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MS 1627 Miscellaneous vocabularies of 32 different tribes

Collector:
Bartlett, John Russell, 1805-1886  Search this
Husband, Bruce  Search this
Encinas, Fr  Search this
Whipple, Amiel Weeks, 1817?-1863  Search this
Brown, H. B.  Search this
Heintzelman, Samuel Peter, 1805-1880  Search this
Duralde, Martin  Search this
Informant:
Cawewas, Pedro  Search this
Peraza, Hieronymo  Search this
Alejo, Marcos  Search this
Ortiz, Santiago  Search this
A-he-ba-tu  Search this
Esteban  Search this
Colusio  Search this
Extent:
183 Items (numbered pages )
Culture:
Kiowa  Search this
Nahua  Search this
Athapascan Indians  Search this
Tanoan Indians  Search this
Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan)  Search this
Pujunan  Search this
Athapaskan  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Seri  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Tanoan  Search this
Wakashan Indians  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Kulanapan  Search this
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Chitimacha  Search this
Atakapa  Search this
Maya  Search this
San Luis Rey  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Pomo  Search this
Maidu  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Basin  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
On page 129-134, there is a Comanche vocabulary alongside with Spanish and Luiseno. Follows items called for in Smithsonian Institution Comparative Vocabulary. Some Comanche terms lacking.
Contents: Bartlett, John R. "Cochimi language of Lower California obtained through Mr Robinia of Guaymas, Sonora." No date. [post 1852] Autograph document. pages 215-218 in bound volume of vocabularies. Vocabulary written in "American Ethnological Society Circular Number 1, Indian Languages of America, June, 1852," a printed outline of 200 words. Negative microfilm on file. Heintzelman, Major S. P. Vocabulary of the Cocopa language. Fort Yuma, Colorado, April 19, 1854. Copy by Bartlett, pages 165-166. Heintzelmam, Major S. P. Vocabulary of the Mohavi or Hum-mock-havy taken by Major Heintzelman. Copy by Bartlett, pages 167-176. Copy in another hand in printed outline published by American Ethnological Society, pages 177-180. On negative Microfilm reel #37. Comanche San Luis Rey [Bartlett, John R.] San Luis Rey- Comanche comparative vocabulary. No informant or date is recorded for the Comanche vocabulary of about 150 words, pages 129-135. All pages are in the handwriting of George Gibbs, here not specifically attributed to Bartlett. However, penciled note on another copy of the Comanche vocabulary (Bureau of American Ethnology Manuscript Number 762) states "probably of J. R. Bartlett." Approximately 5 extra Comanche terms are listed in 1627 which were not copied into the manuscript filed under 762.
Contents: San Luis Rey Comanche [Bartlett, John R.] San Luis Rey- Comanche comparative vocabulary. San Luis Rey vocabulary of about 180 words, pages 128-135. May 10, 1852. All pages are copies in handwriting of George Gibbs, here not specifically attributed to Bartlett, but so attributed to Bartlett, but so attributed in another copy, namely, Bureau of American Ethnology Manuscript Number 772. According to the discussion, pages 128 and 135, vocabulary was recorded from Pedro Cawewas, an old man called the captain or chief of his tribe, about 150 of which now live where the mission of San Luis Rey is situated. Tiwa: Piro [Bartlett, John R.] Piro vocabulary of about 180 words, pages 53-54, and another copy, pages 67-68. "Language of the Piros," discussion, pages 55-59. No date. [Ca. October 2, 1852: date on "Tigua" (Piro ?) vocabulary immediately following on pages 63-65.] All pages are copies in handwriting of George Gibbs, here not specifically attributed to Bartlett, but so attributed in other copies, namely, Bureau of American Ethnology Numbers 458-b and 458-c. According to discussion, page 55, vocabulary was recorded from Hieronymo Peraza and Marcus Alejo, principal men of the pueblo of "Sinecu" [Senecu del Sur, Chihuahua] a few miles below El Paso de Norte, on the western bank of the Rio Grande. Tiwa: Senecu del Sur (Piro ?) [Bartlett, John R.] "Tigua" vocabulary of about 200 words, pages 63-65. October 2, 1852. Copy in handwriting of George Gibbs, here not specifically attributed to Bartlett, but was so attributed in other copies, namely, Bureau of American Ethnology Numbers 458-a and 458-c. Note following heading: "[Language of ?] Indians of Taos, in New Mexico (pronounced Tee-wa) [sic] taken from Santiago Ortiz (A-he-ba-tu) head chief of Senecu, Isleta, etc. [i. e. Senecu del Sur, Chihuahua; see Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 30, II, 509.]" Bartlet's Vocabularies ? 1. Pages 17-19 Sioux vocabulary, translated into Sioux by Bruce Husband, Fort Laramie, February 26, 1849. 2 pages. 2. Pages 21-24 Kiowa vocabulary, from Esteban, a Mexican captive for 7 years among the Comanches and Kiowas in Texas. 5 pages. 3. Pages 25-27 cf. Manuscript 1139- a copy of this. Ceris (Seri) vocabulary taken from a native at Hermosillo, January 1, 1852 (note by Gatschet says 1853). Informant- Colusio. 3 pages. 4. Pages 31-34 Yaqui vocabulary by Fr. Encinas of Ures, December 1851. 4 pages, including notes. 5. Pages 37-39 Opate (Nahuatlan) vocabulary, taken at Ures, Sonora. 3 pages. 6. Pages 43-45; 49-51. Apaches of the Coppermine, taken from Mangus Colorado July, 1851. 3 pages. (also duplicate copy). 7. Pages 53-59; 57 Piro (Tanoaan) vocabulary, taken from two Indians, Hieromymo Peraza and Marcus Alejo. 2 pages. Notes 5 pages. 8. Pages 63-65 "Tigua " [Tiwa] Indians of Taos in New Mexico vocabulary, taken from Santiago Ortiz, head chief of Senecu, Isleta, etc. 3 pages.
Contents: 9. Pages 71-73 Vocabulary of the language of the Coco-Maricopas of the river Gila (Yumian). 3 pages. 10. Pages 77-81; 85-92; Reel #21 Vocabulary of the Diegueno tribe, vocabulary, 8 pages; and 11. Los Angeles Indians, Diegueno tribe, vocabulary, 8 pages. 12. Pages 93-103 Yuman or Cuchan and Comiya (Comeya) vocabulary and notes, 11 pages, including extract from Lt Whipple's diary, October 7, 1849. 13. Pages 105-6; 109-10 13. Vocabulary in the Digger (Pujunan) [Maidu] language, from manuscript in the possession of J. B. Moore obtained by H. B. Brown. 4 pages. 14. Pages 113-116 Napa Valley (Digger) [Pujunan] vocabulary. 3 pages. 15. Pages 117-123 Makah of Cape Flattery and Diggers [Pujunan] of Napa Valley- vocabulary. 6 pages. 16. Pages 125-128 Kechi (Mission of San Luis Rey) vocabulary. Taken from Pedro Cawenas, May 10, 1852, San Luis Rey. Notes. 17. Pages 129-35 San Luis Rey and Comanche vocabulary. 7 pages. Taken from Pedro Cawewas. Includes notes. 18. Pages 137-39. San Luis Obispo vocabulary. 3 pages. 19. Pages 141-144 San Jose Indian vocabulary. 4 pages including notes.
Contents: Bartlett's vocabularies. 20. Pages 145-152 H'hana of Sacramento (Kulanapan) vocabulary, 6 pages. 21. Pages 155-159 Coluse (between Sacramento River and Clear Lake), vocabulary- 6 words only. Erroneously marked Athapaskan in Hewitt's hand. Actually Patwin and Wintun; see word for "Indian"- Note by M. R. Haas. 11/58. Items 21 ans 22: See Pitkin, Harvey and William Shipley, Comparative Survey of California Penutian, IJAL, Volume 24, Number 3, July, 1958, pages 174-88. (Reference from MRH). 22. Coluse and Noema vocabulary. 3 pages. 23. Page 163 Tehama vocabulary. 1 page. 24. Pages 165-66 Cocopa vocabulary. (Fort Yuma, Colorado, Mouth of the Colorado River). 2 pages. April 19, 1854. 25. Pages 167-180 Mohave vocabulary. Major Heintzelman. 14 pages including notes. 26. Pages 181-84 Otomi (Mexico) vocabulary. 3 pages. (1767 and 1826). 27. Pages 186-201 Chitimacha and Attacapa vocabularies and notes. 15 pages. (1848) 28. Pages 203-206 Maya vocabulary. From manuscript dictionary in possession of John Carter Brown. 3 pages. 29. Pages 207-210 Tarahumara vocabulary. 3 pages. (1787 and 1826). 30. Pages 211-214 Cahita (Sonora) vocabulary. 3 pages. 31. Pages 215-18 Cochimi (of Lower California), vocabulary. 3 pages. 32. Pages 219-221 Nevome (Pima of Sonora) vocabulary. 2 pages. (printed). 33. Pages 223-224 Letter to John R. Bartlett from George Gibbs re. to vocabularies. 3 pages.
Contents: Smith, Buckingham. "Vocabulary of the Nevome, As Spoken by the Pima of Moris, A Town of Sonora." 1861, and prior. Printed document. 2 pages. On pages 219 and 221 of this Manuscript. Published excerpt from History Magazine, July, 1861, pages 202-203. Contains grammatical notes, general vocabulary, and the Lord's Prayer in the Nevome dialect of Piman.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1627
Local Note:
Manuscript document
Topic:
Dakota language; Mayo dialect (Piman); Kumiai language; Central Pomo language  Search this
Kiowa language  Search this
Seri language  Search this
Yaqui language  Search this
Opata language  Search this
Chiricahua language  Search this
Maricopa language  Search this
Yuma language  Search this
Maidu language  Search this
Makah language  Search this
Luiseño language  Search this
Comanche language  Search this
Chumash language  Search this
Cocopa language  Search this
Mohave language  Search this
Chitimacha language  Search this
Atakapa language  Search this
Tarahumara language  Search this
Pima Bajo language  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Otomi language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Athabaskan  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Wakash  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Pima (Akimel O'odham)  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 1627, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1627
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3a26edfb4-2402-46a4-a7d1-b985e6b84b47
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1627
Online Media:

