and collection in Madagascar and Kashmir

1896 -- Exploration and collection in Malay Peninsula, including:Jan-Feb – PerakFeb-Mar – CantonApr-Nov – Trang Province, Siam, including Pramon, Tyching, and Penang

1897 -- Exploration and collection:Jan -- TrangApr-May -- PenangMay-Dec -- India

1898 -- Volunteered in Spanish-American War with William A. Chambers as Irregular Horse in Florida, and served in CubaTravel in Singapore and China

1899 -- Construction of schooner TerrapinExploration and collection accompanied by Cecil Boden Kloss:Jan-Mar -- TrangMarch -- SingaporeMar-Apr -- JavaJul-Sept -- Lingga and Anamba islandsOct-Nov - Singapore, PenangDec - Junkseylon

1900 -- Exploration and collection accompanied by Kloss:Jan-Mar -- Burma, Mergui ArchipelagoJun-Aug -- Natuna ArchipelagoNov-Dec -- Penang, Burma, Mergui Archipelago

1901 -- Exploration and collection accompanied by Kloss:Jan -- Andaman IslandsJan-Mar -- Nicobar IslandsApr-Nov -- Northern Sumatra, Rhio-Lingga Archipelago, Johore, PenangNov-Jan 02- Simalur

1902 -- Exploration and collection accompanied by Kloss:Jan-Feb -- Banjak Islands, Lasia, BabiFeb-Mar -- Western SumatraMar -- NiasApr-May -- Pahang, Malaya; Singapore and Straits IslandsAug-Sep -- Bintang, Rhio ArchipelagoOct-Nov -- SimalurNov-Jan 03 -- Pagi Islands

1903 -- Exploration and collection:Jan -- Western SumatraFeb -- Pulo TelloApr -- Penang, SingaporeMay-June -- Karimun IslandsJuly-Aug -- Rhio-Lingga ArchipelagoAug-Sep -- Eastern SumatraOct -- PenangNov-Mar 04 -- Burmese coast, including Victoria Point, Mergui Archipelago, and Tenasserim

1904 -- Exploration and collection:Apr -- Penang and Straits of MalaccaMay-Jun -- Banka IslandJul-Aug -- Billiton IslandAug-Sep -- Karimata IslandOct -- Benkulen, SumatraNov-Dec -- Engano

1905 -- Exploration and collection:Dec 04-Feb- Western SumatraFeb-Mar -- NiasJun-Sep -- Western Borneo, including Pontianak and Kapuas riversNov-Jan 06 -- Eastern Sumatra Designated Honorary Associate in Zoology by the U.S. National Museum

1906 -- Visited Hong Kong and Japan (April-May)Exploration and collection accompanied by Kloss:Oct-Feb 07 -- Easter Sumatra, including Bengkalis and Rupat islands and Siak River

1907 -- Exploration and collectionMar -- Rhio ArchipelagoMay -- Islands of South China Sea, including Direction Island, Datu, Temayer, Lamukutan, Panebangan, and PelapisMay-Sep -- Western Borneo, including Kapuas and Simpang riversNov-Dec -- Java Sea, including Bawean Island

1908 -- Exploration and collection:Dec 07-Mar- Southeastern Borneo, including Pulo Laut and Pulo SebukuJun -- Southwestern BorenoNov -- Java Sea

1909 -- Exploration and collection:Dec 08-Apr -- Pulo Laut and eastern Borneo, including Pasir RiverOnset of partial blindness caused by spirochetosis, and treatment in Aachen, Germany. Illness forced Abbott to suspend collecting activities in tropics.

1910-1915 -- Exploration and collection in Kashmir

1912-1915 -- Donated funds to United States National Museum for expedition to Borneo by Henry Cushier Raven

1914 -- Brief visit and collection in Molucca Islands and Celebes, accompanied by his sister

1915-1916 -- Donated funds for expedition by Raven to Dutch East Indies, especially Celebes

1916 -- Exploration and collection in Dominican Republic

1917-1918 -- Exploration and collection in Haiti

1918 -- Interruption of field work by Abbott because of servere illness (dysentary) and by Raven because of the war

1919-1923 -- Exploration and collection in Hispaniola

1920 -- Donated funds to United States National Museum for botanical collection in Haiti by Emery C. Leonard, aid in Division of Plants

1920-1922 -- Donated funds to United States National Museum for expedition to Australia by naturalist Charles M. Hoy

1923-1924 -- Donated funds to United States National Museum for expedition to China by Charles M. Hoy until Hoy's death in the field; workconcluded by Reverend David Crockett Graham

1925-1927 -- Donated funds to United States National Museum for expeditions to Hispaniola

1928 -- Donated funds to United States National Museum for expedition to China

1928 -- Donated funds to United States National Museum for expedition to Hispaniola by Arthur J. Poole, Division of Mammals

