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Bob Stocksdale and Kay Sekimachi papers, circa 1900-2015

Creator:
Stocksdale, Bob, 1913-2003  Search this
Stocksdale, Kay Sekimachi, 1926-  Search this
Subject:
Stocksdale, Bob  Search this
Collingwood, Peter  Search this
Anderson, Norman  Search this
Stocksdale, Kay Sekimachi  Search this
Turner, Tran  Search this
Larsen, Jack Lenor  Search this
Maloof, Alfreda Ward  Search this
Maloof, Sam  Search this
Okubo, Miné  Search this
Merrill, Forrest L.  Search this
Shawcroft, Barbara  Search this
Uchida, Yoshiko  Search this
Central Utah Relocation Center  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
War Relocation Authority  Search this
Tanforan Assembly Center (San Bruno, Calif.)  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Bob Stocksdale and Kay Sekimachi papers, circa 1900-2015. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Textile design  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Fiberwork -- Technique  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Asian American fiber artists  Search this
Asian American educators  Search this
Japanese Americans -- Forced removal and internment, 1942-1945  Search this
Woodwork  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Theme:
Craft  Search this
Asian American  Search this
Lives of artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)11112
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)246683
AAA_collcode_stockbob
Theme:
Craft
Asian American
Lives of artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_246683
Online Media:

Anneberg Gallery records, 1945-1992, bulk 1966-1981

Creator:
Anneberg Gallery  Search this
Subject:
Anneberg, Margery  Search this
Forkner, Edgar  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Citation:
Anneberg Gallery records, 1945-1992, bulk 1966-1981. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Folk art  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Folk art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Folk art -- Mexico  Search this
Theme:
Craft  Search this
Art Gallery Records  Search this
Art Market  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)11573
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)248730
AAA_collcode_annegall
Theme:
Craft
Art Gallery Records
Art Market
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_248730

Oral history interview with James Bassler, 2002 February 11-June 6

Interviewee:
Bassler, James W., 1933-  Search this
Interviewer:
Emanuelli, Sharon K.  Search this
Subject:
University of California, Los Angeles  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Quotes and excerpts must be cited as follows: Oral history interview with James Bassler, 2002 February 11-June 6. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Fiberwork -- California  Search this
Art -- Political aspects  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Weaving  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Theme:
Craft  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)11858
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)237918
AAA_collcode_bassle02
Theme:
Craft
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_237918
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Katherine Westphal, 2002 September 3-7

Interviewee:
Westphal, Katherine, 1919-  Search this
Interviewer:
Austin, Carole  Search this
Subject:
Farago, Daphne  Search this
Hickman, Pat (Patricia Lynette)  Search this
Karoly, Frederic  Search this
Laky, Gyöngy  Search this
Larsen, Jack Lenor  Search this
Lynn, Greg  Search this
Rossbach, Ed  Search this
Fiberworks, Center for the Textile Arts  Search this
Rhode Island School of Design  Search this
University of California, Davis  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Citation:
Quotes and excerpts must be cited as follows: Oral history interview with Katherine Westphal, 2002 September 3-7. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Decorative arts  Search this
Fiber artists -- California -- Berkeley -- Interviews  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women textile artists  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Theme:
Craft  Search this
Women  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)11788
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)238673
AAA_collcode_westph02
Theme:
Craft
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_238673

Oral history interview with Gerhardt Knodel, 2004 August 3

Interviewee:
Knodel, Gerhardt, 1940-  Search this
Interviewer:
Adamson, Glenn, 1972-  Search this
Subject:
Abakanowicz, Magdalena  Search this
Albers, Anni  Search this
Al-Hilali, Neda  Search this
Andreson, Laura  Search this
Christo  Search this
Hicks, Sheila  Search this
Kester, Bernard  Search this
Larsen, Jack Lenor  Search this
Leland, Mary Jane  Search this
Smith, Kiki  Search this
Tawney, Lenore  Search this
Zeisler, Claire  Search this
Cranbrook Academy of Art  Search this
Los Angeles City College  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
University of California, Los Angeles  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Place:
California -- Los Angeles -- Description and travel
Michigan -- Description and travel
Citation:
Quotes and excerpts must be cited as follows: Oral history interview with Gerhardt Knodel, 2004 August 3. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Abstract expressionism  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Theme:
Craft  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12740
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)249179
AAA_collcode_knodel04
Theme:
Craft
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_249179
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Gerhardt Knodel

