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Kallawaya Blessing Ceremony

Creator:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2013-12-12T17:14:18.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Cultural property  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianfolklife
Data Source:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianfolklife
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_wauUx1DYMCI

Vivian E. Garrison papers

Creator:
Garrison, Vivian, 1933-2013  Search this
Names:
Arensberg, Conrad M. (Conrad Maynadier), 1910-1997  Search this
Extent:
108.29 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
New York (State) -- New York City
New Jersey -- Newark
Date:
circa 1930-2009
bulk 1960-1993
Summary:
Vivian E. Garrison was an applied medical anthropologist who researched the cultural understandings and community treatment structures surrounding mental illness and mental health care among low-income, minority, and migrant communities of the New York metropolitan area. The Vivian E. Garrison papers document this research and consist of clinical and case files; research policies and protocols; presentations and workshops notes; manuscripts and drafts; publications and working papers; correspondence; grant applications; administrative files; sound recordings and films; annotated scholarly literature; and personal biographical material.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Vivian E. Garrison, circa 1930-2009 (bulk 1960-1993) document her work as an applied medical anthropologist in the New York metropolitan area. Garrison studied and published on the cultural understandings and community treatment structures surrounding mental illness and mental health care among low-income, minority, and migrant communities. The collection includes clinical and case files, sound recordings, and films; research policies and protocols; presentations and workshop notes and recordings; manuscripts and drafts; publications and working papers; correspondence; grant applications; administrative files; annotated scholarly literature (reprints and books); and personal biographical material.

The bulk of material in the collection relates to Garrison's research under and administration of different research grants focusing on community mental health care in the greater New York City area. As a research scientist at the Lincoln Hospital Mental Health Services (LHMHS), Garrison undertook anthropological research under the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) grant, "Study of Neighborhood Centers and Mental Health Aides" (1965-1969). The research completed at LHMHS was used in her dissertation (1971). Garrison continued her studies of the South Bronx populations at the Columbia-Bronx Research Center as principal investigator under the NIMH grant, "Folk Healers and Community Mental Health Programming" (1972-1975). She built upon that research as the director and principal investigator of the U.S. Public Health Grant "Inner-City Support Systems" (ICSS) from 1976-1982, run through the College (later University) of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (C/UMDNJ). Within the Resource Center for Multicultural Care and Prevention (RCMCP) at UMDNJ (born out of the ICSS program), Garrison administered the NIMH grant "Community Support Systems of Haitian Immigrants," (CSSHI) which transferred to Columbia University in 1984. Garrison's research under these and other grants was typically undertaken in concert with anthropological colleagues, community consultants, and medical professionals. The materials in this collection reflect the collaborative nature of this research process, as well as Garrison's administrative role at the ICSS project at UMDNJ. Some research notes, case files, and manuscript drafts of colleagues and contributors are present in this collection.

The collection also contains personal biographical, medical, and historical material documenting the lives of Vivian Garrison and her husband, anthropologist Conrad M. Arensberg. Much of this material relates to Arensberg's medical history and care in the last years of his life, as meticulously recorded and analyzed by Garrison. Personal material in the collection also relates to the preservation and destruction of her historic home in Rumson, New Jersey (the Morris-Salter-Hartshorn-Tredwell House).
Arrangement:
The Vivian E. Garrison papers are arranged into the following 10 series:

Series 1: Lincoln Hospital Mental Health Services, circa 1960-1973

Series 2: Columbia University Bronx Research Center, circa 1968-1977

Series 3: Inner-City Support System Project, circa 1968-1997

Series 4: Community Support Systems of Haitian Immigrants, circa 1973-1988

Series 5: Publications, manuscripts, and associated research files, circa 1960-2005

Series 6: Presentations, workshops, and conferences, 1969-2000

Series 7: Professional development files, 1955-2008

Series 8: Personal files, circa 1930-2009

Series 9: Scholarly literature and bibliographies, circa 1970s-1980s, undated

Series 10: Unprocessed material
Biographical Note:
Vivian Eva Garrison, known as "Kelly" to friends and colleagues, was an applied medical anthropologist who researched the cultural understandings and community treatment structures surrounding mental illness and mental health care among low-income, minority, and migrant communities the New York metropolitan area. She worked predominantly with African American, Hispanic, and Caribbean migrant populations in the South Bronx and in Newark, New Jersey.

Garrison was born on August 28, 1933 in Butte, Montana. She earned a B.A. in Spanish and psychology from New York University in 1961 and a Ph.D. in anthropology from Columbia University in 1972. Her dissertation, Social Networks, Social Change and Mental Health among Migrants in a New York City Slum, was completed in 1971.

Garrison conducted her research under the purview of various federal and state grants to examine community mental health care. The majority of her research was completed at Lincoln Hospital in the Bronx, at the College/University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, and at Columbia University.

Throughout her career, Garrison acted as a consultant in matters of folk healing and community health care and published frequently on folk healing, espiritismo, psychiatry, and psychiatric methodology. She taught intermittently, including teaching one semester of Margaret Mead's "Problems and Methods in Anthropology" course at Columbia University (1979). She also contributed to the President's Commission on Mental Health in 1977-1978.

Garrison married anthropologist Conrad M. Arensberg in 1973 and died in April 2013 at the age of 79.

Chronology

1933 August 28 -- Born in Butte, Montana

1961 -- B.A. New York University (Spanish and Psychology)

1962-1963 -- Administrative Assistant, Peace Corps, North Borneo (now Sabah, Malaysia)

1965-1969 -- Research Scientist, National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Grant "Study of Neighborhood Centers and Mental Health Aides," Lincoln Hospital Mental Health Services, Yeshiva University Albert Einstein College of Medicine

1969-1972 -- Assistant Professor and Staff Member, Program Information and Assessment Section, Connecticut Mental Health Center, Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine

1972 -- Ph.D. Columbia University (Anthropology)

1972-1973 -- Senior Research Associate, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University

1972-1975 -- Senior Research Associate and Principal Investigator, NIMH Grant "Folk Healers and Community Mental Health Programming," Department of Anthropology, Columbia University

1973 -- Married Conrad M. Arensberg

1974-1985 -- Assistant to Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Mental Health Science, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), New Jersey Medical School

1976-1982 -- Principal Investigator, U.S. Public Health Grant "Inner-City Support Systems," UMDNJ

1979 -- Senior Lecturer, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University,

1980-1984 -- Director, Resource Center for Multicultural Care and Prevention, UMDNJ

1982-1984 -- Principal Investigator and Director, NIMH Grant "Community Support Systems of Haitian Immigrants," UMNDJ

1982-1984 -- Project Director, "Culturally Sensitive Case Management Training," State of New Jersey, Division of Mental Health and Hospitals, UMDNJ

1983-1986 -- Associate Research Scholar, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University

1984-1985 -- Principal Investigator, U.S. Public Health Grant "Community Support Systems of Haitian Immigrants," Columbia University

1984-? -- Visiting Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Charles R. Drew Postgraduate Medical School, King/Drew Medical Center

1986-? -- Senior Research Associate, Teachers College, Columbia University, Institute for Urban and Minority Education

2013 April 2 -- Died
Related Materials:
Conrad M. Arensberg papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Separated Materials:
The films in this collection have been transferred to the Human Studies Film Archives, accession number HSFA/NAFC 2017-013. They are described in this finding aid.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by the estate of Vivian Garrison Arensberg in 2017.
Restrictions:
The Vivian E. Garrison papers are open for research.

Certain materials in the collection contain personally identifiable information (PII) and personal health information (PHI). These materials are restricted for 80 years from the date of their creation. Restricted materials are noted in the following finding aid and have been removed to boxes 54-61.

Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Original audiovisual material in the Human Studies Film Archives may not be played. Please contact the archives for information on availability of access copies of audiovisual recordings.

Access to the Vivian E. Garrison papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Applied anthropology  Search this
Clinical sociology  Search this
Medical anthropology  Search this
Medical policy  Search this
Traditional medicine  Search this
Espiritismo (Cult)  Search this
Spiritualism  Search this
Women anthropologists  Search this
Citation:
Vivian E. Garrison papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2017-19
See more items in:
Vivian E. Garrison papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2017-19

Inka Road Symposium 01 - Day 1 Blessing

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Symposia
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2015-07-15T18:45:36.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_UWa3sw5sVoE

Henry Niese photographs of Thunderbird Pow Wow, University of Maryland Indian Awareness Week, and Turkey Tayac

Creator:
Niese, Henry  Search this
Names:
Proctor, Philip Piscataway, 1895-1978  Search this
Extent:
10 Prints (silver gelatin)
Culture:
Piscataway (Conoy)  Search this
Ho-Chunk (Winnebago)  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Photographs
Date:
1974-1975, 1978
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs depicting Winnebago and Piscataway people at various gatherings. The collection includes images of two Winnebago boys dancing at the August 1974 Thunderbird Pow Wow in Oakland, New Jersey, as well as photographs of Turkey Tayac (Philip Proctor), Jenice Bigbee, and Mark Tayac, made for University of Maryland Indian Awareness Week in March 1975. There are also informal portraits of Turkey Tayac and a group of Piscataway people, made in April 1978.
Biographical/Historical note:
Henry Niese is a painter, photographer, teacher, and founder of the Eagle Voice Center in Glenelg, Maryland. He graduated from The Cooper Union and Columbia University and taught in the Art Department at the University of Maryland (1969-1996). He also wrote "The Man Who Knew the Medicine," a memoir about his experience learning traditional medicine ways from Bill Schweigman Eagle Feather, Lakota Sun Dance chief and medicine man.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 81-47, NAA Photo Lot 75-49
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Additional photographs of Turkey Tayac can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in Photo Lot R79-22 and Photo Lot 79-45.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
This collection available for reference only. Permission to copy or publish must be granted by Henry Niese.
Topic:
Powwows  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo lot 81-47, Henry Niese photographs of Thunderbird Pow Wow, University of Maryland Indian Awareness Week, and Turkey Tayac, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.81-47
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-81-47

Edward C. Green papers

Creator:
Green, Edward C. (Edward Crocker), 1944-  Search this
Extent:
8.12 Linear feet (20 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Mozambique
Asia
Dominican Republic
Africa
Europe, Eastern
Suriname
South America
Swaziland
Middle East
Date:
circa 1970-2016
Summary:
The papers of Edward C. Green, circa 1970-2016, document his work as an applied medical anthropologist and research consultant focusing principally on the distribution and prevention of AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases in Africa and South America. Much of Green's research and policy focus lay in understanding indigenous health belief systems and instituting locally-designed approaches to major health concerns. The collection consists of correspondence, field diaries and typed research, sound recordings, photographs, and published reports and articles, including material from his dissertation research among the Matawai Maroons of Suriname.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Edward C. Green, circa 1970-2016, document his field research in Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and South America and his career as an applied medical anthropologist and research consultant focusing principally on the distribution and prevention of AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases. The collection consists of correspondence, field diaries and typed research, photographs, sound recordings, and published reports and articles.

The bulk of the material covers Green's field research undertaken predominantly in the Dominican Republic, Mozambique, Suriname, and Swaziland. Of note are sound recordings of interviews, songs, and rituals recorded in Suriname between 1971 and 1973. These recordings document the Matawai dialect of the Saramaccan language, an endagered creole dialect derived from Portuguese, English, and Afro-Caribbean sources. Correspondence in the collection dates from 1973 to 2015 and is a mix of personal and professional correspondence with colleagues and friends. Publications retained in the collection consist primarily of reports on healthcare policy and education, produced between 1978 and 2016 and written for state agencies and non-governmental organizations for which Green worked as a consultant. The bulk of the reports were produced with funding from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) or one of its subsidiary funds.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 3 series:

(1) Field notes, circa 1970-2016

(2) Publications, circa 1978-2016

(3) Correspondence, 1973-2015
Biographical Note:
Edward Crocker "Ted" Green is an applied medical anthropologist who has served as the director of the AIDS Prevention Research Project at the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies (2006-2010) and as the founder and president of the New Paradigm Fund (2010-). He was born in 1944 to the Hon. Marshall Green, a United States diplomat, and Lispenard "Lisa" Crocker Green. He earned his bachelor's degree in anthropology from George Washington University (1967), his master's in anthropology from Northwestern University (1968), and his PhD in anthropology from the Catholic University of America (1974). Green produced his dissertation on the Matawai Maroons of Suriname. He served as the National Institute of Mental Health Fellow at Vanderbilt University from 1978-1979 and as the Takemi Fellow at Harvard University from 2001-2002.

