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Zuni

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
8 Boxes
Culture:
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Date:
1913-1953
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southwest series contains Harrington's Zuni research, which mainly focused on the linguistic relationship between Zuni and Tano-Kiowan-Keresan-Shoshonean stock.

The earliest field data which Harrington obtained on Zuni was recorded in the form of three brief vocabularies. One, dated February 20, 1913, was elicited from George Piro. Harrington indicated that another list of Zuni terms was copied for his B.A.E. colleague Neil Judd in 1919. A third gives the Indian names of several Zuni native speakers and ethnologists. Brief intermixed vocabulary and grammar notes were taken in the field from Nachapani in June and July 1929. A few Navajo comparisons were added.

The vocabulary sections contains Zuni terms arranged semantically, most numerous in the animal and animal parts categories. Other categories include age/sex, material culture, phenomena, placenames, plants, rank, relationship terms, religion, time, and tribenames. Most of the original material was obtained in 1929 in New Mexico where he consulted primarily with Charles or Dick Nachapani.

For his comparative vocabulary, Harrington followed the same semantic arrangement he used for the vocabulary notes, interfiling and comparing Tewa, Kiowa, Hano, Taos, Acoma, and Cahuilla terms. The material stems from his original notes in these languages and contains references to his publications in Tewa ethnozoology and ethnogeography. Perry A. Keahtigh was cited as the Kiowa souce and Adan Castillo for Cahuilla terms. Juan is the only Tewa speaker mentioned by name in the notes, although other Tewa speakers undoubtedly contributed to the original notes used in the many comparisons. Also interfiled are excerpts from papers by Ruth L. Bunzel on Zuni ethnology and grammar and compilations of Nahuatl from the works of Horatio Carochi and Alonso de Molina. Other terms labeled "Gatschet revd by Hodge" may refer to B.A.E. ms. 2870 in which many of Gatschet's approximately 200 Zuni/English vocabulary slips contain annotations by Frederick W. Hodge. Harrington also tapped Matilda Coxe Stevenson's "The Zuni Indians" (1904) for further comparisons. Kymograph tracings are mainly a comparison of Zuni and Navajo lexical terms.

Harrington's Zuni grammatical material was probably assembled in Washington for correlation with his own notes on other languages and with notes from secondary sources to be compiled into a comparative grammar. Most of Harrington's original Zuni material was derived from his fieldwork with Nachapani in June and July of 1929.

Correspondence indicates that Harrington's first draft of a comparative grammar was written in 1944 and was to be titled "Zuni Discovered To Be Hokan." Many of the notes which precede it, however, were interfiled later (probably in the early 1950s) and stem from his original field notes in Zuni, Tewa, and Kiowa. Also included are a lesser number of Taos and Aztec expressions. Harrington utilized the same sources as those found in the grammatical notes, relying most heavily on Bunzel's "Zuni." Another version of the manuscript has the modified title "Zuni, Tanoan, Kiowa Comparisons: Zuni Discovered To Be Hokan."

His ethnobotany notes contains extracts from Wooton and Standley's Flora of New Mexico (1913) and Stevenson's "Ethnobotany of the Zuni Indians." The ethnographic notes are based on Stevenson's The Zuni Indians. This work is frequently referred to in the notes as "Zuni Book."

Harrington's writings consists of notes used in "Name of Zuni Salt Lake in Alarcon's 1540 Account" (1949) and in "Trail Holder" (1949) as well as drafts and notes for proposed publications. Harrington's article "The Name Zuni Comes from the Laguna Dialect of West Keresan" was apparently not accepted for publication. Most of the notes are based on the Zuni section of Hodge's "Handbook." Another unpublished article is on Zuni phrases and numbers. It is similar in approach to a draft on Aztec phrases and numbers, suggesting that he may have contemplated a series of such short articles.
Biographical / Historical:
As early as 1919, John P. Harrington claimed a linguistic relationship between Zuni and a putative Tano-Kiowan-Keresan-Shoshonean stock. In 1929, at the suggestion of Edgar L. Hewett, he was authorized by the Bureau of American Ethnology to work with University of New Mexico students at a summer session in Chaco Canyon. Correspondence and reports indicate that he accumulated the bulk of his original Zuni notes at that time, later reorganizing them at various intervals in Washington, D.C., with an eye toward producing a vocabulary and grammar that would clearly demonstrate affinity among these languages. Harrington also recorded several hundred kymograph tracings. Charles and Dick Nachapani (Natcapanih) and Charlie Cly served as the primary sources of information. Harrington called one of the Nachapani brothers "the prince of all Zuni informants;" which one is uncertain.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Zuni language  Search this
Cahuilla language  Search this
Kiowa language  Search this
Acoma dialect  Search this
Tiwa language  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Navajo language  Search this
Nahuatl language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Grammar, Comparative and general  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Zoology -- nomenclature  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Numeration  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 4.4
See more items in:
John P. Harrington Papers
John P. Harrington Papers / Series 4: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Southwest
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14612
Online Media:

Isleta/Isleta del Sur/Piro

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Laird, Carobeth, 1895-1983  Search this
Karpinski, Louis Charles, 1878-1956  Search this
Vivian, Gordon  Search this
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
3 Boxes
Culture:
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Piro Pueblo Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Works of art
Sketches
Date:
1909-1910, 1918-1920, 1946-1947
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southwest series contains Harrington's research on Isleta, Isleta del Sur, and Piro.