Interviewee:
Knodel, Gerhardt  Search this
Interviewer:
Adamson, Glenn  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Cranbrook Academy of Art -- Faculty  Search this
Los Angeles City College -- Students  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
University of California, Los Angeles -- Students  Search this
Abakanowicz, Magdalena  Search this
Al-Hilali, Neda, 1938-  Search this
Albers, Anni  Search this
Andreson, Laura  Search this
Christo, 1935-  Search this
Hicks, Sheila, 1934-  Search this
Kester, Bernard  Search this
Larsen, Jack Lenor  Search this
Leland, Mary Jane  Search this
Smith, Kiki, 1954-  Search this
Tawney, Lenore  Search this
Zeisler, Claire, 1903-1991  Search this
Extent:
7 Items (Sound recording: 7 sound files (5 hr., 23 min.), digital, wav)
77 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Place:
California -- Los Angeles -- Description and Travel
Michigan -- Description and Travel
Date:
2004 August 3
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Gerhardt Knodel conducted 2004 August 3, by Glenn Adamson, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan.
Knodel speaks of his German heritage; his parents each immigrating to Los Angeles; growing up in Los Angeles and being part of the German community; his father building houses; the influence of his childhood environment on his artwork; taking art classes in school; participating in theater and set design; studying art at Los Angeles City College; collecting textiles; transferring to UCLA; teaching high school art; the influence of Abstract Expressionism on his early work; quitting teaching and studying fiber arts at University of California, Long Beach; traveling to numerous countries, and their influence on his artwork; researching and lecturing on fabric as environment; how the fiber art movement has evolved and changed; early exhibitions and the need for more venues; the fiber art community in the 1960s and 70s; the importance of University art programs; moving to Michigan and teaching at Cranbrook; the importance of scale and context in his work; making large scale pieces to fit within an architectural space; working on commission for public projects; working with the community in Pontiac, Michigan on a commissioned piece; the influence of the history of textiles; being director of the Cranbrook Academy of Art; putting figures on to textiles; the decline of the fiber art movement; and the benefits of schools such as Cranbrook. Knodel also recalls Bernard Kester, Mary Jane Leland, Laura Andreson, Anni Albers, Sheila Hicks, Neda Al-Hilali, Lenore Tawney, Claire Zeisler, Magdalena Abakanowicz, Jack Lenor Larsen, Christo, Kiki Smith, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Gerhardt Knodel (1940-) is a fiber artist from Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Glenn Adamson is a curator and, art historian from Wisconsin.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 7 digital wav files. Duration is 5 hr., 23 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Fiber artists -- California  Search this
Topic:
Abstract expressionism  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.knodel04
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw999d0091b-59dd-4fd8-88ba-b3b708f0d003
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-knodel04
Online Media:

Oral history interview with James Bassler

Interviewee:
Bassler, James W., 1933-  Search this
Interviewer:
Emanuelli, Sharon K.  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
University of California, Los Angeles -- Faculty  Search this
University of California, Los Angeles -- Students  Search this
Extent:
125 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2002 February 11-June 6
Scope and Contents:
An interview of James Bassler conducted 2002 February 11-June 6, by Sharon K. Emanuelli, for the Archives of American Art, as part of the Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America.
Bassler speaks of his early childhood; traveling with his father, a major league baseball catcher; his early interest in fiber through his father's hooked rugs, which he worked on during the off season; his early education; his sister Sally and a course she took from Laura Andreson where they dug for clay at UCLA; working at Douglas Aircraft; drafted into the Army; his travels through Europe while in the Army; his wife Veralee Osborn Bassler; his education at UCLA with professors such as Bernard Kester, Laura Andreson, Cornelia Breitenbach, and fellow student Neda Al Hilali; teaching at Emerson Junior High School; the Egg and Eye Gallery; his siblings, Barbara Bassler Johnson, Sally Bassler Chest, and John Bassler. Bassler also discusses living in Oaxaca from 1970-1975; returning to the U.S. and then moving to Tennessee to teach at Appalachian Center for Crafts; the camaraderie at the Craft Center; his experience with commissions; the impact of the music of John Cage; his teaching techniques; artistic process; political issues that influenced his artwork, such as the Exxon Valdez Oil spill [Shroud] or the Persian Gulf War [Soiled]; his relationships with dealers and galleries, Barbara Okun, Christa Thurman, and currently the Gail Martin Gallery in New York; the spontaneity of Willem de Kooning's artwork and a recent exhibit "Willem de Kooning: Tracing the Figure" at the Museum of Contemporary Art [MOCA], Los Angeles, February 10-April 28, 2002; the Peruvian influence upon his work and experiments with dyeing and batik; a piece he was working on for Jack Lenor Larsen's 75th birthday; exhibitions to which he loaned pieces of his collection; significant books he has read and uses in his classes, such as James Burkes' "Connections," and Jared Diamond's "Guns, Germs and Steel"; the "Art in Embassy" Program and his exhibit in Poland; the benefits of a university education; the Ann Blinks Research Group; his enjoyment of the weaving process; lack of signatures on his artwork; new technology; visiting the "Andy Warhol Retrospective," MOCA, May 25 - August 18, 2002 and solving his artistic block there; the difficulty in being a perfectionist; important artist friendships with Olga de Amaral, Ruth Asawa, Trude Guermonprez, Dominic Di Mare, and Lenore Tawney; and finally his reactions to Craft in America, a symposium which Emanuelli coordinated the agenda for. Bassler also recalls Ina Conradi-Chavez, Edward Durell Stone, Carol Shaw-Sutton, Roger Herman; Larry Pittman; Judy Mitoma; Victoria Vesna; Robert Brady, Phil Fike, Susan Petersen, Eudora Moore, Edith Wyle, Patricia Anawalt, Ed Rossbach, Mildred Constantine, Mary Kahlenberg, Martin Puryear, Magdalena Abakanowicz, Mary Dusenbury, Robert Rauschenberg, Wayne Thiebaud, Adrian Saxe, Kaye Spilker, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
James Bassler (1933- ) is a fiber artist of San Pedro, California.
General:
Originally recorded on 6 sound cassettes and 4 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 23 digital wav files. Duration is 10 hr., 7 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Fiberwork -- California  Search this
Art -- Political aspects  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Weaving  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.bassle02
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9c456ed65-65e0-4878-8ad6-642d46dcf78d
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-bassle02
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Katherine Westphal

