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Oral history interview with Gyöngy Laky, 2007 December 11-12

Interviewee:
Laky, Gyöngy, 1944-  Search this
Laky, Gyöngy, 1944-  Search this
Interviewer:
Riedel, Mija, 1958-  Search this
Subject:
Branford, Joanne Segal  Search this
Christiansen, Brett  Search this
Dobras, Darryl  Search this
Dumas, Mary  Search this
Elliott, Lilian  Search this
Foosaner, Judith  Search this
Gablik, Suzi  Search this
Hamilton, Ann  Search this
Lahner, Émile  Search this
Larsen, Jack Lenor  Search this
Miller, Henry  Search this
Nevelson, Louise  Search this
Ocampo, Kim  Search this
Puryear, Martin  Search this
Rossbach, Ed  Search this
Sontag, Susan  Search this
Voulkos, Peter  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Topic:
Decorative arts  Search this
Computer Art  Search this
Painting -- China  Search this
Textile artists -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Art and computers  Search this
Theme:
Craft  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13672
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)274523
AAA_collcode_laky07
Theme:
Craft
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_274523
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Adela Akers, 2008 March 4-6

Interviewee:
Akers, Adela, 1933-  Search this
Akers, Adela, 1933-  Search this
Interviewer:
Riedel, Mija, 1958-  Search this
Subject:
Art Institute of Chicago  Search this
Cranbrook Academy of Art  Search this
Penland School of Handicrafts  Search this
Tyler School of Art  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women textile artists  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Theme:
Craft  Search this
Women  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13680
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)274892
AAA_collcode_akers08
Theme:
Craft
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_274892
Online Media:

Trude Guermonprez papers, circa 1900-1987, bulk 1932-1976

Creator:
Guermonprez, Trude, 1910-1976  Search this
Guermonprez, Trude, 1910-1976  Search this
Subject:
Guermonprez, Paul.  Search this
Elsesser, John  Search this
Marcks, Gerhard  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Type:
Diaries
Drawings
Photographs
Prints
Sketchbooks
Sketches
Topic:
Decorative arts  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women textile artists  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Theme:
Craft  Search this
Sketches & Sketchbooks  Search this
Women  Search this
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)11149
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)248798
AAA_collcode_guertrud
Theme:
Craft
Sketches & Sketchbooks
Women
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_248798
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Neda Al-Hilali, 2006 July 18-19

Interviewee:
Al-Hilali, Neda, 1938-  Search this
Al-Hilali, Neda, 1938-  Search this
Interviewer:
Riedel, Mija, 1958-  Search this
Subject:
Bassler, James W.  Search this
Hunsaker, Joyce Badgley  Search this
Jacobs, Ferne K. (Ferne Kent)  Search this
Kester, Bernard  Search this
Simsar, Alice  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
California State University, Los Angeles  Search this
Claremont Graduate University  Search this
Hunsaker/Schlesinger Gallery  Search this
Scripps College  Search this
Taliban  Search this
University of California, Los Angeles  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women textile artists  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Climatic changes  Search this
Theme:
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Craft  Search this
Women  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13545
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)261763
AAA_collcode_alhila06
Theme:
Lives of American Artists
Craft
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_261763
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Consuelo Jimenez Underwood, 2011 July 5-6

Interviewee:
Jimenez Underwood, Consuelo, 1949-  Search this
Jimenez Underwood, Consuelo, 1949-  Search this
Interviewer:
Riedel, Mija, 1958-  Search this
Subject:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)15964
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)302897
AAA_collcode_underw11
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_302897
Online Media:

Gyöngy Laky papers, 1912-2007

Creator:
Laky, Gyöngy, 1944-  Search this
Laky, Gyöngy, 1944-  Search this
Subject:
Laky, Zyta  Search this
University of California, Davis. Art Dept.  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women textile artists  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Theme:
Craft  Search this
Women  Search this
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)11146
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)248742
AAA_collcode_lakygyon
Theme:
Craft
Women
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_248742

Oral history interview with Wilma Harris, 1964 Apr. 22

Interviewee:
Harris, Wilma, 1910-  Search this
Harris, Wilma, 1910-  Search this
Interviewer:
McChesney, Mary Fuller, 1922-  Search this
Subject:
Arnautoff, Victor Mikhail  Search this
Bufano, Beniamino  Search this
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
New Deal, 1933-1939  Search this
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women textile artists  Search this
Theme:
Craft  Search this
New Deal  Search this
Women  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12681
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)213548
AAA_collcode_harris64
Theme:
Craft
New Deal
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_213548

The Will to Adorn: African American Diversity, Style, and Identity

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
The creative traditions of dress and body arts among people of African descent in the United States reveal continuities of ideas, values, skills, and knowledge rooted in the African continent and in the American experience. They have been shaped by identities born of African heritage; legacies of bondage and resistance; and encounters and alliances between people of African descent, indigenous Americans, Europeans, and more recent African and Caribbean diasporas. They may reflect, for example, shared experiences of the Civil Rights and Black Power movements; group commitments to faith; and the politics of gender.

African Americans "belong" to many communities variously defined by ethnic, class, gender and gender orientation, regional, religious, political, cultural, and other affiliations that exist in complex interrelationship with each other. Accordingly, there is no single African American aesthetic of dress; there are many aesthetics that at times overlap, intertwine, and are juxtaposed in visual dialogues defining difference and belonging.

