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1968 #9 - Chistochina

Collection Creator:
De Laguna, Frederica, 1906-2004  Search this
McClellan, Catharine  Search this
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Guédon, Marie Françoise  Search this
Emmons, George Thornton  Search this
Collection Correspondent:
Stearns, Mary Lee  Search this
Container:
Reel 56
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
July 21 & 24, 1968
Scope and Contents:
Chistochina Fish Camp

Sunday, July 21, 1968

with extra spliced on

ATNA

1. Kate Sanford sings song to her sister, when she nearly died

2. Kate Sanford sings Frank Charley's song to his brother

3. Kate Sanford sings Fred Ewan's [?] song for his uncle

4. Tubara - 5 chilali [?]

6. (a,b,c,d) Long Lucy --Leioriri [s] song (s?)

7. Kodiak to Eklutha

8. TAlsnia Song

9. Jim Sinyore tells TAlsina story

10. "Twana horsing [?] goodbye"

11. Banzahita Billy's love song

12. Seagull Song

13. Gene Nicolai

14. Gene Nicolai

15. Teasing Song

16. Chief Andrew's Love song

to 24
Collection Restrictions:
Some of the original field notes are restricted due to Frederica de Laguna's request to protect the privacy of those accused of witchcraft. The originals are restricted until 2030. Photocopies may be made with the names of the accused redacted.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Frederica de Laguna papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Frederica de Laguna papers
Frederica de Laguna papers / Series 12: Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw31bc1a5c3-f82d-40f1-b308-f052d9d0f9df
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1998-89-ref2354

Edward S. Curtis photogravure plates and proofs for The North American Indian

Photographer:
Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952  Search this
Extent:
96 Photomechanical prints (photogravure proofs)
184 Printing plates (copper printing plates)
Culture:
Twana  Search this
Hoh  Search this
Walla Walla (Wallawalla)  Search this
Wishram  Search this
Suquamish  Search this
Skokomish  Search this
Quinault  Search this
Quileute  Search this
Apache  Search this
Tolowa  Search this
Hupa  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Squaxon  Search this
Mewuk (Miwok)  Search this
Achomawi (Pit River)  Search this
Klamath  Search this
Yurok  Search this
Kumeyaay (Diegueño)  Search this
Cayuse  Search this
Northern Paiute (Paviotso)  Search this
Santa Ysabel (Santa Isabela) Diegueño  Search this
Kalispel (Pend d'Oreilles)  Search this
Salish (Flathead)  Search this
Spokan  Search this
Yakama (Yakima)  Search this
Sahnish (Arikara)  Search this
Numakiki (Mandan)  Search this
Pikuni Blackfeet (Piegan)  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Sicangu Lakota (Brulé Sioux)  Search this
Niimíipuu (Nez Perce)  Search this
A'aninin (Gros Ventre)  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Tsuu T'ina (Sarcee)  Search this
Kainai Blackfoot (Kainah/Blood)  Search this
Denésoliné (Chipewyan)  Search this
Cree  Search this
Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo)  Search this
San Ildefonso Pueblo  Search this
Tewa Pueblos  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Kewa (Santo Domingo Pueblo)  Search this
K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo)  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
Jemez Pueblo  Search this
Serrano  Search this
Washoe (Washo)  Search this
Kutzadika'a (Mono Paiute)  Search this
Kupangaxwichem (Kupa/Cupeño)  Search this
Piipaash (Maricopa)  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux)  Search this
Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan)  Search this
Hualapai (Walapai)  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Tohono O'odham (Papago)  Search this
Mojave (Mohave)  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Wichita  Search this
Ponca  Search this
Osage  Search this
Yokuts  Search this
Chukchansi Yokuts  Search this
Southern Mewuk (Southern Miwok)  Search this
Wailaki  Search this
Pomo  Search this
Wappo  Search this
Maidu  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photomechanical prints
Printing plates
Photogravures
Photographs
Date:
1899-1927
circa 1980
Summary:
The Edward S. Curtis photogravure plates and proofs for The North American Indian include photogravure printing plates and associated proofs made from Curtis photographs and used in the publication of The North American Indian volumes 1-9 and 12-19. The bulk of the images are portraits, though there are also images of everyday items, ceremonial artifacts, and camps.
Scope and Contents:
The collection comprises 183 photogravure plates (101 folio and 82 octavo) and 96 associated proofs used in the printing of The North American Indian volumes 1-9 and 12-19. The original photographs used to make the photogravures were made circa 1903-1926 and the photogravure plates were made in 1907-1930. The bulk are portraits, though there are also images of everyday items, ceremonial artifacts, and camps. About half of the proofs in the collection are originals used for Curtis's publication, though the collection also includes proofs made in the process of later publication by the Classic Gravure Company (circa 1980). Vintage proofs include handwritten notes, likely made by Curtis Studio employees in Seattle and Los Angeles. Many of the photogravure plates do not have matching proofs; in particular, there are no proofs for the octavo plates.
Arrangement:
The plates and proofs are arranged by the volume of The North American Indian in which they were published. They are described in this finding aid by the caption and plate number with which they were published.
Biographical / Historical:
Edward Sheriff Curtis (1868-1952) was an American photographer best known for his monumental and now-controversial project, the twenty-volume publication The North American Indian. Here he sought to document in words and pictures the "vanishing race" of American Indians.