1928-1931 -- Donated funds to United States National Museum for archeological expedition to Hispaniola by Herbert William Krieger, curator, Division of Ethnology

1932 -- Donated funds to United States National Museum for archeological expedition to Cuba

1934 -- Purchase and donation of birds of the Himalayas for the United States National Museum

April 2, 1936 -- Death of William Louis Abbott at his farm near North East, Maryland of heart disease after a long illnessBequest to Smithsonian Institution any of books and papers desired (278 volumes accepted) and approximately $100,000 (1/5 of estate) to promote zoological researchers
Provenance:
William Louis Abbott was a self-trained and self-sustaining collector who donated large numbers of ethnological artifacts, zoological specimens, and funds to the United States National Museum of the Smithsonian Institution around the turn of the twentieth century. The Abbott Papers in the National Anthropological Archives were apparently compiled by the staff of the Department of Anthropology, especially Otis Tufton Mason, curator of ethnology, in order to process incoming collections. The correspondence and printed materials relate primarily to Abbott's collecting activities and to Mason's research on Abbott's collections.
Restrictions:
The William Louis Abbott collection is open for research. Access to the William Louis Abbott collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Citation:
William Louis Abbott collection, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.XXXX.0228
See more items in:
William Louis Abbott collection
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw328cd842b-b0dd-464d-aae1-0b81d6251200
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-xxxx-0228

Student

Collection Creator:
Kramer, Carol, 1943-2002  Search this
Extent:
2.71 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1961 - 1973
Scope and Contents:
This series documents Kramer's undergraduate studies at CUNY and her graduate studies at University of Chicago and University of Pennsylvania. In the series are her class notes, assignments, transcripts, diplomas, and dissertation (including drafts, notes, and correspondence). Course files are organized by date.

Notes for her dissertation can also be found in Series 11. Card files and possibly Series 1. Research.
Arrangement:
This series has been arranged in 3 subseries: 7.1 CUNY; 7.2 University of Chicago; 7.3 University of Pennsylvania.
Collection Restrictions:
The Carol Kramer papers are open for research.

Materials with student grades and social security numbers have been restricted. The dates that the restricted items will be made available for access range from 2047 to 2064. Access to Kramer's computer disks is also restricted. Please consult an archivist for more information.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Carol Kramer Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2006-14, Series 7
See more items in:
Carol Kramer papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3923202fd-b9eb-4366-9e89-e823252df048
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2006-14-ref551

University of Pennsylvania

Collection Creator:
Kramer, Carol, 1943-2002  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
The Carol Kramer papers are open for research.

Materials with student grades and social security numbers have been restricted. The dates that the restricted items will be made available for access range from 2047 to 2064. Access to Kramer's computer disks is also restricted. Please consult an archivist for more information.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Carol Kramer Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2006-14, Subseries 7.3
See more items in:
Carol Kramer papers
Carol Kramer papers / Series 7: Student
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw35c63e7d9-71e0-49bf-826b-b763ebf0152a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2006-14-ref665

Anthro 510 -- Goodenough

Collection Creator:
Kramer, Carol, 1943-2002  Search this
Container:
Box 41
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
Fall 1965
Collection Restrictions:
The Carol Kramer papers are open for research.

Materials with student grades and social security numbers have been restricted. The dates that the restricted items will be made available for access range from 2047 to 2064. Access to Kramer's computer disks is also restricted. Please consult an archivist for more information.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Carol Kramer Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Carol Kramer papers
Carol Kramer papers / Series 7: Student / 7.3: University of Pennsylvania
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3c2a3ac54-b692-4c5f-b16e-2dcd26709e8e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2006-14-ref771

Anthro 612 -- Dyson

Collection Creator:
Kramer, Carol, 1943-2002  Search this
Container:
Box 41
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
Fall 1965
Scope and Contents:
Bronze Age in East
Collection Restrictions:
The Carol Kramer papers are open for research.

Materials with student grades and social security numbers have been restricted. The dates that the restricted items will be made available for access range from 2047 to 2064. Access to Kramer's computer disks is also restricted. Please consult an archivist for more information.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Carol Kramer Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Carol Kramer papers
Carol Kramer papers / Series 7: Student / 7.3: University of Pennsylvania
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3773f14c3-0249-4a98-96a5-7a42d2b4117f
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2006-14-ref773

Prof. Goodenough -- Fundamentals of Anthro (601)

Collection Creator:
Kramer, Carol, 1943-2002  Search this
Container:
Box 41
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
Spring 1966
Collection Restrictions:
The Carol Kramer papers are open for research.