Style, the art of dress and personal adornment, is a powerful way to assert complex identities, announce solidarity with a cause, proclaim music and dance preferences, uphold cultural pride, and declare belief in a set of religious and moral principles. In all its glorious diversity, African American style is as local as the barbershop on the corner and as global as the influence of hip hop dress culture among young people from Japan to South Africa. The 2013 Festival celebrated the communities, artisans, and exemplars of style who contribute to this distinctive, expressive art form and their creative approaches, processes, and performances.

The Will to Adorn Festival program was part of a multi-year collaborative cultural research and community engagement project initiated by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage. The project brought together faculty and students at historically (and predominantly) African American colleges and universities, museum and independent scholars, community and student researchers, educators, and cultural practitioners to document and present the wearable art traditions of African Americans from diverse regional, ethnic, occupational, faith, and ideology-based communities. This research focused on urban style centers - Atlanta, metropolitan Washington, D.C., Baltimore, Chicago, Detroit, New Orleans, New York, St. Croix and St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands, and most recently Oakland, California. The project identified and represented a range of traditions of dress and body arts of Americans of African descent across the United States. At the 2013 Festival, this work was highlighted at the Research Tent, where, as part of the Smithsonian's Will to Adorn Youth Access project, teen researchers worked with visitors to create their own sartorial (dress) autobiographies.

Diana Baird N'Diaye was Program Curator, with a Curatorial Team including Olivia Cadaval, Elaine Nichols, and Debora Mack; Sally A. Van de Water was Program Coordinator. Advisors included: Harold Anderson, Mary Jo Arnoldi, Jade D. Banks, Rachel Delgado-Simmons, Tina Dunkley, James Early, Jessica Harris, Monte Oyd Harris, Christine Kreamer, Marsha MacDowell, Maurita Poole, Mark Puryear, Deborah Richardson, Gwendolyn K. Robinson, Pamela Rogers, Nicole Shivers, Pravina Shukla, Deborah Smith-Pollard, Gabrielle Tayac, Patricia Turner, Mary Arnold Twining Baird, and Deborah Willis.

The program was produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage and supported by Smithsonian Institution funds from the Youth Access Grants Program, the National Museum of African American History and Culture, and other Smithsonian fund sources. It was also supported by AARP. Major in-kind support came from the Smithsonian Office of Mobile Technology, the National Museum of the American Indian, the National Museum of African Art, the Center for Aesthetic Modernism, Spelman College, Clark Atlanta University, Bowie State University, Frank McClarin High School, University of the District of Columbia, University of Michigan, University of California-Los Angeles, Michigan State University, Pyramid Atlantic Art Center, and Mind-Builders Creative Arts Center. Research for the program was funded by the Craft Research Fund, Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation, Smithsonian Scholarly Studies, Smithsonian Institution Consortium for Understanding the American Experience and Consortium for World Cultures, and the Virgin Islands Council on the Arts.
Researchers:
Maurita Poole and Spelman College students, Deborah Robinson and McClarin High School Video Production Program, Atlanta researchers; Althea Grey McKenzie, Baltimore researcher; Gwendolyn Robinson, Chicago researcher; Simone Forde, Deborah Smith Pollard, Detroit researchers; Diana Briggs, Malik Stevenson, New Orleans researchers; Jade D. Banks, Madaha Kinsey Lamb, and students of the Beverly Robinson Folk Arts Internship Program, Mind-Builders Creative Arts, New York City researchers; Shukuru Sanders, Oakland researcher; Harold Anderson and students at Bowie State University and Goucher College, Camila Bryce-LaPorte and students, Katherine Hockey, Mark Puryear, James Robinson, Washington, D.C., researchers; Sally A. Van de Water, Januwa Moja, Jade D. Banks, Betty Mahoney, U.S. Virgin Islands researchers; Camila Bryce LaPorte, Olivia Smith-Elnaggar, Deborah Smith Pollard, communities of faith researchers; Rachel Delgado-Simmons, Gabrielle Tayac, Native/African American communities researchers; Keisha Martin, on-line communities of style researcher
Presenters:
Kimberly Brown, Camila Bryce-LaPorte, James Early, Allison J. Hamilton, Elaine Nichols, Mark Puryear, Gwendolyn Robinson, Olivia Smith-Elnaggar, Gabrielle Tayac, Patricia Turner, Derrick Washington
Participants:
DESIGN STUDIO ARTISANS

Hadia Abul-Qasim, 1968-, henna artist, Washington, D.C.

Elena Crusoe Aiken, 1947-, jewelry maker, Silver Spring, Maryland

Kwasi Asare, 1963-, kente weaver, Washington, D.C., and Nwasam, Ghana

Akosua Bandele, 1951-, jewelry designer, Windsor, North Carolina

Vanilla Beane, milliner, Washington, D.C.

C. Alan Bennett (1968-) and the Bennett Career Institute, beauty school, Washington, D.C.

Lawrence Berry, 1942-, shoe designer and stylist, Upper Marlboro, Maryland

Andrea Bray, 1942-, milliner, Silver Spring, Maryland

Fana Chisolm, 1959-, hair braider and stylist, Silver Spring, Maryland

Malaika Tamu Cooper, 1967-, hairstylist and hair show organizer, Baltimore, Maryland

Jay F. Coleman, artist, tattoo artist, painter, lecturer, educator, Washington, D.C.