Born in Wisconsin in 1868, Edward Curtis grew up on his family's farm in Le Sueur County, Minnesota, from 1874 to 1887. In 1887, he and his father Johnson Curtis settled on a plot near what is now Port Orchard, Washington, and the rest of the family joined them the following year. When Johnson Curtis died within a month of the family's arrival, the burden of providing for his mother and siblings fell to 20-year-old Edward, and Edward set out to do so through his photography. In 1891, Curtis moved to the booming city of Seattle and bought into a joint photo studio with Rasmus Rothi. Less than a year later, he formed "Curtis and Guptill, Photographers and Photoengravers" with Thomas Guptill; the enterprise quickly became a premier portrait studio for Seattle's elite. In 1895, Curtis made his first "Indian photograph" depicting Princess Angeline, daughter of the chief for whom Seattle had been named. The following year he earned his first medal from the National Photographic Convention for his "genre studies."

In 1899, Edward Curtis joined the Harriman Alaska Expedition as official photographer, a position which allowed him to learn from anthropologists C. Hart Merriam and George Bird Grinnell while documenting the landscapes and peoples of the Alaskan coast. This expedition and the resulting friendship with Grinnell helped to foster Curtis's ultimate goal to "form a comprehensive and permanent record of all the important tribes of the United States and Alaska that still retain to a considerable degree their primitive customs and traditions" (General Introduction, The North American Indian). Curtis made several trips to reservations from 1900 to 1904, including a trip with Grinnell to Montana in 1900 and multiple trips to the Southwest, including the Hopi Reservation. He also hired Adolph Muhr, former assistant to Omaha photographer Frank A. Rinehart, to manage the Curtis studio in his absence, a decision which would prove more and more fruitful as Curtis spent less and less time in Seattle.

In 1906, Curtis struck a deal with financier J. P. Morgan, whereby Morgan would support a company – The North American Indian, Inc. – with $15,000 for five years, by which time the project was expected to have ended. Systematic fieldwork for the publication began in earnest that summer season, with Curtis accompanied by a team of ethnological researchers and American Indian assistants. Arguably the most important member of Curtis' field team was William Myers, a former newspaperman who collected much of the ethnological data and completed most of the writing for the project. The first volume, covering Navajo and Apache peoples, was published at the end of 1907, but already Morgan's funding was incapable of meeting Curtis's needs. Despite heaping praise from society's elite, Curtis spent much of his time struggling to find people and institutions willing to subscribe to the expensive set of volumes. After the initial five years, only eight of the proposed twenty volumes had been completed. Fieldwork and publication continued with the support of J. P. Morgan, but Curtis's home life suffered because of his prolonged absences.

