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Kallawaya Blessing Ceremony

Creator:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2013-12-12T17:14:18.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Cultural property  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianfolklife
Data Source:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianfolklife
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_wauUx1DYMCI

Teriananda papers

Author:
Teriananda, 1947-  Search this
Names:
Peltier, Leonard  Search this
Extent:
0.83 Linear feet (2 archival boxes )
Culture:
Indians of North America  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Indians of Mexico  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Articles
Writings
Letters
Clippings
Reports
Date:
1972 - 1999
Summary:
The Teriananda Papers contain writings authored by Teriananda, as well as various position papers, news articles, flyers, correspondence, and group newsletters that represent the political activities she participated in on behalf of Native American and other Indigenous peoples.
Scope and Contents:
This collection, from the 1970s to the 1990s, is comprised of published and unpublished writings by Teriananda, as well as letters, reports, newspaper and magazine articles, group newsletters, flyers and announcements of political events, and news releases. The issues represented here, including support work for "The Longest Walk," the campaign for justice for Leonard Peltier, and the Big Mountain relocation are indicative of the concerns in parts of Indian Country in the United States and elsewhere during these decades.
Arrangement:
The Teriananda papers are arranged into two series:

Series I: Writings (1978-1991)

Series II: Political Activities (undated; 1972-1996)
Biographical / Historical:
Teriananda was born in Manhattan in 1947, where she grew up and has continued to live throughout her adult life. Teriananda's father, born in Brooklyn, became a financial officer and independent scholar, her mother, born in British Guiana (now Guyana), was a classical pianist who immigrated to the United States and later became an editorial assistant, working part-time during Teriananda's childhood. Her parents instilled in Teriananda a belief that she was "a citizen of the world." She studied ballet as a youngster, and, as a teenager, immersed herself in the artistic and intellectual milieu of the Lower East Side and Greenwich Village. An improperly diagnosed back injury while she was a senior in high school resulted in severe back problems in the 1970s that have persisted throughout her life.

Teriananda became interested in Indigenous struggles in the 1970s following a "back crisis" that almost took her life yet proved to be psychically transformative. In seeking to know who she was, she realized she needed to know where she was, and this led her to ask who the original inhabitants of the continent were. She soon became involved in activist struggles for Indigenous rights, and worked with a number of Native American groups during the 1970s and 1980s, including, among other things, the International Treaty Council's attempts to found the U.N.'s permanent Working Group on Indigenous People, support for Yvonne Wanrow and Leonard Peltier, the issue of uranium contamination from mining on Native American land, and the problem of the Joint Land Use Area near Big Mountain on the Hopi and Navajo reservations.

Teriananda also worked on issues surrounding the AIDS crisis after the death of several friends from this disease. She had become familiar with the possibilities of natural medicines, partly through contact with traditional Native teachers, and she became active promoting the benefits of nutritional, herbal and other natural therapies to sufferers of AIDS. As Teriananda's own health issues persisted and worsened, she turned to Tibetan Buddhism, and has devoted herself to artistic pursuits influenced by this spiritual path, although she has worked artistically since the early 1970s, when she stopped dancing. Although she has cut back on her activism, due to health problems and family demands, Teriananda remains a committed political activist who stays informed of current issues and is determined to pass on the heritage of struggles for peace and justice to the next generation.
Provenance:
Donated to the National Museum of the American Indian Archives by Teriananda in March 2003
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 3:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the NMAI Archivist. The Archives has no information on the status of literary rights for the work of others found in these papers; researchers are responsible for determining any question of copyright.
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Civil rights  Search this
Indians of North America -- Relocation  Search this
Traditional medicine  Search this
AIDS (Disease)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Land tenure  Search this
Indians of South America  Search this
Indians of Central America  Search this
Genre/Form:
Articles
Writings
Letters
Clippings
Reports
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Teriananda papers, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.009
See more items in:
Teriananda papers
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4c4026e79-6475-49d9-ac8d-c282f248302d
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-009

Inka Road Symposium 13 - Day 2 Blessing

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Symposia
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2015-07-15T18:45:36.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_9GlagvdDtdY

Inka Road Symposium 01 - Day 1 Blessing

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Symposia
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2015-07-15T18:45:36.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_UWa3sw5sVoE

Inka Road Symposium 20 - Remarks on Kallawayas and Traditional Medicine

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Symposia
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2015-07-15T18:45:36.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_zwDymUYN29k

Carol Laderman lecture video

Creator:
Laderman, Carol  Search this
Extent:
1 Videocassette (78 minutes, color sound)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Videocassettes
Video recordings
Date:
2001
Scope and Contents:
Full video recording of a lecture by medical anthropologist Carol Laderman given on April 21, 2001 on how she became a medical anthropologist, the trajectory of the field of medical anthropology within the discipline of anthropology, and her work in Malaysia studying traditional medicine as practiced by the indigenous population. Video also includes her showing slides of her research on birth practices and divination in Malaysia and question and answer session with the students.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or Anthropology Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Local Number:
HSFA 2013.7.1
Related Materials:
The National Anthropological Archives holds the Carol Laderman papers.
Provenance:
Transferred from the National Anthropological Archives in 2013.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Please contact the archives for information on availability of access copies of audiovisual recordings. Original audiovisual material in the Human Studies Film Archives may not be played.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Medical anthropology  Search this
Anthropology -- History  Search this
Women anthropologists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Carol Laderman lecture video, Human Studies Film Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
HSFA.2013.07
Archival Repository:
Human Studies Film Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pc98e503e80-ab36-43fc-afee-17e172befcef
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-hsfa-2013-07

Carol Laderman Papers

Creator:
Laderman, Carol  Search this
Extent:
6 Linear feet ((15 boxes and 1 manuscript envelope) and 154 cassette tapes)
Culture:
Malays (Asian people)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Field notes
Sound recordings
Photographs
Place:
Kampong Merchang (Terengganu)
Malaysia
Date:
1970-2009
Summary:
Carol Laderman was a medical anthropologist best known for her research on Malay traditional medicine. Her work focused on beliefs and practices regarding childbirth and nutrition as well as shamanic healing practices in rural Malaysia. This collection consists of the professional papers of Carol Laderman, medical anthropologist and university professor. The bulk of the collection pertains to her research on childbirth, nutrition, and shamanic healing practices in rural Malaysia. These materials include field notes, surveys, transcripts of Main Peteri ceremonies, grant applications, photographs, and sound recordings. Of special interest are her photographs of midwives and shamans treating patients, including Main Peteri ceremonies, as well as traditional Malay weddings and festivals. Also noteworthy are her recordings of Main Peteri ceremonies and her interviews with midwives and shamans. The collection also contains her unpublished and published writings; her dissertation; a report on her undergraduate fieldwork with pregnant Puerto Rican teenagers; her lecture notes and files as a university professor; files documenting her involvement in professional associations; and correspondence with colleagues.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of the professional papers of Carol Laderman, medical anthropologist and university professor. The bulk of the collection pertains to her research on childbirth, nutrition, and shamanic healing practices in rural Malaysia. These materials include field notes, surveys, transcripts of Main Peteri ceremonies, grant applications, photographs, and sound recordings. Of special interest are her photographs of midwives and shamans treating patients, including Main Peteri ceremonies, as well as traditional Malay weddings and festivals. Also noteworthy are her recordings of Main Peteri ceremonies and her interviews with midwives and shamans. The collection also contains her unpublished and published writings; her dissertation; a report on her undergraduate fieldwork with pregnant Puerto Rican teenagers; her lecture notes and files as a university professor; files documenting her involvement in professional associations; and correspondence with colleagues.
Arrangement:
This collection is organized in 8 series: Series 1. Research, 1972, 1975-1977, 1981, 1985, 1987, 2000-2003, undated; Series 2. Writings, 1970, 1975, 1978-2001, 2004, undated; Series 3. Student Files, 1972, 1975, 1979, undated; Series 4. Teacher Files, 1977, 1979-1982, 2001-2002, 2007, undated; Series 5. Correspondence, 1974-1981, 1985-2005, 2009, undated; Series 6. Professional Activities, circa 1981, 1989-1990, 1994, 2004, undated; Series 7. Photographs, circa 1975-1977, circa 1982, undated; Series 8. Sound Recordings, 1976-1977, 1982, 2003, undated.
Biographical/Historical note:
Carol Laderman was a medical anthropologist best known for her research on Malay traditional medicine. Her work focused on beliefs and practices regarding childbirth and nutrition as well as shamanic healing practices in rural Malaysia.