Zuni

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
8 Boxes
Culture:
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Date:
1913-1953
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southwest series contains Harrington's Zuni research, which mainly focused on the linguistic relationship between Zuni and Tano-Kiowan-Keresan-Shoshonean stock.

The earliest field data which Harrington obtained on Zuni was recorded in the form of three brief vocabularies. One, dated February 20, 1913, was elicited from George Piro. Harrington indicated that another list of Zuni terms was copied for his B.A.E. colleague Neil Judd in 1919. A third gives the Indian names of several Zuni native speakers and ethnologists. Brief intermixed vocabulary and grammar notes were taken in the field from Nachapani in June and July 1929. A few Navajo comparisons were added.

The vocabulary sections contains Zuni terms arranged semantically, most numerous in the animal and animal parts categories. Other categories include age/sex, material culture, phenomena, placenames, plants, rank, relationship terms, religion, time, and tribenames. Most of the original material was obtained in 1929 in New Mexico where he consulted primarily with Charles or Dick Nachapani.

For his comparative vocabulary, Harrington followed the same semantic arrangement he used for the vocabulary notes, interfiling and comparing Tewa, Kiowa, Hano, Taos, Acoma, and Cahuilla terms. The material stems from his original notes in these languages and contains references to his publications in Tewa ethnozoology and ethnogeography. Perry A. Keahtigh was cited as the Kiowa souce and Adan Castillo for Cahuilla terms. Juan is the only Tewa speaker mentioned by name in the notes, although other Tewa speakers undoubtedly contributed to the original notes used in the many comparisons. Also interfiled are excerpts from papers by Ruth L. Bunzel on Zuni ethnology and grammar and compilations of Nahuatl from the works of Horatio Carochi and Alonso de Molina. Other terms labeled "Gatschet revd by Hodge" may refer to B.A.E. ms. 2870 in which many of Gatschet's approximately 200 Zuni/English vocabulary slips contain annotations by Frederick W. Hodge. Harrington also tapped Matilda Coxe Stevenson's "The Zuni Indians" (1904) for further comparisons. Kymograph tracings are mainly a comparison of Zuni and Navajo lexical terms.

Harrington's Zuni grammatical material was probably assembled in Washington for correlation with his own notes on other languages and with notes from secondary sources to be compiled into a comparative grammar. Most of Harrington's original Zuni material was derived from his fieldwork with Nachapani in June and July of 1929.

Correspondence indicates that Harrington's first draft of a comparative grammar was written in 1944 and was to be titled "Zuni Discovered To Be Hokan." Many of the notes which precede it, however, were interfiled later (probably in the early 1950s) and stem from his original field notes in Zuni, Tewa, and Kiowa. Also included are a lesser number of Taos and Aztec expressions. Harrington utilized the same sources as those found in the grammatical notes, relying most heavily on Bunzel's "Zuni." Another version of the manuscript has the modified title "Zuni, Tanoan, Kiowa Comparisons: Zuni Discovered To Be Hokan."

His ethnobotany notes contains extracts from Wooton and Standley's Flora of New Mexico (1913) and Stevenson's "Ethnobotany of the Zuni Indians." The ethnographic notes are based on Stevenson's The Zuni Indians. This work is frequently referred to in the notes as "Zuni Book."

Harrington's writings consists of notes used in "Name of Zuni Salt Lake in Alarcon's 1540 Account" (1949) and in "Trail Holder" (1949) as well as drafts and notes for proposed publications. Harrington's article "The Name Zuni Comes from the Laguna Dialect of West Keresan" was apparently not accepted for publication. Most of the notes are based on the Zuni section of Hodge's "Handbook." Another unpublished article is on Zuni phrases and numbers. It is similar in approach to a draft on Aztec phrases and numbers, suggesting that he may have contemplated a series of such short articles.
Biographical / Historical:
As early as 1919, John P. Harrington claimed a linguistic relationship between Zuni and a putative Tano-Kiowan-Keresan-Shoshonean stock. In 1929, at the suggestion of Edgar L. Hewett, he was authorized by the Bureau of American Ethnology to work with University of New Mexico students at a summer session in Chaco Canyon. Correspondence and reports indicate that he accumulated the bulk of his original Zuni notes at that time, later reorganizing them at various intervals in Washington, D.C., with an eye toward producing a vocabulary and grammar that would clearly demonstrate affinity among these languages. Harrington also recorded several hundred kymograph tracings. Charles and Dick Nachapani (Natcapanih) and Charlie Cly served as the primary sources of information. Harrington called one of the Nachapani brothers "the prince of all Zuni informants;" which one is uncertain.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Zuni language  Search this
Cahuilla language  Search this
Kiowa language  Search this
Acoma dialect  Search this
Tiwa language  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Navajo language  Search this
Nahuatl language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Grammar, Comparative and general  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Zoology -- nomenclature  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Numeration  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 4.4
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 4: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Southwest
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw385cf212b-afea-4900-97c1-e610682ed7cc
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14612
Online Media:

Tewa

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Freire-Marreco, Barbara W. (Barbara Whitchurch), 1879-1967  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
21 Boxes
Culture:
Tewa Pueblos  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Dictionaries
Manuscripts
Narratives
Vocabulary
Date:
1908-circa 1949
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southwest series contains Harrington's Tewa research. The files include field notes, vocabulary, linguistic and ethnographic notes, a dictionary, records of rehearings, texts, writings, and miscellanous notes.

His field notebooks contain grammar, vocabulary, placenames, names of persons, relationship terms, and material culture; texts concerning Qwiqumat, other myths, and ethnohistory of early Southwest tribes, pueblos, clans, and religion; copies of the San Ildefonso census; and other miscellaneous ethnographic information.

The vocabulary section of the Tewa files include a group of slips identified as Rio Grande vocabulary with some Santa Clara terms specified as such. There is a wide variety of terms, and animal and plant vocabularies were marked by Harrington "A" and "P" respectively (former B.A.E. MS 4678pt.) with some linguistic insertions. The information was collected during the early period. There is also a small file of Spanish loanwords in Tewa that Harrington copied from Eduardo Cata's material.

