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Ezra Zubrow aerial photographs of the Rio Grande Pueblos, circa 1967

Photographer:
United States. Air Force  Search this
Creator:
Zubrow, Ezra B. W.  Search this
Extent:
64 Prints (silver gelatin, 10" x 20")
Culture:
Pueblo Indians  Search this
Nambe Pueblo  Search this
Tesuque Pueblo  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Zia Pueblo  Search this
Santa Ana Pueblo  Search this
Taos Pueblo  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Cochiti Pueblo  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
San Ildefonso Pueblo  Search this
Picuris Pueblo  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Aerial photographs
Place:
Rio Grande Valley (Colo.-Mexico and Tex.)
San Felipe Pueblo (N.M.)
Jemez Pueblo (N.M.)
Pojoaque pueblo (N.M.)
Sandia Pueblo (N.M.)
San Juan Pueblo (N.M.)
Date:
circa 1967
Summary:
64 aerial photographs of Rio Grande Pueblos made circa 1967 from 60,000 feet by a U2 aircraft.
Scope and Contents:
Aerial photographs of Rio Grande Pueblos made circa 1967 from 60,000 feet by a U2 aircraft, commissioned by Ezra Zubrow. Pueblos photographed include Acoma, Cochiti, Ildefonso, Isleta, Jemez, Laguna, Nambe, Picuris, Pojoaque, Sandia, San Felipe, San Juan, Santa Ana, Santa Clara, Taos, Tesuque, Zia, and Zuni.
Arrangement:
The photographs are arranged alphabetically by Pueblo.
Historical Note:
Ezra Zubrow provides the following background:

"Here is a quick version of the story of the photographs. . . I was a graduate student at the University of Arizona and during the summer of 1967 or 1968. I was working at the Southwestern Archaeological Expedition run by Paul S. Martin of the Field Museum of Chicago at the Hay Hollow Valley. I was a field foreman.

One day a group of B52's came over the nearby mesas very very low. This was the time of Vietnam. The sound was deafening and it seemed as if the earth shook and that they were only a few hundred feet above us. I remember looking up and I would swear that the bomb doors were open and that I saw a light inside. It was clear that they were doing some kind of low level practice and I thought it was a practice bombing run. When my ears stopped ringing, I thought to myself those planes must have cameras to record the dropping of the bombs and if they happen to come by again maybe I could ask them to take pictures of our excavations. So I wrote a letter to the "commanding general of the air force". I did not have a name or an address so I just sent it to the Commanding General US Air Force, Pentagon, Washington DC. I explained how useful photographs from the air were for doing archaeology in my letter and drove some 20 miles to Showlow Arizona to send the letter. When I did not hear anything I promptly forgot about it realizing that it was a "silly thing to have done." Two and half months went by and just before I left Vernon I received a package from the US Air Force from a colonel who was with a "reconnaissance" wing. In it was a letter saying that my letter had been received at the pentagon and had wended its way through various offices with a request that if it was possible to help us please do and here were a set of pictures of your excavations and the nearby area. To say the least I was thunderstruck. I had no idea how they had done the photographs but there were a set of 9x18 negatives and prints.

When I returned to Tucson for the fall semester a few days later, I started to look at the photographs. I realized that I wanted to say thank you and sent a letter saying thank you to the air force. It then occurred to me that it would be a nice thing to do to call and say thank you in person. I called the Pentagon and after several calls they provided me a number to call. It had the same area code as Tucson and I realized that the colonel was probably stationed at Davis Monthan Air Force Base. So I called the base and asked if I could make an appointment to meet him and personally say thank you. I got an appointment the following week and went out to the base. At the guard house I told them I had an appointment with the colonel and they told me to wait at the gate house which I did. After about 15 minutes a soldier came out with a car and asked me to leave my car at the gatehouse and he would drive me into the base. The car actually had blacked out side and rear windows.

We went into a low lying building and there were several people there including Colonel Y and a Lieutenant X. I told them how appreciative I was and that all the other archaeologists at the Southwestern Archaeological Expedition appreciated their help as well.

I had no idea with whom I was dealing. They showed me around various rooms and laboratories for photography and finally came to a room with a large chalkboard in it. On the chalkboard was a listing of missions, plane numbers, and pilots. There were a range of missions scheduled for several weeks and when I realized that several of them were over Vietnam, Cambodia, China, and Russia I stopped in my tracks. I looked at my hosts and said what kind of planes were they flying. I still thought it was something like a B52. They said it was the U2. I was speechless and as I later learned my mouth dropped so wide that all the men in the room started laughing. They said that if I wanted to watch one land it was going to land in a few minutes and as I was leaving I could watch. Of course I wanted to.