Evette Everett, jewelry designer and bead maker, College Park, Georgia

Dusan and Rachel Grante, cosmetologists, make-up artists, stylists, Vienna, Virginia

Alexis Gumbs, 1982-, dress artist and cultural activist, Durham, North Carolina

Diondra Hall, stylist, wig maker, Capitol Heights, Maryland

Fannie Hamilton, 1949-, master gardener and herbalist, Washington, D.C.

Al Haynes, 1959-, designer of Caribbean Carnival costumes, St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands

Paul Koko, 1955-, tailor, Riverdale, Maryland

Crystal Little, milliner, Washington, D.C.

Peterbug Mathews, 1949-, cobbler and educator, Washington, D.C.

Dennis "Denny Moe" Mitchell, barber, New York, New York

Habeebah Muhammad, 1954-, confectioner of scents and natural body care products, Washington, D.C.

Januwa Moja Nelson, dress artist, Washington, D.C.

Cynthia Sands, textile artist, Washington, D.C.

Marvin Sin, 1948-, leather accessories designer, Windsor, North Carolina

Situ Sofon, hair braider, Silver Spring, Maryland

Thomas Tate, shoe designer and stylist, Upper Marlboro, Maryland

Brenda Winstead, designer, New Windsor, Maryland

ROCK THE RUNWAY STAGE

Fatoukiné Ndiaye Abeille, style exemplar, Washington, D.C., and Paris, France

Christylez Bacon, musician, Washington, D.C.

Junious Brickhouse and Urban Artistry, dancers/voguers, Washington, D.C.

Juanita Britton, entrepreneur, Washington, D.C., and Ghana

Sharon Bullock, 1954-, designer, owner Metamorphosis Boutique, Silver Spring, Maryland

A'Lelia Bundles, family historian, writer, Washington, D.C.

Caribbean and Afro-Latino style exemplars, Washington, D.C.

Cristine Brooks Cropper, D.C. fashion commissioner, Washington, D.C.

Emory Douglas, 1943-, graphic arts designer, former minister of culture for the Black Panther Party for Self Defense, San Francisco, California

Earthen Vessels youth, style exemplars, Washington, D.C.

Kahil El'Zabar and the Ethnic Heritage Ensemble, musician, tailor, Chicago, Illinois

Gladys-Marie Fry, folklorist, University of Maryland professor emeritus, Maryland

In Process..., Washington, D.C.

Kimberly Kelley, regalia maker, Nottaway tribal member, Washington, D.C.

Rosemary Reed Miller, historian and entrepreneur, Washington, D.C.

Lubna Muhammad, 1955-, fashion designer, Pennsauken, New Jersey

Betty Keckley Stratford, family historian, Washington, D.C.

Takoma Park Baptist Church, style exemplars, Takoma Park, Maryland

RESEARCH TENT

Jade Banks, director, Dr. Beverly J. Robinson Community Folk Culture Program, Mind-Builders Creative Arts Center, New York, New York

Monte Oyd Harris, 1966-, Maryland, plastic surgeon, Chevy Chase, Maryland

Yemaya Jones, 1949-, resist dyer, Frederiksted, St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands

James Pogue, 1993-, Frank McClarin High School student researcher, Atlanta Georgia

Darius Smith, 1993-, Frank McClarin High School student researcher, Atlanta Georgia

Geena Paige Mignon, genealogist, African ancestry

Edmund Asante, 1993-, Mind-Builders student researcher, Bronx, New York

Katherine Blanco, 1995-, Mind-Builders student researcher, Bronx, New York

Marlon Carter, Mind-Builders student researcher

Chennell Christopher, 1984-, Mind-Builders student researcher, Bronx, New York

Phylicia Martin, Mind-Builders student researcher

Debra Robinson, 1953-, videographer, educator, Frank McClarin High School, Atlanta, Georgia

Andrene M. Taylor, 1978-, health activist, CEO of Zuriworks for Women's Health, Washington, D.C.
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2013 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2013, Series 5
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2013 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk553d2190a-b510-4921-9eb2-07807ae02e2c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2013-ref39

Oral history interview with Adela Akers

Interviewee:
Akers, Adela, 1933-  Search this
Interviewer:
Riedel, Mija, 1958-  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Art Institute of Chicago -- Student  Search this
Cranbrook Academy of Art -- Faculty  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Penland School of Handicrafts -- Faculty  Search this
Tyler School of Art -- Faculty  Search this
Extent:
113 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2008 March 4-6
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Adela Akers conducted 2008 March 4-6, by Mija Riedel, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Akers' studio, in Guerneville, California.
Akers speaks of her California studio; moving from Spain to Cuba at a young age; earning a degree in pharmacy before pursuing art at the Art Institute of Chicago, Illinois; her parents' businesses; struggling with English and becoming a citizen; the influence of architecture, geometry, and math in her work; her first big show at the American Craft Museum; working at Penland School of Crafts and Cranbrook Academy of Art; her several commissioned works; light and shadow in her accordion-shaped pieces; working with the Peace Corps and weaving in Peru; learning pre-Colombian weaving techniques; working on a commissioned project in Mexico with native weavers; experimenting with size and color in weaving; teaching at the Tyler School of Art; the influence of travel in her work; the qualities of jute, sisal, metal, and horsehair in weaving. Akers also recalls Cindy Cleary, Guido Llinas, Abelardo Estorino, Marianne Strengell, Ed Rossback, Glen Kaufman, Julia and Isiah Zagar, Joyce Chow, Katie and Billy Bernstein, Tom Suomalainen, Ron Garfinkel, Lee Nordness, Janet Taylor, Leora Stewart, Aron Siskin, Lewis Knauss, Agnes Martin, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Adela Akers (1933- ) is a fiber artist from Guerneville, California. Mija Riedel (1958- ) is a curator and writer from San Francisco, California.
General:
Originally recorded on 3 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 10 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hr., 59 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Weavers -- California  Search this
Fiber artists -- California  Search this
Educators -- California  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women textile artists  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.akers08
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw98a3d8c10-03c4-482a-831c-5d479db4a89c
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-akers08
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Consuelo Jimenez Underwood