Some field notes relative to the Isleta, Isleta del Sur, and Piro languages are in the form of a comparative vocabulary and remain filed together to maintain integrity. Most of the terms are in Isleta. Harrington utilized a typed copy of John Russell Bartlett's Piro vocabulary (B.A.E. MS 485b) as a basis for eliciting data during his fieldwork. His handwritten annotations to the manuscript include a column of Isleta terms from Mary Chontal (obtained in Albuquerque in 1909) and a column of Isleta del Sur words from Ponciano Juin. Vittoriano Pedraza, a Piro, evidently also reheard the material. Harrington made use of the same word list in his article "Notes on the Piro Language." A separate vocabulary was recorded from the Isleta del Sur speaker Mariano Colmenero. The notes also give the names of other Piro speakers, Santo Domingo and Santa Clara speakers, and some of Bartlett's informants.

Brief notes on names collected about 1909 and 1910 are mainly Isleta but relate loosely to "Notes on the Piro Language" and to "An Introductory Paper on the Tiwa Language, Dialect of Taos, New Mexico."

From July 1946 to July 1947 Harrington was in Washington and among other endeavors, he prepared an article titled "Tihuex is Isleta, Quirix is San Felipe." He consulted a wide assortment of sources on early Spanish expeditions in the Southwest translations of old Spanish manuscripts, and critical works. Related bibliographic data form a cohesive part of this section. While there is some linguistic content, the origins and early spellings of Tiwa names and the location of early habitations are the main themes of the unpublished monograph. James Johnson, an Acoma Indian, reheard some of the Tiwa terms. Another undated proposed article is titled "Tihuex Equals Puaray," for which Harrington consulted many of the same sources.

The section of miscellaneous notes contains correspondence with professor Louis C. Karpinski, Marjorie F. Tichy, and Gordon Vivian regarding Harrington's paper "Tihuex is Isleta." Copies of random material from an unidentified Gatschet notebook, a few slips in the Sandia dialect, and brief notes in the Santo Domingo dialect (probably written at a much later date) complete the miscellaneous section.

The notes and writings of Carobeth Laird are also in this subseries. Carobeth, Harrington's wife at the time, collected a substantial set of Isleta notes in June 1918. The Isleta speakers she worked with were Luis Abetta, Maria Chihuihui, Jesus Chihuihui, Felicitas Jiron, and Jose Pali (Chihuihui?). Her notes contain linguistic, grammatical, and ethnographic information. Her files also contain proposed monographs, dated 1920, and one undated article (probably 1919), which were prepared from her field notes. The first part of her monograph "Isleta Language; Texts and Analytic Vocabulary," (former B.A.E. MS 2299a) is divided into eight texts in Isleta with Spanish or English translations. Another monograph with a linguistic focus was "The Isleta Pronoun" (former B.A.E. ms. 2299b). The typed, undated manuscript titled "Southern Tiwa Katcinas" provides ethnographic lore surrounding the kachina cult. Included are crayon illustrations in color sketched by native artists. No informants are named, perhaps due to the secret nature of the ceremonies and dances. Some annotations by John Harrington appear on the drawings. The draft and notes relative to it were formerly cataloged as B.A.E. MS 2306 and part of MS 2308.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Isleta language  Search this
Piro (Tanoan) language  Search this
Tanoan languages  Search this
Tiwa language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Works of art
Sketches
Collection Citation:
Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 4.8
See more items in:
John P. Harrington Papers
John P. Harrington Papers / Series 4: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Southwest
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14663

Picuris

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Roberts, Helen H. (Helen Heffron), 1888-1985  Search this
Vargas, Rosendo  Search this
Names:
Spinden, Herbert Joseph, 1879-1967  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
3 Boxes
Culture:
Tiwa Pueblos  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Galley proofs
Manuscripts
Songs
Narratives
Date:
1920-1928
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southwest series contains Harrington's Picuris files. Virtually all of the material is related to Harrington's "Picuris Children's Stories with Texts and Songs."