Green's career focused on healthcare education and international policy surrounding sexually transmitted diseases and AIDS in addition to family planning, maternal and child health, primary health care, children impacted by war, and water and sanitation. Much of Green's research and policy focus lay in understanding indigenous health belief systems and in instituting locally-designed approaches to major health concerns. He has served with the Department of Population and Reproductive Health at Johns Hopkins University and as the Senior Research Scientist for International Health at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. He has also served on over a dozen advisory boards or boards of directors, including the UNAIDS Steering Committee, AIDS2031 (2008-2009); the Presidential Advisory Council for HIV/AIDS (2003-2007); the Office of AIDS Research Advisory Council, National Institutes of Health (2003-2006); and the Global Initiative for Traditional Systems of Health, Oxford University (2000-). Green has also worked as a consultant and as a public health advisor to the governments of Mozambique and Swaziland.

Sources Consulted:

George Washington University Department of Anthropology. Edward Green Curriculum Vitae. Accessed December 20, 2016. https://anthropology.columbian.gwu.edu/edward-c-green

MedAnth: Medical Anthropology Wiki. "Edward C. (Ted) Green." Accessed December 20, 2016. https://medanth.wikispaces.com/Edward+C.+(Ted)+Green.

New Paradigm Fund. "Edward C. Green Bio." Accessed December 20, 2016. http://newparadigmfundorg.startlogic.com/about/leadership/dr-edward-c-green-bio/.

Chronology

1944 -- Born to the Hon. Marshall Green and Lispenard Crocker Green in Washington, D.C.

1967 -- B.A. George Washington University (Anthropology)

1968 -- M.A. Northwestern University (Anthropology)

1971-1973 -- Ethnographic field research among the Matawai Maroons of Suriname

1974 -- Ph.D. The Catholic University of America (Anthropology)

1976 -- Visiting Assistant Professor, University of Kentucky Department of Anthropology

1976-1978 -- Visiting Assistant Professor, West Virginia University Department of Anthropology and Sociology

1978-1979 -- National Institute of Mental Health Fellow, Vanderbilt University

1981-1983 -- Social Scientist, Swaziland Ministry of Health and the Academy for Educational Development

1984-1985 -- Personal Services Contractor, U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), Swaziland

1986-1989 -- USAID SOMARC (Social Marketing for Change) Project Senior Staff, with John Short and Associates and The Futures Group

1991-1993 -- Advisor for Family Health International (FHI) and AIDS Control and Prevention Project (AIDSCAP) in South Africa and Tanzania

1994-1995 -- Advisor to the Mozambique Ministry of Health, under sponsorship of the Swiss Development Cooperation

1996-2001 -- Board Member, World Population Society

1997-1998 -- Advisor for AIDSCAP and USAID in Southeast Asia

2000- -- Advisory Board Member, Global Initiative for Traditional Systems of Health, Oxford University

2001-2002 -- Takemi Fellow, Harvard School of Public Health

2002-2006 -- Senior Research Scientist, International Health, Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies

2003-2006 -- Member, Office of AIDS Research Advisory Council, National Institutes of Health

2003-2007 -- Member, Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS

2004-2009 -- Behavior Change and Evaluation Specialist, President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) in Uganda, Rwanda, and Ethiopia

2006- -- Senior Consultant for W.K. Kellogg Foundation programs in southern Africa

2006-2010 -- Director, AIDS Prevention Project, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

2008-2009 -- Member, UNAIDS Steering Committee, AIDS2031

2009- -- Consultant for World Bank programs in southern Africa

2010- -- Director, New Paradigm Fund, Washington DC

2011 -- Elizabeth Eddy Visiting Professor of Anthropology, University of Florida

2011-2014 -- Research Associate, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Department of Population, Family, and Reproductive Health

2014- -- Research Professor, George Washington University Department of Anthropology
Separated Materials:
1 VHS and 1 DVD ("What Happened in Uganda?"), and 1 DVD ("Miss HIV: Botswana Education Version") were tranferred to the Human Studies Film Archives (HSFA).
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Edward C. Green in 2016. Additional digital material was donated by Edward Green in 2018.
Restrictions:
The Edward C. Green papers are open for research. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Digital media (including 1 computer disc of photographic slides, 1 DVD, and 3 USB flash drives) are restricted for preservation reasons.

Access to the Edward C. Green papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Maroons -- Suriname  Search this
HIV infections -- Prevention  Search this
Saramaccan language  Search this
AIDS (Disease) -- Prevention  Search this
Public health  Search this
Medical policy  Search this
AIDS (Disease)  Search this
Medical anthropology  Search this
Applied anthropology  Search this
Sexually transmitted diseases  Search this
Traditional medicine  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Edward C. Green papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2016-31
See more items in:
Edward C. Green papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2016-31
Online Media:

Carol Laderman Papers

Creator:
Laderman, Carol  Search this
Extent:
6 Linear feet ((15 boxes and 1 manuscript envelope) and 154 cassette tapes)
Culture:
Malays (Asian people)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Field notes
Sound recordings
Photographs
Place:
Kampong Merchang (Terengganu)
Malaysia
Date:
1970-2009
Summary:
Carol Laderman was a medical anthropologist best known for her research on Malay traditional medicine. Her work focused on beliefs and practices regarding childbirth and nutrition as well as shamanic healing practices in rural Malaysia. This collection consists of the professional papers of Carol Laderman, medical anthropologist and university professor. The bulk of the collection pertains to her research on childbirth, nutrition, and shamanic healing practices in rural Malaysia. These materials include field notes, surveys, transcripts of Main Peteri ceremonies, grant applications, photographs, and sound recordings. Of special interest are her photographs of midwives and shamans treating patients, including Main Peteri ceremonies, as well as traditional Malay weddings and festivals. Also noteworthy are her recordings of Main Peteri ceremonies and her interviews with midwives and shamans. The collection also contains her unpublished and published writings; her dissertation; a report on her undergraduate fieldwork with pregnant Puerto Rican teenagers; her lecture notes and files as a university professor; files documenting her involvement in professional associations; and correspondence with colleagues.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of the professional papers of Carol Laderman, medical anthropologist and university professor. The bulk of the collection pertains to her research on childbirth, nutrition, and shamanic healing practices in rural Malaysia. These materials include field notes, surveys, transcripts of Main Peteri ceremonies, grant applications, photographs, and sound recordings. Of special interest are her photographs of midwives and shamans treating patients, including Main Peteri ceremonies, as well as traditional Malay weddings and festivals. Also noteworthy are her recordings of Main Peteri ceremonies and her interviews with midwives and shamans. The collection also contains her unpublished and published writings; her dissertation; a report on her undergraduate fieldwork with pregnant Puerto Rican teenagers; her lecture notes and files as a university professor; files documenting her involvement in professional associations; and correspondence with colleagues.
Arrangement:
This collection is organized in 8 series: Series 1. Research, 1972, 1975-1977, 1981, 1985, 1987, 2000-2003, undated; Series 2. Writings, 1970, 1975, 1978-2001, 2004, undated; Series 3. Student Files, 1972, 1975, 1979, undated; Series 4. Teacher Files, 1977, 1979-1982, 2001-2002, 2007, undated; Series 5. Correspondence, 1974-1981, 1985-2005, 2009, undated; Series 6. Professional Activities, circa 1981, 1989-1990, 1994, 2004, undated; Series 7. Photographs, circa 1975-1977, circa 1982, undated; Series 8. Sound Recordings, 1976-1977, 1982, 2003, undated.
Biographical/Historical note:
Carol Laderman was a medical anthropologist best known for her research on Malay traditional medicine. Her work focused on beliefs and practices regarding childbirth and nutrition as well as shamanic healing practices in rural Malaysia.

Laderman (née Cohen) was born on October 25, 1932 in Brooklyn, New York. When she was 6, her father changed their family's surname to Ciavati due to his difficulty as a Jew finding an engineering job. Laderman grew up with musical aspirations, intending to become a concert pianist. She attended the High School of Music and Art in Manhattan and majored in music at Brooklyn College. In 1953, she married Gabriel Laderman, a painter and later an art professor. She took a leave from college to follow her husband after he was drafted into the U.S. Army five months following their wedding. Her hiatus from college spanned fifteen years, during which time she had two sons (1958, 1965). She also worked as a legal secretary in Ithaca, New York, and as a social secretary and translator for an opera singer when she and her family lived in Italy.

After returning to New York City, she enrolled in evening classes at Hunter College. Although she planned to resume her studies in music, her academic focus changed after taking an anthropology course taught by medical anthropologist Rena Gropper. In 1972, she earned her B.A. in Anthropology, and with the assistance of a Danforth Foundation Fellowship, she attended graduate school at Columbia University, where she earned her Ph.D. in Anthropology in 1979.

As an undergraduate student, Laderman conducted fieldwork at Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York City (1972-1973), assisting in a project on pregnant teenagers and nutritional health. She was assigned to collect data on Puerto Rican adolescent mothers, which exposed her to humoral beliefs in food, medicine, and people. This experience would later inspire her to conduct her graduate fieldwork on nutrition and childbirth in Malaysia, where humoral beliefs were also held but not well-explored by researchers.

From 1975 to 1977, Laderman and her family lived in Merchang, in Trengganu (now Terengganu), Malaysia. Working under the auspices of the Malaysian Ministry of Health of the Institute for Medical Research, Laderman studied both traditional and hospital-based medicine. As part of her fieldwork, she received training from a hospital to collect blood samples to study the effects of birthing and dietary practices on women's health. She also apprenticed herself to a traditional midwife (bidan kampung), whom she assisted in a number of births. By comparing food ideologies and actual food intake of pregnant and postpartum women, Laderman was able to refute the prevailing view of scholars that malnutrition among rural Malays was largely due to dietary restrictions based on the humoral system. In her dissertation, "Conceptions and Preconceptions: Childbirth and Nutrition in Rural Malaysia," Laderman describes how Malay women adapt their diets to their needs and that their customs allow for interpretation and manipulation. In 1983, a revised version of her dissertation was published as Wives and Midwives: Childbirth and Nutrition in Rural Malaysia.

While seeking to gain an understanding of traditional Malay medicine in its entirety, Laderman also became exposed to theatrical spirit séances known as Main Peteri (also Puteri or Teri). At that time Main Peteri was no longer performed in most Malaysian states but was still thriving in Trengganu and nearby Kelantan. Performed primarily as healing ceremonies by shamans (bomoh), Main Peteri was a last resort for the afflicted. These performances were characterized by entranced patients, spirit possessions, singing, music, dancing, and an audience. Laderman attended and participated in a number of these ceremonies and became a student and adopted daughter to a shaman. She recorded and transcribed several Main Peteri performances and received an NEH grant (1981-1985) to translate the texts. She also returned to Merchang in 1982 to conduct further research on traditional healing ceremonies. In her monograph Taming the Wind of Desire (1991), she discusses Main Peteri and its relationship to the Malay concept of Inner Winds (angin), which determine a person's personality, talents, and drives. In 1987 to 1990, she returned to her musical roots to collaborate with ethnomusicologist Marina Roseman to transcribe, analyze, and interpret the music of Main Peteri. Together, she and Roseman also edited The Performance of Healing (1996). In addition, Laderman became interested in the effects of urbanization and globalization on traditional Malay healing practices, a topic which she addressed in a collection of her writings, The Life and Death of Traditional Malay Medicine (in press).

Laderman was a professor at the Department of Anthropology at City University of New York City College (1990-2010). She was also an associate professor at Fordham University (1982-1990) and taught briefly at Hunter College (1978-1980), Brooklyn College (1979-1980), and Yale University (1980-1982).