Laderman (née Cohen) was born on October 25, 1932 in Brooklyn, New York. When she was 6, her father changed their family's surname to Ciavati due to his difficulty as a Jew finding an engineering job. Laderman grew up with musical aspirations, intending to become a concert pianist. She attended the High School of Music and Art in Manhattan and majored in music at Brooklyn College. In 1953, she married Gabriel Laderman, a painter and later an art professor. She took a leave from college to follow her husband after he was drafted into the U.S. Army five months following their wedding. Her hiatus from college spanned fifteen years, during which time she had two sons (1958, 1965). She also worked as a legal secretary in Ithaca, New York, and as a social secretary and translator for an opera singer when she and her family lived in Italy.

After returning to New York City, she enrolled in evening classes at Hunter College. Although she planned to resume her studies in music, her academic focus changed after taking an anthropology course taught by medical anthropologist Rena Gropper. In 1972, she earned her B.A. in Anthropology, and with the assistance of a Danforth Foundation Fellowship, she attended graduate school at Columbia University, where she earned her Ph.D. in Anthropology in 1979.

As an undergraduate student, Laderman conducted fieldwork at Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York City (1972-1973), assisting in a project on pregnant teenagers and nutritional health. She was assigned to collect data on Puerto Rican adolescent mothers, which exposed her to humoral beliefs in food, medicine, and people. This experience would later inspire her to conduct her graduate fieldwork on nutrition and childbirth in Malaysia, where humoral beliefs were also held but not well-explored by researchers.

From 1975 to 1977, Laderman and her family lived in Merchang, in Trengganu (now Terengganu), Malaysia. Working under the auspices of the Malaysian Ministry of Health of the Institute for Medical Research, Laderman studied both traditional and hospital-based medicine. As part of her fieldwork, she received training from a hospital to collect blood samples to study the effects of birthing and dietary practices on women's health. She also apprenticed herself to a traditional midwife (bidan kampung), whom she assisted in a number of births. By comparing food ideologies and actual food intake of pregnant and postpartum women, Laderman was able to refute the prevailing view of scholars that malnutrition among rural Malays was largely due to dietary restrictions based on the humoral system. In her dissertation, "Conceptions and Preconceptions: Childbirth and Nutrition in Rural Malaysia," Laderman describes how Malay women adapt their diets to their needs and that their customs allow for interpretation and manipulation. In 1983, a revised version of her dissertation was published as Wives and Midwives: Childbirth and Nutrition in Rural Malaysia.

While seeking to gain an understanding of traditional Malay medicine in its entirety, Laderman also became exposed to theatrical spirit séances known as Main Peteri (also Puteri or Teri). At that time Main Peteri was no longer performed in most Malaysian states but was still thriving in Trengganu and nearby Kelantan. Performed primarily as healing ceremonies by shamans (bomoh), Main Peteri was a last resort for the afflicted. These performances were characterized by entranced patients, spirit possessions, singing, music, dancing, and an audience. Laderman attended and participated in a number of these ceremonies and became a student and adopted daughter to a shaman. She recorded and transcribed several Main Peteri performances and received an NEH grant (1981-1985) to translate the texts. She also returned to Merchang in 1982 to conduct further research on traditional healing ceremonies. In her monograph Taming the Wind of Desire (1991), she discusses Main Peteri and its relationship to the Malay concept of Inner Winds (angin), which determine a person's personality, talents, and drives. In 1987 to 1990, she returned to her musical roots to collaborate with ethnomusicologist Marina Roseman to transcribe, analyze, and interpret the music of Main Peteri. Together, she and Roseman also edited The Performance of Healing (1996). In addition, Laderman became interested in the effects of urbanization and globalization on traditional Malay healing practices, a topic which she addressed in a collection of her writings, The Life and Death of Traditional Malay Medicine (in press).

Laderman was a professor at the Department of Anthropology at City University of New York City College (1990-2010). She was also an associate professor at Fordham University (1982-1990) and taught briefly at Hunter College (1978-1980), Brooklyn College (1979-1980), and Yale University (1980-1982).

She died on July 6, 2010 at the age of 77.

Sources Consulted

[Autobiographical statement], Series 2. Writings, Carol Laderman Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution

1972. Carol Laderman, SGS Student, Wins Danforth Fellowship. SGS Newsletter 2(7): 1.

Laderman, Carol. 1983. Wives and Midwives: Childbirth and Nutrition in Rural Malaysia. Berkeley, California: University of California Press.

Laderman, Carol. 1991. Taming the Wind of Desire: Psychology, Medicine, and Aesthetics in Malay Shamanistic Performance. Berkeley, California: University of California Press.

Maizura, Intan. 2003, September 28. A bidan, a bomoh & a New Yorker. Nuance: 16-18.

Roseman, Marina, Laurel Kendall and Robert Knox Dentan. 2011. Obituaries: Carol Laderman (1932-2010). American Anthropologist 113(2): 375-377.

1932 -- Born October 25 in Brooklyn, New York

1953 -- Marries Gabriel Laderman and takes a leave from Brooklyn College

1972 -- Earns B.A. in Anthropology from Hunter College

1972-1973 -- Conducts research at Mt. Sinai Hospital on ethnic eating patterns, food beliefs, and anemia in adolescent Puerto Rican mothers

1975-1977 -- Conducts fieldwork in Merchang in Trengganu, Malaysia

1979 -- Earns Ph.D. in Anthropology from Columbia University

1982 -- Returns to Malaysia to conduct fieldwork on shamanism and trance healing

1982-1988 -- Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Fordham University

1988-1990 -- Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Fordham University

1990-2010 -- Professor, Department of Anthropology, City University of New York City College

2010 -- Dies on July 6
Related Materials:
Two videotapes were received with the Carol Laderman papers and transferred to the Human Studies Film Archives.