Interviewee:
Jimenez Underwood, Consuelo  Search this
Interviewer:
Riedel, Mija, 1958-  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Extent:
191 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2011 July 5-6
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Consuelo Jimenez Underwood conducted 2011 July 5 and 6, by Mija Riedel, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Underwood's home and studio, in Cupertino, California.
Biographical / Historical:
Consuelo Jimenez Underwood (1949- ) is a textile artist and weaver in Cupertino, California. Mija Riedel (1958- ) is an independent scholar in San Francisco, California.
General:
Originally recorded as 7 sound files. Duration is 6 hr., 41 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Weavers -- California -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.underw11
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9ddd299bc-8554-4388-921b-ebe65163a205
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-underw11
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Gyöngy Laky

Interviewee:
Laky, Gyöngy, 1944-  Search this
Interviewer:
Riedel, Mija, 1958-  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Branford, Joanne Segal, 1933-1994  Search this
Christiansen, Brett  Search this
Dobras, Darryl  Search this
Dumas, Mary  Search this
Elliott, Lilian, 1930-1994  Search this
Foosaner, Judith, 1940-  Search this
Gablik, Suzi  Search this
Hamilton, Ann, 1956-  Search this
Lahner, Émile, 1893-1980  Search this
Larsen, Jack Lenor  Search this
Miller, Henry, 1891-1980  Search this
Nevelson, Louise, 1899-1988  Search this
Ocampo, Kim  Search this
Puryear, Martin, 1941-  Search this
Rossbach, Ed  Search this
Sontag, Susan, 1933-2004  Search this
Voulkos, Peter, 1924-2002  Search this
Extent:
11 Items (Sound recordings: 11 sound files (4 hr., 8 min.), digital, wav)
66 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
2007 December 11-12
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Gyöngy Laky conducted 2007 December 11-12, by Mija Riedel, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Laky's home and studio, in San Francisco, California.
Laky speaks of her recent exhibitions; leaving Hungary as a child; using words in art; learning languages; family influences in her art; the family art gallery and Chinese painting; changing majors in college; working with various materials; using recycled materials in her work; retirement; planning her works; working with assistants; working with a small community in Europe; construction of her works; using computers to create art; the craft "renaissance"; scale and outdoor projects; working with dealers and commissioned pieces; emphasis on negative space. Laky also recalls Emile Lahner, Mary Dumas, Ed Rossbach, Judy Foosaner, Peter Voulkos, Joanne Branford, Lillian Elliott, Henry Miller, Louise Nevelson, Darryl Dobras, Brett Christiansen, Kim Ocampo, Jack Lenor Larsen, Martin Puryear, Ann Hamilton, Suzi Gablik, Susan Sontag, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Gyöngy Laky (1944- ) is a textile artist from San Francisco, California. Mija Riedel (1958- ) is a curator and writer from San Francisco, California.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 11 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hr., 8 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
Decorative arts  Search this
Computer Art  Search this
Painting -- China  Search this
Textile artists -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Art and computers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.laky07
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw943b1a81c-dc91-43ff-b58c-94ffd7b397ac
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-laky07
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Neda Al-Hilali

Interviewee:
Al-Hilali, Neda, 1938-  Search this
Interviewer:
Riedel, Mija, 1958-  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
California State University, Los Angeles -- Faculty  Search this
Claremont Graduate University -- Faculty  Search this
Hunsaker/Schlesinger Gallery  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Scripps College -- Faculty  Search this
Taliban  Search this
University of California, Los Angeles -- Faculty  Search this
University of California, Los Angeles -- Students  Search this
Bassler, James W., 1933-  Search this
Hunsaker, Joyce Badgley  Search this
Jacobs, Ferne K. (Ferne Kent), 1942-  Search this
Kester, Bernard  Search this
Simsar, Alice  Search this
Extent:
116 Pages (Transcript)
22 Items (Sound recording: 22 sound files (7 hr., 46 min.), digital, wav)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
2006 July 18-19
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Neda Al-Hilali conducted 2006 July 18-19, by Mija Riedel, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at the artist's home, in Los Angeles, California.
Al-Hilali speaks of her childhood in Czechoslovakia and Bavaria; studying language in London; her experience living in Baghdad, Iraq with her first husband; moving to California and completing her undergraduate and graduate degrees at UCLA; teaching experiences at Scripps College, Claremont Graduate University, California State University Los Angeles, and UCLA; the installation processes of Beach Occurrence with Tongues, Black Passage, the Cassiopeia series, and others; frustrations she encountered with commission work; the rich history of the fiber tradition; travels to Afghanistan, Japan, and Oaxaca, Mexico; achieving gestural and painterly qualities with fiber; the importance of color in textile work in the Middle East; experiences with galleries, including the Hunsaker/Schlesinger Gallery in Santa Monica, California; utilizing a Ouija board for reflection and creative guidance; issues such as global warming and over-development; the status of women in Afghanistan under Taliban rule; the gratitude she feels at being a part of the fiber tradition; and plans for the future. Al-Hilali also recalls Bernard Kester, Jim Bassler, Fern Jacobs, Joyce Hunsaker, Alice Simsar, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Neda Al-Hilali (1938- ) is a fiber artist and weaver in Los Angeles, California. Mija Riedel (1958- ) is a curator and writer in San Francisco, California.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 22 digital wav files. Duration is 7 hr., 46 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Fiber artists -- California  Search this
Educators -- California  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women textile artists  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Climatic changes  Search this
Function:
Art commissions
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.alhila06
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw90c8786e8-2836-4115-ab8b-deb8cd8afa38
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-alhila06
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Wilma Harris