Materials include handwritten drafts with interlineal English translations and written and typed notes on large sheets and slips, encompassing a brief glossary of Picuris terms (not published) and some grammatical and ethnographic elaborations. There are also notes, music, and galleys for the songs, but no notes for Helen Roberts' forty-eight page analysis among the papers. According to the field notes, a Mrs. Mullen drew the Giant and Elf illustrations facing page 326. Many of the titles were reworded in the final publication. The subseries also includes galley proofs of the manuscript. In addition, there are handwritten notes for the glossary, comments on phonetics, and notes to the printer. His notes also include some Taos comparisons, mainly based on Harry S. Budd's Taos vocabulary (B.A.E. ms. 1028). Vargas, apparently fluent in Picuris and Taos, provided the Taos terms. Translations of the Lord's Prayer and of the hymn "Nearer My God to Thee" are on file, but only the former appeared in the publication. Also included are Harrington's comments on the notes of H. J. Spinden.
Biographical / Historical:
In 1928 the Bureau of American Ethnology published John P. Harrington's "Picuris Children's Stories with Texts and Songs." Helen H. Roberts transcribed the music and wrote a detailed analysis of the songs. Harrington had proposed an interlinear translation as the most efficacious format, but the article appeared with Picuris and English on facing pages. Rosendo Vargas dictated the linguistic information and rendered the songs. Field notes indicate that Harrington worked with Vargas in the summer of 1921, having possibly laid the groundwork for these sessions late in 1920. Preparation and translation of the notes for publication began upon his return to Washington in April 1922 and they were ready by late 1924. Proofs were in hand in 1926, at which time Harrington also translated Roberts' songs.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Local Note:
Most of these files constituted former B.A.E. Manuscripts 2298, 2300, 2301, 2302, 2303, 2304, 2305, and 2572.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Tiwa language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnomusicology  Search this
Tiwa Indians -- Music  Search this
Picuris Pueblo  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Galley proofs
Manuscripts
Songs
Narratives
Collection Citation:
Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 4.9
See more items in:
John P. Harrington Papers
John P. Harrington Papers / Series 4: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Southwest
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14674

Taos

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Laird, Carobeth, 1895-1983  Search this
Stevenson, Matilda Coxe, 1850-1915  Search this
Stevenson, James, Colonel  Search this
Grant, Blanche C. (Blanche Chloe), 1874-1948  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
22 Boxes
Culture:
Taos Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Narratives
Date:
1909-circa 1944
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southwest series contains Harrington's Taos research. The materials consist of field notes, grammatical and semantic slipfile, grammar, dictionary, linguistic notes, ethnographic and historical notes, and texts.

Among his field notes are slips prepared for semantic arrangement (former B.A.E. MS 2309 and 2290pt.). Many of the terms were used in the draft of an unpublished grammar, with some orthographic variations. The use of "q" for "kw" suggests an early date, possibly 1909-1910 . An early vocabulary is comprised of Harrington's comparative Taos terms used in his article "Notes on the Piro Language" (1909a).

From former B.A.E. manuscripts 2290pt., 2292pt., and 2296 come several categories of miscellaneous field notes. Included are a vocabulary elicited in 1910, typed and annotated notes which collate much of the information written on slips, and miscellaneous slips some dated 1920, some probably earlier-which contain brief Picuris comparisons. Data encompass placenames, tribenames, ethnogeographic terms, and some grammatical elaborations.

Another group of field notes appears to be Taos with Isleta comparisons. This is a tentative identification still subject to the scrutiny of linguists, who are not presently in complete agreement. The physical condition and type of paper used indicate that these notes may have been recorded during the period 1909 to 1911.

A set of slips, formerly cataloged as B.A.E. MS 2318 and 2295pt., fills four boxes. Field notes and reports suggest that this comprehensive body of material may have been accumulated, annotated, and rearranged over a period of time ranging from 1909 to 1928. The largest section of the file was arranged by Harrington according to grammatical categories and is especially substantial on verb and pronoun usage. Another group of slips is semantically arranged; some phonetic, ethnographic, and historical material is interjected.

The grammar section includes tabulations in English of pronoun prefix material which give an excellent indication of Harrington's methodology for accumulating slipfiles. Taos slips deal with pronoun usage, verb paradigms, and sentence structure. These are early notes, probably dating from 1909 to 1911. Mondragon was the principal source of information. The section also includes three drafts of manuscripts on Taos grammar, only of which one was published. "Ambiguity in the Taos Personal Pronoun" (1916) (former B.A.E. MS 2293pt. and 4682pt.) was condensed from another draft of an unpublished, more comprehensive grammar (former B.A.E. MS 4682pt.). A draft of a paper on numerals is filed with some of the original field notes from which it evolved (former B.A.E. MS 4681). Another major subsection consists of a draft of over 500 typed pages of a comprehensive grammar by Carobeth Laird, Harrington's wife at the time. The manuscript (former B.A.E. MS 2307 and 4680), titled "Grammatical Analysis of the Taos Language," is dated 1920. The fieldwork for the paper was done in Taos during July and August of 1918 with Taos speakers Lujan and Mondragon. A partial and preliminary draft and notes reveal some annotations by Harrington, who also was in Taos at the same time working with the same speakers.

This subseries also contains Harrington's Taos dictionary. The Taos-English section is in alphabetical order according to the first sound of the base. Although the English-Taos section gives the English word first, it follows the alphabetical order of the Taos term according to Harrington's list of initial symbols. Some entries in the dictionary are followed by the notes from which they evolved. There is also a file of Taos bird names, apparently intended for incorporation into the dictionary, as well as a small group of plant names. These also are in Taos-English and English-Taos. Filed with this material is a list of the scientific names for Taos birds; annotations were supplied by Florence Merriam Bailey and Vernon Bailey. (See "Studying the Mission Indians of California and the Taos of New Mexico" [1929].)