Some of Laderman's original field recordings are at Columbia University's Center for Ethnomusicology. Copies of those recording are in this collection and are so noted.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Carol Laderman's sons, Raphael and Michael Laderman in 2012.
Restrictions:
The Carol Laderman Papers are open for research. Access to the Carol Laderman Papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use. Permission to use sound recordings of Main Peteri ceremonies transcribed and published in Taming the Wind of Desire must be obtained from Columbia University's Center for Ethnomusicology.
Topic:
Traditional medicine  Search this
Shamanism  Search this
Malay language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Medical anthropology  Search this
Malays (Asian people) -- Medicine  Search this
Seances  Search this
Pregnancy -- Nutritional aspects  Search this
Midwifery  Search this
Ethnology -- Malaysia  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Sound recordings
Photographs
Citation:
Carol Laderman Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2012-09
See more items in:
Carol Laderman Papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw33834bd8d-479d-4d3c-ab0d-97f73a5a3609
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2012-09
Online Media:

Festival Recordings: Community Talk: Old Traditions; Passing on Culture; Culture Bridging; Immigrant Stories; Experience

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. African Immigrant Program 1997 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Miller, Mark K., 1953- (recorder)  Search this
Swerda, Frank (recorder)  Search this
Performer:
Ansah-Brew, Kwame  Search this
Asante, Nana  Search this
Frimpong, Ernest  Search this
Pereira, Aristide  Search this
Cook, George  Search this
Abraha, Abrehet  Search this
Rutayuga, John  Search this
Modupe, Cece  Search this
N'Tube, Dominic  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
compact audio cassette
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Maryland
Ghana
Silver Spring (Md.)
Senegal
Ethiopia
Nigeria
Date:
1997 July 5
Track Information:
101 Old Traditions in New Settings: Music of the Durbar / Kwame Ansah-Brew, Nana Asante, Ernest Frimpong. Xylophone,Drum,Mbira,Woodblock.

102 Passing on Culture: Bringing Up Families in the U.S / Aristide Pereira, George Cook.

103 Culture Bridging: Film Making / Abrehet Abraha.

104 Immigrant Stories / John Rutayuga.

105 Immigration Experiences / Cece Modupe, Dominic N'Tube.
Local Numbers:
FP-1997-CT-0291-7
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, July 5, 1997.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. SI Permission.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
World music  Search this
Xylophone  Search this
Drum  Search this
Mbira  Search this
Woodblock  Search this
Musical instruments  Search this
Music  Search this
Marriage  Search this
Manners and customs  Search this
Child rearing  Search this
Media formats  Search this
Motion picture producers and directors  Search this
Motion pictures  Search this
Emigration and immigration  Search this
Community Organizations  Search this
Traditional medicine  Search this
Health  Search this
Medicine  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1997 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1997, Item FP-1997-CT-0291
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1997 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1997 Festival of American Folklife / Series 2: African Immigrant Folklife / 2.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk589a78dea-1f4c-4485-adb6-1f68738c616c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1997-ref654

Vivian E. Garrison papers

Creator:
Garrison, Vivian, 1933-2013  Search this
Names:
Arensberg, Conrad M. (Conrad Maynadier), 1910-1997  Search this
Extent:
108.29 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
New York (State) -- New York City
New Jersey -- Newark
Date:
circa 1930-2009
bulk 1960-1993
Summary:
Vivian E. Garrison was an applied medical anthropologist who researched the cultural understandings and community treatment structures surrounding mental illness and mental health care among low-income, minority, and migrant communities of the New York metropolitan area. The Vivian E. Garrison papers document this research and consist of clinical and case files; research policies and protocols; presentations and workshops notes; manuscripts and drafts; publications and working papers; correspondence; grant applications; administrative files; sound recordings and films; annotated scholarly literature; and personal biographical material.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Vivian E. Garrison, circa 1930-2009 (bulk 1960-1993) document her work as an applied medical anthropologist in the New York metropolitan area. Garrison studied and published on the cultural understandings and community treatment structures surrounding mental illness and mental health care among low-income, minority, and migrant communities. The collection includes clinical and case files, sound recordings, and films; research policies and protocols; presentations and workshop notes and recordings; manuscripts and drafts; publications and working papers; correspondence; grant applications; administrative files; annotated scholarly literature (reprints and books); and personal biographical material.

The bulk of material in the collection relates to Garrison's research under and administration of different research grants focusing on community mental health care in the greater New York City area. As a research scientist at the Lincoln Hospital Mental Health Services (LHMHS), Garrison undertook anthropological research under the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) grant, "Study of Neighborhood Centers and Mental Health Aides" (1965-1969). The research completed at LHMHS was used in her dissertation (1971). Garrison continued her studies of the South Bronx populations at the Columbia-Bronx Research Center as principal investigator under the NIMH grant, "Folk Healers and Community Mental Health Programming" (1972-1975). She built upon that research as the director and principal investigator of the U.S. Public Health Grant "Inner-City Support Systems" (ICSS) from 1976-1982, run through the College (later University) of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (C/UMDNJ). Within the Resource Center for Multicultural Care and Prevention (RCMCP) at UMDNJ (born out of the ICSS program), Garrison administered the NIMH grant "Community Support Systems of Haitian Immigrants," (CSSHI) which transferred to Columbia University in 1984. Garrison's research under these and other grants was typically undertaken in concert with anthropological colleagues, community consultants, and medical professionals. The materials in this collection reflect the collaborative nature of this research process, as well as Garrison's administrative role at the ICSS project at UMDNJ. Some research notes, case files, and manuscript drafts of colleagues and contributors are present in this collection.

The collection also contains personal biographical, medical, and historical material documenting the lives of Vivian Garrison and her husband, anthropologist Conrad M. Arensberg. Much of this material relates to Arensberg's medical history and care in the last years of his life, as meticulously recorded and analyzed by Garrison. Personal material in the collection also relates to the preservation and destruction of her historic home in Rumson, New Jersey (the Morris-Salter-Hartshorn-Tredwell House).
Arrangement:
The Vivian E. Garrison papers are arranged into the following 10 series:

Series 1: Lincoln Hospital Mental Health Services, circa 1960-1973

Series 2: Columbia University Bronx Research Center, circa 1968-1977

Series 3: Inner-City Support System Project, circa 1968-1997

Series 4: Community Support Systems of Haitian Immigrants, circa 1973-1988

Series 5: Publications, manuscripts, and associated research files, circa 1960-2005

Series 6: Presentations, workshops, and conferences, 1969-2000

Series 7: Professional development files, 1955-2008

Series 8: Personal files, circa 1930-2009

Series 9: Scholarly literature and bibliographies, circa 1970s-1980s, undated

Series 10: Unprocessed material
Biographical Note:
Vivian Eva Garrison, known as "Kelly" to friends and colleagues, was an applied medical anthropologist who researched the cultural understandings and community treatment structures surrounding mental illness and mental health care among low-income, minority, and migrant communities the New York metropolitan area. She worked predominantly with African American, Hispanic, and Caribbean migrant populations in the South Bronx and in Newark, New Jersey.

Garrison was born on August 28, 1933 in Butte, Montana. She earned a B.A. in Spanish and psychology from New York University in 1961 and a Ph.D. in anthropology from Columbia University in 1972. Her dissertation, Social Networks, Social Change and Mental Health among Migrants in a New York City Slum, was completed in 1971.

Garrison conducted her research under the purview of various federal and state grants to examine community mental health care. The majority of her research was completed at Lincoln Hospital in the Bronx, at the College/University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, and at Columbia University.