So as I left, I said thank you again and the Colonel and the Lieutenant said if they could help more, they would be willing to do so.

It turned out that Lieutenant X and I were about the same age and that we each had just been married a short time. We both were in a "foreign town," Tucson. So the two couples began t to meet for dinner and joined some other young couples who were in Tucson for the first time. The following semester, I had the idea of photographing the Pueblos. I asked Lieutenant X and Colonel Y if it might be possible and they said yes. I went back to the base and we sat with maps and plotted out the exact flight plan.

And that's more or less how it happened. The Colonel, the Lieutenant, and I continued to be friends for many years."[1]

[1] Email from Ezra Zubrow to archivist Gina Rappaport, April 22, 2010.
Biographical Note:
Ezra Zubrow is an anthropologist who has served on the faculty of the University at Buffalo since 1977. His broad interests include archaeological and anthropological theory and method, social policy of heritage and disability, Nordic archaeology, and ecology.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Ezra Zubrow in 2010.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Pueblos  Search this
Genre/Form:
Aerial Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 2010-13, Ezra Zubrow aerial photographs of the Rio Grande Pueblos, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.2010-13
See more items in:
Ezra Zubrow aerial photographs of the Rio Grande Pueblos, circa 1967
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-2010-13

Ed Brady collection of photographs of Native Americans

Collector:
Brady, Ed  Search this
Publisher:
Keystone View Company  Search this
Pacific Photo Company (Salem, Or.)  Search this
Names:
Atkinson, James  Search this
Photographer:
Johnston  Search this
Moorhouse, Lee, 1850-1926  Search this
Potts, E.  Search this
Williams, G.F.  Search this
Extent:
1 Pamphlet
1 Stereograph (silver gelatin)
2 Color postcards
2 Color prints
3 Copy negatives
5 Copy prints
42 Prints (silver gelatin (some on postcard stock))
Culture:
Arctic peoples  Search this
Palouse  Search this
Pueblo Indians  Search this
Umatilla  Search this
Tewa Pueblos  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Eskimos  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Wishram  Search this
Taos Indians  Search this
Assiniboine (Stoney)  Search this
American Indians -- Southwest  Search this
Niimíipuu (Nez Perce)  Search this
Omaha  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pamphlets
Stereographs
Color postcards
Color prints
Copy negatives
Copy prints
Prints
Place:
Tesuque Pueblo (N.M.)
Date:
circa 1880-1950
Scope and Contents note:
Ed Brady's collection of photographs and postcards of Native American camps, people, crafts, schools, and dances, as well as agency personnel at various reservations. A majority of the original prints are photographs by Lee Moorhouse, including images of American Indian dwellings, camps, Kate Drexel School, children in cradleboards, and formal and informal portraits. Additionally, there are photographs made by E. Potts at Tesuque Pueblo on November 12, 1924 during the feast day; images are mostly of Tewa people dancing the Buffalo-Deer Dance.

The collection also includes a stereograph depicting Taos people in front of Taos Pueblo, as well as photographic postcards of Omaha men in Walthill, Nebraska, American Indians at a camp in Idaho, Indians at a camp near International Falls, Minnesota, a Navajo camp in Arizona, an elevated view of a camp with numerous tipis, possibly for a rodeo, two Alaskan Eskimo girls, and a reenactment of the Battle of Little Bighorn aftermath. There is also a pamphlet entitled "Old Travois Trails," from 1941, which was possibly originally collected by Dr. W. A. Russell, a doctor for the Fort Peck Agency.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 90-8, NAA Photo Lot 81-39, NAA Photo Lot 89-28
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Photo Lot 81-39 has been relocated and merged with Photo Lot 90-8. These photographs were also collected by Ed Brady and form part of this collection.
Brady also donated Indian police badges to the Department of Anthropology in accessions 343151 and 378681.
Additional photographs by Moorhouse can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in Photo Lot 78 and the BAE historical negatives.
The University of Oregon Special Collections holds a large collection of Lee Moorhouse photographs, 1888-1925 (PH036).
Additional photographs published by the Keystone View Company can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in MS 4551, Photo Lot 140 and Photo Lot 90-1.
The University of Washington holds Ed Brady photographs of the Mount St. Helens Eruption (PH Coll 889).
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Schools  Search this
Dance  Search this
Infant carriers  Search this
Pottery  Search this
Sweatbaths  Search this
Dwellings  Search this
Citation:
Photo Lot 90-8, Ed Brady collection of photographs of Native Americans, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.90-8
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-90-8