Interviewee:
Westphal, Katherine  Search this
Interviewer:
Austin, Carole  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Fiberworks, Center for the Textile Arts  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Rhode Island School of Design  Search this
University of California, Davis -- Faculty  Search this
Farago, Daphne  Search this
Hickman, Pat (Patricia Lynette), 1941-  Search this
Karoly, Frederic, 1898-1987  Search this
Laky, Gyöngy, 1944-  Search this
Larsen, Jack Lenor  Search this
Lynn, Greg  Search this
Rossbach, Ed  Search this
Extent:
58 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Date:
2002 September 3-7
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Katherine Westphal conducted 2002 September 3-7, by Carole Austin, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America.
This interview took place in Berkeley, California. Westphal speaks of drawing every day; her rewarding education experience teaching at University of California, Davis' Applied Behavioral Sciences Department; her college encounters; the World Crafts Conference in Vienna in 1980; the significance of her travels in her artwork, including trips to Egypt, Hawaii, Wyoming, and Indonesia among others; her fascination with different types of art; the non-functional aspect of her artwork; the lack of necessity to sell artwork due to her job teaching, and the personal nature of her work not driven by a "craft market"; working for the textile industry; working with agent Frederick Karoly in New York; the considerable collection Daphne Farago has made of both Katherine's and her husband, Ed Rossbach's, artwork; her working environment; her storage condo; her most precious possession, her dogs; remodeling her Berkeley home and installing a glass elevator; the artist community at UC Davis and Fiberworks before it became a school; people she took workshops with at Fiberworks; a chronology of her work from the 1960s to present day; her and Ed's retirement in 1979 and their subsequent trip to Bali; her relationship with the home health care industry when Ed became sick; her development of baskets; her love of color; her artist in residency at Rhode Island School of Design in 1980, learning to work on the Jacquard loom; her very personal collection of postcards, which she created while on trips; her dog stories; several of the shows she has been in, including "Objects: USA" and "American Crafts at the Vatican"; the commission she completed for a hotel in Tokyo; and her copy machines and the various technological advances made during her career. Westphal also recalls Gyöngy Laky, Chere Lai Mah, Pat Hickman, Greg Lynn, Helen and Tio Giambruni, Jack Lenor Larsen and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Katherine Westphal (1919- ) is a fiber artist in Berkeley, California. Carole Austin is an interviewer, curator, and writer in Orinda, California.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Use requires an appointment.
Access is to transcript only.
Topic:
Decorative arts  Search this
Fiber artists -- California -- Berkeley -- Interviews  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women textile artists  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.westph02
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw90eb7eed0-7263-4e68-a8f7-8c1b28986497
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-westph02