Harrington's linguistic notes (former B.A.E. MS 2292pt. and 2295pt.) include grammar, vocabulary, and textual material, apparently accumulated in July and August of 1918 from his work with Lujan and Mondragon. At least a portion of the material was collected with the assistance of his wife Carobeth, and a number of pages are in her hand. The pagination evidently underwent several reorganizations and is therefore somewhat chaotic. His other notes consist of comments on George L. Trager's "The Kinship and Status Terms of the Tiwa Languages" (1943) and on Elsie Clews Parsons' Taos Pueblo (1936). Relationship terms, age and sex nouns, personal names, rank nouns, and tribenames are mentioned.

Among his ethnographic and historical notes is his unfinished manuscript, "The Taos Indians" (former B.A.E. MS 3073). He relied heavily on Matilda Coxe Stevenson's field notes for his manuscript; her contribution is mainly ethnographic while a few pages are the work of her husband, James. Taos speaker Tony Romero is the source for the clan names. Harrington also incorporated his notes from 1908, 1909, 1911, 1918, and 1919. For historical data, Harrington relied on published sources, especially early Spanish documents for which he supplied original translations and throughout which some Picuris history is interwoven. The bibliographic information for the historical sources is interspersed throughout the notes.

There are also notes and excerpts from Blanche C. Grant's publications and miscellaneous notes on dances (former B.A.E. MS 2292pt.). A few random ethnographic notes on slips are written in English.

Contained in a series of texts are stories of Wolf and Deer and two versions of the Lord's Prayer with grammatical notes. Also included is the Tanoan linguistic diagram (former B.A.E. MS 2292 pt.) used in Harrington's "An Introductory Paper on the Tiwa Language, Dialect of Taos, New Mexico" (191 Oc). Jose Lopez and Santiago Mirabel provided the Taos terms used in this publication.
Biographical / Historical:
The first indication of John P. Harrington's work among the Taos Indians comes from his financial records of September 20, 1909, to January 15, 1910, when he was based in Santa Fe and doing fieldwork in various languages of the Southwest. Peak periods of in-depth work on Taos, sometimes in the field and sometimes in Washington, D.C., appear to be 1909-1911, 1918-1922, 1926-1930, and 1944-1945. He worked primarily with Joe Lujan (abbreviated "L.") and Manuel Mondragon ("M."), with Mondragon helping from 1910 to 1927. There are references to a trip which Harrington made with Margaret Tschirgi and F. E. Betts to the ruins east of Taos on September 30, 1928, but there are no further explanatory notes.

Mutual professional respect had arisen between Harrington and Matilda Coxe Stevenson of the Bureau of American Ethnology, at whose ranch he spent six weeks in the autumn of 1908. He was in possession of a large body of her original notes on south western Indians at the time of her death in 1915 and planned to arrange, annotate, and publish them. Her material on Taos appears in an unpublished historical and ethnographic manuscript titled "The Taos Indians."
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Tiwa language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Dance  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Narratives
Collection Citation:
Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 4.10
See more items in:
John P. Harrington Papers
John P. Harrington Papers / Series 4: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Southwest
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14679
Online Media:

Tewa

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Freire-Marreco, Barbara W. (Barbara Whitchurch), 1879-1967  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
21 Boxes
Culture:
Tewa Pueblos  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Dictionaries
Manuscripts
Narratives
Vocabulary
Date:
1908-circa 1949
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southwest series contains Harrington's Tewa research. The files include field notes, vocabulary, linguistic and ethnographic notes, a dictionary, records of rehearings, texts, writings, and miscellanous notes.

His field notebooks contain grammar, vocabulary, placenames, names of persons, relationship terms, and material culture; texts concerning Qwiqumat, other myths, and ethnohistory of early Southwest tribes, pueblos, clans, and religion; copies of the San Ildefonso census; and other miscellaneous ethnographic information.

The vocabulary section of the Tewa files include a group of slips identified as Rio Grande vocabulary with some Santa Clara terms specified as such. There is a wide variety of terms, and animal and plant vocabularies were marked by Harrington "A" and "P" respectively (former B.A.E. MS 4678pt.) with some linguistic insertions. The information was collected during the early period. There is also a small file of Spanish loanwords in Tewa that Harrington copied from Eduardo Cata's material.

His linguistic and ethnographic notes contain a few pages each of over twenty topics such as dances, estufas (kivas), pottery, societies, religion, superstitions, Tewa trails, and Tewa origins (former B.A.E. MS 4704pt.). Barbara Freire-Marreco collaborated in the accumulation of some of the material, most of which came from the many informants who contributed to the early notes. Some linguistic material is interspersed. There is a handwritten copy of the Nambe census of 1911, a description and rough sketches of the Black Mesa of San Ildefonso, and several references to Jemez, Spanish Cochiti, Spanish Hopi, Taos, Zuni, and Sia.

A collection of linguistic and ethnographic terms remains in slipfile form (former B.A.E. MS 4704pt.). Some are in various Tewa dialects such as Nambe, San Ildefonso, San Juan, and Santa Clara. A few Taos comparisons are included. The largest group is related to animal parts and animal activities. Ethnographic information includes such topics as snakes, estufas, officers and government, plants, pottery, shrines, and societies. A small group is credited to Barbara Freire-Marreco.