Interviewee:
Harris, Wilma, 1910-  Search this
Interviewer:
McChesney, Mary Fuller  Search this
Creator:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Names:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Arnautoff, Victor Mikhail, 1896-1979  Search this
Bufano, Beniamino, 1898-1970  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound tape reel (Sound recordings (1 hour), 5 in.)
31 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound tape reels
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1964 Apr. 22
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Wilma Harris conducted by Mary McChesney on 1964 Apr. 22 for the Archives of American Art.
Harris speaks of her background and art education at the California School of Fine Arts; the Federal Art Project weaving project in San Francisco and her involvement in it. She recalls Victor Arnautoff and Beniamino Bufano.
Biographical / Historical:
Weaver; California.
General:
The recording ends before the conclusion of the interview.
Provenance:
Conducted as part of the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts project, which includes over 400 interviews of artists, administrators, historians, and others involved with the federal government's art programs and the activities of the Farm Security Administration in the 1930s and early 1940s.
Occupation:
Weavers -- California  Search this
Topic:
New Deal, 1933-1939  Search this
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women textile artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.harris64
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw965c7d5c7-b34e-4e61-92fb-e706ba22ab4e
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-harris64

Gyöngy Laky papers

Creator:
Laky, Gyöngy, 1944-  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
University of California, Davis. Art Dept. -- Faculty  Search this
Laky, Zyta  Search this
Extent:
21.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Date:
1912-2007
Scope and Contents:
Biographical information, correspondence, writings, photographs, printed material, works of art, and a video.
Biographical / Historical:
Gyöngy Laky (1944- ) is a textile artist and educator in San Francisco, Calif.
Provenance:
Donated 2004-2010 by Gyöngy Laky as part of the Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America. Additions are expected.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center.
Laky's diary from her year in India, 1971-1972 (1 fldr) is ACCESS RESTRICTED: written permission required. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Fiber artists -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Educators -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women textile artists  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.lakygyon
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9f6453527-18e0-4f6b-8d16-1320f7f7c7fb
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-lakygyon

Trude Guermonprez papers

Creator:
Guermonprez, Trude, 1910-1976  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Elsesser, John  Search this
Guermonprez, Paul.  Search this
Marcks, Gerhard  Search this
Extent:
1.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Diaries
Drawings
Photographs
Prints
Sketchbooks
Sketches
Date:
circa 1900-1987
bulk 1932-1976
Summary:
The papers of fiber artist and educator Trude Guermonprez measure 1.2 linear feet and date from circa 1900 to 1987 with the bulk of the material dating from 1932 to 1976. The collection includes biographical material, diaries, correspondence, printed material, artwork, and photographs.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of fiber artist and educator Trude Guermonprez measure 1.2 linear feet and date from circa 1900 to 1987 with the bulk of the material dating from 1932 to 1976. The collection includes biographical material, diaries, correspondence, printed material, artwork, and photographs.

Biographical material includes an address book, awards and certificates, two diaries, and a wedding announcement. Correspondence is with Guermonprez's family, Paul Guermonprez, John Elsesser, Gerhard Marcks, and others. Printed materials include Clippings and periodicals about Guermonprez. Artwork contains doodles, sketches and drawings, etchings, and two sketchbooks by Guermonprez and others. Photographs are of Guermonprez and her family.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as five series.

Series 1: Biographical Materials, circa 1950-1975 (0.2 linear feet; Box 1, OV 4)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1930s-1987 (0.4 linear feet; Boxes 1-3)

Series 3: Printed Materials, 1946-1976 (2 folders; Box 2)

Series 4: Artwork, circa 1940-1976 (0.5 linear feet; Boxes 2-3, OV 4)

Series 5: Photographs, circa 1900-circa 1970 (2 folders; Boxes 2-3, OV 4)
Biographical / Historical:
Trude Guermonprez (1910-1976) was a fiber artist and educator in San Francisco, California.