John K. Hillers photographs of Pueblos

Photographer:
Hillers, John K., 1843-1925  Search this
Artist:
Nichols, Hobart, 1869-1962  Search this
Names:
Powell, John Wesley, 1834-1902  Search this
Extent:
40 Mounted prints (circa, albumen)
Culture:
Cochiti Pueblo  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Taos Indians  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Mounted prints
Photographs
Place:
Chelly, Canyon de (Ariz.)
Date:
1870s-1880s
bulk 1879-1879
Scope and Contents note:
The collection primarily consists of photographs made by John K. Hillers for the Bureau of American Ethnology documenting pueblos, cliff and rock dwellings, and people in Arizona and New Mexico. The photographs depict Navajo, Zuni, Taos, Oraibi, Walpi, Tesuque, Sichomovi, Cochiti, Mishongnavi, and Shipaulovi Pueblos. There are also pictures of mounds, possibly in West Virginia, and a Hobart Nichols drawing of the interior of a Pueblo dwelling. The bulk of the photographs are on BAE mounts, of which some are stamped "Compliments of J. W. Powell". Several of the images were made during the United States Geological Survey in 1885.
Biographical/Historical note:
John K. Hillers (1843-1925) immigrated to the United States from Germany in 1852. He spent almost twenty years photographing Native Americans, largely for the Bureau of American Ethnology and the United States Geological Survey. He began work on the Survey as a boatman on John Wesley Powell's second expedition down the Colorado River in 1871. He soon became the assistant, and then main photographer (1872) for the expedition. From 1879 to 1900, Hillers served as the first staff photographer of the Bureau of Ethnology, and in 1881 he took pictures for the United States Geological Survey.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 143
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Additional Hillers photographs in the National Anthropological Archives can be found in Photo Lot 14, Photo Lot 24, Photo Lot 28, Photo Lot 40, Photo Lot 83-18, Photo Lot 87-2N, Photo Lot 90-1, Photo Lot 92-46, and the BAE historical negatives.
The National Anthropological Archives also holds Hillers's diary from 1871-1872 and 1874, 1875 (MS 4410).
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Pueblos  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo lot 143, John K. Hillers photographs of Pueblos, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.143
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-143

Living Earth Symposium 2 - Clayton Brascoupe

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Symposia
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2015-07-21T20:50:31.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_qj_PZpwq5Gc