The dictionary (former B.A.E. MS. 4704pt.) was arranged by Cata in June 1927 from his field notes taken during the early period. Part is in alphabetic order, part is devoted to adjectives provided by Julian Martinez, and part covers adverbs from Santiago Naranjo. A second group is also arranged in alphabetic order but no sources are identified. Some related nonlexical and bibliographical material is interspersed.

There are also materials from rehearings Harrington conducted with Santiago Naranjo in 1911, Eduardo Cata in 1927, and David Dozier and "O" in 1948-1949. Harrington and Cata developed a linguistic treatment of notes based on an unpublished dissertation on New Mexico Spanish by Aurelio H. Espinosa. Together they reworked geographic terms from Harrington's "The Ethnogeography of the Tewa Indians." Other miscellaneous rehearings with Cata were more grammatically oriented. Dozier and "O" provided substantial material on San Juan/Hano comparisons, although some of the notes may have been accumulated during a February 1946 visit to Albuquerque, where Harrington interviewed Mr. Shupla, a Hano speaker. This meeting may have resulted also in his proposed article "Hano . . . Same Word as Tano."

In the text section are three myths given by Juan Gonzales on September 1, 2, and 3, 1908 at the camp near the Stone Lions, rendered in Tewa and English with some linguistic notes. Also in both languages is an Ignacio Aguilar story recorded on September 23, 1909. Some stories probably obtained between 1908 and 1909 are in English only. Not all are complete and the continuity of some is broken due to repetitive material and interspersed corrections. There are two short Nambe myths. Eduardo Cata supplied thirteen texts in addition to the three published in 1947. These are in Tewa, most with either interlinear or parallel English translations. Harrington used pencils of different colors to insert orthographic corrections and later annotations. Whether the texts were obtained in 1927 when Cata was in Washington or during the 1940s is uncertain.

Harrington's writing files contain notes and drafts for his unpublished and published writings. There are substantial notes accumulated for "A Brief Description of the Tewa Language" (1910) (former B.A.E. MS 4704pt.). Harrington's notes contain more extensive phonetic and morphological information than the final publication. Notes probably recorded in 1910 for "Ethnogeography" and "Ethnobotany" are intermixed and largely disorganized, although substantial in number (former B.A.E. MS 4704pt.). Additional information and some relevant correspondence for "Ethnogeography" is included (former B.A.E. mss. 3801 and 4704pt.), as well as some notes Harrington excerpted in 1946 from this publication. Drafts and notes for "Three Tewa Texts" include insertions of additional information provided by David Dozier and "O." There are also five sets of drafts for proposed articles. "Ablaut in the Tewa Language of New Mexico" (1912) is an elaboration of the phonetic material used in "A Brief Description of the Tewa Language." "Some Aspects of Tewa Indian Placenames" was written in 1920. Undated are "Hano, Indian Pueblo of Arizona, the Same Word as Tano" (former B.A.E. MS 4521pt.), "Santa Fe at Northern Edge of Tano Country," and "The Tewa Pueblos."

Among the writing files are also materials relating to "Phonetics of the Tewa Language," submitted or sold by Eduardo Cata to the B.A.E. (former MS 4704pt.). The title page, bill of sale, and notes in Harrington's handwriting, and some possibly in Cata's are on file. Informants Mr. and Mrs. "O" also contributed information. There are also two unpublished articles on Tewa tones that Harrington co-authored with David Dozier--"Tewa Tones" and "The 3 Tone Accents and the 1 Non-tone Accent of Tewa."

Also in this subseries are miscellaneous notes, mainly from the early period. Some of the information came from Ignacio Aguilar. There is a small selection of Jemez, Ute, and Taos equivalences. Also included are a diagram of Tewa color symbolism (former B.A.E. ms. 1790), a reproduction of a San Juan Pueblo religious painting, and a very short bibliography.
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington's study of the Tewa languages began in July 1908 under the auspices of the School of American Archaeology (S.A.A.) in Santa Fe, and his interest in the Tewa Indians continued into the late 1940s. Accumulation and organization of notes fall generally into three time frames. The early period can be dated between 1908 and 1916 when Harrington worked first for the Museum of New Mexico as assistant curator, then for Edgar Lee Hewett of the S.A.A., and, from December 1914, as ethnologist for the Bureau of American Ethnology. Six of his publications are based on the notes from this period. In October 1910 he spent several weeks on a tour of Tewa country securing placenames from large numbers of informants. The principal informants for the entire early period are Ignacio Aguilar and Santiago Naranjo (also called "Jim").

Dating from a middle period in 1927, Harrington worked closely with Eduardo Cata in Washington. Cata was described by Harrington as an educated San Juan Tewa Indian. With the exception of one short period (from February to July 1946), Harrington was in Washington from early 1942 until April 1949. During this third period he published "Three Tewa Texts" (1947) based on stories from Cata. The texts may have been received from Cata during the middle period, but the notes represent a rehearing in the 1940s with David Dozier and an informant identified only as "0." Harrington knew David Dozier's father and in May 1944, he wrote self-introductory letters to the son, a fluent speaker of the Santa Clara dialect, who was then in the Indian Service. Harrington also reworked and reorganized much of his grammatical information during these years in Washington. Notes indicate that he may have planned to publish a Tewa grammar.