She died on July 6, 2010 at the age of 77.

Sources Consulted

[Autobiographical statement], Series 2. Writings, Carol Laderman Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution

1972. Carol Laderman, SGS Student, Wins Danforth Fellowship. SGS Newsletter 2(7): 1.

Laderman, Carol. 1983. Wives and Midwives: Childbirth and Nutrition in Rural Malaysia. Berkeley, California: University of California Press.

Laderman, Carol. 1991. Taming the Wind of Desire: Psychology, Medicine, and Aesthetics in Malay Shamanistic Performance. Berkeley, California: University of California Press.

Maizura, Intan. 2003, September 28. A bidan, a bomoh & a New Yorker. Nuance: 16-18.

Roseman, Marina, Laurel Kendall and Robert Knox Dentan. 2011. Obituaries: Carol Laderman (1932-2010). American Anthropologist 113(2): 375-377.

1932 -- Born October 25 in Brooklyn, New York

1953 -- Marries Gabriel Laderman and takes a leave from Brooklyn College

1972 -- Earns B.A. in Anthropology from Hunter College

1972-1973 -- Conducts research at Mt. Sinai Hospital on ethnic eating patterns, food beliefs, and anemia in adolescent Puerto Rican mothers

1975-1977 -- Conducts fieldwork in Merchang in Trengganu, Malaysia

1979 -- Earns Ph.D. in Anthropology from Columbia University

1982 -- Returns to Malaysia to conduct fieldwork on shamanism and trance healing

1982-1988 -- Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Fordham University

1988-1990 -- Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Fordham University

1990-2010 -- Professor, Department of Anthropology, City University of New York City College

2010 -- Dies on July 6
Related Materials:
Two videotapes were received with the Carol Laderman papers and transferred to the Human Studies Film Archives.

Some of Laderman's original field recordings are at Columbia University's Center for Ethnomusicology. Copies of those recording are in this collection and are so noted.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Carol Laderman's sons, Raphael and Michael Laderman in 2012.
Restrictions:
The Carol Laderman Papers are open for research. Access to the Carol Laderman Papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use. Permission to use sound recordings of Main Peteri ceremonies transcribed and published in Taming the Wind of Desire must be obtained from Columbia University's Center for Ethnomusicology.
Topic:
Traditional medicine  Search this
Shamanism  Search this
Malay language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Medical anthropology  Search this
Malays (Asian people) -- Medicine  Search this
Seances  Search this
Pregnancy -- Nutritional aspects  Search this
Midwifery  Search this
Ethnology -- Malaysia  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Sound recordings
Photographs
Citation:
Carol Laderman Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2012-09
See more items in:
Carol Laderman Papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2012-09
Online Media:

[Malay traditional medicine association]

Collection Creator:
Laderman, Carol  Search this
Container:
Box 12
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1981
Collection Restrictions:
The Carol Laderman Papers are open for research. Access to the Carol Laderman Papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use. Permission to use sound recordings of Main Peteri ceremonies transcribed and published in Taming the Wind of Desire must be obtained from Columbia University's Center for Ethnomusicology.
Collection Citation:
Carol Laderman Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Carol Laderman Papers
Carol Laderman Papers / Series 6: Professional Activities
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2012-09-ref218

Inka Road Symposium 20 - Remarks on Kallawayas and Traditional Medicine

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Symposia
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2015-07-15T18:45:36.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_zwDymUYN29k

Side A: Dolores Jones, Folk Medicine informant, interviewed by Jason Dotson at Indianapolis, Indiana, June 5, 1979. Side B : Dora and Marjorie Darden and Ernestine Weddle, preparations and use of traditional medicines, interviewed by Jason Dotson at In...

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
1979 June 5
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1979 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1979, Item FP-1979-CT-0066
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1979 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1979 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: Folklife in the Museum - Folk Medicine / 4.1: Fieldwork
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1979-ref149

Dora and Marjorie Dardern and Ernestine Weddle, Preparations and use of traditional medicines, interviewed by Jason Dotson at Indianapolis, Indiana June 5, 1979. Continuation of SI-FP-1979-CT-066 Side B.

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
1979 June 1
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1979 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1979, Item FP-1979-CT-0067
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1979 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1979 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: Folklife in the Museum - Folk Medicine / 4.1: Fieldwork
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1979-ref150

Forest, Field and Sea: Folklife in Indonesia

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Indonesia is the fifth most populous country in the world with a population of over 180 million, a land of enormous cultural diversity with 300 distinct ethnic groups living on more than 1,000 islands distributed across 3,000 miles of ocean. How could the Festival approach such a complex nation and bring it to the National Mall?

Examples of cultural adaptations by people from three Indonesian provinces to vastly different environments were selected to provide an introduction to Indonesia's great diversity - Kenyah and Modang people living in the lowland and upland forests of East Kalimantan, Bugis and Makassarese maritime people living in coastal South Sulawesi, and rural Javanese and Madurese agriculturalists living in coastal and inland East Java. These communities displayed some of the indigenous skills and traditional knowledge that have developed in environments outside the urban centers and fertile river valleys of the Indonesian heartland. Together, these rich traditions are the expression of a civilization whose cultural sources - local, Hindu, Buddhist, Islamic - are as complex as any on earth.

Kenyah and Modang people of Kalimantan showed visitors how they have made life possible and meaningful in the rainforest. Festival-goers could witness their careful use of indigenous plants for medicine, trees for vernacular longhouses, and other forest products for aesthetic and religious practices. Buginese and Makassarese boatbuilders, seafarers, cooks, and silk makers demonstrated skills they use to live with and from the sea - the economic trade and natural bounty it has historically provided. And from East Java came village agriculturalists, rice farmers of that island's rich soil who have developed an intricate fabric of social, material, and performance arts. Performers from four artistic traditions came from East Java to the Festival, presenting peasant batik from Tuban on the north coast, which uses hand-woven cotton; masked dance-drama of Madura, based on stories from the Indian epics, Mahabharata and Ramayana; gandrung social dance of Banyuwangi; and the music and dance performance known as reyog from the region of Ponorogo on the western side of the Province.

Richard Kennedy was Curator of the program, with Uaporn Ang Robinson and Sal Murgiyanto as Program Coordinators and Katrinka Ebbe as Assistant Program Coordinator.

Forest, Field and Sea: Folklife in Indonesia was part of the Festival of Indonesia 1990-1991 and was made possible with the support of Yayasan Nusantara Jaya, Garuda Indonesia Airlines, and American President Lines.
Fieldworkers:
Rachel Cooper, Zailani Idris, Dewi Indrawati, Dloyana Kusumah, Sardono W. Kusumo, Halilintar Latief, Deddy Luthan, A.M. Munardi, Philip Yampolsky
Presenters:
Rachel Cooper, Virginia Gorlinsky, Mukhlis, Darmawan M. Rahmar, Pamela Rogers-Aguiniga, Patti Seery, Herwasono Soedjito, S. Suprapto, Philip Yampolsky, Tinuk Yampolsky
Participants:
East Kalimantan

H. Zailani Idris, Regional Coordinator, East Kalimantan, Indonesia

Kenyah

Pangun Jalung, dancer, East Kalimantan, Indonesia

Peding Ajang, dancer, East Kalimantan, Indonesia

Buaq Aring, dancer, East Kalimantan, Indonesia

Ngang Bilung, dancer, East Kalimantan, Indonesia

Peluhat Saring, dancer, East Kalimantan, Indonesia

Pelajam Udou, dancer, East Kalimantan, Indonesia

Lawai Jalung, musician, East Kalimantan, Indonesia

Pelenjau Ala, lamin builder, East Kalimantan, Indonesia

Ajan Ding, lamin builder, East Kalimantan, Indonesia

Dau Kirung, beadworker, East Kalimantan, Indonesia

Alina Ubang, weaver, East Kalimantan, Indonesia

Agang Merang, blacksmith, East Kalimantan, Indonesia

Modang

Lehong Bujai, musician, East Kalimantan, Indonesia

Jiu Ping Lei, musician, East Kalimantan, Indonesia

Djeng Hong, hudok dancer, East Kalimantan, Indonesia

Y. Bayau Lung, hudok dancer, East Kalimantan, Indonesia

Yonas Wang Beng, hudok carver, East Kalimantan, Indonesia

Bit Beng, hudok dancer, East Kalimantan, Indonesia

South Sulawesi

Halilintar Lathief, Regional Coordinator, South Sulawesi, Indonesia

Hamsinah Bado, dancer, South Sulawesi, Indonesia

Hasnah Gassing, dancer, South Sulawesi, Indonesia

Daeng Gassing, musician, dancer, South Sulawesi, Indonesia

Mile Ngalle, musician, dancer, South Sulawesi, Indonesia

Juma, musician, South Sulawesi, Indonesia

Jamaluddin, musician, South Sulawesi, Indonesia

Serang Dakko, musician, South Sulawesi, Indonesia

Ismail Madung, musician, South Sulawesi, Indonesia

H. Damang, boat builder, South Sulawesi, Indonesia

H. Muhammad Tahir, 1943-, boat builder, South Sulawesi, Indonesia

Martawang La Pucu, weaver, South Sulawesi, Indonesia

Roslina Suaib, foodways, South Sulawesi, Indonesia

East Java

A.M. Munardi, Regional Coordinator, East Java, Indonesia

East Java -- , -- Madura

Hosnan P. Atromu, dancer, Madura, East Java, Indonesia

Fauzi, dancer, Madura, East Java, Indonesia

Masruna, dancer, musician, Madura, East Java, Indonesia

Merto, dancer, musician, Madura, East Java, Indonesia

"Supakra" Sudjibta, dancer, mask carver, Madura, East Java, Indonesia

Marzuki, musician, Madura, East Java, Indonesia

A.S. Marzuki, musician, Madura, East Java, Indonesia

Muhni, musician, Madura, East Java, Indonesia

Sahabuddin, musician, Madura, East Java, Indonesia

Sutayyib, musician, Madura, East Java, Indonesia

Sutipno, musician, Madura, East Java, Indonesia

Saleh, musician, Madura, East Java, Indonesia

Sunarwi, musician, Madura, East Java, Indonesia

Suraji, musician, Madura, East Java, Indonesia

Riskijah, foodways, Madura, East Java, Indonesia

Hadiya, traditional medicine, Madura, East Java, Indonesia

East Java -- , -- Banyuwangi

Astani, dancer, Banyuwangi, East Java, Indonesia

Supinah, dancer, Banyuwangi, East Java, Indonesia

Adenan, musician, Banyuwangi, East Java, Indonesia

Praminto Adi, musician, Banyuwangi, East Java, Indonesia

Basuki, musician, Banyuwangi, East Java, Indonesia

Sahuni, musician, Banyuwangi, East Java, Indonesia

Sukidi, musician, Banyuwangi, East Java, Indonesia

Sanali, musician, Banyuwangi, East Java, Indonesia

Sumitro Hadi, musician, Banyuwangi, East Java, Indonesia

East Java -- , -- Ponorogo

Buwono, -- reog -- performer, Ponorogo, East Java, Indonesia

Harjokemun al Moloq, -- reog -- performer, Ponorogo, East Java, Indonesia

Heri Suprayitno, -- reog -- performer, Ponorogo, East Java, Indonesia

Margono, -- reog -- performer, Ponorogo, East Java, Indonesia

Marwan, -- reog -- performer, Ponorogo, East Java, Indonesia

Nardi, -- reog -- performer, Ponorogo, East Java, Indonesia

Saleh, -- reog -- performer, Ponorogo, East Java, Indonesia

Shodiq, -- reog -- performer, Ponorogo, East Java, Indonesia

Subroto, -- reog -- performer, Ponorogo, East Java, Indonesia

Sunardi, -- reog -- performer, Ponorogo, East Java, Indonesia

Suparman, -- reog -- performer, Ponorogo, East Java, Indonesia

Kusnan, 1950-, gamelan maker, Ponorogo, East Java, Indonesia

Misri, gamelan maker, Ponorogo, East Java, Indonesia

East Java -- , -- Tuban

Rukaiyah, batik dyer, Tuban, East Java, Indonesia

Tarsi, batik dyer, Tuban, East Java, Indonesia
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1991 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1991, Series 3
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1991 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1991-ref26

Festival Recordings: Narrative Porch: Traditional Crafts in the Bahamas; Boatbuilding; Hurricanes; Bush Medicine

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Bahamas Program 1994 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Wascher, Mike (recorder)  Search this
Performer:
Dunham, Cecily  Search this
Kemp, Lorna  Search this
Collie, Viola  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Bahamians  Search this
Afro-Caribbean  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Bahamas
Spanish Wells (Bahamas)
Eleuthera Island (Bahamas)
Acklins Island (Bahamas)
Date:
1994 July 1
Track Information:
101 Traditional Crafts in the Bahamas / Cecily Dunham, Lorna Kemp.