Throughout her career, Garrison acted as a consultant in matters of folk healing and community health care and published frequently on folk healing, espiritismo, psychiatry, and psychiatric methodology. She taught intermittently, including teaching one semester of Margaret Mead's "Problems and Methods in Anthropology" course at Columbia University (1979). She also contributed to the President's Commission on Mental Health in 1977-1978.

Garrison married anthropologist Conrad M. Arensberg in 1973 and died in April 2013 at the age of 79.

Chronology

1933 August 28 -- Born in Butte, Montana

1961 -- B.A. New York University (Spanish and Psychology)

1962-1963 -- Administrative Assistant, Peace Corps, North Borneo (now Sabah, Malaysia)

1965-1969 -- Research Scientist, National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Grant "Study of Neighborhood Centers and Mental Health Aides," Lincoln Hospital Mental Health Services, Yeshiva University Albert Einstein College of Medicine

1969-1972 -- Assistant Professor and Staff Member, Program Information and Assessment Section, Connecticut Mental Health Center, Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine

1972 -- Ph.D. Columbia University (Anthropology)

1972-1973 -- Senior Research Associate, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University

1972-1975 -- Senior Research Associate and Principal Investigator, NIMH Grant "Folk Healers and Community Mental Health Programming," Department of Anthropology, Columbia University

1973 -- Married Conrad M. Arensberg

1974-1985 -- Assistant to Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Mental Health Science, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), New Jersey Medical School

1976-1982 -- Principal Investigator, U.S. Public Health Grant "Inner-City Support Systems," UMDNJ

1979 -- Senior Lecturer, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University,

1980-1984 -- Director, Resource Center for Multicultural Care and Prevention, UMDNJ

1982-1984 -- Principal Investigator and Director, NIMH Grant "Community Support Systems of Haitian Immigrants," UMNDJ

1982-1984 -- Project Director, "Culturally Sensitive Case Management Training," State of New Jersey, Division of Mental Health and Hospitals, UMDNJ

1983-1986 -- Associate Research Scholar, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University

1984-1985 -- Principal Investigator, U.S. Public Health Grant "Community Support Systems of Haitian Immigrants," Columbia University

1984-? -- Visiting Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Charles R. Drew Postgraduate Medical School, King/Drew Medical Center

1986-? -- Senior Research Associate, Teachers College, Columbia University, Institute for Urban and Minority Education

2013 April 2 -- Died
Related Materials:
Conrad M. Arensberg papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Separated Materials:
The films in this collection have been transferred to the Human Studies Film Archives, accession number HSFA/NAFC 2017-013. They are described in this finding aid.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by the estate of Vivian Garrison Arensberg in 2017.
Restrictions:
The Vivian E. Garrison papers are open for research.

Certain materials in the collection contain personally identifiable information (PII) and personal health information (PHI). These materials are restricted for 80 years from the date of their creation. Restricted materials are noted in the following finding aid and have been removed to boxes 54-61.

Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Original audiovisual material in the Human Studies Film Archives may not be played. Please contact the archives for information on availability of access copies of audiovisual recordings.

Access to the Vivian E. Garrison papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Applied anthropology  Search this
Clinical sociology  Search this
Medical anthropology  Search this
Medical policy  Search this
Traditional medicine  Search this
Espiritismo (Cult)  Search this
Spiritualism  Search this
Women anthropologists  Search this
Citation:
Vivian E. Garrison papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2017-19
See more items in:
Vivian E. Garrison papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw354d09191-b7b5-483e-a35d-9d5ef0adc847
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2017-19

Edward C. Green papers

Creator:
Green, Edward C. (Edward Crocker), 1944-  Search this
Extent:
8.12 Linear feet (20 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Mozambique
Asia
Dominican Republic
Africa
Europe, Eastern
Suriname
South America
Swaziland
Middle East
Date:
circa 1970-2016
Summary:
The papers of Edward C. Green, circa 1970-2016, document his work as an applied medical anthropologist and research consultant focusing principally on the distribution and prevention of AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases in Africa and South America. Much of Green's research and policy focus lay in understanding indigenous health belief systems and instituting locally-designed approaches to major health concerns. The collection consists of correspondence, field diaries and typed research, sound recordings, photographs, and published reports and articles, including material from his dissertation research among the Matawai Maroons of Suriname.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Edward C. Green, circa 1970-2016, document his field research in Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and South America and his career as an applied medical anthropologist and research consultant focusing principally on the distribution and prevention of AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases. The collection consists of correspondence, field diaries and typed research, photographs, sound recordings, and published reports and articles.

The bulk of the material covers Green's field research undertaken predominantly in the Dominican Republic, Mozambique, Suriname, and Swaziland. Of note are sound recordings of interviews, songs, and rituals recorded in Suriname between 1971 and 1973. These recordings document the Matawai dialect of the Saramaccan language, an endagered creole dialect derived from Portuguese, English, and Afro-Caribbean sources. Correspondence in the collection dates from 1973 to 2015 and is a mix of personal and professional correspondence with colleagues and friends. Publications retained in the collection consist primarily of reports on healthcare policy and education, produced between 1978 and 2016 and written for state agencies and non-governmental organizations for which Green worked as a consultant. The bulk of the reports were produced with funding from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) or one of its subsidiary funds.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 3 series:

(1) Field notes, circa 1970-2016

(2) Publications, circa 1978-2016

(3) Correspondence, 1973-2015
Biographical Note:
Edward Crocker "Ted" Green is an applied medical anthropologist who has served as the director of the AIDS Prevention Research Project at the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies (2006-2010) and as the founder and president of the New Paradigm Fund (2010-). He was born in 1944 to the Hon. Marshall Green, a United States diplomat, and Lispenard "Lisa" Crocker Green. He earned his bachelor's degree in anthropology from George Washington University (1967), his master's in anthropology from Northwestern University (1968), and his PhD in anthropology from the Catholic University of America (1974). Green produced his dissertation on the Matawai Maroons of Suriname. He served as the National Institute of Mental Health Fellow at Vanderbilt University from 1978-1979 and as the Takemi Fellow at Harvard University from 2001-2002.

Green's career focused on healthcare education and international policy surrounding sexually transmitted diseases and AIDS in addition to family planning, maternal and child health, primary health care, children impacted by war, and water and sanitation. Much of Green's research and policy focus lay in understanding indigenous health belief systems and in instituting locally-designed approaches to major health concerns. He has served with the Department of Population and Reproductive Health at Johns Hopkins University and as the Senior Research Scientist for International Health at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. He has also served on over a dozen advisory boards or boards of directors, including the UNAIDS Steering Committee, AIDS2031 (2008-2009); the Presidential Advisory Council for HIV/AIDS (2003-2007); the Office of AIDS Research Advisory Council, National Institutes of Health (2003-2006); and the Global Initiative for Traditional Systems of Health, Oxford University (2000-). Green has also worked as a consultant and as a public health advisor to the governments of Mozambique and Swaziland.

Sources Consulted:

George Washington University Department of Anthropology. Edward Green Curriculum Vitae. Accessed December 20, 2016. https://anthropology.columbian.gwu.edu/edward-c-green

MedAnth: Medical Anthropology Wiki. "Edward C. (Ted) Green." Accessed December 20, 2016. https://medanth.wikispaces.com/Edward+C.+(Ted)+Green.

New Paradigm Fund. "Edward C. Green Bio." Accessed December 20, 2016. http://newparadigmfundorg.startlogic.com/about/leadership/dr-edward-c-green-bio/.