Other Tewa speakers that Harrington worked with include Bert Fredericks, Manuel Vigil, Bernardo Sanchez, Joe Horner, Desiderio Naranjo, and Alfredo Montoya.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Tewa language  Search this
Tiwa language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Zoology  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Zoology -- nomenclature  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Dictionaries
Manuscripts
Narratives
Vocabulary
Collection Citation:
Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 4.11
See more items in:
John P. Harrington Papers
John P. Harrington Papers / Series 4: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Southwest
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14694
Online Media:

General and Miscellaneous Materials

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Freire-Marreco, Barbara W. (Barbara Whitchurch), 1879-1967  Search this
Henderson, Junius, 1865-1937  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
3 Boxes
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Taos Indians  Search this
Tiwa Pueblos  Search this
Tewa Pueblos  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Hualapai (Walapai)  Search this
Yavapai  Search this
Pueblo Indians  Search this
Athapascan Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Sketches
Place:
Elden Pueblo (Ariz.)
Date:
circa 1907-circa 1957
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southwest series within the John P. Harrington papers contains general and miscellaneous materials. Certain notes in this subseries encompass the Southwest as an entity; others constitute small files of miscellany which do not relate directly to the preceding sets of field notes. Few precise dates are assigned to this section of material as it is based on information accumulated over an indefinite period of time.

One section contains archaeological field notes relating to Elden Pueblo. In 1926 Harrington was called to assist J. W. Fewkes at the excavation of ruins at Elden Pueblo near Flagstaff, Arizona. This set of files comprises the journal entries which Harrington made on an almost daily basis between May 27 and August 27, 1926. There are two sets of notes--the original handwritten ones and a typed copy which was submitted to Fewkes on November 10, 1926 (former B.A.E. MS 6010). The journal contains brief notes, sketches of pits and artifacts, references to photographs, and names of associates; there are no significant linguistic or ethnographic data.

The subseries also contains a comparative list of Taos, Picuris, Isleta, Tewa (San Juan), and Tanoan numerals, based mainly on Harry S. Budd's B.A.E. MS 1028. There are also notes on pueblo basket-making from his interviews with Dr. and Mrs. Colton and Mr. Gladwin (B.A.E. MS 2291) , as well as an account of an Indian scout (Yavapai) working for the U.S. Cavalry. In addition, there is an assortment of notes on photographs, bibliography, and a large chart of pronouns.

Harrington's writings are also present. These include preliminary drafts and notes for "The Southwest Indian Languages" and "The Sounds and Structure of the Aztecan Languages." Most of the information was evidently extracted from notes on hand at the time. Harrington mentioned James Johnson and Edward Hunt, both of whom spoke Acoma-Laguna and worked with him in July and August of 1944. Tom Polacca's son gave Hopi data. There are also a partial draft, notes, and bibliography for an article titled "Indians of the Southwest" (1942). Material relating to unpublished writings includes notes for a review of Mary Roberts Coolidge's The Rain-Makers (1929). An undated draft and notes on "The Southern Athapascan" are also included.

A group of original field notes from Harrington's collaborators were left in his possession; in particular, a group of handwritten slips taken between December 10, 1912, and April 6, 1913, were found in an envelope addressed to Harrington. Barbara Freire-Marreco evidently sent them from Polacca, Arizona, to Harrington in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The content is mainly grammatical, with vocabulary items and ethnographic material interspersed. The language has not been identified. A second set of notes consists of cards and a typed list, evidently compiled by Junius Henderson. The data include animal terms in Hopi (Moki), Pima, and Walapai.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Tanoan languages  Search this
Tiwa language  Search this
Isleta language  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Laguna dialect  Search this
Acoma dialect  Search this
Hopi language  Search this
Pima language  Search this
Hualapai language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Basket making  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Numeration  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Sketches
Collection Citation:
Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 4.12
See more items in:
John P. Harrington Papers
John P. Harrington Papers / Series 4: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Southwest
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14711

MS 613 Terms, sentences, texts and myths of the Isleta Indians of New Mexico, obtained from Henry Kendall, an Isleta pupil at Carlisle, Pa., by Albert S. Gatschet, 1879 and 1885

Collector:
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Informant:
Kendall, Henry  Search this
Extent:
95 Pages
Culture:
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Newsclippings
Date:
1879-1885
Scope and Contents:
Also news clipping on the Buffalo Dance pasted on back of volume.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 613
General:
Previously titled "Words, sentences, myths and songs."
Topic:
Tiwa -- Isleta  Search this
Dance -- Buffalo  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Music -- Songs  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Newsclippings
Citation:
Manuscript 613, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS613
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms613
Online Media:

MS 454 Kiowa vocabulary by John R. Bartlett

Creator:
Bartlett, John Russell, 1805-1886  Search this
Mooney, James, 1861-1921  Search this
Gibbs, George, 1815-1873  Search this
Extent:
9 Pages
Culture:
Kiowa  Search this
Tiwa Pueblos  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Copied into Schedule of John Wesley Powell's Introduction to the Study of Indian Languages outline of 180 terms in handwriting of George Gibbs; with "Sinecu" and "Isleta" [del Sur] terms added in pencil in handwriting of James Mooney [1897].
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 454
Local Note:
Sinecu and Isleta notes are marked, "D7-97" and "D-15," as are corresponding notes in Mooney's notebook, Catalog Number 1953, where these figures apparently refer to the dates December 7 and 15, 1897. See 19th Annual Report, Bureau of American Ethnology for year 1897-98, page xvi, referring to Mooney's trip to this area in December, 1897. --MCB, 1/67.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Kiowa language  Search this
Tiwa language  Search this
Senecú del Sur Pueblo  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 454, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS454
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms454
Online Media:

MS 104-a Vocabularies of the Pueblo and other Indians of New Mexico from a "Journal of a Military Reconnaissance from Santa Fe, New Mexico, to the Navajo Country [in 1844], by Jas. H. Simpson 1st Lieut. Top. Eng." Phila. 1852

Creator:
Gibbs, George, 1815-1873  Search this
Simpson, J. H. (James Hervey), 1813-1883  Search this
Extent:
2 Pages
Culture:
Towa Pueblos  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Pueblo Indians  Search this
Ute  Search this
Tewa Pueblos  Search this
Keresan Pueblos  Search this
Tiwa Pueblos  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Basin  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Title page, in handwriting of George Gibbs, and back cover prepared to enclose Manuscript copies by Gibbs of vocabularies by Simpson, printed in the publication cited. Manuscript copies of the 9 Simpson vocabularies (marked by Gibbs, "Simpson Number 1," etc.) are separately catalogued as follows: "Keresan Manuscript Number 504-b (Simpson Number 1), Tewa Manuscript Number 1024-a (Simpson Number 2), Tiwa Manuscript Number 1024-b (Simpson Number 3), Towa Manuscript Number 1026 (Simpson Number 4), Zuni Manuscript Number 1156-b (Simpson Number 5), Hopi Manuscript Number 780 (Simpson Number 6), Navaho Manuscript Number 104-b (Simpson Number 7), Apache Manuscript Number 115 (Simpson Number 8), and Ute Manuscript Number 783 (Simpson Number 9).
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 104-a
Local Note:
manuscript document
Topic:
Navaho  Search this
Tiwa  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 104-a, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS104A
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms104a

MS 1024-b Comparative vocabulary, Pueblo Indians of Taos, Picuris, Sandia, Isleta

Creator:
Simpson, J. H. (James Hervey), 1813-1883  Search this
Gibbs, George, 1815-1873  Search this
Extent:
2 Pages
Culture:
Tanoan Indians  Search this
Tanoan  Search this
Tiwa Pueblos  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Copy in hand of George Gibbs, marked, "Simpson No. 3." Gives one native term only for each English word.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1024-b
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Tiwa  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 1024-b, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1024B
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1024b

MS 3125 Numerals in the Picuris, Taos, Isleta, and San Juan languages

Collector:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Extent:
1 Page
Culture:
Picuris Pueblo  Search this
Picuris Pueblo  Search this
San Juan  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Taos Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Tiwa Pueblos  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3125
Topic:
American Indian  Search this
Vocabularies  Search this
Numbers  Search this
Taos Indians  Search this
Numbers  Search this
Isleta Indians  Search this
Numbers  Search this
San Juan  Search this
Numbers  Search this
Tiwa  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 3125, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3125
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3125

MS 2087 Taos vocabulary and grammatical constructions

Creator:
Stevenson, Matilda Coxe, 1850-1915  Search this
Culture:
Taos Pueblo  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Taos Indians  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1906
Scope and Contents:
Includes: 1 notebook, approximately 88 pages handwritten, marked "Copied on machine April 9, 1906." "Taos vocabulary, 1906. Stevenson," approximately 60 pages, typed. "Birds of Taos," vocabulary, 11 pages handwritten, and 2 cards, typed. Some of the typed Taos vocabularies also have Isleta forms added in pencil.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2087
Topic:
Tiwa language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 2087, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2087
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2087
Online Media:

MS 1553 The Tewa [sic] dialect of Sandia, New Mexico. Obtained in Washington from the governor of Sandia, Mariano Carpintero

Collector:
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Names:
Albuquerque Land and Irrigation Company  Search this
Carpintero, Mariano  Search this
Extent:
16 Pages
Culture:
Sandia Pueblo  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Newsclippings
Date:
November, 1899
Scope and Contents:
Also newsclipping, 1 column. Note on flyleaf by Gatschet, "Hodge said, April 1, 1904, that Tiwa and Tewa were not exactly the same dialect," explains Gatschet's previous unawareness of this distinction.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1553
Local Note:
Newsclipping marked Times, November 15, 1899, entitled "Protest of the Pueblos," concerns the visit of Pueblo delegation, including Mariano Carintero, to Secretary of Interior Hitchcock to protest encroachment on lands of Pueblo Indians and white farmers by Albuquerque Land and Irrigation Co.
Topic:
Federal-Indian relations -- Sandia  Search this
Tiwa language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Newsclippings
Citation:
Manuscript 1553, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1553
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1553
Online Media:

MS 614 Language of the Sandía Pueblo or Nafin ab, in the central parts of New Mexico. Tewa [sic] linguistic family. Obtained in November 1899 from Mariano Carpintero, governor of Sandia, for the Bureau of American Ethnology