His linguistic and ethnographic notes contain a few pages each of over twenty topics such as dances, estufas (kivas), pottery, societies, religion, superstitions, Tewa trails, and Tewa origins (former B.A.E. MS 4704pt.). Barbara Freire-Marreco collaborated in the accumulation of some of the material, most of which came from the many informants who contributed to the early notes. Some linguistic material is interspersed. There is a handwritten copy of the Nambe census of 1911, a description and rough sketches of the Black Mesa of San Ildefonso, and several references to Jemez, Spanish Cochiti, Spanish Hopi, Taos, Zuni, and Sia.

A collection of linguistic and ethnographic terms remains in slipfile form (former B.A.E. MS 4704pt.). Some are in various Tewa dialects such as Nambe, San Ildefonso, San Juan, and Santa Clara. A few Taos comparisons are included. The largest group is related to animal parts and animal activities. Ethnographic information includes such topics as snakes, estufas, officers and government, plants, pottery, shrines, and societies. A small group is credited to Barbara Freire-Marreco.

The dictionary (former B.A.E. MS. 4704pt.) was arranged by Cata in June 1927 from his field notes taken during the early period. Part is in alphabetic order, part is devoted to adjectives provided by Julian Martinez, and part covers adverbs from Santiago Naranjo. A second group is also arranged in alphabetic order but no sources are identified. Some related nonlexical and bibliographical material is interspersed.

There are also materials from rehearings Harrington conducted with Santiago Naranjo in 1911, Eduardo Cata in 1927, and David Dozier and "O" in 1948-1949. Harrington and Cata developed a linguistic treatment of notes based on an unpublished dissertation on New Mexico Spanish by Aurelio H. Espinosa. Together they reworked geographic terms from Harrington's "The Ethnogeography of the Tewa Indians." Other miscellaneous rehearings with Cata were more grammatically oriented. Dozier and "O" provided substantial material on San Juan/Hano comparisons, although some of the notes may have been accumulated during a February 1946 visit to Albuquerque, where Harrington interviewed Mr. Shupla, a Hano speaker. This meeting may have resulted also in his proposed article "Hano . . . Same Word as Tano."

In the text section are three myths given by Juan Gonzales on September 1, 2, and 3, 1908 at the camp near the Stone Lions, rendered in Tewa and English with some linguistic notes. Also in both languages is an Ignacio Aguilar story recorded on September 23, 1909. Some stories probably obtained between 1908 and 1909 are in English only. Not all are complete and the continuity of some is broken due to repetitive material and interspersed corrections. There are two short Nambe myths. Eduardo Cata supplied thirteen texts in addition to the three published in 1947. These are in Tewa, most with either interlinear or parallel English translations. Harrington used pencils of different colors to insert orthographic corrections and later annotations. Whether the texts were obtained in 1927 when Cata was in Washington or during the 1940s is uncertain.

Harrington's writing files contain notes and drafts for his unpublished and published writings. There are substantial notes accumulated for "A Brief Description of the Tewa Language" (1910) (former B.A.E. MS 4704pt.). Harrington's notes contain more extensive phonetic and morphological information than the final publication. Notes probably recorded in 1910 for "Ethnogeography" and "Ethnobotany" are intermixed and largely disorganized, although substantial in number (former B.A.E. MS 4704pt.). Additional information and some relevant correspondence for "Ethnogeography" is included (former B.A.E. mss. 3801 and 4704pt.), as well as some notes Harrington excerpted in 1946 from this publication. Drafts and notes for "Three Tewa Texts" include insertions of additional information provided by David Dozier and "O." There are also five sets of drafts for proposed articles. "Ablaut in the Tewa Language of New Mexico" (1912) is an elaboration of the phonetic material used in "A Brief Description of the Tewa Language." "Some Aspects of Tewa Indian Placenames" was written in 1920. Undated are "Hano, Indian Pueblo of Arizona, the Same Word as Tano" (former B.A.E. MS 4521pt.), "Santa Fe at Northern Edge of Tano Country," and "The Tewa Pueblos."

Among the writing files are also materials relating to "Phonetics of the Tewa Language," submitted or sold by Eduardo Cata to the B.A.E. (former MS 4704pt.). The title page, bill of sale, and notes in Harrington's handwriting, and some possibly in Cata's are on file. Informants Mr. and Mrs. "O" also contributed information. There are also two unpublished articles on Tewa tones that Harrington co-authored with David Dozier--"Tewa Tones" and "The 3 Tone Accents and the 1 Non-tone Accent of Tewa."

Also in this subseries are miscellaneous notes, mainly from the early period. Some of the information came from Ignacio Aguilar. There is a small selection of Jemez, Ute, and Taos equivalences. Also included are a diagram of Tewa color symbolism (former B.A.E. ms. 1790), a reproduction of a San Juan Pueblo religious painting, and a very short bibliography.
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington's study of the Tewa languages began in July 1908 under the auspices of the School of American Archaeology (S.A.A.) in Santa Fe, and his interest in the Tewa Indians continued into the late 1940s. Accumulation and organization of notes fall generally into three time frames. The early period can be dated between 1908 and 1916 when Harrington worked first for the Museum of New Mexico as assistant curator, then for Edgar Lee Hewett of the S.A.A., and, from December 1914, as ethnologist for the Bureau of American Ethnology. Six of his publications are based on the notes from this period. In October 1910 he spent several weeks on a tour of Tewa country securing placenames from large numbers of informants. The principal informants for the entire early period are Ignacio Aguilar and Santiago Naranjo (also called "Jim").

Dating from a middle period in 1927, Harrington worked closely with Eduardo Cata in Washington. Cata was described by Harrington as an educated San Juan Tewa Indian. With the exception of one short period (from February to July 1946), Harrington was in Washington from early 1942 until April 1949. During this third period he published "Three Tewa Texts" (1947) based on stories from Cata. The texts may have been received from Cata during the middle period, but the notes represent a rehearing in the 1940s with David Dozier and an informant identified only as "0." Harrington knew David Dozier's father and in May 1944, he wrote self-introductory letters to the son, a fluent speaker of the Santa Clara dialect, who was then in the Indian Service. Harrington also reworked and reorganized much of his grammatical information during these years in Washington. Notes indicate that he may have planned to publish a Tewa grammar.

Other Tewa speakers that Harrington worked with include Bert Fredericks, Manuel Vigil, Bernardo Sanchez, Joe Horner, Desiderio Naranjo, and Alfredo Montoya.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Tewa language  Search this
Tiwa language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Zoology  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Zoology -- nomenclature  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Dictionaries
Manuscripts
Narratives
Vocabulary
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 4.11
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 4: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Southwest
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3e3ed7a56-2578-4e9c-af71-e95c24437b34
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14694
Online Media:

General and Miscellaneous Materials

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Freire-Marreco, Barbara W. (Barbara Whitchurch), 1879-1967  Search this
Henderson, Junius, 1865-1937  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
3 Boxes
Culture:
Hualapai -- language  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Taos Indians  Search this
Tiwa Pueblos  Search this
Tewa Pueblos  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Hualapai (Walapai)  Search this
Yavapai  Search this
Pueblo  Search this
Athapascan Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Sketches
Place:
Elden Pueblo (Ariz.)
Date:
circa 1907-circa 1957
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southwest series within the John P. Harrington papers contains general and miscellaneous materials. Certain notes in this subseries encompass the Southwest as an entity; others constitute small files of miscellany which do not relate directly to the preceding sets of field notes. Few precise dates are assigned to this section of material as it is based on information accumulated over an indefinite period of time.

One section contains archaeological field notes relating to Elden Pueblo. In 1926 Harrington was called to assist J. W. Fewkes at the excavation of ruins at Elden Pueblo near Flagstaff, Arizona. This set of files comprises the journal entries which Harrington made on an almost daily basis between May 27 and August 27, 1926. There are two sets of notes--the original handwritten ones and a typed copy which was submitted to Fewkes on November 10, 1926 (former B.A.E. MS 6010). The journal contains brief notes, sketches of pits and artifacts, references to photographs, and names of associates; there are no significant linguistic or ethnographic data.