102 Boatbuilding in Ragged Island.

103 Living Through Hurricanes.

104 Bush Medicine / Viola Collie.
Local Numbers:
FP-1994-CT-0079
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, July 1, 1994.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Quilting  Search this
Straw work  Search this
Boatbuilding  Search this
Hurricanes  Search this
Disasters  Search this
Medicine  Search this
Traditional medicine  Search this
Herbs -- Theraputic use  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1994 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1994, Item FP-1994-CT-0079
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1994 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1994 Festival of American Folklife / Series 2: The Commonwealth of The Bahamas / 2.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1994-ref618

Festival Recordings: Narrative Porch: Bush Medicine; Fishing in the Bahamas; Bahamian Folktales

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Bahamas Program 1994 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Wascher, Mike (recorder)  Search this
Performer:
Collie, Viola  Search this
Brown, Kingston  Search this
Cox, Sheddie  Search this
Eneas, Cleveland  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Bahamians  Search this
Afro-Caribbean  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Acklins Island (Bahamas)
Bahamas
Andros (Bahamas)
Date:
1994 July 1
Track Information:
101 Bush Medicine / Viola Collie.

102 Fishing in the Bahamas / Kingston Brown, Sheddie Cox.

103 Bahamian Folktales / Cleveland Eneas.
Local Numbers:
FP-1994-CT-0080
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, July 1, 1994.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Storytelling  Search this
Traditional medicine  Search this
Herbs -- Theraputic use  Search this
Maritime  Search this
Fishing  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1994 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1994, Item FP-1994-CT-0080
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1994 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1994 Festival of American Folklife / Series 2: The Commonwealth of The Bahamas / 2.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1994-ref619

African Immigrant Folklife

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Across the Washington metropolitan region, African immigrants actively redefine their ideas of tradition and community by creating institutions and events that draw on African expressive forms. African-born area residents establish language and culture schools where their American-born children learn the social and artistic skills of their ancestral homes. Family and friends come together to celebrate births, weddings, and other rites of passage. African immigrant entrepreneurs employ their knowledge of personal adornment and of the social needs of their home communities to serve fellow immigrants and other Washingtonians.

The Festival program explored several cultural dimensions: the use made of knowledge, skills, values, and expressive forms brought from home to construct new communities and identities; and the new traditions, growing from encounters with groups in the African Diaspora and in American society as a whole, that contribute to the rich cultural landscape of the United States.

As continental Africans living in the nation's capital region have increased in number, they have stamped their presence on the ethnic map and cultural calendar of the area. Africans present cultural programs, conferences, and forums about their communities. Using traditional skills and knowledge, African-born entrepreneurs develop services for immigrants and the community at large. African immigrants bring to America ideas of ethnic and region-based organizations that were devised when Africans flrst migrated from rural towns to urban centers in Africa. These patterns of organization continue in the United States. Community institutions sometimes use traditional forms of social organization like tontines - revolving credit and savings societies - other kinds of investment groups, burial societies, and town associations to get things done.

As African expatriates become immigrants, and as immigrants become citizens, they use aspects of traditional culture to maintain connections with their roots, affirm their identity, maintain positive self-images for their children, express their links to other African world people, and assert their unique contribution to their land of adoption. The multi-year Festival program sought to contribute, through its research and public presentations (see also the 1995 concert series that inaugurated the project), to greater understanding of the cultures and experiences of continental Africans living in the United States, and in particular to promote connection and collaboration between Africans in America and African Americans, between Washington's immigrants and its long-established populations.

Betty Belanus and Diana Baird N'Diaye were Curators, and Khadijah Mann was Program Coordinator. Community Scholars and Curators included: Dagnachew Abebe, Veronica Abu, Ebo Ansa, Nomvula Cook, Abdirahman Dahir, T.V. Erekosima, Florence Guindo, Tesfaye Lemma, Nabil Makar, Mumia Shimaka Mbasu, Gorgui N'Diaye, Kwaku Ofori-Ansa, Gilbert Ogunfiditimi, Ann Olumba, Dorothy Osei-Kuffuor, and Aristide Pereira.

Project Advisors included: Raymond Almeida, Hayelom Ayele, Camilla Bryce-Laporte, Roy Bryce-Laporte, Laura Bigman, Olivia Cadaval, Anna Cisse, Qamar Dahir, Yosef Ford, Ena Fox, John Franklin, Hassan Gure, Wellella Hirpassa, Rukia Hussein, Philippa Jackson, Portia James, Hermele Kebede, Niani Kilkenny, Mama Konta, Michael Licht, Deborah Mack, Kinuthia Macharia, Phyllis May-Machunda, Fekadu Mergessa, Sulayman Nyang, Sharon Ogunfiditimi, Peter Pipim, Nenzi Plaatjies, Sharon Reinken, John Roberts, Beverly Robinson, Fath Ruffins, Yane Sangare, Osama El Sayed, Peter Seitel, Nana Sheshibe, Marie-Therese Thomas, and Addissu Tolessa.

Support for this program came from the Smithsonian Institution Educational Outreach Program and the Recording Industries Music Performance Trust Funds.
Researchers:
Researchers

Photographer/Researcher -- Harold Dorwin

Photographic Advisor/Researcher -- Roland Freeman

Research Consultants -- Abiodun Adepoju, Kofi Kissi Dompere, Makale Faber, Cece Modupé Fadopé, Michael Licht, Kinuthia Macharia, Sulayman Nyang, Reverend Frederick Ogunfiditimi, Peter Pipim, Diana Sherblom, Molly Uzo
Presenters:
Foodways & Home Life Presenters

Veronica Abu, Raymond Almeida, Nomvula Cook, Mumia Shimaka Mbasu, LaDena Schnapper

Garden Presenter

John Franklin

Music & Dance Presenters

Dagnachew "Dany" Abebe, Kofi Kissi Dompere, Tonye Erekosima, Ibrahim Kanja Bah, Hamid Mernissi, Kwaku Ofori- Ansa, Gilbert Ogunfiditimi, Peter Pipim

Palaver Place/Community Social Hall Presenters

Abdirahman Dahir, Makale Faber, Tesfaye Lemma, Nabil Makar, Aristide Pereira

Narrative Presenters

Charles Elegalem, Cece Modupé Fadopé, Abiyi Ford, Dominic N'Tube

Teaching & Learning Culture Presenters

Remi Aluko, Hassan Gure

Enterprise Area Presenter

Kinuthia Macharia
Participants: Music & Dance:
AFRICAN MUSIC AMBASSADORS, juju, soukous

Itunu Olu Abaiko, Nigerian, drummer, Langley Park, Maryland

Saubana Adekunle, Nigerian, conga, Langley Park, Maryland

Sami Agagu, Nigerian, lead vocals, Langley Park, Maryland

Ayalere Alajede, Nigerian, talking drum, Langley Park, Maryland

Tope Aregbesola, Nigerian, vocals, Langley Park, Maryland

Samuel Ebidighi, Nigerian, bass, Langley Park, Maryland

Russel Lyle, Nigerian, saxophone, Langley Park, Maryland

Frank Martins, Nigerian, lead rhythm guitar, Langley Park, Maryland

AKWA IBOM ASSOCIATION, traditional music & dance

Eventus Akai, Nigerian, dancer, drummer, Forestville, Maryland

Emmanuel Akpa, Nigerian, dancer, drummer, Forestville, Maryland

Ekerete Akpaete, Nigerian, dancer, drummer, Forestville, Maryland

Isaiah Akpaete, Nigerian, dancer, drummer, Forestville, Maryland

Grace Akpan, Nigerian, dancer, Forestville, Maryland

Imo Akpan, Nigerian, dancer, drummer, Forestville, Maryland

Regina Akpan, Nigerian, dancer, Forestville, Maryland

Vivian Bassey, Nigerian, dancer, Forestville, Maryland

Edemekong Esema, Nigerian, dancer, Forestville, Maryland

Ibok Esema, Nigerian, dancer, drummer, Forestville, Maryland

Samuel Esema, Nigerian, dancer, drummer, Forestville, Maryland

Idongesit Eshie, Nigerian, dancer, Forestville, Maryland

Mfon Eyo, Nigerian, dancer, drummer, Forestville, Maryland

Idorenyin Ikpim, Nigerian, dancer, drummer, Forestville, Maryland

Jus tina Ikpim, Nigerian, dancer, Forestville, Maryland

Mfonobong Ikpim, Nigerian, dancer, drummer, Forestville, Maryland

Florence Inwang, Nigerian, dancer, Forestville, Maryland

Helen Inwang, Nigerian, dancer, Forestville, Maryland

Paul Inyang, Nigerian, dancer, drummer, Forestville, Maryland

Benjamin Obong, Nigerian, dancer, drummer, Forestville, Maryland

Nse Obong, Nigerian, dancer, drummer, Forestville, Maryland

Uwem Obong, Nigerian, dancer, drummer, Forestville, Maryland

Eno Okon, Nigerian, dancer, Forestville, Maryland

Louisa Okon, Nigerian, dancer, Forestville, Maryland

Wilson Oduk, Nigerian, dancer, drummer, Forestville, Maryland

Roland Udo, Nigerian, dancer, drummer, Forestville, Maryland

Utibe Udo, Nigerian, dancer, drummer, Forestville, Maryland

Aniekeme Udofia, Nigerian, dancer, drummer, Forestville, Maryland

Sam Udofia, Nigerian, dancer, drummer, Forestville, Maryland

Unyime Udofia, Nigerian, dancer, Forestville, Maryland

Beatrice Udonsen, Nigerian, dancer, Forestville, Maryland

Michael Ukpong, Nigerian, dancer, drummer, Forestville, Maryland

ASANTE KOTOKO ASSOCIATION

Sandy Osei Achampong, drummer

Kingsley Addai, drummer

Yaw Fobi Agyapong, drummer

Vera Agyeiwaa, drummer

Yaw Ofori Ahenkorah, drummer

Rad Akorli, drummer

Mammyaa Pokua Amoah, dancer

Nana B. Amoah, Jr., dancer

Jennifer Anokye, dancer

Maureen Anokye, dancer

Angie Boadu, dancer

Yaw Boakye, leader, drummer

John Kankam, dancer

Georgina Nsiah, leader, dancer

Michelle Nsiah, dancer

Cecilia Ntim, dancer

Daniel Ntim, drummer

Margaret Ntim, drummer

Matilda Ntim, dancer

Alice Osei, drummer

Nickie Osei, dancer

Sandra Osei, drummer

Albert Poku-Sarkodie, drummer

Joseph Yeboah, leader, dancer, drummer

BAKULA, HIGHLIFE & SOUKOUS

Bilo Ray Adoye, Ghanaian, vocals, Washington, D.C.

Juju Amegavi, Togolese, dancer, Washington, D.C.

Kosua Amegavi, Togolese, dancer, Washington, D.C.

Francis Asorigda, Nigerian, rhythm guitar, Washington, D.C.

Itadi Bonney, Togolese, lead guitar, vocals, Washington, D.C.

George Kwaku, Ivoirian, keyboard, Washington, D.C.

Gerti Selina Mwaro, South African, vocals, Washington, D.C.

Samba N'Diaye, Senegalese, bass, Washington, D.C.

Jean Papy Ramazani, Congolese, Democratic Republic, vocals, Washington, D.C.