Collector:
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Informant:
Carpintero, Mariano  Search this
Extent:
43 Pages
Culture:
Sandia Pueblo  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Pueblo Indians  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
This is a copy of Bureau of American Ethnology Number 1553, arranged by subject-- parts of the body, etc. (see note by A .S. Gatschet on last page of 1553), plus 2 page discussion of relationship of Sandia language with Isleta and others.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 614
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Tiwa language  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 614, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS614
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms614
Online Media:

MS 1023 Taos language vocabulary and letter

Collector:
Budd, Harry S.  Search this
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Extent:
6 Pages
Culture:
Picuris Pueblo  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Tiwa Pueblos  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
July 29, 1886
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1023
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Tewa  Search this
Tiwa  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 1023, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1023
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1023

MS 1027 Comparative Tiwa vocabularies from the Isleta (MS 1019), Isleta Pueblo (MS 1021) and Pueblo Indians of Taos, Picuris, Sandia, and Isleta (MS 1024-b)

Creator:
Gibbs, George, 1815-1873  Search this
Kautz, August V. (August Valentine), 1828-1895  Search this
Simpson, J. H. (James Hervey), 1813-1883  Search this
Extent:
6 Pages
Culture:
Tiwa Pueblos  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Tewa Pueblos  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
In Comparative Vocabulary form.
Gibbs, Isleta vocabulary copied from Bureau of American Ethnology Manuscript 1019; Kautz, Isleta vocabulary copied from Bureau of American Ethnology Manuscript 1021; Simpson, comparative Tiwa vocabulary copied from Bureau of American Ethnology Manuscript 1024-b.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1027
General:
Previously titled "Tiwa vocabularies, all copied from other Manuscripts in Bureau of American Ethnology"
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Tiwa  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 1027, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1027
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1027

Isleta corngrinding and war songs

Collector:
Densmore, Frances, 1867-1957  Search this
Culture:
Tiwa -- Isleta  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Isleta Indians  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Material comprises: 19 pages text (including descriptive analysis), 18 pages tabulated analysis, 9 pages transcriptions.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3182
Topic:
Tiwa -- Isleta  Search this
Music -- corngrinding songs  Search this
Tiwa -- Isleta  Search this
Music -- war songs  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 3182, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3182
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3182

Scribe's copy of Bartlett's Tiwa (Piro ?) vocabularies (Bureau of American Ethnology Numbers 458-a and 458-b)

Creator:
Bartlett, John Russell, 1805-1886  Search this
Extent:
7 pages
Culture:
Tiwa -- Piro -- (identification uncertain)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Tewa Indians  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
In printed "Comparative Vocabulary" form.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 458-c
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 458-c, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS458C
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms458c

Piro vocabulary of about 180 words

Creator:
Bartlett, John Russell, 1805-1886  Search this
Informant:
Peraza, Hieronymo  Search this
Alejo, Marcos  Search this
Extent:
6 pages
Culture:
Tiwa -- Piro  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Tewa Indians  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
ca. 1862
Scope and Contents:
Copy in printed outline, in handwriting of George Gibbs, presumably from earlier Gibbs copy in volume of miscellaneous vocabularies, Bureau of American Ethnology Number 1627, pages 53-54, which see.
Biographical / Historical:
According to note with Number 1627, the vocabulary was recorded from Hieronymo Peraza and Marcos Alejo, principal men of the pueblo of "Sinecu" [Senecu del Sur], a few miles below El Paso del Norte, on the western bank of the Rio Grande. (Note with 458-b, presumably transcribed from Number 1627, gives apparently erroneous spellings of same names.)
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 458-b
Local Note:
Old Smithsonian Institution Number 599.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 458-b, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS458B
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms458b

Tiwa vocabulary of about 180 words

Creator:
Bartlett, John Russell, 1805-1886  Search this
Ortiz, Santiago  Search this
A-he-ba-tu  Search this
Extent:
6 pages
Culture:
Tiwa -- Senecu del Sur (Piro) -- ?  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Tewa Indians  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
October 2, 1852
Scope and Contents:
Copy in Printed Outline, in handwriting of George Gibbs, presumably from earlier Gibbs copy in volume of miscellaneous vocabularies, Bureau of American Ethnology Number 1627, pages 63-65, which see. (Latter also includes a few words not transcribed here.)
Biographical / Historical:
Note on last page, by Gibbs, presumably based on similar, but less complete note in Number 1627: "Language of the Indians of Taos in New Mexico (pronounced Te-wa) [sic], taken by Mr Bartlett from Santiago Ortiz (A-he ba-tu) head chief of Senecu, Isleta, & c. [i. e.. Senecu del Sur, Chihuahua]. It is analogous to the Piro."
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 458-a
Local Note:
Note: The catalog entry follows the earliest information about the source of the vocabulary, which is from Gibbs. Gatschet's note on page 1 "from Taos (From Tewa), N. M. taken from the head chief of Sinecu" is later and is clearly an imperfect interpretation of the earlier information, which makes it clear that the informant is not from Taos (although the language may be similar). MCB, 2/1964
Old Smithsonian Institution Number 549.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 458-a, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS458A
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms458a

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