Chronology

1944 -- Born to the Hon. Marshall Green and Lispenard Crocker Green in Washington, D.C.

1967 -- B.A. George Washington University (Anthropology)

1968 -- M.A. Northwestern University (Anthropology)

1971-1973 -- Ethnographic field research among the Matawai Maroons of Suriname

1974 -- Ph.D. The Catholic University of America (Anthropology)

1976 -- Visiting Assistant Professor, University of Kentucky Department of Anthropology

1976-1978 -- Visiting Assistant Professor, West Virginia University Department of Anthropology and Sociology

1978-1979 -- National Institute of Mental Health Fellow, Vanderbilt University

1981-1983 -- Social Scientist, Swaziland Ministry of Health and the Academy for Educational Development

1984-1985 -- Personal Services Contractor, U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), Swaziland

1986-1989 -- USAID SOMARC (Social Marketing for Change) Project Senior Staff, with John Short and Associates and The Futures Group

1991-1993 -- Advisor for Family Health International (FHI) and AIDS Control and Prevention Project (AIDSCAP) in South Africa and Tanzania

1994-1995 -- Advisor to the Mozambique Ministry of Health, under sponsorship of the Swiss Development Cooperation

1996-2001 -- Board Member, World Population Society

1997-1998 -- Advisor for AIDSCAP and USAID in Southeast Asia

2000- -- Advisory Board Member, Global Initiative for Traditional Systems of Health, Oxford University

2001-2002 -- Takemi Fellow, Harvard School of Public Health

2002-2006 -- Senior Research Scientist, International Health, Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies

2003-2006 -- Member, Office of AIDS Research Advisory Council, National Institutes of Health

2003-2007 -- Member, Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS

2004-2009 -- Behavior Change and Evaluation Specialist, President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) in Uganda, Rwanda, and Ethiopia

2006- -- Senior Consultant for W.K. Kellogg Foundation programs in southern Africa

2006-2010 -- Director, AIDS Prevention Project, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

2008-2009 -- Member, UNAIDS Steering Committee, AIDS2031

2009- -- Consultant for World Bank programs in southern Africa

2010- -- Director, New Paradigm Fund, Washington DC

2011 -- Elizabeth Eddy Visiting Professor of Anthropology, University of Florida

2011-2014 -- Research Associate, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Department of Population, Family, and Reproductive Health

2014- -- Research Professor, George Washington University Department of Anthropology
Separated Materials:
1 VHS and 1 DVD ("What Happened in Uganda?"), and 1 DVD ("Miss HIV: Botswana Education Version") were tranferred to the Human Studies Film Archives (HSFA).
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Edward C. Green in 2016. Additional digital material was donated by Edward Green in 2018.
Restrictions:
The Edward C. Green papers are open for research. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Digital media (including 1 computer disc of photographic slides, 1 DVD, and 3 USB flash drives) are restricted for preservation reasons.

Access to the Edward C. Green papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Maroons -- Suriname  Search this
HIV infections -- Prevention  Search this
Saramaccan language  Search this
AIDS (Disease) -- Prevention  Search this
Public health  Search this
Medical policy  Search this
AIDS (Disease)  Search this
Medical anthropology  Search this
Applied anthropology  Search this
Sexually transmitted diseases  Search this
Traditional medicine  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Edward C. Green papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2016-31
See more items in:
Edward C. Green papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw321ff4f5e-7bcb-4ee9-a2a5-f2dcdc611af7
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2016-31
Online Media:

[Malay traditional medicine association]

Collection Creator:
Laderman, Carol  Search this
Container:
Box 12
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1981
Collection Restrictions:
The Carol Laderman Papers are open for research. Access to the Carol Laderman Papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use. Permission to use sound recordings of Main Peteri ceremonies transcribed and published in Taming the Wind of Desire must be obtained from Columbia University's Center for Ethnomusicology.
Collection Citation:
Carol Laderman Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Carol Laderman Papers
Carol Laderman Papers / Series 6: Professional Activities
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw329f4c622-0869-4fd5-a43d-a81fddb12dc9
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2012-09-ref218

Henry Niese photographs of Thunderbird Pow Wow, University of Maryland Indian Awareness Week, and Turkey Tayac

Creator:
Niese, Henry  Search this
Names:
Proctor, Philip Piscataway, 1895-1978  Search this
Extent:
10 Prints (silver gelatin)
Culture:
Piscataway (Conoy)  Search this
Ho-Chunk (Winnebago)  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Photographs
Date:
1974-1975, 1978
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs depicting Winnebago and Piscataway people at various gatherings. The collection includes images of two Winnebago boys dancing at the August 1974 Thunderbird Pow Wow in Oakland, New Jersey, as well as photographs of Turkey Tayac (Philip Proctor), Jenice Bigbee, and Mark Tayac, made for University of Maryland Indian Awareness Week in March 1975. There are also informal portraits of Turkey Tayac and a group of Piscataway people, made in April 1978.
Biographical/Historical note:
Henry Niese is a painter, photographer, teacher, and founder of the Eagle Voice Center in Glenelg, Maryland. He graduated from The Cooper Union and Columbia University and taught in the Art Department at the University of Maryland (1969-1996). He also wrote "The Man Who Knew the Medicine," a memoir about his experience learning traditional medicine ways from Bill Schweigman Eagle Feather, Lakota Sun Dance chief and medicine man.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 81-47, NAA Photo Lot 75-49
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Additional photographs of Turkey Tayac can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in Photo Lot R79-22 and Photo Lot 79-45.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
This collection available for reference only. Permission to copy or publish must be granted by Henry Niese.
Topic:
Powwows  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo lot 81-47, Henry Niese photographs of Thunderbird Pow Wow, University of Maryland Indian Awareness Week, and Turkey Tayac, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.81-47
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw30cba1765-e05c-4e0c-9409-e9b47ae7a0d7
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-81-47

Wales Smithsonian Cymru

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
The small country of Wales sets an example of sustainable culture that links history and tradition to the latest alternative technologies, thereby providing a focus for the 2009 Festival program, Wales Smithsonian Cymru. A spectrum of sustainability stretches throughout the history of Wales and into the future - continuing, preserving, and reviving older environmental practices as well as creating new ones. This continuum connects people within communities, regions, and nations, starting at the local level and radiating out around the globe.

While doing research for the 2009 Festival program, fieldworkers sought four types of sustainability relating to traditional culture in Wales: 1) keeping the best of traditional practices; 2) recycling in the broadest sense; 3) thinking globally, acting locally; and 4) planning for a sustainable future. They documented music and dance; storytelling; occupational skills such as farming and mining; the building arts; industrial heritage; outdoor pursuits; maritime arts; textile, ceramics, and wood crafts; and cooking, gardening, and traditional medicine. The four core sustainability concepts helped the fieldworkers make connections among genres, regions, and the skills and talents of potential participants, informing the program throughout its development.

The results of this collaboration were available for Festival visitors to enjoy on the National Mall.In addition to a rich program of music, dance, and oral traditions, visitors could interact with Welsh tradition-bearers to explore and experience topics such as Welsh genealogy; wood, stone, metal, clay, wool, and basketry crafts; plants and traditional medicine; maritime, sports, and ecotourism; renewable energy and sustainable building workshops (highlighting three sustainable structures); and more.