In 1919, Curtis's wife Clara was awarded a divorce settlement which included the entire Curtis studio in Seattle. Exhausted and bankrupt, Edward Curtis moved with his daughter Beth Magnuson to Los Angeles, where they operated a new Curtis Studio and continued work on the volumes; volume 12 was published in 1922. The constant financial strain forced Myers to leave the North American Indian team after volume 18 (fieldwork in 1926) and Curtis made his last trip to photograph and gather data for volume 20 in 1927. After the final volumes were published in 1930, Curtis almost completely faded from public notice until his work was "rediscovered" and popularized in the 1970s.

Curtis's "salvage ethnology," as scholar Mick Gidley describes it, was mildly controversial even during his life and has become ever more so as his legacy deepens. In his quest to photograph pre-colonial Indian life through a twentieth-century lens, he often manipulated and constructed history as much as he recorded it: he staged reenactments, added props, and removed evidence of twentieth-century influences on "primitive" life. Curtis's work continues to shape popular conceptions of American Indians and so, while problematic, his legacy--his vision of American Indian life--continues to be relevant.
Related Materials:
NMAI also holds Edward Curtis photographs documenting the Harriman Expedition (1899) as well as platinum prints and photogravures of the images published in The North American Indian.

The Smithsonian Institution, National Anthropological Archives holds Edward Curtis prints submitted for copyright (Photo Lot 59) as well as many of his original negatives, photographs, and papers.

Steve Kern donated photogravure plates to the Center for Creative Photography and the Seattle Art Museum at the same time that he donated this set to MAI.
Provenance:
This collection was donated by Steven and Arlene Kern to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, in 1984.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Pictorial works  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photogravures
Photographs
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Edward S. Curtis photogravure plates and proofs for The North American Indian, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.080
See more items in:
Edward S. Curtis photogravure plates and proofs for The North American Indian
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv47bb7e1cf-cd0f-42a1-ac5b-8ee402c1ab8f
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-080
Online Media:

MS 1766 The Twana, Chemakum, and Clallam Indians of Washington Territory; a historic account prepared for the press