EWI PRAISE POETRY

Abiodun Adepoju, Nigerian, vocals, Lanham, Maryland

Kemi Anazia, Nigerian, dancer, vocals, Lanham, Maryland

Kemi Oriowo, Nigerian, dancer, vocals, Lanham, Maryland

Tayo Oriowo, Nigerian, drummer, Lanham, Maryland

KANKOURAN, traditional dance & drumming (Senegambian, Pan-African)

Ateya Ball, dancer, Washington, D.C.

Paula Coleman, dancer, Washington, D.C.

Antionette Connell, dancer, Washington, D.C.

Sue Ann Forde, dancer, Washington, D.C.

Randee L. Grant, dancer, Washington, D.C.

Medoune Gueye, drummer, Washington, D.C.

Wilhelmina Joseph, dancer, Washington, D.C.

Assane Konte, leader, Washington, D.C.

Steve Mcallister, drummer, Washington, D.C.

Malari Moore, drummer, Washington, D.C.

Joseph Soh Ngwa, drummer, Washington, D.C.

Babatunde Pyne, drummer, Washington, D.C.

Kevin Waller, dancer, Washington, D.C.

THE KASBAH BAND, chaabi and rai music

Lahsen Azzar, Moroccan, percussion, Alexandria, Virginia

Mohamed Djebbour, Moroccan, lead guitar, Alexandria, Virginia

Karim El Hamti, Moroccan, lead vocalist, Alexandria, Virginia

Kamal Essalhi, Moroccan, violin, background vocals, Alexandria, Virginia

Ismail Haddou, Moroccan, bass, background vocals, Alexandria, Virginia

Abdel Kader Rhanime, Moroccan, saxophone, keyboards, background vocals, Alexandria, Virginia

Abderhahman Rhanime, Moroccan, drums, background vocals, Alexandria, Virginia

Anis Rhanime, Moroccan, keyboards, Alexandria, Virginia

Mohamed Rhanime, Moroccan, percussion, Alexandria, Virginia

KENGMO, traditional music & dance

Terril K. Dongmo, Cameroonian, Washington, D.C.

Pernell D. Fongan, Cameroonian, Washington, D.C.

Kengmo, Cameroonian, Washington, D.C.

Agnes Koutchieu, Cameroonian, Washington, D.C.

Patrick Kwankam, Cameroonian, Washington, D.C.

Mitchell Lamont, Cameroonian, Washington, D.C.

Linda Machekou, Cameroonian, Washington, D.C.

KOKOMOS, juju, makossa, Yoruba gospel

Layo Ajibade, Nigerian, Washington, D.C.

Nathaniel Ajibari, Nigerian, Washington, D.C.

Titus Ogungbe, Nigerian, Washington, D.C.

John Okanlawon, Nigerian, Washington, D.C.

Tayo Oriowo, Nigerian, Washington, D.C.

Gabriel Osanyingbemi, Nigerian, Washington, D.C.

DJIMO KOUYATE & MAMAYA, African jazz (Senegalese, Pan-African), Washington, D.C.

Alex Holland, saxophone, Washington, D.C.

John Holland, keyboard, Washington, D.C.

Aisha Jackson, vocals, Washington, D.C.

Amadou Kouyate, -- djembe -- drums, Washington, D.C.

Djimo Kouyate, kora, vocals, Washington, D.C.

Tom Newman, guitar, Washington, D.C.

Greg Phillips, trap drums, Washington, D.C.

Jay Turner, bass, Washington, D.C.

Joe Yanovitch, guitar, Washington, D.C.

MAHALA, township music

James Levy, South African, keyboards, Bethesda, Maryland

Richard Lynch, South African, drums, Bethesda, Maryland

Steve McGovern, South African, bass guitar, Bethesda, Maryland

Apry'al McNeil, South African, vocals, Bethesda, Maryland

Thembi Mtshali, South African, vocals, Bethesda, Maryland

Tabetha Mueller, South African, vocals, Bethesda, Maryland

Mongezi "Chris" Ntaka, South African, lead guitar, music director, Bethesda, Maryland

Jean Francis Varre, South African, percussion, Bethesda, Maryland

MEMORY OF AFRICAN CULTURE, traditional music & dance (Senegambian, Pan-African), Washington, D.C.

Afia Akoto, dancer, Washington, D.C.

Akosua Akoto, Washington, D.C.

Akua Akoto, Washington, D.C.

Fofie Akoto, Washington, D.C.

Kofi Akoto, Washington, D.C.

Kweku Akoto, Washington, D.C.

Osei Akoto, Washington, D.C.

Mahiri Edward, lead drummer, Washington, D.C.

Malik Hooks, Washington, D.C.

Awura-Akua Johari, Washington, D.C.

Akua Femi Kouyate, dancer, Washington, D.C.

Amadou Kouyate, Washington, D.C.

Bintou Kouyate, Washington, D.C.

Djimo Kouyate, -- kora -- , Washington, D.C.

Makini Niliwaambieni, dancer, Washington, D.C.

Diallo Sumbry, Washington, D.C.

Nkenge Sumbry, Washington, D.C.

MURIDULAH MALE AND FEMALE CHORAL GROUPS, Sufi music (Senegambian)

DAHIRATUL JAMIATU SALAAM OF WASHINGTON, D.C. -- DAHIRATUL JAMIATU SALAAM OF WASHINGTON, D.C.Cheikh Dieng, vocals, Washington, D.C.Ndiounga Dieng, vocals, Washington, D.C.Marne Diokhane, vocals, Washington, D.C.Rassul Fall, vocals, Washington, D.C.Mamadou Mountaga, Washington, D.C.Gueye, vocals, Washington, D.C.Mokhtar Gueye, vocals, Washington, D.C.Mamadou Kane, vocals, Washington, D.C.Cheikh Kebe, vocals, Washington, D.C.Marne Mor Mbacke, vocals, Washington, D.C.Abdou Lahat Mbaye, vocals, Washington, D.C.Lamine Mbaye, vocals, Washington, D.C.Malick Mbothe, vocals, Washington, D.C.Fallou Samb, vocals, Washington, D.C.Mamadou Samb, vocals, Washington, D.C.Moustapha Sankhare, vocals, Washington, D.C.Abdoulaye Pele Seck, vocals, Washington, D.C.Talla Seye, vocals, Washington, D.C.Elhadj Thiam, vocals, Washington, D.C.Mbaye Thiam, vocals, Washington, D.C.

DAHIRA SOKNA MAME DIARRA BOUSSO -- DAHIRA SOKNA MAME DIARRA BOUSSOKaty Ba, vocalsFatou Dia, vocalsMariame Diagne, vocalsAdja Diop, vocalsAissatou Diop, vocalsNdeye Diop, vocalsSosse Gassama, vocalsAdja Guine, vocalsAissatou Koundoul, vocalsLika Ndiaye, vocalsSoda Ndiaye, vocalsNdoumbe Niang, vocalsAdja Seck, vocalsAtta Seck, vocalsAdja Thiam, vocalsMarne Penda Thiam, vocalsMaty Thiam, vocals

NORTH AFRICAN ENSEMBLE, traditional music -- NORTH AFRICAN ENSEMBLE, traditional musicMajed Alsaray, Falls Church, VirginiaKhaled Baldi, Falls Church, VirginiaCorina Bouzghia, Falls Church, VirginiaMohammed Bouzghia, Falls Church, VirginiaMahmoud Hassanein, Falls Church, VirginiaSayed Issmeal, Falls Church, VirginiaMahmoud Tutu, Falls Church, Virginia

NORTHERN SUDANESE COMMUNITY, traditional music & dance -- NORTHERN SUDANESE COMMUNITY, traditional music & danceHadia M. Abdel-Mageed, Sudanese, vocals, Springfield, VirginiaAli Elsigaid, Sudanese, vocals, Washington, D.C.Tabaruk Gibreel, Sudanese, dancer, Washington, D.C.Amira Yousif, Sudanese, dancer, Washington, D.C.

PA ALEX AND GENERATIONS, dance hall music -- PA ALEX AND GENERATIONS, dance hall musicPa Alex, Ghanaian, lead vocals, Chevy Chase, MarylandBilly Da, Ghanaian, trumpet, Chevy Chase, MarylandPapa Louis, Ghanaian, lead guitar, Chevy Chase, MarylandKwasi Michael, Ghanaian, keyboard, Chevy Chase, MarylandSammy, Ghanaian, saxophone, Chevy Chase, MarylandKwame Seth, Ghanaian, bass guitar, vocals, Chevy Chase, MarylandFrances Tawa, Ghanaian, congas, Chevy Chase, MarylandNan Willi, Ghanaian, rhythm guitar, Chevy Chase, Maryland

THE VOLTA ENSEMBLE, traditional music & dance -- THE VOLTA ENSEMBLE, traditional music & danceCynthia Aku, Ghanaian, dancer, Rockville, MarylandDavid Aku, Jr., Ghanaian, dancer, Rockville, MarylandDavid Aku, Sr., Ghanaian, drummer, Rockville, MarylandJosephine Aku, Ghanaian, musician, Rockville, MarylandGideon Allotey, Ghanaian, drummer, Rockville, MarylandGordon Allotey, Ghanaian, drummer, Rockville, MarylandAmanda Azuma, Ghanaian, dancer, Rockville, MarylandEric Azuma, Ghanaian, drummer, Rockville, MarylandEvelyn Azuma, Ghanaian, musician, Rockville, MarylandLynda Azuma, Ghanaian, musician, Rockville, MarylandSefe Azuma, Ghanaian, dancer, Rockville, MarylandSelom Azuma, Ghanaian, dancer, Rockville, MarylandEnyonam Blege, Ghanaian, dancer, Rockville, MarylandByram Blege, Ghanaian, dancer, Rockville, MarylandFelly Blege, Ghanaian, drummer, Rockville, MarylandNana Blege, Ghanaian, drummer, Rockville, MarylandSitsofe Blege, Ghanaian, dancer, Rockville, MarylandJeff Kriebel, Ghanaian, drummer, Rockville, MarylandAlexandra Nuwame, Ghanaian, dancer, Rockville, MarylandGeorgina Nuwame, Ghanaian, musician, Rockville, MarylandPascal Nuwame, Ghanaian, dancer, Rockville, MarylandSharon Nuwame, Ghanaian, dancer, Rockville, MarylandEmmanuel Sawyer, Ghanaian, drummer, Rockville, MarylandAfi Vodi, Ghanaian, dancer, Rockville, MarylandAma Vodi, Ghanaian, dancer, Rockville, MarylandGladys Vodi, Ghanaian, drummer, Rockville, MarylandMawuli Vodi, Ghanaian, dancer, Rockville, Maryland

Church of the Living God, West African Gospel Chorus, Hyattsville, Maryland

Cheikh Amala Diabate, Malian, -- ngoni -- musician, Silver Spring, Maryland

Eritrean Cultural and Civic Center, Eritrean, Washington, D.C.

Nana Ernest Frimpong, Ghanaian, drummer, Silver Spring, Maryland

Hassan Gure, Somali, oud, vocals, Washington, D.C.

The International House of Prayer for All People (Nigerian), Washington, D.C.

Kyaga, Ugandan, traditional music & dance

Liziba, Congolese, Democratic Republic, Central African, -- soukous -- , Silver Spring, Maryland

Nile Ethiopian Ensemble, Ethiopian, traditional music & dance, Washington, D.C.

Rivers State Forum, Nigerian, traditional music & dance, Baltimore, Maryland

Simba Wanyika & Virunga, Soboso (Swahili pop)

Zumunta Association, Nigerian, traditional music & dance
Participants: Enterprise Area:
Enterprise Area

AFRICAN BRAIDS AND ACCENTS -- AFRICAN BRAIDS AND ACCENTSAgnes Diouf, Senegalese, Silver Spring, MarylandSainabou Sallah, Senegalese, Silver Spring, Maryland

TOUBA BRAIDING CENTER -- TOUBA BRAIDING CENTERMama Keita, SenegaleseFatou Thiam, SenegaleseIssa Thiam, Senegalese

Thony Anyiam, Nigerian, owner, designer, Anyiam's Creations International, Langley Park, Maryland

Bukola Babalola, Nigerian, owner, manager, Oyingbo Market, Hyattsville, Maryland

Gloria Cole, Sierra Leonean, importer, Hyattsville, Maryland

Tamiru Degefa, Ethiopian, owner, manager, Merkato Market, Washington, D.C.