Betty J. Belanus was Curator; Dorey Butter was Program Coordinator; Beverly Simons was Foodways Coordinator; and Kim Stryker was Family Learning Coordinator. A Curatorial Committee in Wales included: Teri Brewer and Gareth Evans; Peter Finch and colleagues; Eluned Haf; Angharad Pearce Jones, Rocet Arwel Jones, and Rhydian Griffiths; Tecwyn Vaughan Jones; Lesley-Anne Kerr; Dai Lloyd and Andy Williams; Ceri Rhys Matthews; Andy Middleton; Dafydd Roberts; Beth Thomas; Dan Thomas; Siân Thomas; and Moira Vincentelli. The program's Steering Committee comprised: Gary Davies, Ifona Deeley, Nick Capaldi, Keven Higgins, Paul Allen, Linda Tomos, Wynfford James, Paul Islwyn Thomas, Mike Hnyda, Andrew Green, Michael Houlihan, Eirlys Thomas, and Virginia West.

The program was produced in partnership with the Welsh Assembly Government. Donors included Alzeim Ltd., BioPharm, Neal's Yard Remedies, Summit (Wales) Ltd., and Caligo Inks. Additional contributions were provided by the St. David's Welsh-American Society of Washington, D.C., St. David's Society of Racine & Vicinity, the Welsh Society of Philadelphia, the St. David Welsh Society of St. Petersburg and the Suncoast, and Roger W. Hughes.
Researchers:
Maria Teresa Agozzino, Gareth Beech, Teri Brewer, Walter Ariel Brooks, Gareth Evans, Sarah Howells, Angharad Pearce Jones, Ceri Jones, Dylan Jones, Gwenno Jones, Howard Kimberley, Mared McAleavey, Gerallt Nash, Elen Phillips, Stephen Rees, Libby Richards, Siwan Rosser, Aparna Sharma, Siân Thomas, Kath Williams, Sioned Williams
Participants:
HERITAGE MEETS INNOVATION

Carpentry and Stonework

Stuart Fry, 1950-, Beulah, Wales

David Jenkins, 1959-, Newtown, Wales

Selwyn Jones, 1963-, Betws, Wales

Ray Smith, 1944-, Cardiff, Wales

Ty-Mawr Lime Ltd., Brecon, Wales

Energy

Blanche Cameron, 1969-, Machynlleth, Wales

Helen Nelson, 1974-, Swansea, Wales

Matthew Slack, 1961-, Machynlleth, Wales

Wayne Thomas, 1960-, Swansea, Wales

Adam Thorogood, Machynlleth, Wales

Siân Francis Williams, 1971-, Swansea, Wales

Farming and Textiles

Cefyn Burgess, 1961-, Deganwy, Wales

Eifion Griffiths, 1954-, Haverfordwest, Wales

Ariel Grant Hughes, Trelew, Wales and Patagonia, Argentina

Chris Jones, 1967-, Ammanford, Wales

Christine Mills, 1961-, Llangadfan, Wales

Keith Rees, 1949-, Llandysul, Wales

Metalwork

Angharad Pearce Jones, 1969-, Garnant, Wales

Iona McLaggan, 1966-, Merthyr Mawr, Wales

Matthew Tomalin, 1945-, Brecon, Wales

Slate

Howard Bowcott, 1956-, Penrhyndeudraeth, Wales

Dafydd Davies, 1950-, Rhiwlas, Wales

John Neilson, 1959-, Llansilin, Wales

Dafydd Roberts, 1956-, Tregarth, Wales

LANGUAGE AND ARTS IN ACTION

Animation

Gerald Conn, 1960-, Cardiff, Wales

Sean Harris, 1965-, Llangynog, Wales

Creating Books

Julian Thomas, 1952-, Borth, Wales

David Vickers, 1949-, Newtown, Wales

Music and Dance

Catrin Ashton, 1979-, Conwy, Wales

Ceri Ashton, 1983-, Conwy, Wales

Gareth Bonello, 1981-, Cardiff, Wales

Christine Cooper, 1983-, Tenby, Wales

Crasdant -- CrasdantRobin Huw Bowen, 1957-, Aberystwyth, WalesAndy McLauchlin, 1960-, Bangor, WalesStephen Rees, 1963-, Llanllechid, WalesHuw Williams, 1959-, Pontypool, Wales

Linda Griffiths, 1958-, Aberystwyth, Wales

Arfon Gwilym, 1950-, Llanllechid, Wales

Lisa Healy, 1988-, Aberystwyth, Wales

The Hennessys -- The HennessysDave Burns, 1946-, Cardiff, WalesFrank Hennessy, 1947-, Cardiff, WalesIolo Jones, 1955-, Cardiff, Wales

Siân James, 1961-, Trallwng, Wales

Ceri Rhys Matthews, 1960-, Pencader, Wales

Chris O'Connor, 1973-, Cardiff, Wales

Mark O'Connor, 1976-, Cardiff, Wales

Only Men Aloud! Cardiff, Wales

Parti Cut Lloi, Banw Valley, Wales

Wyn Pearson, 1972-, Holywell, Wales

Sild -- SildMartin Leamon, 1974-, Ystalyfera, WalesSille Ilves, 1981-, Ystalyfera, Wales