James E. Curry papers

Correspondent:
Paul, William L. Jr  Search this
Creator:
Curry, James E., 1907-1972  Search this
Names:
Rosebud Sioux Tribe  Search this
Three Affiliated Tribes  Search this
United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs  Search this
Bingham, Jonathan  Search this
Cohen, Felix  Search this
Cohen, Henry  Search this
Extent:
121.7 Linear feet
Culture:
Potawatomi  Search this
Muckleshoot  Search this
Nooksack  Search this
Missouria (Missouri)  Search this
Kalispel (Pend d'Oreilles)  Search this
Coeur d'Alene  Search this
Sac and Fox (Sauk & Fox)  Search this
Haida [Kasaan]  Search this
Salish (Flathead)  Search this
Kiowa  Search this
Yuit (Siberian Yup'ik) [Gambell, St. Lawrence Island]  Search this
Hunkpapa Lakota [Standing Rock]  Search this
Sicangu Lakota (Brulé Sioux)  Search this
Wahpetonwan Dakota [Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe]  Search this
Mdewakantonwan Dakota [Flandreau]  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Yavapai [Fort McDowell]  Search this
Mojave (Mohave)  Search this
Piipaash (Maricopa)  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Wendat (Huron)  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Santa Ana Pueblo  Search this
Cocopa  Search this
San Ildefonso Pueblo  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
San Felipe Pueblo  Search this
Tohono O'odham (Papago)  Search this
Paiute  Search this
Wesort  Search this
Tillamook  Search this
Nisga'a (Niska)  Search this
Stockbridge Mahican  Search this
Quinault  Search this
Lummi  Search this
Hualapai (Walapai)  Search this
Taos Pueblo  Search this
Tesuque Pueblo  Search this
Eastern Shawnee [Quapaw Agency, Oklahoma]  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Sandia Pueblo  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Cheyenne River Lakota Sioux  Search this
Coeur d'Alene  Search this
Croatan  Search this
Choctaw  Search this
Cocopa  Search this
Chickahominy  Search this
Lake Superior Chippewa [Lac Courte Oreilles, Wisconsin]  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo)  Search this
Alaskan Eskimo  Search this
Unangan (Aleut)  Search this
Chiricahua Apache [Fort Sill, Oklahoma]  Search this
San Carlos Apache  Search this
Inunaina (Arapaho)  Search this
Sioux [Crow Creek]  Search this
Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan)  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Caddo  Search this
Ho-Chunk (Winnebago)  Search this
Yavapai  Search this
Sauk  Search this
Washoe (Washo)  Search this
Niimíipuu (Nez Perce)  Search this
Seneca  Search this
Omaha  Search this
Menominee (Menomini)  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Seri  Search this
Zia Pueblo  Search this
Yoeme (Yaqui)  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Catawba  Search this
Muskogee (Creek)  Search this
Numakiki (Mandan)  Search this
Minitari (Hidatsa)  Search this
Sahnish (Arikara)  Search this
Osage  Search this
Chickasaw  Search this
Umatilla  Search this
Kaw (Kansa)  Search this
Tsimshian [Metlakatla]  Search this
Tlingit  Search this
Ute  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
Jemez Pueblo  Search this
Havasupai (Coconino)  Search this
Kootenai (Kutenai) [Idaho]  Search this
Klamath  Search this
Kickapoo [Oklahoma]  Search this
Oto  Search this
Spokan  Search this
Yakama (Yakima)  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo)  Search this
Cochiti Pueblo  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Notes
Letters
Clippings
Legal documents
Place:
Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
Date:
1932-1958
Summary:
These are the papers of Washington, D.C. attorney James E. Curry, whose legal career included work both as a government attorney and in his own private practice. The bulk of the papers reflect his private practice in the area of Indian affairs.
Scope and Contents:
The material in the collection includes documents relating to many aspects of Curry's career but most of it relates to his work with Indian tribes and the National Congress of American Indians. For the most, the collection is made up of such materials as letters exchanged with government officials, Indians, and other attorneys; copies of legal documents; published government documents; notes; and clippings and other printed materials. Of particular significance is a subject file relating to Indian affairs. It includes material concerning affairs of Alaskan natives and the Aleut (Akutan, Pribilof Islands), Apache (including Fort Sill, Jicarilla, Mescalero, San Carlos White Mountain), Arapaho (Southern), Assiniboine (Fort Belknap, Fort Peck), Bannock (including Fort Hall), Blackfeet, Caddo, Catawba, Cherokee (Eastern), Cheyenne (Northern, Southern), Chickahominy, Chickasaw, Chippewa (including Lac Courte Oreilles), Choctaw, Cochiti, Cocopa, Coeur d'Alene, Colville, Comanche, Creek, Croatan, Crow, Dakota (Big Foot, Cheyenne River, Crow Creek, Devil's Lake, Flandreau, Fort Totten, Lower Brule, Mdewakanton, Oglala, Rosebud, Santee, Sisseton-Wahpeton, Standing Rock, Yankton), Delaware, Eskimo (including Gambell, Kiana), Flathead, Fox, Haida (including Kasaan), Havasupai, Hopi, Iroquois (Caughnawaga, Seneca, St. Regis), Isleta, Jemez, Kalilspel, Kansa (Kaw), Kickapoo, Kiowa, Klamath, Kutenai, Laguna, Lummi, Maricopa (Gila River, Salt River), Menominee, Missouria, Mohave (Fort Mohave), Mohave Apache (Fort McDowell), Muckleshoot, Navaho, Nez Perce, Niska, Nooksak, Omaha, Osage, Oto, Papago, Paiute (Fallon, Fort McDermitt), Moapa, Pyramid Lake, Shivwits, Walker River, Yerington), Pima (Gila River, Salt River), Potowatomi, Quinaielt, San Felipe, San Ildefonso, San Juan, Santa Ana, Santa Clara, Sandia, Sauk, Seminole (Florida, Oklahoma), Seneca, Seri, Shawnee (Eastern), Shoshoni (including Fort Hall), Sia, Spokan, Stockbridge, Taos (Pyote clan), Tesuque, Three Affiliated Tribes (Mandan, Arikara, and Hidatsa), Tillamook, Tlingit (including Angoon, Craig, Juneau, Kake, Ketchikan, Klawak, Klukwan, Taku, Wrangell), Tsimshian (Metlakatla), Umatilla, Ute (including Uintah-Ouray), Walapai, Washo, Wesort, Winnebago, Wyandot, Yakima, Yaqui, Yavapai, Yuma, and Zuni. There are also materials relating to Curry's work with the Bureau of Indian Affairs and National Congress of American Indians, and material that reflects his interest in conditions and events in given locations (often filed by state) and in organizations with interest in Indians. The material relating to Curry's work in Puerto Rico has been deposited in the Archivo General de Puerto Rico, Instituto de Cultura Puertorriquena, in San Juan.
Arrangement note:
The James E. Curry Papershave been arranged into 6 series: (1) Daily Chronological Files, 1941-1955; (2) Subject Files Regarding Indian Affairs, bulk 1935-1955; (3) Miscellaneous Files Regarding Indian Affairs, bulk 1947-1953; (4) Non-Indian Affairs, n.d.; (5) Puerto Rico Work, 1941-1947; (6) Miscellany, undated.
Biographical/Historical note:
James E. Curry was trained in law in Chicago and practiced in that city from 1930 until 1936, serving part of that time as secretary of the local branch of the American Civil Liberties Union. From 1936 to 1938, he was an attorney with the United States Department of the Interior Bureau of Indian Affairs, being largely involved with matters of credit affecting Indians. From 1938 to 1942, he continued service with the Interior Department but worked in several capacities involving the Puerto Rico Reconstruction Administration, the department's Consumers' Counsel Division, and the Puerto Rico Water Resources Authority.