Bob Stocksdale and Kay Sekimachi papers

Creator:
Stocksdale, Bob, 1913-2003  Search this
Names:
Central Utah Relocation Center  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Tanforan Assembly Center (San Bruno, Calif.)  Search this
War Relocation Authority  Search this
Anderson, Norman  Search this
Collingwood, Peter, 1922-2008  Search this
Larsen, Jack Lenor  Search this
Maloof, Alfreda Ward  Search this
Maloof, Sam  Search this
Merrill, Forrest L.  Search this
Okubo, Miné, 1912-2001  Search this
Shawcroft, Barbara  Search this
Stocksdale, Bob, 1913-2003  Search this
Stocksdale, Kay Sekimachi  Search this
Turner, Tran  Search this
Uchida, Yoshiko  Search this
Former owner:
Stocksdale, Kay Sekimachi  Search this
Extent:
19.5 Linear feet
0.125 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Interviews
Sound recordings
Scrapbooks
Date:
circa 1900-2015
Summary:
The papers of woodturner Bob Stocksdale and fiber artist Kay Sekimachi measure 19.5 linear feet and 0.125 GB and date from circa 1900 to 2015. Found are biographical materials, correspondence, writings, professional files, exhibition files, project files, personal business records, printed and digital material, scrapbooks, photographic material, and artwork. Of note are records from Sekimachi's forced internment during World War II at Tanforan Assembly Center and Topaz War Relocation Center from 1942 to 1944.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of woodturner Bob Stocksdale and fiber artist Kay Sekimachi measure 19.5 linear feet and 0.125 GB and date from circa 1900 to 2015. Found are biographical materials, correspondence, writings, professional files, exhibition files, project files, personal business records, printed and digital material, scrapbooks, photographic material, and artwork. Of note are records from Sekimachi's forced internment during World War II at Tanforan Assembly Center and Topaz War Relocation Center from 1942 to 1944.

The bulk of biographical materials are from Kay Sekimachi with some originating from her time spent in forced internment at Topaz and Tanforan camps. These records include identification cards, War Relocation Authority printed materials, and school records. Also found are awards, resumes, and blank stationery. Some materials are from Stocksdale's 85th birthday and memorial service.

Letters and extensive greeting cards are from friends, family, and professional acquaintances. Correspondents include Norman Anderson, Peter Collingwood, Jack Lenor Larsen, Sam and Alfreda Maloof, Forrest L. Merrill, Miné Okubo, Barbara Shawcroft, and others.

Writings and notes are scattered and include two interviews with Kay Sekimachi, hanging instructions, and notes. Writings by others are by Jack Lenor Larsen, Tran Turner, and Yoshiko Uchida.

Sekimachi's and Stocksdale's professional activities are documented through files relating to their participation at conferences, awards ceremonies, and lectures. Also found are fiber samples, order forms for materials and equipment, and notes on techniques and design by Kay Sekimachi. Exhibition records include extensive documentation on Marriage in Form, In the Realm of Nature, and Loom and Lathe as well as files for various solo and group exhibitions for both Sekimachi and Stocksdale. Gallery and institution files include material on multiple or unnamed exhibitions. Exhibiton documentation may include correspondence, writings, proposals, printed material, financial and loan records, condition reports, and photographs. Project files contain material for proposed book projects, a retrospective, and portfolio, by and about Sekimachi and Stocksdale. Also found are three commissions files for works by Sekimachi. A proposed retrospective on the work of Bob Stocksdale by Kay Sekimachi includes a digital sound recording of recollections.

Personal business records include sales books, purchase records for works of art by others, appraisals, contracts, consignment receipts, and insurance records.

Published books, clippings, exhibition announcements and catalogs, magazines, and newsletters are found within printed materials. Of note is a publication by the San Francisco Chronicle entitled "This World" which features illustrations by Miné Okubo.

Four scrapbooks compiled by Kay Sekimachi date from 1937 to 1944. Most of the scrapbooks contain printed material from magazines and other sources with images such as children, valentines, food, birds, clothing, and may include scattered sketches and notes by Sekimachi. One scrapbook dates from the end of Sekimachi's internment at Topaz and relocation to Cincinnati, Ohio. This scrapbook includes sketches and printed materials concerning local and global events. Loose material found in this series was likely meant to be pasted into a new or the forth scrapbook. These materials include relocation information, Japanese-American publications, maps, clippings, sketches, and printed programs.