Gai Toms, 1976-, Tanygrisiau, Wales

Sioned Webb, 1960-, Caernarfon, Wales

WNO MAX, Cardiff, Wales

Musical Instrument Workshop

Bryan Blackmore, 1959-, Llangwm, Wales

John Evans, 1947-, Llanfihangel-ar-Arth, Wales

Trefor Owen, 1951-, Cricieth, Wales

Poetry and Storytelling

David Ambrose, 1950-, Wick, Wales

Gillian Clarke, 1937-, Llandysul, Wales

Gwyneth Glyn, 1979-, Cardiff, Wales

Ifor ap Glyn, 1961-, Caernarfon, Wales

Jon Gower, 1959-, Cardiff, Wales

Esyllt Harker, 1947-, Llandovery, Wales

Ceri Wyn Jones, 1967-, Cardigan, Wales

Mab Jones, 1977-, Cardiff, Wales

Aneirin Karadog, 1982-, Pontyberem, Wales

Daniel Morden, 1964-, Abergavenny, Wales

Sharon Morgan, 1949-, Cardiff, Wales

Clare Potter, 1972-, Pontypridd, Wales

Welsh Language

Iona Hughes, 1974-, Cardiff, Wales

REIMAGINING HOME AND COMMUNITY

Ceramics and Basketry

Helen Campbell, 1956-, Carmarthen, Wales

Lowri Davies, 1978-, Cardiff, Wales

Caitlin Jenkins, 1976-, Ewenny, Wales

Susie Vaughan, 1948-, Llansoy, Wales

Plants and Medicine

Tim Bevan, 1959-, Llanarthne, Wales

Gareth Evans, 1958-, Swansea, Wales

Alison Nash, 1964-, Aberystwyth, Wales

Kristina Patmore, 1983-, Llandeilo, Wales

Taste of Wales

Anthony Evans, 1976-, Llanelli, Wales

Angela Gray, 1961-, Cardiff, Wales

Geraldine Trotman, 1952-, Cardiff, Wales

Gareth Johns, 1961-, Machynlleth, Wales

Ana Chiabrando Rees, 1975-, Gaiman, Wales and Patagonia, Argentina

Hazel Thomas, 1957-, Drefach, Llanybydder, Wales

Woodworking

Emyr Davies, 1963-, Swansea, Wales

Mike Davies, 1944-, Cwmbran, Wales

WALES AND THE WORLD

Walter Ariel Brooks, 1974-, Cardiff, Wales

Carwyn Evans, 1979-, Cardiff, Wales

Carlos Pinatti, 1961-, Cardiff, Wales

Beth Thomas, 1953-, Cardiff, Wales

Family Activities

Mary Lloyd Jones, 1934-, Aberystwyth, Wales

Welsh Roots

Beryl Evans, 1966-, Aberystwyth, Wales

Cyril Evans, 1962-, Aberystwyth, Wales

Catherine Tudor Jones, 1981-, Aberystwyth, Wales

Menna Morgan, 1974-, Aberystwyth, Wales

WORKING AND PLAYING OUTDOORS

Along the Water

Karl Chattington, 1959-, Aberdare, Wales

Siân Dorling, 1959-, Penarth, Wales

Roger Hall, 1948-, Penarth, Wales

David Jenkins, 1959-, Swansea, Wales

Dylan Jones, 1969-, Cardiff, Wales

Keith Jones, 1968-, Caernarfon, Wales

Thomas Jones, 1984-, Conwy, Wales

The Outdoors

Eric Jones, 1936-, Tremadog, Wales

Emma Newsome, 1984-, St. Davids, Wales

Eleri Thomas, 1978-, Ystradgynlais, Wales

Chris Wright, Llanfairpwll, Wales

Sports

Urdd Gobaith Cymru, Cardiff, Wales
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2009 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2009, Series 5
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2009 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk560630a68-052f-42bf-97e3-e044ae8a317a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2009-ref39

Bhutan: Land of the Thunder Dragon

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
The Bhutan program at the 2008 Festival was the largest and most comprehensive celebration of Bhutanese life and culture ever presented outside of the kingdom. One hundred and fifty Bhutanese participants provided Festival visitors an unparalleled opportunity to see, hear, touch, smell, and experience life in the "Land of the Thunder Dragon."

The program started each Festival morning with an elaborate ceremonial procession to honor important guests. Accompanied by blaring monastic trumpets and framed by the U.S. Capitol, Washington Monument, and dozens of fluttering colorful prayer flags, the Bhutanese participants proceeded to the Bhutanese temple, where each day they recognized the chief guests. Festival audiences enjoyed Bhutanese music and dance, arts and crafts, spiritual and religious traditions, traditional medicine, food, storytelling, and recreational activities. Every day, live reports were sent to Bhutan to broadcast on Bhutan's national television station.

Bhutan's thirteen traditional arts were presented in a shaded area near the temple, where visitors could mingle with some of the country's finest weavers, painters, sculptors, carvers, cooks, and other artists. Under the trees, visitors also encountered an ancient box of many doors representing the Buddha's understanding of the many paths to enlightenment and a chanter who called people to ponder the box's mysteries. Traditional yak herders from the highlands welcomed guests into their yak-hair tent and entertained them with stories and lively antics. Nearby, some of Bhutan's best cooks shared their stories about food in Bhutan around a traditional clay stove. Practitioners of Bhutanese traditional medicine also shared ancient Buddhist teachings and their knowledge of the many natural compounds found in Bhutan's flora and fauna.

The Four Friends Stage, named after a Bhutanese tale that celebrates social and environmental harmony, was the gathering place for lively discussions about traditions and contemporary issues, including Bhutan's voluntary transition from absolute monarchy to democracy, the meaning of "Gross National Happiness" (an official government policy articulated by Bhutan's Fourth King), and the importance of environmental and cultural resources. The Tsechu Stage was the venue for Bhutanese music and dance traditions. Musicians, singers, and dancers from Bhutan's Royal Academy of Performing Arts demonstrated traditional Bhutanese folk dances, and Bhutanese monastic dancers performed sacred masked dances rarely seen outside of Bhutan.

Bhutanese hospitality was evident in the many activities designed for children and adults. With the help of Bhutanese children, families colored Bhutanese postage stamps and made prayer wheels. Archery, the country's national sport, was played daily. Bhutanese archers dazzled spectators by hitting a target the size of a breadbox nearly a football field away.

His Royal Highness Prince Jigyel Ugyen Wangchuck was Head of the Bhutan Delegation. Dorjee Tshering, Richard Kennedy, and Preston Scott constituted the Curatorial Team; while Damcho Rinzin and Arlene Reiniger were Program Coordinators. The Bhutan Curatorial/Production Committee included: Dorjee Tshering, Damcho Rinzin, Dorji Wangchuk, Dorji Wangchuk, Dorji Yangki, Lopen Gyeltshen, Jigme Cholen Yezer, Karma Dukpa, Phuntsok Tashi, Phurba Dorji, Sangay Wangchug, Singye Dorji, Singye Wangmo, Sonam Choden, Thinley Gyamtsho, and Thinley Wangchuk.

The program was produced in partnership with the Royal Government of Bhutan. Major Donors to the program were the Bhutan Department of Tourism and the Dancing Star Foundation. Donors included the Bhutan Foundation and an anonymous donor. Contributors to the program were the Frank W. Hoch Trust, the Shelley & Donald Rubin Foundation, Lawrence Small, and the Summit Fund of Washington. Additional support was provided by the Himalayan Youth Foundation, Eva and Yoel Haller, Friends of the Royal Textile Academy of Bhutan, Exclusive Resorts, Francis and Kathleen McNamara, New Tourism & The Harmony Project, the Sager Family Foundation, Butterfield & Robinson, The University ofTexas at El Paso, and Aman Resorts.
Presenters:
Chime Paden Wangdi, Choeki Wangzom, Deki Wangmo, Gem Dorji, Goen Tshering, Karma Lhendup, Karma Phuntsho, Karma T. Wangchuk, Kinley Dorji, Kunzang Choden, Kuenzang Dorji Thinley, Kuenzang Thinley, Paljor Dorji, Phuntsok Tashi, Sangay Wangchug, Sonam Choki, Sonam Dorji, Thinley Namgyel, Thinley Wangchuk, Tshewang Dendup, Ugen Choden
Participants:
Religious Traditions

Zhung Dratsang (Monastic Body)

Venerable Tsheney Lopen Tandin Tshewang, Thimphu District, ritual chief

Rinzin, Wangdue Phodrang District, chant master

Gyeltshen, Wangdue Phodrang District, -- choepen -- (shrine person)

Kinzang Tshering, Chukha District, -- dhung -- (long horn) player

Namgay Wangchuk, Punakha District, mandala maker

Tazi, Chukha District, torma (ritual cake) maker

Yangka, Paro District, astrologer

Chimi, Wangdue Phodrang District, masked dancer

Kado, Punakha District, -- jaling -- (wind instrument) player

Kencho, Thimphu District, -- nga -- (drum), -- kangdung -- (horn), -- dhungka -- (conch) player

Kinley Penjor, Wangdue Phodrang District, -- nga -- (drum), -- kangdung -- (horn), -- dhungka -- (conch) player