Creator:
Eells, Myron, 1843-1907  Search this
Extent:
440 Pages
Culture:
Twana  Search this
Chimakum  Search this
Klallam (Clallam)  Search this
Chinook  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
April, 1879
Scope and Contents:
Contents: Part I-Man. A. Names, locations, and divisions of the tribes. Twanas, Chemakums, Clallams. B. History. C. Population, and causes affecting. D. Progress: In medical practice. In house building. In dress. In implements. In social customs. In education. In morals. In religion. Part II- Surroundings. A. Inorganic. Outline, etc., of Territory. Geology, economic. Climate. Minerals. C. Social. Travels. Commerce. Part III.- Culture. Chapter 1- Means of subsistance: A. Food. Fish and marine mammals. Shell fish. Roots and branches. Wild fruits. Land mammals. Birds. Salt. Cooking. Storing. B. Drinks. Infusions. Ardent spirits. C. Narcotics. D. Savors. E. Medicines. Chapter II- Habitations and other structures and their appurtenance: A. Houses for human occupancy. Potlatch houses. Sweat houses. Large dwelling-houses. Flat-roofed dwelling-houses. Houses with the roof wholly on one side. Government houses. Mat houses. Half-circle camps. Tents of cotton cloth. Out-buildings. B. Appurtenances to dwellings. Doors. Fireplaces. Material for building. C. Furniture and utensils. Beds. Rugs. Mats. Chapter III- Household vessels and utensils: A. For holding water, food, etc. Baskets. Boxes. Dishes. B. For preparing food. C. For serving and eating food. Mats. Baskets. Plate and troughs. Trays. Ladles. Stone dishes. Pipes. Napkins. D. Miscellaneous. Torches.
Chapter IV- Clothing: d. Head clothing. Hats. E. Body clothing. Pantaloons, shirts, and coats. Blankets. Mat-coats. F. Arm clothing. G. Leg and foot clothing. H. Parts of dress. Lace. Fastenings. Fringes. Bead-work. I. Receptacles for dress. Boxes. Baskets. Chapter V- Personal adornments: A. Skin ornamentation. Tattooing. Painting. B. Head ornaments. Head bands. Plumes. Ear pendants. C. Neck ornaments. Necklaces. D. Breast ornaments. E. Ornaments for the limbs. Bracelets. Finger-rings. F. Toilet articles. Combs. Chapter VI- Implements. (I) Of general use. Knives. Axes, and adzes. Wedges. Chisels. Hammers. Awls. (II) Of war and the chase. A. Weapons for striking. Clubs. B. Throwing weapons. Strings and shots. Fire-pots. C. Cutting weapons. D. Thrusting weapons. Spears. E. Projectile weapons. Bows and arrows. Cases for projectiles. F. Defensive weapons. (III) Implements of special use. A. For stone working. C. For bow and arrow-making. D. Fishing implements. Spears and hooks. Traps and nets. Bouys. Sinkers. F. For leather-working. G. Builder's tool. K. For procuring and manufacturing food. L. Agricultural implements. M. For basket-working. Tools. Ornamentation. N. For working fiber. Hacklers. Spindles. Looms. P. For special crafts. Painting. Dyeing. Sand paper. Rope and strings. Of vegetable matter. Of animal matter.
Chapter VII- Locomotion and transportation. A. Traveling by water. Canoes. Large canoes. Shovel canoes. Small canoes. B. Accessories to water travel. Poles. Paddles. Oars. Sails. Rudders. Anchors. Bailing vessels. C. Foot traveling. Snow shoes. D. Land conveyances. Chapter VIII- Measuring and valuing. A. Counting. B. Measuring. Time. Length. Quality. C. Valuing. Chapter IX- Games and pastimes. With bones. A. Gambling: With disks. Women's games. Cards. B. Field sports and festive games. Dancing. Horse-racing. Shooting. Children's plays. Chapter XI- Music: Instruments and accompaniments. Songs. Boat songs. Patriotic songs. Gambling songs. Nursery songs. Funeral songs. War songs. Religious songs. Chapter XII- Art: On baskets. On cloth. On skin. On wood. Carvings. On horn and bone. On metal. On stone. Chapter XIII- Language and literature. A. Language. The Twana. The Skwaksin. The Chemakum. The Chinook jargon. The English language. B. Literature: Tales about thunder and lightning. Tales about the Sun. Proverbs of the Clallams. Fables of the Twanas. The pheasant and the raven. The enchanted husband. The colcine Indian and the wolf. Domesticating wolves. Modern orations.
Chapter XIV- Domestic life: A. Marriage. B. Children. Cradling. Naming. C. Women. Puberty dance. Chapter XV- Social life and customs: A. Eating. B. Cannibalism. C. Potlatches. Potlatch Number 1. Dancing. Gambling. Tamanous. Eating. The potlatch proper, or distribution of gifts. Learning. Potlatch Number 2. Potlatch Number 3. D. Funeral and burial customs. 1st Period. 2nd Period: canoe burial. 3rd Period: scaffold burial in cemeteries. 4th Period: burial in the ground with Indian accessories. 5th Period: civilized burial. Funeral ceremonies. Mourning observances. Cemeteries. Progress. Chapter XVI- Government. A. Organization. B. Laws and regulations. Division of Labor. Property rights. Chapter XVII- Religion. A. Objects and implements of reverence and worship. Supreme Being. Demons. Angelic spirits. Inanimate objects. Images, pictures, etc. Water. Idols. The sun. Implements of worship. Hand-sticks (wands). Head bands. Drums. Rattles. Masks. B. Holy places C. Ecclesiastical organization. Medicine men. Rain-makers.