The bulk of photographic materials consist of slides of various vacation locations and homes and date from the 1960s to the 1980s. Also found are scattered portraits of Kay Sekimachi and Bob Stocksdale, as well as a photo of Miné Okubo with Roy Leeper and Cecil Thompson. Artworks are largely by Kay Sekimachi and include watercolor and pencil sketches as well as designs for fabrics and a weaving portfolio. Watercolor and pencil sketches are of Tanforan Assembly Center and date from circa 1942.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 11 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, circa 1920-2003 (1.5 linear feet; Box 1-2)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1943-2014 (7.6 linear feet; Box 2-10)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, 1960s-2008 (0.2 linear feet; Box 10)

Series 4: Professional Files, 1950s-2011 (1.1 linear feet; Box 10-11, 22)

Series 5: Exhibition Files, 1951-2015 (2.9 linear feet; Box 11-14, ER01; 0.125 GB)

Series 6: Project Files, circa 1900-2004 (0.3 linear feet; Box 14)

Series 7: Personal Business Records, 1970s-2010 (0.7 linear feet; Box 14-15)

Series 8: Printed Material, 1943-2011 (2.3 linear feet; Box 15-17, 22)

Series 9: Scrapbooks, 1937-1946 (0.9 linear feet; Box 17, 21)

Series 10: Photographic Material, circa 1950-2001 (0.9 linear feet; Box 18)

Series 11: Artwork, 1942-circa 1970 (1.1 linear feet; Box 18-20, 22-23)
Biographical / Historical:
Bob Stocksdale (1913-2003) was a woodturner active in California. He was known for bowls he formed from rare types of wood. Kay Sekimachi (1926- ) is a Japanese-American fiber artist and educator also active in California. She began her career in weaving on and off the loom and was part of the New Basketry movement.

Born in Indiana, Bob Stocksdale began his interest in carving by whittling with a pocket knife. Later, he created his own lathe with a washing machine motor and turned items such as baseball bats. During World War II, he was a conscientious objector and worked at various camps performing forestry work. It was in one of the camps that he turned his first bowl on a lathe.

After the war, Stocksdale settled in the Bay Area of California where he established his own woodturning shop in his basement. He concentrated on making bowls out of rare woods. His work has been recognized throughout the world and in 1998, he received the American Association of Woodturners Lifetime Achievement Award. In 2003, he received the James Renwick Alliance Masters of the Medium Award.

Kay Sekimachi was born in San Francisco, California in 1926. As a high school student, she was forcibly interned through Executive Order 9066 issued by President Franklin D. Roosevelt which incarcerated approximately 120,000 Japanese and Japanese-American citizens during World War II. Along with her mother and siblings, Kay lived at Tanforan Assembly Center and later moved to Topaz War Relocation Center in Utah. She continued her schooling at Topaz and after 1944, was resettled in Cincinnati, Ohio.

After graduating from high school, Kay Sekimachi enrolled at the California College of Arts and Crafts and the Haystack Mountain School of Crafts where she learned the craft of weaving under Trude Guermonprez and Jack Lenor Larsen. Her early works were tapestries and garments. She later used her weaving techniques as part of the New Basketry movement to create baskets and boxes out of fibers. Also an educator, Kay taught weaving at San Francisco Community College. She received the American Craft Council Gold Medal for Consummate Craftsmanship in 2002.

After the dissolution of his first marriage through which he had two children, son Kim and daughter Joy Stocksdale, Bob married Kay Sekimachi in 1972. The two had been acquainted for many years as they were both craft artists living in the Bay Area. Although they married later in life, Kay and Bob travelled the world and exhibited their art together in many exhibitions including Marriage in Form and Loom and Lathe.

Bob Stocksdale died in Oakland, California in 2003. Kay Sekimachi continues to exhibit her work and lives in Berkeley, California.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art are an oral history interview of Bob Stocksdale conducted February 16-March 21, 2001, by Signe Mayfield and an oral history interview of Kay Sekimachi [Stocksdale] conducted July 26-August 6, 2001, by Suzanne Baizerman. Both interviews were conducted in Berkeley, California, during the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America.
Provenance:
The Bob Stocksdale and Kay Sekimachi papers were donated in 2003, 2004, and 2015 by Kay Sekimachi Stocksdale as part of the Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information. Use of original audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Fiber artists -- California  Search this
Topic:
Textile design  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Fiberwork -- Technique  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Asian American fiber artists  Search this
Asian American educators  Search this
Japanese Americans -- Forced removal and internment, 1942-1945  Search this
Woodwork  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Bob Stocksdale and Kay Sekimachi papers, circa 1900-2015. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.stockbob
See more items in:
Bob Stocksdale and Kay Sekimachi papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9d7db1c3a-95bc-44e4-92d5-382fb539e654
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-stockbob
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Dominic Di Mare, 2002 June 4-10

Interviewee:
Di Mare, Dominic, 1932-  Search this
Interviewer:
Mayfield, Signe  Search this
Subject:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Quotes and excerpts must be cited as follows: Oral history interview with Dominic Di Mare, 2002 June 4-10. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Fiberwork  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- California  Search this
Fishing  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Weaving  Search this
Theme:
Craft  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12551
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)237988
AAA_collcode_dimare02
Theme:
Craft
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_237988