The subseries also contains a comparative list of Taos, Picuris, Isleta, Tewa (San Juan), and Tanoan numerals, based mainly on Harry S. Budd's B.A.E. MS 1028. There are also notes on pueblo basket-making from his interviews with Dr. and Mrs. Colton and Mr. Gladwin (B.A.E. MS 2291) , as well as an account of an Indian scout (Yavapai) working for the U.S. Cavalry. In addition, there is an assortment of notes on photographs, bibliography, and a large chart of pronouns.

Harrington's writings are also present. These include preliminary drafts and notes for "The Southwest Indian Languages" and "The Sounds and Structure of the Aztecan Languages." Most of the information was evidently extracted from notes on hand at the time. Harrington mentioned James Johnson and Edward Hunt, both of whom spoke Acoma-Laguna and worked with him in July and August of 1944. Tom Polacca's son gave Hopi data. There are also a partial draft, notes, and bibliography for an article titled "Indians of the Southwest" (1942). Material relating to unpublished writings includes notes for a review of Mary Roberts Coolidge's The Rain-Makers (1929). An undated draft and notes on "The Southern Athapascan" are also included.

A group of original field notes from Harrington's collaborators were left in his possession; in particular, a group of handwritten slips taken between December 10, 1912, and April 6, 1913, were found in an envelope addressed to Harrington. Barbara Freire-Marreco evidently sent them from Polacca, Arizona, to Harrington in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The content is mainly grammatical, with vocabulary items and ethnographic material interspersed. The language has not been identified. A second set of notes consists of cards and a typed list, evidently compiled by Junius Henderson. The data include animal terms in Hopi (Moki), Pima, and Walapai.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Tanoan languages  Search this
Tiwa language  Search this
Isleta language  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Laguna dialect  Search this
Acoma dialect  Search this
Hopi language  Search this
Pima language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Basket making  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Numeration  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Sketches
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 4.12
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 4: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Southwest
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw39c14572f-6a9e-42ff-ba40-1f88a00acd31
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14711

Kiowa

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
26 Boxes
Culture:
Kiowa  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Dictionaries
Manuscripts
Narratives
Place:
Devils Tower National Monument (Wyo.)
Date:
1916-1948
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Plains series contains Harrington's Kiowa research, primarily consisting of vocabulary, comparative vocabulary, a dictionary, linguistic notes, grammar, and texts.

Some of the vocabulary gathered between 1918 and 1920 remains in slipfile form, arranged semantically (former B.A.E. mss. 2289pt. and 2297pt.). Subjects include animals, material culture, plants, and personal categories. During 1945 and 1946, Harrington reorganized his Kiowa notes based on a continuing enlargement of the earlier semantically arranged vocabulary, adding such categories as astronomy, geography, minerals, months, placenames, rank, relationship terms, songs, and tribenames (former B.A.E. ms. 4622pt.). The etymology of some personal names and a partial draft and notes for a proposed paper on "Human Terms" form part of the vocabulary material. The geographic terms were provided by Parker McKenzie and, according to correspondence, most of the relationship terms may also be McKenzie's work. Some of the latter's letters are cut and mounted on separate sheets of paper, others were copied by Harrington, and many are identified with the symbol "<U+2642>." Miscellaneous material includes photocopies of fragments from Robert M. Lowie's "A Note on Kiowa Kinship Terms and Usages," mounted, annotated, and reheard with Keahtigh. A few tribenames elicited from Guy Quoetone (data from him are labeled "Guy Kiowa") and Kiowa Charlie in March and April of 1946 add randomly to the earlier lists.

The comparative vocabulary section contains Tewa comparisons based on Harrington's 1927 accumulation of information from Tewa speaker Eduardo Cata (former B.A.E. ms. 4705pt.). Harrington also used Tewa terms from his "Ethnogeography of the Tewa Indians" (1916), as well as Kiowa terms from James Mooney's "Calendar History of the Kiowa Indians" (1918). In addition, there are a few brief comparisons of Kiowa with Navajo, Paiute (eight pages), and Siouan (two pages).

His dictionary files consist of a manuscript and related notes. The manuscript contains most but not all of the lexical portion of "Vocabulary of the Kiowa Language" with an addition of further entries which were apparently written at a later date.

Among his linguistic notes is a partial draft written in 1916 titled ''The Language of the Kaekua or Kiowa Indians." From 1918 to 1920 while in Anadarko and in Washington, Harrington accumulated extensive information (about 700 pages) on Kiowa vocabulary, grammar, and texts. In 1922 he began a paper on "Notes on the Kiowa Language." He later collated this material in Washington, and in 1928 published a synthesis titled "Vocabulary of the Kiowa Language." The publication encompassed grammatical information with Tewa comparisons, a glossary of lexical terms , and a Kiowa text, (former B.A.E. mss. 4705pt., 2289pt., and 2297pt.).

Documented among the grammar files is Harrington's interest in Kiowa intonation, a title he gave to an unpublished manuscript for which Perry Keahtigh provided information. Their work on this aspect of Kiowa grammar proceeded from September to November 1944, and included recording sessions at the Library of Congress.

There is another unpublished manuscript titled "Kiowa, Pueblo Language of the Plains." This is probably the manuscript that underwent many revisions and rehearings before being published in 1948 as "Popular Account of the Kiowa Indian Language." It encompassed only a minute portion of the ambitious and comprehensive grammar which Harrington had originally envisioned. Because of the diligent reworking of the information, it is rather difficult to determine in what sequence the drafts were created. In order to eliminate as much confusion as possible, all the grammatical drafts of the 1940s are placed together, followed by notes that most nearly reflect the outline of the 1948 publication. Phonetics and morphology are dealt with in detail. Included is brief information on syntax, Indian native language, Spanish and English loanwords, foreign words, slang, and polysynthetic words based on Robert W. Young's "Language: Interesting Side-views of Its Study." (April 1937).

The text section contains over twenty brief stories of Seindei, the culture hero, provided by Delos K. Lonewolf and George Hunt in 1924. Some are in Kiowa and English, some in English only. One myth was given in English by a Comanche Indian named Albert Attock. This textual material was formerly cataloged as part of B.A.E. ms. 4705. There are various versions of Lonewolf's "The Udder-angry Travelers-off" text which appeared in "Vocabulary of the Kiowa Language," "Three Kiowa Texts," and "Popular Account of the Kiowa Indian Language." Frequent rehearings with Keahtigh in November 1945 preceded the last-named publication. Additional material for "Three Kiowa Texts" contains extensive annotations by McKenzie and a few further rehearings from Keahtigh. Laura D. Pedrick translated the Lord's Prayer; a "Church Song" in Kiowa (former B.A.E. ms. 4705pt.) came from Mr. Light (not further identified). There are several texts edited by McKenzie for collaboration with Harrington. They include Enoch Smoky's "Bear Girl Story," recorded March 26,1946, and Hunting Horse's "Mad Girl Story," heard on February 24, 1946 (former B.A.E. ms. 4622pt.). On March 31, 1940, Kiowa Charlie, with the help of Guy Quoetone and Lonewolf, dictated still another Devils Tower myth.

Harrington's Kiowa files also contain other notes and information about Devils Tower in the Black Hills of Wyoming. This evolved into his 1939 publication, "Kiowa Memories of the Northland." The bulk of the Devils Tower material was originally listed as B.A.E. ms. 6070.
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington's search for a relationship between Kiowa and the Tanoan languages led to a substantial accumulation of and career-long interest in Kiowa grammatical, linguistic, and textual material. His study resulted in eight publications on Kiowa, the first appearing in 1910 and the last in 1948.

Early in 1918 Harrington worked in Washington, D.C., with Delos and Ida Lonewolf, (the latter abbreviated "Mrs. L."), who were accompanied by their youngest son, Theodore. In June 1918, Harrington conducted fieldwork at the Kiowa Agency in Anadarko, Oklahoma. Interviews were held with James Waldo (W.): Enoch Smoky, head of the peyote cult among the Kiowa; Parker McKenzie (McK): Laura D. Pedrick (also referred to as "Mrs. P" and"L. Pro "); and several others. The primary focus of his work at that time was to collect linguistic data needed for comparative studies, especially with the Tanoan languages. From mid-1919 through 1920 Harrington remained at Bureau of American Ethnology headquarters, during which time he sorted and reorganized the Kiowa notes. While in Washington, D.C., in 1924, he elicited Kiowa texts from the Lonewolfs and from George Hunt, who was regarded as a superb tribal historian.