D. Sacred rites. Tamanous. Finding tamanous. Using tamanous. Tamanous for wind. Tamanous for gambling. Tamanous to produce and cure illness. The crazy tamanous. Tamanous for the living. Tamanous for lost souls. Black tamanous. Purification. Sacrifice. Dancing. E. Myths and traditions. The Flood. Ants. Snakes. F. Beliefs. Dreams. Future existence. Incarnation and metamorphoses. Chapter XVIII- Archeology: Stone age. Skeletons. Shell heaps. List of archeological items in the book.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1766
Other Title:
The pheasant and the raven
The enchanted husband
The colcine Indian and the wolf
Topic:
Names, tribal -- Twana  Search this
Names, tribal -- Chemakum  Search this
Names, tribal -- Clallam  Search this
Names, place -- Twana  Search this
Names, place -- Chemakum  Search this
Names, place -- Clallam  Search this
Food preparation -- Twana  Search this
Food preparation -- Chemakum  Search this
Food preparation -- Clallam  Search this
Drugs -- Twana  Search this
Drugs -- Chemakum  Search this
Drugs -- Clallam  Search this
Medicine -- Twana  Search this
Medicine -- Chemakum  Search this
Hunting -- Twana  Search this
Medicine -- Clallam  Search this
Hunting -- Chemakum  Search this
Hunting -- Clallam  Search this
Fishing -- Twana  Search this
Fishing -- Chemakum  Search this
Fishing -- Clallam  Search this
Pipes -- Twana  Search this
Pipes -- Chemakum  Search this
Pipes -- Clallam  Search this
Clothing -- Twana  Search this
Clothing -- Chemakum  Search this
Clothing -- Clallam  Search this
Body decoration, adornment, and mutilations -- Twana  Search this
Body decoration, adornment, and mutilations -- Chemakum  Search this
Body decoration, adornment, and mutilations -- Clallam  Search this
War -- Twana  Search this
War -- Chemakum  Search this
War -- Clallam  Search this
Weapons -- Twana  Search this
Weapons -- Chemakum  Search this
Weapons -- Clallam  Search this
Transportation -- Twana  Search this
Transportation -- Chemakum  Search this
Transportation -- Clallam  Search this
Numbers -- Twana  Search this
Numbers -- Chemakum  Search this
Numbers -- Clallam  Search this
Games and toys -- Twana  Search this
Games and toys -- Chemakum  Search this
Games and toys -- Clallam  Search this
Dance -- Twana  Search this
Dance -- Chemakum  Search this
Dance -- Clallam  Search this
Music -- Twana  Search this
Music -- Chemakum  Search this
Music -- Clallam  Search this
Basket making -- Twana  Search this
Basket making -- Chemakum  Search this
Basket making -- Clallam  Search this
Hide preparation -- Twana  Search this
Hide preparation -- Chemakum  Search this
Hide preparation -- Clallam  Search this
Woodwork and wood carving -- Twana  Search this
Woodwork and wood carving -- Chemakum  Search this
Woodwork and wood carving -- Clallam  Search this
Marriage and family -- Twana  Search this
Marriage and family -- Chemakum  Search this
Marriage and family -- Clallam  Search this
Children and childbirth -- Twana  Search this
Children and childbirth -- Chemakum  Search this
Children and childbirth -- Clallam  Search this
Cannibalism -- Twana  Search this
Cannibalism -- Chemakum  Search this
Cannibalism -- Clallam  Search this
Puberty rites -- Twana  Search this
Puberty rites -- Chemakum  Search this
Puberty rites -- Clallam  Search this
Potlatch -- Twana  Search this
Potlatch -- Chemakum  Search this
Potlatch -- Clallam  Search this
Mortuary customs -- Twana  Search this
Mortuary customs -- Chemakum  Search this
Mortuary customs -- Clallam  Search this
Religion -- Twana  Search this
Religion -- Chemakum  Search this
Religion -- Clallam  Search this
Masks -- Twana  Search this
Masks -- Chemakum  Search this
Masks -- Clallam  Search this
Oratory -- Twana  Search this
Oratory -- Chemakum  Search this
Oratory -- Clallam  Search this
Time -- Twana  Search this
Time -- Chemakum  Search this
Time -- Clallam  Search this
Gambling -- Chemakum  Search this
Gambling -- Clallam  Search this
Gambling -- Twana  Search this
Sweat house -- Twana  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Clallam (Klallam)  Search this
Weapons  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 1766, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1766
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw34f7b4dd4-f0e4-4c76-8f06-5e5a4e36c4b9
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1766