Guermonprez was born in Germany to Dr. Heinrich and Jalena Jalowetz and attended the Municipal School of Arts and Crafts in Halle Saale, Germany where she learned weaving from Bauhaus artist Benita Otte. In 1933, her parents and sister Lisa immigrated to the United States. Her parents began teaching at Black Mountain College in North Carolina. Guermonprez stayed with her husband, photographer Paul Guermonprez, in the Netherlands where he became involved in the Dutch resistance during World War II. Paul was killed fighting with the resistance on D-Day in 1944. After his death, Guermonprez decided to move to the United States to be with her mother and sister. Her father had died a year earlier. Guermonprez temporarily led the weaving program at Black Mountain College when Josef and Anni Albers went on sabbatical, and eventually she became a full time faculty member. When the weaving program ended in 1949, she left North Carolina for California to join her former classmate Marguerite Wildenhain at Pond Farm Workshops. There she met her second husband, craftsman John Elsesser. They moved to San Francisco and Guermonprez began teaching at the California College of Art and Design. She was designated chair of the crafts department in 1960.

Outside of teaching, Guermonprez completed designs for textile companies and commissions while still creating her own works of fiber art. She gained little recognition during her career, winning a couple of awards before her death from cancer in 1976. Her only exhibition, The Tapestries of Trude Guermonprez, was held several years after her death in 1982 at the Oakland Museum of California.
Provenance:
The Trude Guermonprez papers were donated in 2004 by Eric Elsesser, Guermonprez's stepson, as part of the Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center.
Occupation:
Fiber artists -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Educators -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Topic:
Decorative arts  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women textile artists  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Diaries
Drawings
Photographs
Prints
Sketchbooks
Sketches
Citation:
Trude Guermonprez papers, circa 1900-1987, bulk 1932-1976. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.guertrud
See more items in:
Trude Guermonprez papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw945bab192-2076-4234-893a-b882c760d629
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-guertrud

Fiberworks, Center for the Textile Arts records

Creator:
Fiberworks, Center for the Textile Arts  Search this
Names:
Laky, Gyöngy, 1944-  Search this
Extent:
3.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Date:
1973-2005
bulk 1974-1987
Summary:
The Fiberworks, Center for the Textile Arts records measure 3.2 linear feet and date from 1973-2005, with the bulk of the records dating from 1974-1987. The collection documents the textile arts school, gallery, and studio through administrative records, photographs, printed matter, and audiovisual material. Records include meeting minutes; photographs of artwork, events, and the Fiberworks community; brochures, announcements, newsletters, and clippings; and sound and video recordings from symposiums, lectures, and interviews.
Scope and Contents:
The Fiberworks, Center for the Textile Arts records measure 3.2 linear feet and date from 1973-2005, with the bulk of the records dating from 1974-1987. The collection documents the textile arts school, gallery, and studio through administrative records, photographs, printed matter, and audiovisual material. Records include meeting minutes; photographs of artwork, events, and the Fiberworks community; brochures, announcements, newsletters, and clippings; and sound and video recordings from symposiums, lectures, and interviews.

Administrative records include meeting minutes from the board of trustees and advisory committee as well as an exhibition file. Printed material includes exhibition announcements, posters, and catalogs; event posters and schedules; Fiberworks course catalogs and brochures; publications; and clippings. Photographs and slides depict artwork, exhibition installations, and events. Also included is a series composed of papers, photographs, video, and sound recordings from Fiberworks symposiums as well as recordings of interviews and lectures hosted by the organization.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 4 series.

Series 1: Administrative Records, 1974-1987

Series 2: Symposiums, Lectures, and Interviews, circa 1978-1989

Series 3: Printed Material, 1973-2005, bulk 1974-1987

Series 4: Photographs, 1974-1987
Biographical / Historical:
Fiberworks Center for the Textile Arts was a textile arts school in Berkley, California, established in 1973 by artist Gyöngy Laky. Fiberworks operated a studio, a gallery, and a school until 1987.

Fiberworks held exhibitions and symposiums, housed resident-artists, and organized workshops, adult education classes, and trips all over the world for interested textile artists. Additionally, Fiberworks partnered first with Lone Mountain College in San Francisco, California, and then with John F. Kennedy University in Pleasant Hill, California, to provide an M.F.A. degree.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Gyongy Laky, founder of Fiberworks, in 2006.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.

Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Fiber artists -- California  Search this
Function:
Art Schools -- California
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Citation:
Fiberworks, Center for the Textile Arts records, 1973-2005. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.fibecenf
See more items in:
Fiberworks, Center for the Textile Arts records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw938c118e4-851e-4b4f-876b-fad66c330a2c
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-fibecenf