"Vocabulary of the Kiowa Language," published in 1928, unfortunately reflects only a small portion of the information he had amassed during his early work. In his notes, Harrington referred to this publication as the "Dictionary," "Dict.," or "Bulletin." He was evidently not pleased with the work. As he wrote to Parker McKenzie in later years: "It has a lot of idiosyncracies in it which are absolutely incorrect. They [the B.A.E.] forced me to publish, and so I did-to my chagrin now."

In the summer of 1939, Harrington and Parker McKenzie renewed their acquaintance during a visit which Harrington made to Anadarko. They reminisced just a few hours on that occasion. Shortly afterwards they began an exchange of letters which lasted almost into 1950. McKenzie's exposure to linguistic method in their early work together had awakened an abiding interest in the preservation of Kiowa. Thus, he was willing to impart what he had discovered in his efforts to analyze the language. This exchange allowed Harrington to collect updated material for the paper which he eventually published on January 1, 1948, titled "Popular Account of the Kiowa Indian Language."

From September 1944 to early 1947, Harrington elicited additional grammatical information and reheard his earlier notes in work sessions with Perry A. Keahtigh (also referred to as "Keah."). Keahtigh married a daughter of Enoch Smoky around 1930. Knowing that his father-in-law had worked with Harrington in 1918, Keahtigh sought out the linguist when he returned to the East Coast in the 1940s. They worked evenings and weekends while Harrington was detailed to the Office of Censorship as part of a volunteer war effort by members of the Smithsonian staff. Keahtigh provided a wealth of linguistic information during 1945 and most of 1946, his work dwindling off in 1947 as Harrington's manuscript neared completion.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Kiowa language  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Navajo language  Search this
Northern Paiute language  Search this
Southern Paiute language  Search this
Siouan languages  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Dictionaries
Manuscripts
Narratives
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 5.1
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 5: Papers relating to the Native American History, Language and Culture of the Plains
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw30a4064ff-19fc-4834-b08b-03b665396e17
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14726

Supplemental Material on the Southwest

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Names:
Geronimo, 1829-1909  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Boxe
Culture:
Apache  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Tewa Pueblos  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Maps
Date:
circa 1907-circa 1957
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Notes and writings on special linguistic studies series contains material that supplement Harrington's Southwest field notes. The materials cover the Apache, Hopi, Zuni, and Tewa. There are also some general and miscellaneous materials.

The Apache section supplements the notes and drafts for a proposed paper on the life of Geronimo. There is an electrostatic copy of a letter from W. B. Hill to Harrington dated September 23, 1936, in which he enclosed a photograph of Robert Geronimo, the son of the Chiricahua chief. The photograph was used by Charles K. Shirley to make an ink sketch, which is present along with a caption. The Hopi file includes a pocket-sized notebook which Harrington used while conducting fieldwork during May 1926. The notebook contains a brief record of a trip from Somes Bar to Eureka with Mr. Ike, a Karok informant; an expense account for the month of May; miscellaneous personal notes and addresses; and instructions on the use of a camera and compass. Data specifically relating to Hopi include several tiny sketch maps, notes on possible informants and on dances, songs, and kachinas, and a few lexical items from Tom Povatiya (Walpi) and Otto Lomavitu (Oraibi). There are also bibliographic notes for a proposed paper on "The Sounds of the Hopi Language," probably prepared in 1946. The Zuni notes consist of four native names for plants. There are two entries each under the headings "Fungus" and "Pinacea-Pine Family." Most of the supplemental notes on Tewa consist of an alphabetical list of tribenames and placenames from "Abechiu" to "Rio Grande." This file represents a portion of the etymological material which Harrington compiled around 1910 for use in his publication "The Ethnography of the Tewa Indians." Found with this file was a set of about fifty small slips containing one vocabulary item per slip. Most of the words are anatomical terms.

General and miscellaneous materials consist of a typed slip listing residents of Acomita, Casa Blanca, Seama, and Laguna who were possible informants for early fieldwork; a two-page description of Catherine Swan, a young woman whom Harrington met at Elden Pueblo in August 1926; a message to Robert Young (ca. 1936 to 1939) regarding the format of a Navaho primer; and information on the placename "Chaco" (January to February 1946). A note on Tewa and Spanish "accentuology" and notes for a description of the Olivella River were written in the 1940s. There are also two pages of notes on Washington Matthews's paper "The Night Chant, a Navaho Ceremony" (1902) as well as numbered captions for photographs which were taken at a number of archeological excavations. These are divided into separate sections on Rito de los Frijoles, Mesa Verde, Puye, and ruins in southern Utah; one caption mentions Professor Kidder.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Hopi language  Search this
Zuni language  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Spanish language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology)  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Maps
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 8.4
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3d780d737-eeec-444c-bb78-5854384d0595
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15278

John Peabody Harrington papers: Navajo (part 1)

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Young, Robert W., 1912-2007  Search this
Clark, Ann Nolan, 1898-1995  Search this
La Farge, Oliver  Search this
Hoijer, Harry, 1904-1976  Search this
Van Valkenburgh, Richard F.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
59 Boxes
Culture:
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Date:
1935-1949
Scope and Contents:
This set of files contains Harrington's Navajo research. The materials consist of vocabulary, dictionary notes, grammar, rehearings of linguistic data, ethnobotany notes, ethnographic notes, texts, drafts and notes relating to primers, published and unpublished primers, unpublished and published papers, extracts from secondary sources, and miscellaneous notes.

The vocabulary section contains terms extracted from Young and Morgan's The Navaho Language, which were reheard principally to obtain Kiowa and Hano (Arizona Tewa) equivalences. Information is occasionally included from Harrington's Apache and Tewa notes. A brief typed vocabulary contains scattered grammatical material. There is also a slipfile of terms based mainly on An Ethnological Dictionary of the Navaho Language. It contains annotations and relevant excerpts from Harrington-Young correspondence. Plant names wIth Young's annotations are based on W. L. Jepson's A Manual of Flowering Plants of California (1925) and Washington Matthews' The Navajo Names for Plants (1886). Of the twenty semantic categories, the sections on animals, animal parts, plants, and placenames are particularly substantial.

The dictionary section consists of lexical terms from the Bureau of Indian Affairs' "Navajo Phrase Book," obtained from Willard Beatty and sent by Harrington to Young for rehearings. Navajo entries with Kiowa equivalences were apparently taken from a manuscript for a dictionary by Young. Two miscellaneous groups of entries are in Navajo/English.

The material on Navajo grammar is extensive and includes notes, drafts of a manuscript, excerpts from secondary sources, correspondence between Young and Harrington, and slips. The file was for proposed publications ranging from introductory manuals to the structuring of a comprehensive Navajo grammar.

A further substantial body of grammatical material is found on large slips. These include information from Young's voluminous correspondence, not otherwise interfiled. Part of this section is a further rehearing by Young of Morice's The Carrier Language. Another group of notes records comparisons with several southern Athapascan languages, evidently based on Young's notes, vocabulary items, correspondence, and other undocumented material. Harrington also used the slipfile format to index questions which he had earlier sent to Young.

Most of the rehearings of lingustic data are of Edward Sapir's linguistic terms by Young in 1940 and 1941. Though the copied materials may be similar in content, they do not appear to be exact duplicates of the Sapir linguistic holdings at the American Philosophical Society. Young also reheard terms from Hoijer's Chiricahua and Mescalero Apache Texts late in 1940. George E. Hood commented on Hoijer's "The Southern Athapascan Languages," possibly at about the same time. There are typed excerpts from Young's May 1938 letters regarding Morice's The Carrier Language and miscellaneous linguistic information given by Hood and reheard by Richard Long. Other miscellaneous rehearings are with Alfred Sanchez (abbreviated"Alf." or "Alfredo"), Willietto Antonio, George Hood, and Robert Young (September 1939); and with Howard Gorman, Albert Sandoval, and John Charles (1939). There is also a rehearing with Henry Tsosie of terms from Gladys A. Reichard and Adolph Dodge Bittany's Agentive and Causative Elements in Navaho (1940), including some excerpts from the book. Finally, in February 1941, he reheard the vocabulary of Pedro Bautista Pino with Howard Gorman; Young did not consider these terms to be Navajo.