Volume 9

Collection Photographer:
Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952  Search this
Extent:
10 Printing plates
6 Photomechanical prints
Container:
Box F20-F23
Box 8vo10-8vo11
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Printing plates
Photomechanical prints
Date:
1899
1912
bulk 1912-1912
Scope and Contents:
This series includes seven folio plates and three octavo plates depicting portraits of Hoh, Twana, Quileute, Quinault, Skokomish, Suquamish, and Squaxon men and women. It also has six proofs made by Classic Gravure from plates in the collection. Two plates are severely corroded.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Edward S. Curtis photogravure plates and proofs for The North American Indian, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.080, Series 9
See more items in:
Edward S. Curtis photogravure plates and proofs for The North American Indian
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4c410f9d3-0d5b-439a-9317-4ed2a8eabbbc
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-080-ref14

Basket bowl/dish

Culture/People:
Skokomish  Search this
Artist/Maker:
Louise Jones Pulsifer, Skokomish, 1881-1978  Search this
Donor:
R. E. Mansfield (Richard E. Mansfield), Non-Indian, 1937-2007  Search this
Previous owner:
R. E. Mansfield (Richard E. Mansfield), Non-Indian, 1937-2007  Search this
Object Name:
Basket bowl/dish
Media/Materials:
Cattail, bear grass
Techniques:
Twined
Dimensions:
23 x 20 x 12 cm
Object Type:
Made-for-Sale items and Souvenirs
Place:
Skokomish Reservation; Mason County; Washington; USA
Date created:
1960-1970
Catalog Number:
26/4408
Barcode:
264408.000
See related items:
Skokomish
Made-for-Sale items and Souvenirs
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws6324b174d-0ce9-4c4b-bbbe-34764f878529
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_280610
Online Media:

Bowl/Dish

Culture/People:
Skokomish  Search this
Previous owner:
Grace Nicholson, Non-Indian, 1877-1948  Search this
Seller:
Grace Nicholson, Non-Indian, 1877-1948  Search this
Object Name:
Bowl/Dish
Media/Materials:
Mountain sheep horn
Techniques:
Carved
Object Type:
Containers and Vessels
Place:
Washington; USA
Catalog Number:
3/9386
Barcode:
039386.000
See related items:
Skokomish
Containers and Vessels
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws6d3f1b0f8-b3d8-4d3f-b998-71a1c228a445
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_41891
Online Media:

Powder measure (Image withheld)

Culture/People:
Skokomish  Search this
Previous owner:
D. M. Averill and Company  Search this
Seller:
D. M. Averill and Company  Search this
Object Name:
Powder measure (Image withheld)
Media/Materials:
Animal Bone, hide thong/babiche
Techniques:
Carved, perforated
Object Type:
Firearms and accessories
Place:
Grave; Oregon; USA
Catalog Number:
4536
Barcode:
004536.000
See related items:
Skokomish
Firearms and accessories
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws60c0a449b-dace-49d5-82c4-0bd2c232cb86
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_4654

Powder measure (Image withheld)

Culture/People:
Skokomish  Search this
Previous owner:
D. M. Averill and Company  Search this
Seller:
D. M. Averill and Company  Search this
Object Name:
Powder measure (Image withheld)
Media/Materials:
Animal Bone, hide thong/babiche
Techniques:
Carved
Object Type:
Firearms and accessories
Place:
Grave; Oregon; USA
Catalog Number:
4537
Barcode:
004537.000
See related items:
Skokomish
Firearms and accessories
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws643d23d04-e53d-4d74-bb81-6e908292b028
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_4655

Powder measure (Image withheld)