Elizabeth Gordon Papers

Creator:
Gordon, Elizabeth, 1906-2000  Search this
Names:
Claiborne, Craig  Search this
Gordon, Elizabeth, 1906-2000  Search this
Leach, Bernard, 1887-1979  Search this
Extent:
3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Periodicals
Photographs
Correspondence
Personal papers
Place:
Japan
Date:
1958-1987
Summary:
Papers, 1959-1987, of Elizabeth Gordon, editor of the periodical, House Beautiful from 1941-1964, mostly related to her research for the August and September 1960 issues of House Beautiful regarding the Japanese aesthetic concept of "shibui", and the subsequent travelling "shibui exhibition" from 1961-1964. Included are correspondence, some photocopies, 1959-1963; notes; drafts for articles and lectures; printed material including magazine and newspaper clippings, 1959-1987; 2 books, and exhibition announcements; drawings of paper and foil art; a photo album containing photos of exhibition installations; and photographs, slides, color transparencies, and lantern slides depicting people, sites, and objects reflecting the "shibui" aesthetic.
Scope and Contents:
The Elizabeth Gordon Papers measure 4.5 linear feet and span the years 1959-1987. The collection mainly documents Ms. Gordon's research for the August and September 1960 issues of House Beautiful regarding the Japanese aesthetic concept of "shibui", and the subsequent travelling "shibui exhibition" from 1961-1964. Included are correspondence, some photocopies, 1959-1963; research notes and materials; articles; lectures; printed material including magazine and newspaper clippings, 1959-1987; 2 books, and exhibition announcements; article materials; a photo album containing photos of exhibition installations; and photographs, slides, color transparencies, and lantern slides depicting people, sites, and objects reflecting the "shibui" aesthetic.
Arrangement note:
This collection is organized into eight series. 1. Biographical data, 2. Shibui research, 3. Shibui issues of, House Beautiful, 4. Correspondence, 5. Shibui promotion, 6. Exhibition files, 7. Printed materials, and 8. Photographs.
Biographical Information:
Born in Logansport, Indiana in 1906, Elizabeth Gordon served as editor of House Beautiful magazine 1941 to 1964. Ms. Gordon first became interested in Japanese aesthetics during the mid-1950s. As a result she began to read and study Japanese art, history and culture. In 1959, Gordon travelled to Japan with three staff people from, House Beautiful. In Kyoto she met Eiko Yuasa, a young woman then employed by the City of Kyoto to handle foreign V.I.P.s, who was assigned to assist Gordon during her stay there. It was Ms. Yuasa who, in the course of discussions of Japanese aesthetics, introduced the term "shibui." Around that term and its related concepts ("iki", "jimi", "hade") the theme for the issue began to crystallize. In August and September, 1960, House Beautiful, under the editorial control of Ms. Gordon, published two extremely popular issues devoted to the subject of "shibui". Due to the popularity of the issues, museum exhibits devoted to the concept of "shibui" travelled around the United States. Ms. Gordon died in Adamstown, Maryland in 2000.

Biographical Overview

1906 -- Born in Logansport, Indiana

1920s -- Attended the University of Chicago

1930s -- Moved to New York to work as a promotional copywriter for several newspapers

1930s -- Syndicated columnist on home maintenance for The New York Herald Tribune

1930s -- Editor at Good Housekeeping (here for 8 years)

1937 -- More House for your Money by Elizabeth Gordon and Dorothy Ducas published by W. Morrow and Company: New York.

1937 -- Married Carl Hafey Norcross

1939 -- Appointed editor of House Beautiful

1964 -- Left the magazine world

1972 -- Published a special issue on Scandinavian design and awarded the insignia of a knight, first class, in the Finnish Order of the Lion

1987 -- American Institute of Architects made her an honorary member

1988 -- Carl Hafey Norcross died

September 3, 2000 -- Died in Adamstown, MD

(The following biography of Elizabeth Gordon comes courtesy of curator Louise Cort. Written in consultation with Elizabeth Gordon, October 23, 1987)

The research papers, memoranda, magazines, books, photographs and color transparencies and other materials in this archives are related to the publication by Elizabeth Gordon (Mrs. Carl Norcross), editor of House Beautiful from 1941 to 1964 and creator of the August, 1960 issue of the magazine on the special theme of the Japanese aesthetic concept of "shibui". The "shibui issue" was followed by the September, 1960, issue of the same publication on the theme, "How to be shibui with American things." As a by-product of the issues, a "Shibui Exhibition" travelled to eleven museums in the United States during 1961-1964. Each exhibition was opened with a slide lecture by Elizabeth Gordon.

Miss Gordon first became curious about Japanese aesthetics in the mid-1950s when she began to see Japanese objects being displayed and used in the homes of Americans who had spent time in Japan during the Occupation and Japanese influence began to appear in wholesale showrooms of home furnishings manufacturers. It was clear that the time had come: she HAD to go to Japan!

She read for five years before going to Japan - history, social mores, art history. (Many of the books on Japan that she collected during this time have been presented to the library at the University of Maryland, College Park.)

An important bit of advice came from Alice Spaulding Bowen, owner of Pacifica, the highest quality shop of Asian antiquities in Honolulu, who told her, "Be sure to read, The Tale of Genji - then you'll understand everything."

She made her first trip to Japan in April, 1959, accompanied by three staff people from, House Beautiful. In Kyoto she met Eiko Yuasa, a young woman then employed by the City of Kyoto to handle foreign V.I.P.s, who was assigned to assist Miss Gordon during her stay there. It was Ms. Yuasa who, in the course of discussions of Japanese aesthetics, introduced the term "shibui." Around that term and its related concepts ("iki", "jimi", "hade") the theme for the issue began to crystallize.

Miss Gordon came home, planning to spend the summer researching "shibui" with the aid of the Japan Society. But she found virtually nothing written in English on the concept. So she returned to Japan in December, 1959 together with staff member Marion Gough, to dig deeper and to work out details and get better educated with Eiko Yuasa. One of their devices was to walk through department stores and discuss with sales personnel whether objects for sale were "shibui", or were "jimi" or "hade", and why. Between themselves, they did the same for the costumes of women they saw on the streets.