Kinley Penjor, Punakha District, masked dancer

Pema Dorji, Thimphu District, dancer

Shokey, Punakha District, masked dancer

Penpa, Paro District, -- dhung -- (long horn) player

Tashi Wangchuk, Thimphu District, -- jaling -- (wind instrument) player

Tshering Dorji, Thimphu District, chief leader

Tshewang Rigzin, Haa District, masked dancer

Music and Dance Traditions

Royal Academy of Performing Arts (RAPA)

Apa Dodo, Wangdue Phodrang District, masked dancer

Dengo, Trongsa District, dancer

Dorji Dakpa, Samdrup Jongkhar District, dancer

Dorji Norbu, Samdrup Jongkhar District, masked dancer

Kencho Wangdi, Paro District, dancer

Khandu, Paro District, masked dancer

Kinley Penjor, Trongsa District, dancer

Lhaden, Bumthang District, dancer

Nim Dem, Paro District, dancer

Pema Lhamo, Bumthang District, dancer

Pema Tenzin, Mongar District, dancer

Pema Wangdi, Dagana District, musician

Penjor, Paro District, masked dancer

Phub Lham, Punakha District, dancer

Rinchen Wangdi, Mongar District, dancer

Sangay Wangmo, Trashi Yangtse District, dancer

Sherab Dorji, Trashi Yangtse District, masked dancer

Sonam Chogyel, Zhemgang District, masked dancer

Tashi Lhamo, Paro District, dancer

Tashi Phuntsho, Pema Gatshel District, musician

Thinley Pemo, Trashigang District, dancer

Tshering Dorjee, Haa District, masked dancer

Tshering Wangdi, Trashigang District, masked dancer

Ugyen Tshewang, Pema Gatshel District, masked dancer

Wangchuk, Wangdue Phodrang District, dancer

Wangchuk, Trashigang District, masked dancer

Wangchukla, Zhemgang District, musician

Yeshi Wangchuk, Paro District, masked dancer

Zorig Chusum (Thirteen Traditional Arts)

Chimi Pelmo, Thimphu District, incense maker

Dawa Gyeltshen, Mongar District, wood carver

Dawa Penjor, Wangdue Phodrang District, incense maker

Debu Zangmo, Mongar District, bamboo weaver

Deki, Trashi Yangtse District, weaver

Dung Dorji, Bumthang District, calligrapher

Karma Sonam Yuden, Mongar District, wood carver

Kinzang Wangdi, Trashigang District, painter

Kinzang Wangmo, Bumthang District, potter

Kumbu, Wangdue Phodrang District, painter

Namgyel Dema, Trashigang District, weaver

Nim Dorji, Paro District, clay sculptor

Pelden Dorji, Trashi Yangtse District, wood turner

Phajo, Paro District, blacksmith

Ponyala, Mongar District, bamboo weaver

Rada, Wangdue Phodrang District, embroiderer

Rinchen, Punakha District, goldsmith, silversmith

Rinzin Wangmo, Bumthang District, weaver

Sangay Tenzin, Wangdue Phodrang District, painter

Seldon, Lhuntse District, weaver

Singay Karmo, Punakha District, embroiderer

Tashi, Thimphu District, silversmith

Tenzin Thinley, Trashi Yangtse District, wood carver

Thinley, Paro District, painter

Thinley Dorji, Haa District, slate carver

Tshering Dorji, Trashi Yangtse District, wood turner

Architecture

Karma Wangchuk, Trongsa District, building engineer

Karma, Punakha District

Khandu, Punakha District

Lhendup, Punakha District

Namgay Tshering, Punakha District

Nim Dorji, Wangdue Phodrang District

Pem Tshering, Lhuntse District

Phurpa Tshering, Punakha District

Tshewang Dorji, Wangdue Phodrang District

Zeko, Punakha District

Foodways

Phurpa Lhamo, Trashigang District

Tashi Dorji, Mongar District

Tandin, Mongar District

People and Environment

Karma Wangdi, Punakha District

Kencho Zam, Thimphu District, Layap farmer

Singye Wangmo, Punakha District

Sonam Choden, Thimphu District

Tshering, Gasa District, Layap farmer

Traditional Medicine

Dorji Uden, Bumthang District, doctor

Sonam Dorjee, Trongsa District

Sonam Tobgay, Mongar District, doctor
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2008 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2008, Series 2
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2008 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk566e6fd83-49ba-4163-910e-2d23307e60ea
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2008-ref18

Festival Recordings: Bhutan Four Friends: Bhutanese Courtesies (Nancy Strickland, Thinley Choden, Kunzang Choden); Traditional Medicine (Yangka, Dorji Uden, Chencho Dorji, Sonam Dorjee-presenter/participant)

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2008 June 28
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2008 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2008, Item FP-2008-CT-0105
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2008 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2008 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 2: Bhutan: Land of the Thunder Dragon / 2.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5b6d33639-7adb-4aeb-958f-b15f9bd3438a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2008-ref651

Medical Institute Bandiagara, Mali

Photographer:
Pelletier, Sujatha  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Pelletier, Sujatha  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col., 35 mm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1994
Scope and Contents:
An Italian institute for the research of traditional medicine in Bandiagara, Mali. The institute is housed in modern cone shaped stone buildings designed to reflect a local style, April of 1994. Photographed by Sujatha Pelletier.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Rights:
Copyright: Sujatha Pelletier, 1994.
See more items in:
Sujatha Pelletier photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo780486a1b-4ef1-4958-8006-b7496eca853a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1998-003-ref556

Medical Institute Bandiagara, Mali

Photographer:
Pelletier, Sujatha  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Pelletier, Sujatha  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col., 35 mm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1994
Scope and Contents:
A man standing in the open doorway of double Dogon doors at an Italian institute for the research of traditional medicine in Bandiagara, Mali. One door remains closed. The institute in housed in modern dome shaped stone buildings designed to reflect a local style, April of 1994. Photographed by Sujatha Pelletier.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Rights:
Copyright: Sujatha Pelletier, 1994.
See more items in:
Sujatha Pelletier photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo7170daa5e-209c-4326-8834-f9069f85fdd7
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1998-003-ref557

Kallawaya; Bolivia; Traditional Medicine

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2013 July 03
Scope and Contents:
Beatriz, Blenda (presenter); Quispe, Lucio Cuba (medicinal practitioner); de Quispe, Lola Palluca Nina (weaver, ritualist); Quispe, Walter Alvarez (medicinal practitioner) Pasamaquaduoddy Indian dance and music
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2013 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2013, Item 130703_One-World-Many-Voices_Talk-Story_0060
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2013 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2013 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 3: One World, Many Voices: Endangered Languages and Cultural Heritage / 3.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5dd3634c3-5f18-4f7b-a385-c9a877d94fdb
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2013-ref995

Audio Log Sheets

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2014 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2014 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2014 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 2: China: Tradition and the Art of Living / 2.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5ab5b1868-2ba6-4cd9-81df-a8f5761996a0
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2014-ref1051
2 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Audio Log Sheets digital asset number 1
  • View Audio Log Sheets digital asset number 2

Health and Environment: Tai Chi and Traditional Medicine

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2014 June 27
Scope and Contents:
Wang Jingxian; Wang Xiaoping and Quanqun Zhang; Presenter: Larry Witzelfen
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2014 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2014, Item SFF_2014_0627_China_Teahouse_Commons_0002
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2014 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2014 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 2: China: Tradition and the Art of Living / 2.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5ef36deaf-9a35-43f4-b1b2-32b100d1df76
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2014-ref606

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