Dame Gueye, Senegalese, glass painter, Greenbelt, Maryland

Namory Keita, Malian, woodcarver, Washington, D.C.

Maurice Kinyanjui, Kenyan, owner, Simba Records, Langley Park, Maryland

Esther Mahlangu, South African, Ndebele painter, beadworker

Nabil Makar, Egyptian, visual artist, Wheaton, Maryland

Rabel Mekuria, Ethiopian, owner, manager, Addissu Gebeya, Washington, D.C.

Abdirahman Mohammed, Somali, visual artist, Riverdale, Maryland

Omar Nyang, Senegalese, tailor, Mt. Rainier, Maryland

Nwangaji "Gihgi" Ogbonna, Nigerian, dressmaker, Gihgi's African Fashions, Washington, D.C.

Ann Olumba, Nigerian, braider, Washington, D.C.

Dorothy Osei-Kuffuor, Ghanaian, dressmaker, Sarpong, Osei Enterprises, Riverdale, Maryland

Patrick Owusu-Afriyie, Ghanaian, shoemaker, Langley Park, Maryland

John Rutayaga, Tanzanian, traditional medicine, Washington, D.C.

Muna Salih, Sudanese, henna artist, Falls Church, Virginia

Olubanke Sekoni, Nigerian, owner, Levirop's Lagos Fashions 'n Fabrics, Langley Park, Maryland

Mamo Tessema, Ethiopian, potter, New Carrollton, Maryland

Mahmoud Tutu, Egyptian, owner, butcher, Tutu Market and Butcher, Falls Church, Virginia

Rome Yitbarek, Ethiopian, basket weaver, Alexandria, Virginia
Participants: PALAVER AREA, COMMUNITY CELEBRATIONS:
PALAVER AREA, COMMUNITY CELEBRATIONS

ALL NGWA CULTURAL ORGANIZATION, Washington, D.C. -- ALL NGWA CULTURAL ORGANIZATION, Washington, D.C.Christiana Abengowe, Washington, D.C.Innocent Abengowe, Washington, D.C.Agnes Akwarandu, Washington, D.C.Festa Anyatonwu, leader, Washington, D.C.Ego Atulobi, leader, Washington, D.C.Cecelia Irondi, Washington, D.C.Chinyere Nwachukwu, Washington, D.C.Udo Nwatu, Washington, D.C.Uloma Nwatu, Washington, D.C.Nnenna Ogbonna, Washington, D.C.Nwangaji Ogbonna, leader, Washington, D.C.Comfort Wosu, Washington, D.C.

GHANAIAN DURBAR

Asanteman Kuo Organization

NORTHERN SUDANESE NAMING CEREMONY, COMING OF AGE

Ali Dinar

Ahmed E. Elbashir

Zeinab Hag El Safi, Arlington, Virginia

Tamador Gibreel, Washington, D.C.

Muna Salih, Falls Church, Virginia

OROMO STORYTELLING

Dhaba Wayessa, Washington, D.C.

PALAVER HUT

Joe Ngwa

Vera Oye Yaa-Anna (Liberian), Washington, D.C.

SENEGAMBIAN SABAR EVENT

Gambian Association, Silver Spring, Maryland

Mar Gueye with Sing Sing Rhythym (Senegalese)

Senegalese Support Society, Silver Spring, Maryland

SOMALI COMMUNITY BURAANBUR

Asha Adem, Somalian, -- buraanbur -- ,Riverdale, Maryland

Fadumo Dheel, Somalian, -- buraanbur

Hassan Gure, Somalian, oud, Washington, D.C.

Halima Hayi, Somalian, -- buraanbur

lbado Hirmoge, Somalian, -- buraanbur -- , Fairfax, Virginia

Maryam Hussein, Somalian, -- buraanbur -- , Washington, D.C.

Rukia Hussein, Somalian, -- buraanbur -- , Alexandria, Virginia

Jawahir Noor, Somalian, -- buraanbur

SOUTH AFRICAN BRAAI

Felleng Kalema, South African, braai, Burke, Virginia

Bongani Mabaso, South African, braai, Essex, Maryland

Selloane Makhetha, South African, braai, Washington, D.C.

Ranjawe M. Mahlangu, South African, braai, Baltimore, Maryland

Sibusiso Matsinye, South African, braai, Baltimore, Maryland

Vuyiswa Mwerinde, South African, braai, Temple Hills, Maryland

STREET THEATER

Tanya Dallas, African American street theater, Richmond, Virginia

Makale Faber, Guinean street theater, Washington, D.C.

Florencia Gonzalez, Honduran street theater, Centreville, Virginia

Emma Thembani, Ghanaian street theater, Arlington, Virginia

Eric Waller, African American street theater, Halifax, Virginia

Mark Williams, Guyanese street theater, Alexandria, Virginia
Participants: TEACHING & LEARNING CULTURE:
TEACHING & LEARNING CULTURE

ANANSEGROMMA STORYTELLING THEATRE COMPANY -- ANANSEGROMMA STORYTELLING THEATRE COMPANYKwame Ansah Brew, Springfield, VirginiaKofi Roger Dennis, Springfield, VirginiaAnioma Association, Washington, D.C.

CAMP AFRICA -- CAMP AFRICARemi Aluko, Burtonsville, Maryland

ETHIOPIAN CENTER FOR ARTS AND CULTURE, Washington, D.C. -- ETHIOPIAN CENTER FOR ARTS AND CULTURE, Washington, D.C.Seleshe Damessae

ETHIOPIAN COMMUNITY CENTER, Washington, D.C. -- ETHIOPIAN COMMUNITY CENTER, Washington, D.C.Hailu FulasHermela Kebede

ISOKAN YORUBA SCHOOL, Washington, D.C. -- ISOKAN YORUBA SCHOOL, Washington, D.C.Sharon OgunfiditimiOgbu Okiri

SIERRA LEONE COMMUNITY SCHOOL -- SIERRA LEONE COMMUNITY SCHOOLChidi Augu-Jones, Springfield, VirginiaHariette Tucker, Burtonsville, Maryland

SOMALI SATURDAY SCHOOL -- SOMALI SATURDAY SCHOOLFawsiya Abdi, Arlington, VirginiaAsha Ali, Riverdale, MarylandAmina Amin, Silver Spring, MarylandHassan Gure, Washington, D.C.Mohammad Musse, Riverdale, MarylandBarlin Noor, Centerville, Virginia

SOUTHERN SUDANESE COMMUNITY, Washington, D.C. -- SOUTHERN SUDANESE COMMUNITY, Washington, D.C.Christo AdongrechPeter BolOsman BongoAngong Kout DengPeter KarloNicholas Deng KurDaniel LeekElonai MasunguJimmy MullaJuana ObdhiahPeter SundayOliver Tunda

SWAHILI LANGUAGE & STORYTELLING

Mkamburi Mayaa Mshila Lyabaya, College Park, Maryland
Participants: FOODWAYS:
FOODWAYS

Veronica Abu, Ghanaian foodways, Silver Spring, Maryland

Nomvula Cook, Lesotho foodways, Fort Washington, Maryland

Qamar Dahir, Somali foodways, Falls Church, Virginia

Lola Dawodu, Nigerian foodways, Largo, Maryland

Tshion Debbs, Ethiopian foodways, Silver Spring, Maryland

Basse Dieng, Senegalese foodways, Mt. Rainier, Maryland

Liberata Ehimba, Senegalese foodways, Washington, D.C.

Osama El-Sayed, Egyptian foodways, Fairfax Station, Virginia

Mirelle Green, Nigerian foodways, Oxon Hill, Maryland

lbado Hirmoge, Somali foodways, Fairfax, Virginia

Samir Labriny, Moroccan foodways, Alexandria, Virginia

Maria Augusta Faria Lima, Cape Verdean foodways, Gaithersburg, Maryland

Lakech Jezequel, Ethiopian foodways, Washington, D.C.

Jane Musonye, Kenyan foodways, Upper Marlboro, Maryland

Juliana Row, Sierra Leonean foodways, Odenton, Maryland

Ifeyinwa "Iffy" Tagbo-Ogbuagu, Nigerian foodways, Vienna, Virginia

Cecelia Vilakazi, South African foodways, Washington, D.C.

Sara Workeneh, Ethiopian foodways, College Park, Maryland
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1997 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1997, Series 2
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1997 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1997-ref18

Festival Recordings: Community Talk: Old Traditions; Passing on Culture; Culture Bridging; Immigrant Stories; Experience

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. African Immigrant Program 1997 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Miller, Mark K., 1953- (recorder)  Search this
Swerda, Frank (recorder)  Search this
Performer:
Ansah-Brew, Kwame  Search this
Asante, Nana  Search this
Frimpong, Ernest  Search this
Pereira, Aristide  Search this
Cook, George  Search this
Abraha, Abrehet  Search this
Rutayuga, John  Search this
Modupe, Cece  Search this
N'Tube, Dominic  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Maryland
Ghana
Silver Spring (Md.)
Senegal
Ethiopia
Nigeria
Date:
1997 July 5
Track Information:
101 Old Traditions in New Settings: Music of the Durbar / Kwame Ansah-Brew, Nana Asante, Ernest Frimpong. Xylophone,Drum,Mbira,Woodblock.

102 Passing on Culture: Bringing Up Families in the U.S / Aristide Pereira, George Cook.

103 Culture Bridging: Film Making / Abrehet Abraha.

104 Immigrant Stories / John Rutayuga.

105 Immigration Experiences / Cece Modupe, Dominic N'Tube.
Local Numbers:
FP-1997-CT-0291-7
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, July 5, 1997.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. SI Permission.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
World music  Search this
Xylophone  Search this
Drum  Search this
Mbira  Search this
Woodblock  Search this
Musical instruments  Search this
Music  Search this
Marriage  Search this
Manners and customs  Search this
Child rearing  Search this
Media formats  Search this
Motion picture producers and directors  Search this
Motion pictures  Search this
Emigration & immigration  Search this
Community Organizations  Search this
Traditional medicine  Search this
Health  Search this
Medicine  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1997 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1997, Item FP-1997-CT-0291
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1997 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1997 Festival of American Folklife / Series 2: African Immigrant Folklife / 2.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1997-ref654

"Herbal Traditions: Medicinal Plants in American Indian Life" by Barrie Kavasch. [booklet]

Collection Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Traveling Exhibition Service  Search this
Container:
Box 2 of 3
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 536, Smithsonian Institution, Traveling Exhibition Service, Publications
See more items in:
Publications
Publications / Box 2
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru0536-refidd1e1233

Mali: From Timbuktu to Washington

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
The 2003 Mali program was an invitation to think about Mali and her important place in the wider world. Mali's influence in West Africa and beyond has been felt for centuries. But her regional, continental, and global connections are not just part of the past. The Festival program also demonstrated Malians' ongoing interest in actively forging new links worldwide.

From Timbuktu to Washington evolved over five years, from a wish and an idea to a fully developed and exciting program of musical performances and cultural activities. Planning was enhanced by the previous relationships, both personal and institutional, between the Smithsonian and Malian cultural institutions and was supported by the Malian government and U.S. agencies in Mali. Malian organizers thoughtfully deliberated about what to share with American visitors and determined how Malian culture in all its diversity should be represented.

Traditional music is a vibrant expression of Mali's cultural diversity and wealth. Each ethnic group and region is characterized by certain musical rhythms, instruments, and compositions - a tremendous diversity of which were reflected in the Festival program. Music is involved in all aspects of life, marking birth, work, marriage, religious ceremonies, and death. For the Malian people, music is fundamental and essential to life: it has a precise function and meaning, and it is inextricably linked to a set of doctrines, ideals, beliefs, and practices whose coherence constitutes the identity of each group. Since beliefs about music are often associated with beliefs about the origin of both music and the ethnic group that performs it, the perpetuation of music is a matter of considerable importance.