Lacking printed sources for information on "shibui", Miss Gordon sought out and interviewed experts, including Douglas Overton, head of the Japan Society in New York. In Japan in December, 1959, she met Yanagi Soetsu, founder of Japan's Folk Craft Movement and head of the Craft Museum in Tokyo (with an introduction from Tonomura Kichinosuke, head of the Craft Museum in Kurashiki). She met the chef Tsuji Kaichi, who was commissioned to write an article on "kaiseki" (that could not be used because of an inadequate English translation) and Frances Blakemore. She met several times with Bernard Leach and attended his lecture at Bonnier's while he was in New York in March, 1960. (He would later write a "fan letter" for the issue)

As the concept of "the shibui issue" began to take shape, a third trip in the spring of 1960 focused on photography - to produce the shooting script decided on the preceding December. This was executed by the noted photographer Ezra Stoller of Rye, New York, and John DeKoven Hill, House Beautiful's Editorial Director. (Mr. Hill worked with Frank Lloyd Wright except for the ten years that he was a member of the House Beautiful editorial staff)

Miss Gordon was back in Japan in Mid-August 1960 as the "shibui issue" was causing a sensation. Altogether she spent sixteen months in Japan.

As one of the experiences that influenced her strong interest in Japanese costumes and textiles, Miss Gordon remembers a spectacularly thorough exhibition at the Tokyo National Museum in Ueno on, 1200 Years of Japanese Costume. She saw it on the last day of its exhibition (possibly 1964).

The August 1960 issue sold out quickly. Copies of the magazine, which sold for fifty cents, were sold on the "black market" for ten dollars.

The publication of the August 1960 issue was followed by an unprecedented avalanche of "fan mail". Many department heads in colleges and universities, including the Harvard-Yenching Institute and the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago (where Miss Gordon had worked as an undergraduate) wrote to comment on the issue. Many people in other fields of endeavor wrote: heads of firms concerned with interior design, landscape architecture, and related areas expressed their interest in the concept of "shibui" Other writers include Bernard Leach, Gertrude Natzler, Laura Gilpin, Mainbocher, the architect Yoshimura Junzo, the textile artist Marianne Strengell, Walter Kerr, Craig Claiborne, and Oliver Statler.

The "shibui issue" was followed immediately by the September issue dealing with the use of non-Japanese objects to express the concept of "shibui." (Miss Gordon convinced her advertisers, who had been skeptical about the potential success of the August issue, by promising the September issue dealing with American products.) Four American firms were involved in the production of an integrated line of paints, wallpaper, furniture and carpets expressive of the concept. Products were designed by the firms' designers following the clues offered by objects and fabrics purchased by Miss Gordon in Japan in December 1959 and spring 1960. Miss Gordon has expressed her dissatisfaction with the September issue, although public opinion was positive. She feels that some of the firms failed in the "shibui" project, though some "caught" the message: namely the paint company and the fabric/wallpaper company.

In response to strong public interest, the House Beautiful staff prepared a travelling exhibition to introduce the concept of "shibui" through a series of vignettes, mixing fabrics and objects, colors and textures. The museum installation was designed by John Hill of House Beautiful. Japan Air Lines underwrote shipping costs.

The exhibition began in Philadelphia in late 1961. Ezra Stoller was sent to photograph the installation in considerable detail at the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts in January, 1962, so that his photographs cold serve as guidelines for installations at the other museums, which included the San Francisco Museum of Art (April 1962), the Newark Pubic Library, and the Honolulu Academy of Art. Miss Gordon presented a lecture on "shibui" at each of the museum installations.

In appreciation of her work to introduce Americans to the concept of "shibui", the city of Kyoto presented a bolt of especially "shibui" kimono fabric executed by a Living National Treasure textile artist. Miss Gordon eventually tailored the fabric into a dress and jacket. She received the 1961 Trail Blazer Award from the New York Chapter of the National Home Fashions League, Inc. In June, 1987, Miss Gordon was named an honorary member of the American Institute of Architects, with her introduction of the concept of "shibui" and her promotion of an understanding of other culture cited as her major contributions to American architecture.
Provenance:
Elizabeth Gordon donated her papers to the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives in 1988.
Elizabeth Gordon donated her papers to the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives in 1988.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
No restrictions on use.
Topic:
Interior decoration -- Periodicals  Search this
Landscape gardening  Search this
Art, Japanese  Search this
Aesthetics, Japanese  Search this
House funishings  Search this
Interior decoration  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Interior decorators  Search this
Gardens -- Japan  Search this
Genre/Form:
Periodicals -- 1940-1970
Photographs
Correspondence
Personal papers -- 1950-2000
Citation:
The Elizabeth Gordon Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Gift of Elizabeth Gordon, 1988
Identifier:
FSA.A1988.03
See more items in:
Elizabeth Gordon Papers
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/dc3bd5683e5-f956-4a04-9d0c-4565a6b761b7
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a1988-03
Online Media:

The fabric of life : 150 years of Northern California fiber art history : San Francisco State University Art Department Gallery, September 21-October 18, 1997 / curated by Candace Crockett and Mark Johnson ; historic Native American objects selected by Julian Lang in cooperation with the Oakland Museum of California

Title:
150 years of Northern California fiber art history
One hundred and fifty years of Northern California fiber art history
Author:
Crockett, Candace 1945-  Search this
Johnson, Mark  Search this
Lang, Julius  Search this
San Francisco State University Art Department Gallery  Search this
Oakland Museum of California  Search this
Physical description:
48 p. : ill. ; 21 cm
Type:
Exhibitions
Place:
California
Date:
1997
C1997
Topic:
Textile crafts  Search this
Textile artists  Search this
Fiberwork  Search this
Indian arts  Search this
Call number:
TT699 .F33 1997
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_570904

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