The files also contains Harrington's notes on Navajo names for plants, gathered from secondary sources and possibly original data from colleagues or friends. Young also annotated some of the notes.

Harrington's ethnographic files includes notes, vocabulary, and illustrations on the structure of dwelling places as well as some information on the mythic origins of the Navajo. Many of the illustrations are by Charles Keetsie Shirley. On the same subject is a set of cards in Young's hand which was sent to Harrington at Fort Wingate in August 1939. At Harrington's request, Young also translated what appears to be a lesson on hogans, possibly a section of a proposed text for instructional purposes. A group of Chaco Canyon placenames were given by Ed Henry in June 1939; several others were extracted from various secondary sources. Other ethnographic subjects briefly covered are the Hoop and Pole game, a social and economic survey questionnaire, White Hat's funeral (1939), the Lord's Prayer as recorded by Berard Haile, and notes on Sandoval's sound recordings. Malcolm Farmer supplied nonlinguistic information and there is a small set of highly miscellaneous ethnographic and historical notes.

The text section contains billingual texts that Young collected and sent to Harrington in 1936. They were written with interlinear translations and followed by a precis in English. Titles include: "Deer and Coyote," "Where the People Came Out," "A Wedding Ceremonial," and "The Woman Who Changed into a Bear." A recording session on October 31, 1949, with Dick Left, Richard Long, and Harry (not further identified) provided Navajo songs, ceremonies, and legends. Harrington's notes supply the identity of the discs and peripheral information such as the gestures accompanying the songs. Some linguistic annotations are interspersed. The discs described in the notes have not been located.

Notes, drafts, and mockups from Harrington and Young's work creating Navajo primers are also present. During the course of their work together from 1937 to 1939, Harrington and Young prepared drafts for two primers, "Little Bear Primer" and "Spotted Dog Primer," a pre-primer (probably the so called "Doda Primer"), and a playbook or cut-out book. Despite an assurance that at least both of the major works were to be printed, neither of the primers were ever published. He and Young also served as translators for a set of four primers in the "Little Herder" series, and Harrington was also credited with developing the "Harrington-La Farge phonetic system" utilized in the three-volume set entitled Little Man's Family. Harrington and Young also helped translate Ann Nolan Clark's "Who Wants To Be a Prairie Dog?"

Other materials related to Harrington's writing include notes for his "Southern Peripheral Athapaskawan Origins, Divisions, and Migrations" and preliminary drafts and notes for the Navajo portion of "Earliest Navaho and Quechua" (1944) coauthored by Robert W. Young. There are also notes and drafts for his unpublished writings, among which include "Navaho Mouthmap," "The Indian Dog Comes into His Own,"and "What Light Can Navajo Throw on Indogermanic Reconstruction?"

Among his miscellaneous notes is a comparison of Navajo with other Indian languages. There are brief notes on trips made in 1940, a list of the names of non-Indians, miscellaneous correspondence, and notes which are neither linguistic nor ethnographic.

Because of their long-term collaboration, Young's notes are inextricably intermixed with those of Harrington. Although some are labeled "Y," Young's unlabeled contributions can be identified through his handwriting and printing, and even with his style. Other hand-copied material is the work of B.A.E. assistant, Arvilla Johnson. Harrington's daughter Awona produced many of the copies in eighteen-point type.
Biographical / Historical:
Although John P. Harrington published brief articles on Navajo in 1911 and 1929, his most sustained work in this language spanned the years 1935 to 1946. Correspondence and reports indicate that during this period he was in the field from July to November 1939, and from August to mid-November 1940 at such places as Fort Wingate and Gallup, New Mexico, and Phoenix, Tuba CIty, and Window Rock, Arizona. His success in the field is due in no small part to his brilliant young collaborator, Robert W. Young, whom he first contacted in August 1936 and with whom he carried on an extensive correspondence into the mid-1940s. In fact their joint efforts in Navajo were accomplished mainly by mail.

Harrington collaborated or corresponded with others, among whom were Ann Nolan Clark, Oliver La Farge, Francis Elmore, Harry Hoijer, William Hill, and Richard Van Valkenburgh. He also contacted various university professors and graduate students, some of whom taught at such programs as those directed by the Summer Institute of Linguistics (Camp Wycliffe) and the University of New Mexico School of American Research.

Harrington consulted a wide array of secondary sources and reheard or compared data from them which he later combined with original notes. These include several hundred terms from then-unpublished manuscripts of Edward Sapir, and two of Harry Hoijer's publications--Chiricahua and Mescalero Apache Texts (1938) and "The Southern Athapascan Languages" (1938). He made extensive use of two works published by the Franciscan Fathers, An Ethnological Dictionary of the Navaho Language (1910) and A Vocabulary of the Navaho Language (1912). He turned to W. L. Jepson and Washington Matthews for botanical terms, and to Adrien G. Morice for Carrier comparisons. In a search for precise grammatical terminology, he consulted a score or more of grammars, dictionaries, and publications on language and linguistics in Latin, Greek, Indo-Germanic, and several Arabic languages. Most prominent are Walter A. Ripman's Latin Handbook (1930) and Alan H. Gairdner's publication on Arabic phonetics (1935).

He worked with many Navajo speakers, some of whom were well-educated. Mentioned frequently are Willietto Antonio, Chee Dodge, Howard Gorman, George E. Hood, Hoskie Naswood, Albert Sandoval (also called "Chic"), Charles Keetsie Shirley, and Sam Tilden.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Local Note:
This subseries was broken up into two catalog records to facilitate viewing of digital surrogates. See the catalog record for John Peabody Harrington papers: Navajo (part 2) to view surrogates for the rest of Harrington's Navajo files.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Navajo language  Search this
Kiowa language  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Carrier language  Search this
Athapascan languages  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Zoology -- nomenclature  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 4: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Southwest / 4.2: Navajo
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3a20de076-50c6-4ba1-a37d-c9dbdce60655
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref17243

John Peabody Harrington papers: Navajo (part 2)

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Young, Robert W., 1912-2007  Search this
Clark, Ann Nolan, 1898-1995  Search this
La Farge, Oliver, 1901-1963  Search this
Hoijer, Harry, 1904-1976  Search this
Van Valkenburgh, Richard F.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
59 Boxes
Culture:
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Date:
1935-1949
Scope and Contents:
This set of files contains Harrington's Navajo research. The materials consist of vocabulary, dictionary notes, grammar, rehearings of linguistic data, ethnobotany notes, ethnographic notes, texts, drafts and notes relating to primers, published and unpublished primers, unpublished and published papers, extracts from secondary sources, and miscellaneous notes.

The vocabulary section contains terms extracted from Young and Morgan's The Navaho Language, which were reheard principally to obtain Kiowa and Hano (Arizona Tewa) equivalences. Information is occasionally included from Harrington's Apache and Tewa notes. A brief typed vocabulary contains scattered grammatical material. There is also a slipfile of terms based mainly on An Ethnological Dictionary of the Navaho Language. It contains annotations and relevant excerpts from Harrington-Young correspondence. Plant names wIth Young's annotations are based on W. L. Jepson's A Manual of Flowering Plants of California (1925) and Washington Matthews' The Navajo Names for Plants (1886). Of the twenty semantic categories, the sections on animals, animal parts, plants, and placenames are particularly substantial.

The dictionary section consists of lexical terms from the Bureau of Indian Affairs' "Navajo Phrase Book," obtained from Willard Beatty and sent by Harrington to Young for rehearings. Navajo entries with Kiowa equivalences were apparently taken from a manuscript for a dictionary by Young. Two miscellaneous groups of entries are in Navajo/English.

The material on Navajo grammar is extensive and includes notes, drafts of a manuscript, excerpts from secondary sources, correspondence between Young and Harrington, and slips. The file was for proposed publications ranging from introductory manuals to the structuring of a comprehensive Navajo grammar.