Oral history interview with Jack Lenor Larsen, 2004 February 6-8

Interviewee:
Larsen, Jack Lenor, 1927-2020  Search this
Interviewer:
Fisch, Arline M  Search this
Subject:
Rossbach, Ed  Search this
Adamson, Glenn  Search this
University of Washington  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Quotes and excerpts must be cited as follows: Oral history interview with Jack Lenor Larsen, 2004 February 6-8. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Textile crafts  Search this
Textile industry -- Japan  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Theme:
Craft  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13092
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)247149
AAA_collcode_larsen04
Theme:
Craft
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_247149
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Jack Lenor Larsen

Interviewee:
Larsen, Jack Lenor  Search this
Interviewer:
Fisch, Arline M.  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
University of Washington -- Students  Search this
Adamson, Glenn  Search this
Rossbach, Ed  Search this
Extent:
78 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2004 February 6-8
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Jack Lenor Larsen conducted 2004 February 6-8, by Arline M. Fisch, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in Longhouse, East Hampton, N.Y.
Larsen speaks of his childhood in Seattle, Washington; his parents and other adults who had a positive impact on his development; building things with his friends; attending the University of Washington to study architecture and deciding to study textiles instead; visiting Dorothy Liebes's textile studio; leaving school and moving to Los Angeles; attending the University of Southern California and eventually returning to the University of Washington; becoming a teaching assistant to Ed Rossbach; getting a Masters degree at Cranbrook Academy of Art; meeting many influential people in San Francisco and New York; moving to New York and setting up a studio; working on commission for several companies including Thaibok; expanding his offices to include larger looms and a showroom; setting up a branch of production in Haiti; working in the fashion industry and designing home decor; and working in Southeast Asia developing handcrafted woven exports. He also speaks of his involvement with the American Craft Council and the World Crafts Council, re-organizing and building the new campus at the Haystack Mountain School of Crafts; traveling to Central Asia, Africa, Europe, and his desire to travel more; working and exhibiting in Japan; experiencing the Japanese textile industry; writing numerous books on fiber arts including, "The Dyer's Art," often collaborating with other fiber artists; developing a classification system for interlacing; collecting art; gardening and its relation to art and design; building Round House and the inspiration behind it; building LongHouse using the Japanese Ise Shrine as a model and plans for further expansion; retiring and difficulties writing, "A Weaver's Memoir." Larsen also recalls Dorothy Liebes, Marianne Strengell, Florence Knoll, Edgar Kaufman, Ed Rossbach, Toshiko Takaezu, Francis Merritt, Mary Bishop, Garth Clark, Issey Miyake, Mildred Constantine, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Jack Lenor Larsen (1927-2020) was a weaver and textile designer from East Hampton, N.Y. Arline M. Fisch (1931- ) is a jeweler from San Diego, Cailfornia.
General:
Originally recorded on 7 sound discs and 1 sound cassette. Reformatted in 2010 as 19 digital wav files. Duration is 6 hrs., 23 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Textile designers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Textile crafts  Search this
Textile industry -- Japan  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.larsen04
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw98c0a4574-4f94-4ed0-87e7-4413a53ec3c1
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-larsen04
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Dominic Di Mare