Malian crafts are a legacy from the past but also very much a part of the present - and the future. People generally think of crafts as the artistic expression of a civilization or culture, but they are much more. Crafts are an important economic resource for Malians, and in 1995 the government adopted a Craft Code to protect and develop craft activity, which the code defined as all basically manual extraction, transformation, or production of goods or services, in metalwork (such as tool-making and appliance repair), woodwork (from carpentry to paper-making), textile and leather work (such as tailoring and tanning), mining and building trades, food processing and preparation (from meat-cutting to milling grain), health and body care (from hairdressing to incense-making), as well as arts. Crafts encompass not only objects used in rituals and traditional ceremonies, but also objects used in daily life - all demonstrated for Festival visitors on the National Mall. Other presentations focused on Malian vernacular architecture, the building arts, and foodways.

Samuel Sidibé, Oumou Dembélé, Zakiyatou Halatine, Sina Maiga, Stephanie Diakité, Modibo Diarra, and Vanessa Adams constituted the Curatorial Board/General Festival Coordination in Mali; Mary Jo Arnoldi and John Franklin were the Curatorial Team; Aboubakar Sanogo was Program Coordinator; and Diana N'Diaye was Fashion Curator. Music and Dance Commission: Kardigué Laico Traoré and N'tji Bagayoko; Craft Commission: Oumou Maiga; Architecture Commission: Alpha Baba Cissé and Boubacar Mady Diallo; Gastronomy Commission: Ami Sow; Communication Commission: Yiriba Samaké; Tourism Commission: Korotimi Théra; Commercial Crafts Commission: Tidiane Hady Kane.

The Mali National Planning Commission included: Dabele Diassana, Chair; Moussa Konaté; Gaoussou Mariko; Abdoulaye Sow; Germaine Samaké Sylla; Demba Kone; Oumou Maiga; Illal; Fatim Kouyaté; Yriba Samaké; and Mamadou Soubounou. A National Advisory Board included: Mossadeck Shada Bally; Alpha Baba Cissé; Ousmane Daou; Idrissa Diakité; Zakiyatou Halatine; Doulaye Konaté; Adam Ba Konaré, co-chair; Fatim Kouyaté; Adama Samessekou; Bintou Sanankuoa; Klena Sanogo; Samuel Sidibé, co-chair; Bakary Soumanou; Ousmane Sow; Djibril Tabouré; Adam Thiam; Barthélémy Togo; and Ibrahim Ag Youssouf.

The program was made possible by a partnership with the Government of Mali (Office of the President; Office of the Prime Minister; Malian National Folklife Festival Commission; Ministry ofTourism and Crafts; Ministry of Culture; Ministry ofWomen, Family, and Youth Affairs; and Ministry of Education), the World Bank, and the U.S. Agency for International Development. Additional supporting organizations included the U.S. Department of State, Africa Society, Corporate Council on Africa, Friends of Mali, Association of Malians, the Peace Corps, Chemonics Inc., and John Snow Inc.
Participants:
PERFORMANCE TRADITIONS

Ali Farka Touré Group, Niafunke -- Ali Farka Touré Group, NiafunkeAli Farka Touré, electric guitar, vocalsOumar Touré, congas, chorus vocalsAli KontaSouleymane Kane, djembéHamadoun BocoumMamadou Kelly

Baba Larab, Gao -- Baba Larab, GaoGuilemikoye M'bara I., 1956-, dancerArawaidou Yacouba, 1959-, guitarSalif Maiga, 1950-, guitarZéinaba Assoutor, 1977-, dancer

Dogon Masked Dance Group, Bandiagara -- Dogon Masked Dance Group, BandiagaraInogo Dolo, 1928-, singerSomou Dolo, 1963-, dancerYanousssou Dolo, 1956-, dancerBassa Dolo, 1970-, dancerAmatigué Dolo, 1968-, drummerAtemelou Dolo, 1973-, dancerOgodana Dolo, 1950-, drummerBasso Dolo, 1963-, singerAly Dolo, singer

Donso N'goni -- Donso N'goniSékouba Traoré, 1965-, Koulikoro, singer and donso n'goniDramane Traoré, 1973-, Koulikoro, donso n'goniNianankoro Diarra, 1982-, Koulikoro, guiros

Ensemble Instrumental -- Ensemble InstrumentalMassambou Wèlè Diallo, artistic directorSouadou Soumano, 1958-, singerSaranfing Kouyaté, 1950-, singerNafissatou Maiga, 1954-, singerDjeneba Doumbia, 1962-, singerAdama Soumono Sacko, 1960-, singerBabily Kanouté, 1951-, koraSaranfing Kouyaté, 1950-, koraBinéfou Koita, 1960-, n'goniModibo Diabaté, 1961-, balafonMohamadoun Ag Sidi Cissé, djembe

Groupe So Fing, Markala -- Groupe So Fing, MarkalaMariam Thiero, 1956-, singer, dancerAichata Niono, 1971-, backup singerAlmamy Thiero, 1959-, percussionistOumar Traoré, 1959-, percussionistYaya Famenta, 1972-, percussionistMohamed Khalifa Thiero, 1959-, percussionist

Groupe Sogonikun, Wassoulou -- Groupe Sogonikun, WassoulouAmadou Diakité, 1941-, dancerBakary Diakité, 1979-, dancerKassoum Diakité, 1980-, dancerBrehima Diallo, 1973-, percussionistMamaourou Doumbia, 1979-, percussionistAlmamy Traoré, 1963-, percussionistKadiè Traoré, 1978-, singerDoussouba Traoré, singer

Kanaga de Mopti -- Kanaga de MoptiDjeliba Koné, 1953-, trumpetKaniba dit Demba Koné, 1965-, guitarIssa Koné, 1978-, guitarMaki Koné, 1958-, singerSada Traoré, 1978-, drummerSekou dit Tomi Koné, 1952-, saxophone, balafonBouraima Diabaté, 1961-, singerPapa Koné, 1966-, bass guitarMamadou Traoré, 1950-, band leaderSekou Diankoumba, 1948-, singer

Krin de Birgo, Kita -- Krin de Birgo, KitaDemba Sidibé, singer, calabashMooro Sidibé, djembeTenemba Diallo, 1988-, calabashBakary Sidibé, calabash, camale n'goni

Musical Storytellers -- Musical StorytellersMoctar Kone, 1945-, n'goni, MourdiahMamary Diabaté, 1943-, n'goni, Bamako

N'Goussoun, Koulikoro -- N'Goussoun, KoulikoroMariam Bagayoko, 1952-, singer, dancerDjéneba Bagayoko, 1978-, chorus singerDognan Coulibaly, 1975-, balafonAlou Diarra, 1975-, balafon

Néba Solo Group, Sikasso -- Néba Solo Group, SikassoSouleymane Traoré (Néba Solo), 1969-, balafonYacouba Traoré, 1963-, keregneSiaka Traoré, 1971-, balafonOumar Coulibaly, 1971-, percussionZantien Gonsogo, 1959-, percussionMahamadou Traoré, 1976-, percussionBocary Dembélé, dancerIbrahim Dembélé, 1974-, dancer

Oumou Sangaré, Wassoulou -- Oumou Sangaré, WassoulouOumou Sangaré, 1968-, lead vocalsSaya Kouyaté, 1973-, singer, dancerZoumana Tereta, 1963-, sokou (traditional violin)Abdoulaye Fofana, 1954-, fluteNabintou Diakité, 1972-, singer, dancerMouneissa Tandina, 1964-, drummerSalah Baba, 1974-, guitarHamane Touré, 1964-, bassOusmane Haidara, 1954-, managerBrehima Diakité, 1965-, camale n'goniCheikh Oumar Diabaté, 1968-, djembeAlama Diakite, yabara (percussion)

Salif Keita, Bamako -- Salif Keita, BamakoSalif Keita, 1949-, lead vocals, guitarDjely Moussa Kouyaté, electric guitarHarouna Samaké, camale n'goniDrissa Bagayoko, djembeMamadou Kone, calabashAdama Kouyaté, tamaSouleymane Doumbia, African congasSouleyman Kouyaté, n'goniAbdoulaye Diabaté, keyboardsAminata Doumbia, 1976-, background vocalsAssitan Diarra, background vocalsJean-Marie Avisse, technical crewIsabel Bonvalet, technical crewTimor Cardenas, technical crewJohnson Mensah, technical crewDavid Lunardelli, technical crew

Tabital Pulaku, Mopti -- Tabital Pulaku, MoptiBoureima Dicko, 1947-, fluteDinda Sarré, 1958-, n'goniGabdo Cissé, 1978-, dancerGoro Hamadoun, 1971-, calabashAminata Coulibaly, dancerHamadoun Biga Cissé, drumYehia Dicko, violinAlima Barry, dancerAminata Salmana Traoré, singer

Tartit, Kel Antessar -- Tartit, Kel AntessarMohamed Aly Ansar, leaderIssa Amanou, n'goniMohamed Issa Ag Oumar, n'goniIdwal Ag Mohamed, n'goniFatoumata Walett Mohomadoun, dancerTafa Walett Alhousseini, violinFatoumata HaidaraZeinabu Walett Oumar, tende

PUPPETRY

Yaya Coulibaly, 1957-, puppeteer, Bamako

CRAFT TRADITIONS

Fatoumata Maiga, 1961-, carding, Ségou

Aminata Keita, 1983-, spinning, Ségou

Ousmane Sarré, 1969-, cotton weaving, Badalabougou

Kola Kassé, 1944-, wool weaving, Mopti

Nakounté Diarra, -- bogolan -- , mudcloth, Kolokani

Founemousso Sakiliba, 1940-, -- bogolan -- , mudcloth, Bamako

Ousmane Ganame, 1942-, indigo-dyeing, Bandiagara

Tantou Sambaké, modern tie-dyeing, Bamako

Aminata Sacko, 1961-, modern tie-dyeing, Bamako

Sanounou Bathily, fabric finishing, Bamako

Ousmane Traoré, 1947-, hand embroidery, Djenne

Sekou Touré, machine embroidery, Bamako

Dikourou Diarrah Traoré, fashion design, Dou Couture, Bamako

Sambou Fané, fashion design, Bamako

Kasobane Design Group, Bamako -- Kasobane Design Group, BamakoKandioura Coulibaly, fashion designKlétigui Dembélé, fashion design

Style Movement Consultants Models -- Style Movement Consultants ModelsStephanie Alexander, Toya Brown, Terraria Chase, Maria Dennard, Tanisha Dodson, Alyssa Grannum, Torye Hurt, Viola Iso-Hola, Evan Jones, Sean Majors, Darlena Perry, Darletra Perry, Angela Tilghman, Latonya Tilghman, Nila Zachman

Malian Association Models -- Malian Association ModelsRokiatou Ba, Aminata Amy Cissé, Boubacar Cissé, Djeneba Djenny Diakité, Aichatou Keita, Hawa Keita, Kadiatou Koné, Djingareye M. Lawani, Adam A. Ouologuem, Assetou Traoré, Fanta Traoré