Culture/People:
Skokomish  Search this
Previous owner:
D. M. Averill and Company  Search this
Seller:
D. M. Averill and Company  Search this
Object Name:
Powder measure (Image withheld)
Media/Materials:
Animal Bone
Techniques:
Carved
Object Type:
Firearms and accessories
Place:
Grave; Oregon; USA
Catalog Number:
4538
Barcode:
004538.000
See related items:
Skokomish
Firearms and accessories
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws60e5e4007-99fa-4a47-8605-27253e8e6a76
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_4656

Basket

Culture/People:
Skokomish  Search this
Previous owner:
N. B. Church, Non-Indian  Search this
Object Name:
Basket
Media/Materials:
Cattail, bear grass, cedar bark
Techniques:
Twined
Dimensions:
40 x 50 cm
Object Type:
Containers and Vessels
Place:
Washington; USA (inferred)
Catalog Number:
5/6503
Barcode:
056503.000
See related items:
Skokomish
Containers and Vessels
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws6b59f115f-ebb4-40dc-9630-830cdebd8bb5
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_60954
Online Media:

Basket

Culture/People:
Skokomish  Search this
Previous owner:
N. B. Church, Non-Indian  Search this
Object Name:
Basket
Media/Materials:
Cattail, sweetgrass, cherry bark
Techniques:
Twined
Dimensions:
23 x 22 cm
Object Type:
Containers and Vessels
Place:
Washington; USA (inferred)
Catalog Number:
5/6504
Barcode:
056504.000
See related items:
Skokomish
Containers and Vessels
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws6f1c748e2-c955-472d-a6ff-2836e9b8491a
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_60955
Online Media:

Bag

Culture/People:
Twana  Search this
Collector:
Leo J. Frachtenberg (Leo Joachim Frachtenberg/Leo J. Frachtenburg), Non-Indian, 1883-1930  Search this
Object Name:
Bag
Media/Materials:
Cedar bark, rush/rushes
Techniques:
Twined, coiled
Dimensions:
45 x 7 x 30 cm
Object Type:
Bags/Pouches (and parts)
Place:
Tulalip, Tulalip Reservation; Snohomish County; Washington; USA
Catalog Number:
5/7871
Barcode:
057871.000
See related items:
Twana
Bags/Pouches (and parts)
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws6307f4b26-5364-4c49-9b21-07ae0c20c9c3
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_62440
Online Media:

Bag

Culture/People:
Twana  Search this
Collector:
Leo J. Frachtenberg (Leo Joachim Frachtenberg/Leo J. Frachtenburg), Non-Indian, 1883-1930  Search this
Object Name:
Bag
Media/Materials:
Cedar bark, rush/rushes
Techniques:
Twined, plaited
Dimensions:
50 x 7 x 26 cm
Object Type:
Bags/Pouches (and parts)
Place:
Tulalip, Tulalip Reservation; Snohomish County; Washington; USA
Catalog Number:
5/7872
Barcode:
057872.000
See related items:
Twana
Bags/Pouches (and parts)
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws66bc96bf8-8cac-4a27-b2c9-cff082fb0027
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_62441
Online Media:

Basket

Culture/People:
Twana  Search this
Collector:
Leo J. Frachtenberg (Leo Joachim Frachtenberg/Leo J. Frachtenburg), Non-Indian, 1883-1930  Search this
Object Name:
Basket
Media/Materials:
Conifer root, grass, bark
Techniques:
Coiled, imbricated
Dimensions:
17 x 14 x 14 cm
Object Type:
Containers and Vessels
Place:
Tulalip, Tulalip Reservation; Snohomish County; Washington; USA
Catalog Number:
5/7873
Barcode:
057873.000
See related items:
Twana
Containers and Vessels
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws63d2f95bc-ce33-41a4-837b-efa30577ae57
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_62442
Online Media:

Basket

Culture/People:
Twana  Search this
Collector:
Leo J. Frachtenberg (Leo Joachim Frachtenberg/Leo J. Frachtenburg), Non-Indian, 1883-1930  Search this
Object Name:
Basket
Media/Materials:
Conifer root, grass
Techniques:
Coiled, imbricated
Dimensions:
27 x 22 x 17 cm
Object Type:
Containers and Vessels
Place:
Tulalip, Tulalip Reservation; Snohomish County; Washington; USA
Catalog Number:
5/7874
Barcode:
057874.000
See related items:
Twana
Containers and Vessels
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws68469c245-df03-4106-bdd7-0403e902b519
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_62443
Online Media:

Basket

Culture/People:
Twana  Search this
Collector:
Leo J. Frachtenberg (Leo Joachim Frachtenberg/Leo J. Frachtenburg), Non-Indian, 1883-1930  Search this
Object Name:
Basket
Media/Materials:
Conifer root, grass, bark
Techniques:
Coiled, imbricated
Dimensions:
14 x 13 cm
Object Type:
Containers and Vessels
Place:
Tulalip, Tulalip Reservation; Snohomish County; Washington; USA
Catalog Number:
5/7876
Barcode:
057876.000
See related items:
Twana
Containers and Vessels
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws6ec757009-af5a-4ebd-95f3-524089ccc9ac
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_62445
Online Media:

Basket

Culture/People:
Twana  Search this
Collector:
Leo J. Frachtenberg (Leo Joachim Frachtenberg/Leo J. Frachtenburg), Non-Indian, 1883-1930  Search this
Object Name:
Basket
Media/Materials:
Conifer root, grass, bark
Techniques:
Coiled, imbricated
Dimensions:
23 x 18 x 19 cm
Object Type:
Containers and Vessels
Place:
Tulalip, Tulalip Reservation; Snohomish County; Washington; USA
Catalog Number:
5/7877
Barcode:
057877.000
See related items:
Twana
Containers and Vessels
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws66efce7f7-870a-4087-91c1-52615a8f31fd
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_62446
Online Media:

Basket

Culture/People:
Twana  Search this
Collector:
Leo J. Frachtenberg (Leo Joachim Frachtenberg/Leo J. Frachtenburg), Non-Indian, 1883-1930  Search this
Object Name:
Basket
Media/Materials:
Conifer root, grass, bark
Techniques:
Coiled, imbricated
Dimensions:
23 x 18 x 19 cm
Object Type:
Containers and Vessels
Place:
Tulalip, Tulalip Reservation; Snohomish County; Washington; USA
Catalog Number:
5/7878
Barcode:
057878.000
See related items:
Twana
Containers and Vessels
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws66ab4ce89-543e-4067-9a92-9b076dfe4210
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_62447
Online Media:

Basket

Culture/People:
Twana  Search this
Collector:
Leo J. Frachtenberg (Leo Joachim Frachtenberg/Leo J. Frachtenburg), Non-Indian, 1883-1930  Search this
Object Name:
Basket
Media/Materials:
Conifer root, grass, bark
Techniques:
Coiled, imbricated
Dimensions:
25 x 21 x 19 cm
Object Type:
Containers and Vessels
Place:
Tulalip, Tulalip Reservation; Snohomish County; Washington; USA
Catalog Number:
5/7879
Barcode:
057879.000
See related items:
Twana
Containers and Vessels
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws65c7dc324-411b-48cd-8208-1bc7ca618b1b
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_62448
Online Media:

Basket

Culture/People:
Twana  Search this
Collector:
Leo J. Frachtenberg (Leo Joachim Frachtenberg/Leo J. Frachtenburg), Non-Indian, 1883-1930  Search this
Object Name:
Basket
Media/Materials:
Cattail, bear grass
Techniques:
Twined
Dimensions:
12 x 12 cm
Object Type:
Containers and Vessels
Place:
Tulalip, Tulalip Reservation; Snohomish County; Washington; USA
Catalog Number:
5/7880
Barcode:
057880.000
See related items:
Twana
Containers and Vessels
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws66b81152f-5bc2-4c19-9972-24758df80639
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_62449
Online Media:

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