A further substantial body of grammatical material is found on large slips. These include information from Young's voluminous correspondence, not otherwise interfiled. Part of this section is a further rehearing by Young of Morice's The Carrier Language. Another group of notes records comparisons with several southern Athapascan languages, evidently based on Young's notes, vocabulary items, correspondence, and other undocumented material. Harrington also used the slipfile format to index questions which he had earlier sent to Young.

Most of the rehearings of lingustic data are of Edward Sapir's linguistic terms by Young in 1940 and 1941. Though the copied materials may be similar in content, they do not appear to be exact duplicates of the Sapir linguistic holdings at the American Philosophical Society. Young also reheard terms from Hoijer's Chiricahua and Mescalero Apache Texts late in 1940. George E. Hood commented on Hoijer's "The Southern Athapascan Languages," possibly at about the same time. There are typed excerpts from Young's May 1938 letters regarding Morice's The Carrier Language and miscellaneous linguistic information given by Hood and reheard by Richard Long. Other miscellaneous rehearings are with Alfred Sanchez (abbreviated"Alf." or "Alfredo"), Willietto Antonio, George Hood, and Robert Young (September 1939); and with Howard Gorman, Albert Sandoval, and John Charles (1939). There is also a rehearing with Henry Tsosie of terms from Gladys A. Reichard and Adolph Dodge Bittany's Agentive and Causative Elements in Navaho (1940), including some excerpts from the book. Finally, in February 1941, he reheard the vocabulary of Pedro Bautista Pino with Howard Gorman; Young did not consider these terms to be Navajo.

The files also contains Harrington's notes on Navajo names for plants, gathered from secondary sources and possibly original data from colleagues or friends. Young also annotated some of the notes.

Harrington's ethnographic files includes notes, vocabulary, and illustrations on the structure of dwelling places as well as some information on the mythic origins of the Navajo. Many of the illustrations are by Charles Keetsie Shirley. On the same subject is a set of cards in Young's hand which was sent to Harrington at Fort Wingate in August 1939. At Harrington's request, Young also translated what appears to be a lesson on hogans, possibly a section of a proposed text for instructional purposes. A group of Chaco Canyon placenames were given by Ed Henry in June 1939; several others were extracted from various secondary sources. Other ethnographic subjects briefly covered are the Hoop and Pole game, a social and economic survey questionnaire, White Hat's funeral (1939), the Lord's Prayer as recorded by Berard Haile, and notes on Sandoval's sound recordings. Malcolm Farmer supplied nonlinguistic information and there is a small set of highly miscellaneous ethnographic and historical notes.

The text section contains billingual texts that Young collected and sent to Harrington in 1936. They were written with interlinear translations and followed by a precis in English. Titles include: "Deer and Coyote," "Where the People Came Out," "A Wedding Ceremonial," and "The Woman Who Changed into a Bear." A recording session on October 31, 1949, with Dick Left, Richard Long, and Harry (not further identified) provided Navajo songs, ceremonies, and legends. Harrington's notes supply the identity of the discs and peripheral information such as the gestures accompanying the songs. Some linguistic annotations are interspersed. The discs described in the notes have not been located.

Notes, drafts, and mockups from Harrington and Young's work creating Navajo primers are also present. During the course of their work together from 1937 to 1939, Harrington and Young prepared drafts for two primers, "Little Bear Primer" and "Spotted Dog Primer," a pre-primer (probably the so called "Doda Primer"), and a playbook or cut-out book. Despite an assurance that at least both of the major works were to be printed, neither of the primers were ever published. He and Young also served as translators for a set of four primers in the "Little Herder" series, and Harrington was also credited with developing the "Harrington-La Farge phonetic system" utilized in the three-volume set entitled Little Man's Family. Harrington and Young also helped translate Ann Nolan Clark's "Who Wants To Be a Prairie Dog?"

Other materials related to Harrington's writing include notes for his "Southern Peripheral Athapaskawan Origins, Divisions, and Migrations" and preliminary drafts and notes for the Navajo portion of "Earliest Navaho and Quechua" (1944) coauthored by Robert W. Young. There are also notes and drafts for his unpublished writings, among which include "Navaho Mouthmap," "The Indian Dog Comes into His Own,"and "What Light Can Navajo Throw on Indogermanic Reconstruction?"

Among his miscellaneous notes is a comparison of Navajo with other Indian languages. There are brief notes on trips made in 1940, a list of the names of non-Indians, miscellaneous correspondence, and notes which are neither linguistic nor ethnographic.

Because of their long-term collaboration, Young's notes are inextricably intermixed with those of Harrington. Although some are labeled "Y," Young's unlabeled contributions can be identified through his handwriting and printing, and even with his style. Other hand-copied material is the work of B.A.E. assistant, Arvilla Johnson. Harrington's daughter Awona produced many of the copies in eighteen-point type.
Biographical / Historical:
Although John P. Harrington published brief articles on Navajo in 1911 and 1929, his most sustained work in this language spanned the years 1935 to 1946. Correspondence and reports indicate that during this period he was in the field from July to November 1939, and from August to mid-November 1940 at such places as Fort Wingate and Gallup, New Mexico, and Phoenix, Tuba CIty, and Window Rock, Arizona. His success in the field is due in no small part to his brilliant young collaborator, Robert W. Young, whom he first contacted in August 1936 and with whom he carried on an extensive correspondence into the mid-1940s. In fact their joint efforts in Navajo were accomplished mainly by mail.

Harrington collaborated or corresponded with others, among whom were Ann Nolan Clark, Oliver La Farge, Francis Elmore, Harry Hoijer, William Hill, and Richard Van Valkenburgh. He also contacted various university professors and graduate students, some of whom taught at such programs as those directed by the Summer Institute of Linguistics (Camp Wycliffe) and the University of New Mexico School of American Research.

Harrington consulted a wide array of secondary sources and reheard or compared data from them which he later combined with original notes. These include several hundred terms from then-unpublished manuscripts of Edward Sapir, and two of Harry Hoijer's publications--Chiricahua and Mescalero Apache Texts (1938) and "The Southern Athapascan Languages" (1938). He made extensive use of two works published by the Franciscan Fathers, An Ethnological Dictionary of the Navaho Language (1910) and A Vocabulary of the Navaho Language (1912). He turned to W. L. Jepson and Washington Matthews for botanical terms, and to Adrien G. Morice for Carrier comparisons. In a search for precise grammatical terminology, he consulted a score or more of grammars, dictionaries, and publications on language and linguistics in Latin, Greek, Indo-Germanic, and several Arabic languages. Most prominent are Walter A. Ripman's Latin Handbook (1930) and Alan H. Gairdner's publication on Arabic phonetics (1935).

He worked with many Navajo speakers, some of whom were well-educated. Mentioned frequently are Willietto Antonio, Chee Dodge, Howard Gorman, George E. Hood, Hoskie Naswood, Albert Sandoval (also called "Chic"), Charles Keetsie Shirley, and Sam Tilden.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Local Note:
This subseries was broken up into two catalog records to facilitate viewing of digital surrogates. See the catalog record for John Peabody Harrington papers: Navajo (part 1) to view surrogates for the rest of Harrington's Navajo files.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Navajo language  Search this
Kiowa language  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Carrier language  Search this
Athapascan languages  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Zoology -- nomenclature  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 4: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Southwest / 4.2: Navajo
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw319a390f3-cfe7-4322-97c0-fe170d37113c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref17244

MS 746 Moqui and Táowa vocabulary

Creator:
Palmer, Edward, 1829-1911  Search this
Extent:
10 Pages
Culture:
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Tewa Pueblos  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
1869
Scope and Contents:
Contains a general Hopi vocabulary, with a little Tewa.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 746
Local Note:
Title changed from "Moqui and Ta'owi vocabulary" 8/26/2014.
autograph document
Topic:
Hopi language  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 746, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS746
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3d0ee793a-ecbb-4197-aedf-418e1e14eb4f
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms746
Online Media:

MS 1540 Tewa-English vocabulary

Creator:
Stephen, Alexander MacGregor, d. 1894  Search this
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Extent:
27 Pages
Culture:
Tewa Pueblos  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Alphabetically arranged, extracted by A. S. Gatschet from Stephen's English-Tewa vocabulary in Bureau of American Ethnology Manuscript 793, with pagew references to same.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1540
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 1540, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1540
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3e1d12807-9145-4c4e-b604-f1e10daa3826
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1540
Online Media:

MS 30 Tewa vocabulary and Moqui foods

Creator:
Mooney, James, 1861-1921  Search this
Extent:
50 Pages
Culture:
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Tewa Pueblos  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Consists of a Tewa vocabulary of 20 pages in a notebook, and 54 pages of a vocabulary of Hopi foods, mostly untranslated.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 30
Local Note:
manuscript document
Topic:
Food preparation -- Hopi  Search this
Hopi language  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 30, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS30
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw381132926-d6eb-4b52-b06f-4d938bfc51a7
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms30
Online Media:

Three Tewa texts / John P. Harrington

Author:
Harrington, John P  Search this
Physical description:
p. 112-116 ; 26 cm
Type:
Texts
Date:
1947
Topic:
Tewa language  Search this
Call number:
PM2431.Z77 H37 1947
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_898501

Brief description of the Tewa language

Type:
Books
Date:
1910
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_728414

Language, history, and identity : ethnolinguistic studies of the Arizona Tewa / Paul V. Kroskrity

Author:
Kroskrity, Paul V. 1949-  Search this
Physical description:
xvii, 289 p. ; 24 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1993
C1993
Topic:
Tewa language--Arizona--Social aspects  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Ethnic identity  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_456978

Geoffrey N. O'Grady Papers

Creator:
O'Grady, G. N. (Geoffrey N.)  Search this
Extent:
Plus 3 oversize boxes, 4 record storage boxes, and 3 map folders
11.8 Linear feet (24 document boxes and 3 card file boxes)
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Aranda (Australian people)  Search this
Australian Aborigines  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Field notes
Photographs
Sound recordings
Correspondence
Place:
Arizona
Australia
Vancouver (British Columbia)
Date:
1949-2007
bulk 1957-1998
Scope and Contents:
This collection is comprised of the professional papers of linguistic anthropologist Geoffrey O'Grady. Included are research materials consisting of field notes and notebooks, correspondence, published and unpublished writings, annotated copies of other scholars' work, photographs, and sound recordings.

The materials in this collection document O'Grady's career as a linguistic scholar from his days as a jackaroo in the Australian outback to his time at the University of Victoria. The majority of the collection is made up of field research, which contains detailed vocabularies and linguistic analysis for aboriginal peoples of Australia and First Nation communities of Canada. O'Grady's sound recordings represent his work with the Arizona Tewa language among the Hopi as well as various Australian aboriginal languages; they supplement the Field Research series.
Arrangement:
The O'Grady collection is arranged into 7 series: (1) Field Research; (2) Writings; (3) Professional Activities; (4) Correspondence; (5) Writings by Others; (6) Photographs; (7) Sound recordings.
Biographical/Historical note:
Anthropological linguist Geoffrey N. O'Grady was born on January 1, 1928 in southern Australia. He first became interested in languages in high school when he took classes in Latin, German, Russian, and Hungarian. O'Grady became immersed in Australian aboriginal languages during his six years as a jackaroo on a sheep station at Wallal Downs in the Australian Outback. There he spent time with aboriginal peoples and was adopted into the Nyangumarta tribe where he learned to speak their language.

O'Grady was offered a research assistantship at the University of Sydney in 1956. This allowed him to take field research trips into the Outback where he recorded various indigenous languages. During this time he undertook a project to alphabetize the Nyangumarta language. As a result, a literacy program and a Nyangumarta newspaper, which is still published, were established.

In 1960, after completing his BA at the University of Sydney, O'Grady received a Fulbright Scholarship to attend Indiana University. During three summers at Indiana, he travelled to Arizona to conduct field research in Hopi Tewa. After he completed his PhD he accepted a position at the University of Alberta, Edmonton in 1963. While at the University of Alberta he began to study northern Canadian First Nations languages. In 1965 he moved on to the Linguistics Department at the University of Victoria, where he began to study indigenous languages on Vancouver Island and taught courses on phonetics and historical sound change. When O'Grady retired from the University of Victoria in 1993, the Australian National University honored him with a Festschrift entitled "Boundary Rider."

Geoffrey O' Grady passed away on December 28, 2008 after a long struggle with Parkinson's.

Sources Consulted

2009. Geoffrey O'Grady Obituary. Victoria Times Colonist. January 3. http://web.uvic.ca/ling/information/index.htm, accessed April 4, 2012.

John Esling. 2009. In Memoriam: Dr. Geoffrey N. O'Grady. http://ring.uvic.ca/people/memoriam-dr-geoffrey-n-o%E2%80%99grady, accessed April 4, 2012.

1928 -- Born January 1

1956 -- Accepted research assistantship at the University of Sydney and began undergraduate studies

1957 -- Married wife Alix

1959 -- Received BA from the University of Sydney

1960 -- Fulbright scholarship at Indiana University where he finished his PhD

1960-1963 -- Summer field studies of Hopi Tewa in Arizona

1963 -- Completed dissertation on grammar of Nyangumarta under the supervision of C.F. and F.M. Voegelin

1963 -- Began work at University of Alberta, Edmonton

1965 -- Joined the Linguistics Department at University of Victoria in BC Canada

1966 -- Project to outline the relationships among all of the Aboriginal languages of Australia

1993 -- Retired from University of Victoria

2008 -- Died December 28
Related Materials:
For more of O'Grady's language material from Western Australia and sound recordings from his fieldwork among the aborigines in the 1950s and 1960s, consult the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS) located in Lawson Cres, Canberra ACT, Australia.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by O'Grady's wife Alix O'Grady.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Linguistics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Photographs
Sound recordings
Correspondence
Citation:
Geoffrey N. O'Grady Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2010-30
See more items in:
Geoffrey N. O'Grady Papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3d3718b39-3abd-49fb-a376-661060c8cbd3
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2010-30
Online Media:

MS 6045 Tewa drawings

Extent:
3 Drawings (26 x 19 inches, 14 x 23 inches, 11 x 29 inches.)
Culture:
Tewa Pueblos  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
This collection is comprised of three undated color drawings depicting Tewa subjects.
Biographical / Historical:
The Tewa (or Tano) are a linguistic group of Pueblo American Indians who speak the Tewa language and share the Pueblo culture.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 6045
Topic:
Works of art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Citation:
Manuscript 6045, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.MS6045
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3cb0ab13f-d2bf-4751-93df-6eb139e4807d
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms6045

Téwa Kháwä = Tewa names / Pueblo designs courtesy of Geronima Montoya (P'otsúnú)

Physical description:
82 p. : ill. ; 14 x 22 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1983
Topic:
Names  Search this
Tewa language--Conversation and phrase books  Search this
Call number:
PM2431 .T352 1983
PM2431.T352 1983
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_363586

Téwa pehtsiyeh = Tewa tales : San Juan dialect

Physical description:
59 p. : ill., music ; 22 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1982
Topic:
Legends  Search this
Tewa language--Readers  Search this
Call number:
PM2431 .T353 1982
PM2431.T353 1982
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_363587

San Juan Pueblo Tewa dictionary [microform] / material collected by P'oe Tsá̧wá̧̈ (Esther Martinez) ; illustrations by Pá̧̈á̧ Sen (Peter Povijua)

Author:
Pʼoe Tsa̦wa̦  Search this
Pa̦a̦ Sen  Search this
Physical description:
163 p., [1] leaf of plates : ill., folded map ; 23 cm
Type:
Microforms
Place:
San Juan Pueblo (N.M.)
Date:
1982
Topic:
Tewa language--Dictionaries--English  Search this
Call number:
mfc 006572.03
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_531145

Ethnozoology of the Tewa Indians / by Junius Henderson and John Peabody Harrington

Author:
Henderson, Junius 1865-1937  Search this
Harrington, John Peabody  Search this
School of American Archaeology (Santa Fe, N.M.)  Search this
Physical description:
x, 76 pages ; 24 cm
Type:
Dictionaries
Terminology
Place:
New Mexico
Date:
1914
Topic:
Tewa Indians--Ethnozoology  Search this
Ethnozoology  Search this
Tewa language--English  Search this
Zoology  Search this
Call number:
E99.T35 H4X
E99.T35 H4X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_239192

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