Materials with student grades and social security numbers have been restricted. The dates that the restricted items will be made available for access range from 2047 to 2064. Access to Kramer's computer disks is also restricted. Please consult an archivist for more information.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Carol Kramer Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Carol Kramer papers
Carol Kramer papers / Series 7: Student / 7.3: University of Pennsylvania
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3ccf6c91c-c9fd-40fe-a026-bceee0ed5353
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2006-14-ref774

Dr. Netting -- Anthro. 625 -- Cultural Ecology

Collection Creator:
Kramer, Carol, 1943-2002  Search this
Container:
Box 41
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
Spring 1966
Collection Restrictions:
The Carol Kramer papers are open for research.

Materials with student grades and social security numbers have been restricted. The dates that the restricted items will be made available for access range from 2047 to 2064. Access to Kramer's computer disks is also restricted. Please consult an archivist for more information.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Carol Kramer Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Carol Kramer papers
Carol Kramer papers / Series 7: Student / 7.3: University of Pennsylvania
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3d50e2344-3d4f-478d-b126-9953b7e82d5c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2006-14-ref775

Anthro 652 -- Hymes and Hallowell

Collection Creator:
Kramer, Carol, 1943-2002  Search this
Container:
Box 42
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
Spring 1966
Collection Restrictions:
The Carol Kramer papers are open for research.

Materials with student grades and social security numbers have been restricted. The dates that the restricted items will be made available for access range from 2047 to 2064. Access to Kramer's computer disks is also restricted. Please consult an archivist for more information.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Carol Kramer Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Carol Kramer papers
Carol Kramer papers / Series 7: Student / 7.3: University of Pennsylvania
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw398444fac-273e-4fc4-93ee-e7ef324f990c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2006-14-ref776

Anthro. 575

Collection Creator:
Kramer, Carol, 1943-2002  Search this
Container:
Box 41
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
Fall 1966
Scope and Contents:
1 of 2
Collection Restrictions:
The Carol Kramer papers are open for research.

Materials with student grades and social security numbers have been restricted. The dates that the restricted items will be made available for access range from 2047 to 2064. Access to Kramer's computer disks is also restricted. Please consult an archivist for more information.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Carol Kramer Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Carol Kramer papers
Carol Kramer papers / Series 7: Student / 7.3: University of Pennsylvania
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw308b91bf2-935c-4221-b59d-932e554e808c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2006-14-ref778

Anthro. 575

Collection Creator:
Kramer, Carol, 1943-2002  Search this
Container:
Box 42
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
Fall 1966
Scope and Contents:
2 of 2
Collection Restrictions:
The Carol Kramer papers are open for research.

Materials with student grades and social security numbers have been restricted. The dates that the restricted items will be made available for access range from 2047 to 2064. Access to Kramer's computer disks is also restricted. Please consult an archivist for more information.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Carol Kramer Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Carol Kramer papers
Carol Kramer papers / Series 7: Student / 7.3: University of Pennsylvania
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3c78d44fd-5bff-4825-9093-6f7fe71be4a2
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2006-14-ref780

African Archaeology -- Papers

Collection Creator:
Kramer, Carol, 1943-2002  Search this
Container:
Box 42
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
Fall 1966
Scope and Contents:
Contains papers by other students, 1 of 2
Collection Restrictions:
The Carol Kramer papers are open for research.

Materials with student grades and social security numbers have been restricted. The dates that the restricted items will be made available for access range from 2047 to 2064. Access to Kramer's computer disks is also restricted. Please consult an archivist for more information.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Carol Kramer Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Carol Kramer papers
Carol Kramer papers / Series 7: Student / 7.3: University of Pennsylvania
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw355755489-0a50-466b-aa25-969f0c2e5737
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2006-14-ref782

African Archaeology -- Papers

Collection Creator:
Kramer, Carol, 1943-2002  Search this
Container:
Box 42
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
Fall 1966
Scope and Contents:
Contains papers by other students, 2 of 2
Collection Restrictions:
The Carol Kramer papers are open for research.

Materials with student grades and social security numbers have been restricted. The dates that the restricted items will be made available for access range from 2047 to 2064. Access to Kramer's computer disks is also restricted. Please consult an archivist for more information.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Carol Kramer Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Carol Kramer papers
Carol Kramer papers / Series 7: Student / 7.3: University of Pennsylvania
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw314acb2b1-3949-4a2d-ae86-ec377631ac95
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2006-14-ref784

Near Eastern Archaeology -- Dyson

Collection Creator:
Kramer, Carol, 1943-2002  Search this
Container:
Box 42
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
Spring 1967
Collection Restrictions:
The Carol Kramer papers are open for research.

Materials with student grades and social security numbers have been restricted. The dates that the restricted items will be made available for access range from 2047 to 2064. Access to Kramer's computer disks is also restricted. Please consult an archivist for more information.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Carol Kramer Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Carol Kramer papers
Carol Kramer papers / Series 7: Student / 7.3: University of Pennsylvania
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw34500af1e-a19c-400a-a912-5c8e559fcc8d
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2006-14-ref785

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