Interviewee:
Di Mare, Dominic, 1932-  Search this
Interviewer:
Mayfield, Signe  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Extent:
60 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2002 June 4-10
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Dominic Di Mare conducted 2002 June 4-10, by Signe Mayfield, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at his home and studio, in Tiburon, California.
Di Mare speaks of growing up in Monterey, California, around thread, as his mother crocheted and his fisherman father made lures; drawing as a child; receiving the Junior Scholastic Art Awards in high school; enrolling at Monterey Peninsula College and San Francisco State; acquiring a teacher's degree and taking a craft class; being "enthralled" by setting up a loom; teaching art in junior high schools; getting married and buying a loom; reading Craft Horizon magazine and becoming inspired by the work of Kay Sekimachi; buying yarn from Helen Pope at The Yarn Depot and forming a friendship with her; exhibiting at The Yarn Depot; participating in craft competitions and showing his work to Paul Smith, the director of the Museum of Contemporary Crafts; his first show at the Museum of Contemporary Crafts in 1965; exhibiting at Museum West (the west coast extension of the Museum of Contemporary Crafts); recognizing "self and struggle and passion" in Ferne Jacobs' work; his dealers including Marjorie Annenberg (Annenberg Gallery, San Francisco), Ruth Braunstein (Braunstein/Quay Gallery, San Francisco), Susan Cummins (Susan Cummins Gallery, Mill Valley, Calif.), and Florence Duhl (Florence Duhl Gallery, New York); receiving a grant from the Marin Arts Council; quitting his teaching job, receiving an NEA grant, and becoming a full-time artist; collectors Dan and Hillary Goldstein; the beauty of poet Betty Parks' article, "Dominic Di Mare: Houses for the Sacred," in American Craft (October/November 1982); his "shrine" imagery; his military service during the Korean War and being assigned to a post office in Paris, France; going to the Louvre and encountering the Nike, "winged victory" sculpture; and Jack Lenore Larson's support.
Di Mare considers himself to be "self-taught" although he attended the California College of Arts and Crafts, San Francisco State, and Rudolph Schaefer School of Design. He also talks about autobiographical elements in his work; his "personal, artistic vocabulary"; the repetition of black and white; his use of sticks and feathers; and cross shapes, representing the church and a ship's mast. He comments on making portraits during his summers in Switzerland and making magical wands; and his artistic philosophy. Di Mare also recalls Camille Cook, Helen Drutt, Trude Guermonprez, Sophi Harpe, Gyongy Laky, Marjorie Livingston, Hal Painter, June Schwarcz, Rose Slivka, Millie Tresko, and Dorian Zachai.
Biographical / Historical:
Dominic Di Mare (1932- ) is a fiber artist from Tiburon, California. Signe Mayfield is an art historian.
General:
Originally recorded 3 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 6 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hr., 47 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Patrons must use transcript. Transcript available online. Sound recordings (3 cassettes) are ACCESS RESTRICTED; Written permission required.
Occupation:
Weavers -- California -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Fiberwork  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- California  Search this
Fishing  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Weaving  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.dimare02
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9b7ef2f19-f62a-41b4-9a04-be2dd364ab11
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-dimare02
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Joyce Marquess Carey, 2002 June 16

Interviewee:
Carey, Joyce Marquess, 1936-  Search this
Interviewer:
Adamson, Glenn, 1972-  Search this
Subject:
University of Wisconsin--Madison  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Quotes and excerpts must be cited as follows: Oral history interview with Joyce Marquess Carey, 2002 June 16. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Decorative arts  Search this
Fiberwork  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Women textile artists  Search this
Theme:
Craft  Search this
Women  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12329
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)237986
AAA_collcode_carey02
Theme:
Craft
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_237986
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Joyce Marquess Carey

Interviewee:
Carey, Joyce Marquess  Search this
Interviewer:
Adamson, Glenn  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
University of Wisconsin--Madison -- Faculty  Search this
University of Wisconsin--Madison -- Students  Search this
Extent:
76 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2002 June 16
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Joyce Marquess Carey conducted 2002 June 16, by Glenn Adamson, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Carey's home, in Madison, Wisconsin.
Carey speaks of growing up in Redding, California; her widowed mother working to support Carey and herself; her "lonesome" childhood and her eagerness to leave Redding to attend the University of California at Berkeley; majoring in English; meeting her husband Harlan (Mark) Marquess in her senior year at Berkeley and marrying him; dropping out of college; regretting her marriage; her life as a housewife and mother in the late 1950s and 1960s; moving to Madison, Wisconsin, for her husband's job as a Russian teacher; taking weaving classes with Larry Edman at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; and meeting fiber artist Claire Zeisler on a field trip to Chicago. Carey discusses experimentation in her work and "stretching the limits of the technique" in Edman's class; receiving her undergraduate degree in textile arts in 1971; working with a computer-driven Dobby Loom; studying with Ruth Gao and Jim Peters at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee for her MFA in the early 1970s; teaching weaving at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, with a focus on technical and design skills; writing articles on the technical aspects of fiber art for "Fiber Arts," "Weaver's Journal," "Shuttle, Spindle, & Dye Pot," and other periodicals; exhibiting with the Wisconsin Designer Craftsmen in the 1970s; participating in the Quilt National Show in 1979; receiving a five-year development grant from the University of Wisconsin and quitting her teaching job; using "systematic" weaving methods in quilting; her involvement with galleries such as the Connell/Great American Gallery in Atlanta, Georgia; working with art consultants; the difference between private and corporate commissions; her use of bright colors and various fabrics; her use of tools and technology including an industrial sewing machine and computer programs such as Photoshop; her second marriage to Phil Carey in 1980 after her divorce to Marquess in the mid-1970s; and the "ephemeral" qualities in art. She considers herself a "collager," assembling fabrics and "embellishments." She also discusses her involvement with the Studio Art Quilt Associates and in the Art Quilt Network; and her piece, "Blue Ribbon," in the collection of the American Craft Museum. Carey recalls Camille Cook, Lia Cook, Martha Connell, Hillary Fletcher, Ted Hallman, Pat Mansfield, Ursula Ilse-Neuman, Yvonne Porcella, [Laurence] Rathsack, Victor Vasarely, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Joyce Marquess Carey (1936- ) is a quilt maker from Madison, Wisconsin. Glenn Adamson is an art historian.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 4 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hr., 51 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Quiltmakers -- Wisconsin  Search this
Educators -- Wisconsin  Search this
Topic:
Decorative arts  Search this
Fiberwork  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Women textile artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.carey02
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9f3213bc2-a50f-4b55-a7f5-0c9301ff06f5
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-carey02
Online Media:

Kuba hatmaker, Mushenge, Congo (Democratic Republic)

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Kuba (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Congo (Democratic Republic)
Date:
1971
Scope and Contents:
"A basic Kuba man's hat (laket) is essentially a small, domed cap worn on the crown of the head and held in place with a metal hat pin. All Kuba hats are created from undyed raffia fiber using the basketry technique of coiling. The many surface textures and patterns of the laket reflect the variations possible with the coiling technique and the skillful manipulation of the hatmaker, who is a male specialist." [Darish P. and Binkley D., 1978: Headdresses and Titleholding among the Kuba, Crowning Achievements. Fowler Museum of Cultural History, University of California, Los Angeles]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Westinghouse Film and traveled to Africa from October 26, 1970 to end of March 1971.
Local Numbers:
H 3 KBA 21.2 EE 71
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
Frame value is 13.
Slide No. H 3 KBA 21.2 EE 71
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
Textile crafts  Search this
Headdresses -- headgear -- Africa  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 7266
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Congo (Democratic Republic) / EECL / Unidentified, Congo (Democratic Republic)
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo74d4a387e-67d3-4bf6-8d92-2cce496e7ef2
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref24065

Kuba hatmaker, Mushenge, Congo (Democratic Republic)

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Kuba (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Congo (Democratic Republic)
Date:
1971
Scope and Contents:
"A basic Kuba man's hat (laket) is essentially a small, domed cap worn on the crown of the head and held in place with a metal hat pin. All Kuba hats are created from undyed raffia fiber using the basketry technique of coiling. The many surface textures and patterns of the laket reflect the variations possible with the coiling technique and the skillful manipulation of the hatmaker, who is a male specialist." [Darish P. and Binkley D., 1978: Headdresses and Titleholding among the Kuba, Crowning Achievements. Fowler Museum of Cultural History, University of California, Los Angeles]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Westinghouse Film and traveled to Africa from October 26, 1970 to end of March 1971.
Local Numbers:
H 3 KBA 21.3 EE 71
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Local Note:
Frame value is 11.
Slide No. H 3 KBA 21.3 EE 71
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
Textile crafts  Search this
Headdresses -- headgear -- Africa  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 7267
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Congo (Democratic Republic) / EECL / Unidentified, Congo (Democratic Republic)
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo7acd93445-7073-43db-bb5d-b73deca22b2f
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref24066

Metals in dress and adornment : symposium abstracts of the Costume Society of America, 25th anniversary annual meeting and symposium, May 27-May 31, 1998, Pasadena, California / [abstracts edited by Kathy K. Mullet]

Title:
Silver symposium in the golden state
CSA 1998 abstracts
Costume Society of America, 1998 abstracts
Author:
Costume Society of America Meeting and Symposium (25th, [i.e. 24th : 1998 : Pasadena, Calif.)  Search this
Mullet, Kathy K  Search this
Physical description:
iii, 28 p. ; 28 cm
Type:
Congresses
Date:
1998
C1998
Topic:
Costume  Search this
Metal cloth  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Call number:
GT2250 .C67 1998
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_592539

Photograph of display of goods from El Centro de Arte Regional, La Paz, Baja California Sur

Subject:
El Centro Regional de Arte  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Date:
196-
Citation:
Photograph of display of goods from El Centro de Arte Regional, La Paz, Baja California Sur, 196-. Eduardo Carrillo papers, circa 1953-1999. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Pottery  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)21263
See more items in:
Eduardo Carrillo papers, circa 1953-1999, bulk 1975-1997
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_item_21263

Statements / organized by H. J. Weeks ... ; Hazel V. Bray

Title:
Oakland Museum Art Department is pleased to present
Author:
Oakland Museum Art Department  Search this
Weeks, H. J  Search this
Bray, Hazel V  Search this
Physical description:
1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 22 cm
Type:
Exhibitions
Place:
California, Northern
Date:
1973
1973]
20th century
Topic:
Pottery, American  Search this
Textile crafts--History  Search this
Glass art--History  Search this
Call number:
N6530.C3 O25 1973
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_899246

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