Alassane Ag Agaly, 1973-, Tuareg jewelry, Gao

Amadou Samasekou, 1955-, Tuareg jewelry, Mopti

Hady Koné, 1967-, modern jewelry, Bamako

Mamadou Gueye Thiam, modern jewelry, Kayes

Kassim Ballo, 1961-, blacksmithing, Bamako

Mohamed Ag Iknane, 1964-, blacksmithing, Gao

Kadidia Nienta, 1975-, pottery, Mopti

Almadane Traoré, 1939-, straw jewelry, Timbuktu

Fatoumata Gariko, 1958-, straw jewelry, Hombori, Mopti region

Halimatou Abouba, mat-weaving, Gao

Tago Walet Mémé, 1956-, leather work, Timbuktu

Fadiala Dembelé, 1953-, modern leather work, Bamako

Tairou Soumbounou, shoemaking, Bamako

Mody Cissoko, 1959-, wood sculpture, Bamako

ARTS OF ADORNMENT

Kadidia Ouologuem, 1963-, hairdressing, Bamako

Soumata Sidi, 1964-, hairdressing, Gao

Aminata Doumbia, 1976-, henna artistry. Bamako

Korotoumo Ouattara, 1948-, shea butter extraction, Sikasso

TRADITIONAL MEDICINE

Toumani Diakité, 1966-, Bamako

FOODWAYS TRADITIONS

Ami Sow

Kadiatou Sow Traoré, 1955-

Halimatou Touré

Kadia Souko

Fatoumata Sissoko Cissé

Koumba Kanté

Mariam Diarra

Aissa Touré Alhamafi, 1955-

Maimouna Coulibaly Camara

ARCHITECTURE TRADITIONS

Baba Cissé, architect

Boubacar Mady Diallo, architect

Alassane Hasseye, 1942-, master mason

Boubacar Kouroumanse, master mason

Manhamane dit Berre Yanou, 1936-, master mason

Almoudou Baigna, master mason

Alhousseini Ag Tajoudine, 1963-, Tuareg tent

Sekou Tientao, mason

Mandedeou Tanapo, mason

Mamoudou Kontao, mason

Oumar Yonou, mason

Agaly Ousmane, mason

Baba Touré, mason

Ahamadou Hasseye, mason

Adoulahi Albaidja, mason
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2003 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2003, Series 3
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2003 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2003-ref26

Festival Recordings: Malian Baskets: Almadane Traoré, Fatoumata Gariko,, Oumou Maiga (Janet Goldner, Oumou Maiga); N'Goussoum (Haoua Traoré); Traditional Medicine and Karite: Toumani Diakité (Hassimi Maiga)

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2003 June 29
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2003 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2003, Item FP-2003-CT-0257
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2003 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2003 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 3: Mali: From Timbuktu to Washington / 3.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2003-ref836

New Jersey

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Folklore is commonly identified by many people with rural settings, and New Jersey is basically urban, suburban, and industrial. There are indeed some rural areas in New Jersey - the truck farms of "the Garden State" and the Pine Barrens of South Jersey - but the former are fast disappearing and the latter survive only because they are preserved by the state. Most New Jerseyans live and work in the densely populated corridor that cuts across the mid-section of the state. But folklorists today recognize that there is also a folklore of the factory, a folklore of the city, and a folklore of ethnicity, and New Jersey provides a rich source for their study.

The streets of New Jersey's cities abound with traditional life as practiced for generations. One need only to walk through Hoboken or Bayonne to see children playing stick ball, hop scotch, and Double Dutch jump rope. New Jersey is populated by a large number of ethnic groups, many of which have clustered in city neighborhoods. There is a Cuban community in Union City, a Portuguese community in Newark, a Hungarian community in New Brunswick, and a Japanese community in rural Seabrook Farms. For many ethnic groups folk traditions are their symbols of identity. Their ethnicity is expressed in foodways, language, music, dance, and festivals (often in ethnic costume). Music such as Ukrainian trio music, once performed informally at weddings, is now formally presented on a stage at a public festival with dancers in folk costume. Craft traditions that used to be a vital part of rural economy in the mother country are now miniaturized and made into a hobby.

The 1983 Festival program brought a panoply of presentations from New Jersey to the National Mall, ranging from ethnic celebrations of African Americans, Japanese Americans, Italian Americans and others to craft demonstrations featuring skills and techniques of silk weaving, herbalism and glassblowing, and on to the diverse occupations associated with maritime trades and the sacred songs of menhaden fishermen.

The New Jersey Program was made possible through many generous corporate and private donations to Festival New Jersey '83!, a nonprofit corporation established and chaired by Governor Thomas H. Kean to fund New Jersey's participation in the 17th Annual Festival of American Folklife.

Sue Manos-Nahwooksy served as New Jersey Program Coordinator.
Participants:
Agriculture

Joan Sorbello Adams, farm life, Mullica Hill

Anthony Catalano, produce sales, Salem

Toni Catalano, produce sales, Salem

Mary Sorbello, produce sales, Mullica Hill

Susan Sorbello, produce sales, Mullica Hill

Celebrations

Alabama Day

Thelma Britt, Afro-American cooking, Newark

Glennie Davis Franklin, 1933-2003, shape note singing, Hillside

Mabel Jackson, shape note singing, East Orange

Mary Alice Phillips, shape note singing, Elizabeth

Mabel Upshaw, shape note singing, East Orange

Bon Festival

Iddy Asada, cooking, Bridgeton

Sandy Ikeda, drums-New York, New York

Fusaye Kazaoka, 1930-2006, embroidery, Bridgeton

Shigeko Kazaoka, 1902-1992, crafts, Bridgeton

Ellen Nakamura, 1919-2000, obon dancing, kimono making, Elmer

Kiyomi Nakamura, 1916-1986, technical director, obon dancing, Elmer

Kazuyo Nakao, dancing, Seabrook

Sunke Oye, dancing, Vineland

Wendy Takahisa, drums, New York, New York

Suzi Takata, 1924-2004, crafts, Bridgeton

Harumi Taniguchi, 1902-2001, cooking, Seabrook

Hisano Tazumi, 1898-1999, kimono dressing, Bridgeton

Jenny Wada, drums, New York, New York

Audee Kochiyama Williams, drums, New York, New York

Peter Wong, drums, New York, New York

Theodora Yoshikami, drums, Brooklyn, New York

The Feast of Our Lady of Casadrino

The Joseph Colletti Marching Band -- The Joseph Colletti Marching BandJohn Bonfante, trumpet, TrentonLouis Cordas, 1909-1997, clarinet, TrentonJoseph D'Ambrosio, drums, TrentonCarmine DeLorento, trumpet, TrentonPaul Farinella, drums, TrentonBill Felter, drums, BordentownRonald E. Hansen, 1936-, trombone, Morrisville, PennsylvaniaRoy Hasty, tuba, TrentonRuss Jenkins, trumpet, TrentonFranz Mayer, drums, TrentonFrank Miller, saxophone, Hamilton SquareJames Penkala, baritone, TrentonJames Peraino, saxophone, CranburyJohn Peraino, band leader, TrentonSarah Peraino, assistant, TrentonNate Pratico, tuba, TrentonAI Procassini, trombone, West Chester, PennsylvaniaNick Sciarrotta, trumpet, TrentonAldo Stagi, baritone, Yardley, PennsylvaniaAndrew Wierzbowski, clarinet, Trenton

Oktoberfest

Bernie Bunger, Sr., 1950-, dance, Scotch Plains

Bernie Bunger, band leader, Piscataway

Betty Bunger, cooking, Piscataway

Elfreide Bunger, dance, Scotch Plains

Bill Mueller, drums, vocals, Union

Karl Pfeifer, singing, Franklin Lake

Dana Sylvander, brass, Englewood

John Van Decker, brass, Avenel

Queimada Ritual

Arturo Lopez-Dominguez, 1948-, coordinator, Newark

"Andurina" Bagpipers -- "Andurina" BagpipersAlvaro Castro, BayonneCarlos Corbacho, 1947-, director, NewarkJorge Fernandez, Jr., NewarkFrancisco Lara, drums, NewarkAmador Lopez, IrvingtonJosé Noguerol, NewarkJosé Noguerol, Jr., Newark

Ballet Folklore "Alborada" -- Ballet Folklore "Alborada"Linda Acebo, NewarkHerminio Alvarez, NewarkJulio Barreiro, IrvingtonManolo Lago, director, IrvingtonJulia Lara, NewarkEmilio Lopez, HarrisonDorothy Ventoso, KearnyIsabel Ventoso, LyndhurstNancy Villanueva, North Arlington

Hispania: Coral Polifonica -- Hispania: Coral PolifonicaManuel Alonso, KearnyJuan Alvarez, Roselle ParkDonato Barreiro, NewarkAgustina Caamano, NewarkMarcelino Caamaflo, NewarkAlezandro Cobelo, NewarkEugenio Fernandez, NewarkMaria Fernandez, NewarkClementina Garcia, NewarkManuel R. Garcia, 1942-, choral director, CalifonSantiago Garcia, NewarkMaria Rodriguez Gil, Brooklyn, New YorkAna Maria Gomez, NewarkMaria Dolores Gonzalez, NewarkRamona Gonzalez, NewarkFrancisca Lopez, HarrisonManuela Lopez, HarrisonManuel Malvarez, NewarkMaria del Carmen Maza, KearnyImmaculada Mendez, NewarkMaria Mendez, NewarkEmilio Nepomuceno, NewarkFrancisco Platas, LindenHerminia Rodriguez, KearnyJosefa Salgado, Newark

Maritime Area

Robert Ames, menhaden chanties, Port Norris

Bernie Borrelli, 1957-, boat building, Lavallette

Owen Carney, 1921-, salt hay rope making, Port Norris

Donald Cisrow, 1957-, oyster shucking, gospel singing, Port Norris

Evelyn Cisrow, 1929-2006, oyster shucking, gospel singing, Port Norris

Sarah Cisrow, 1961-, oyster shucking, gospel singing, Port Norris

Joseph Gibbs, 1924-1997, oyster shucking, gospel singing, Port Norris

Gary Giberson, decoy carving, Port Republic

Robert Lee Hamon, menhaden chanties, Port Norris

Charles E. Hankins, 1925-2003, boat building, Lavallette

Anthony Hillman, boat building, decoy carving, Seaville

Sam Hunt, 1911-2004, boat building, Waretown

Oliver Johnson, menhaden chanties, Port Norris

William Richardson, 1916-1987, lobster trap making, Keyport

Mrs. William Richardson, lobster trap making, Keyport

Harry Shourds, decoy carving, Seaville

Henry Weldon, 1915-1990, rush seat weaving, Milville

Beryl Whittington, 1919-2003, oyster shucking, gospel singing, Port Norris

Music

Herb Abramson, Walter Rhodes' manager, New York, New York

Saul Betesh, Sephardic oud, Deal

Walter Rhodes, blues singing, guitar, Paterson

Tex Logan Band -- Tex Logan BandJimmy Arnold, fiddle, banjo, guitar, Fredericksburg, VirginiaChad Bruce, drums, harmonica, vocals, Fairfax, VirginiaJohn Carlini, guitar bass, SummitKen Gallahan, rhythm guitar, Alexandria, VirginiaJoey Greene, mandolin banjo, Fredericksburg, VirginiaWade Hill, banjo mandolin, Fredericksburg, VirginiaBenjamin Franklin "Tex" Logan, fiddle, MadisonPeter Rowan, rhythm guitar, vocals, Madison

"Doc" McKenzie and the Gospel Hi-Lites -- "Doc" McKenzie and the Gospel Hi-LitesMarvin Bradshaw, bass, PatersonDarryl Henley, guitar, PatersonGreg Herbert, organ, PatersonAbraham McKenzie, vocals, PatersonDavid McKenzie, vocals, PatersonMilbert "Doc" McKenzie, 1949-, vocals, PatersonHenry Redmond, drums, PatersonWilliam Wribbee, vocals, Paterson

Pure Water -- Pure WaterCharles Banks, Jr., vocals, NewarkJoe Briscoe, vocals, NewarkTerrance Forward, vocals, NewarkWayne Johnson, vocals, IrvingtonJohnny Shipley, group leader, Newark

Silk

Joseph Grauso, 1916-1997, weaving, Elmwood Park

Roy Harris, 1920-1990, weaving, Bensalem, Pennsylvania

Prince Hatley, 1916-1991, weaving, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Traditional Medicine & Pharmacology

Fred Anderson, glassblower, Sun City, Arizona

Evidio Espinosa, herbalist, West New York

Louis Molinari, 1931-2004, glassblower, Stirling

Efrain Osorio, herbalist, Newark

Alvin Segelman, pharmacognosist, Piscataway
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1983 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1983, Series 6
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1983 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1983-ref43

Nigeria, Paul Taylor Proposal re: Traditional Medicine, 1986

Collection Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Office of International Relations  Search this
Container:
Box 18 of 24
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 01-114, Smithsonian Institution, Office of International Relations, Country Files
See more items in:
Country Files
Country Files / Box 18
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-fa01-114-refidd1e3907

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