In 1945, Curry returned to Washington and set up private practice, also maintaining for a time an office in Puerto Rico. In Washington, he became the attorney for the National Congress of American Indians and from that time until the 1950s his practice increasingly involved representation of American Indian tribes, mostly in claims against the federal government. In this work, for a time, he was involved in business relations with a New York Law firm that included Henry Cohen, Felix Cohen, and Jonathan Bingham.

He also often worked closely with lawyers who lived near the tribes he represented, William L. Paul, Jr., of Alaska, for example. This aspect of his practice--representing Indian tribes--was largely broken up during the early 1950s when the Commissioner of Indian Affairs began to use his powers to disapprove contracts between Curry and the tribes. In 1952 and 1953, his official relationship with the National Congress of American Indians was also ended. After this, while Curry continued until his death to act as a consultant in Indian claims with which he had earlier been involved, his career and life developed in a different direction.
Related Materials:
Additional material relating to James E. Curry can be found in the records of the National Congress of American Indians, also located at the National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center.
Provenance:
The Curry papers were originally donated to the National Anthropological Archives by James E. Curry's daughter Mrs. Aileen Curry-Cloonan in December 1973. In 2007 The Curry papers were transferred from the National Anthropological Archives to the National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center along with several other records concerning American Indian law and political rights.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadbast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Genre/Form:
Notes
Letters
Clippings
Legal documents
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); James E. Curry papers, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.015
See more items in:
James E. Curry papers
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-015

Tesuque Pueblo

Collection Correspondent:
Paul, William L. Jr  Search this
Collection Creator:
Curry, James E., 1907-1972  Search this
Container:
Box 157
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadbast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); James E. Curry papers, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
James E. Curry papers
James E. Curry papers / Series 2: Subject File Regarding Indian Affairs
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-015-ref385

Tesuque Pueblo, New Mexico

Collection Creator:
National Congress of American Indians  Search this
Container:
Box 398
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1971
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadbast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Collection Title, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
National Congress of American Indians records
National Congress of American Indians records / Series 6: NCAI Committees and Special Issues Files / 6.20: Economic and Reservation Development / Reservation Development Program Proposals - Tribal Files
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-010-ref5339

Fred Harvey Company collection of Carl Moon Southwest photographs

Photographer:
Moon, Carl, 1878-1948  Search this
Publisher:
Fred Harvey (Firm)  Search this
Extent:
434 Photographs
Container:
Box 1
Culture:
Havasupai (Coconino)  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Tesuque Pueblo  Search this
White Mountain Apache  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Hopi [Sipaulovi]  Search this
Kewa (Santo Domingo Pueblo)  Search this
K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo)  Search this
Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo)  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
Taos Pueblo  Search this
San Ildefonso Pueblo  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Photographs
Place:
San Felipe Pueblo (N.M.)
Arizona
New Mexico
Date:
1907-1914
Summary:
This collection contains photographs that were commissioned by Fred Harvey Co. and shot by Carl Moon circa 1907-1914. The photographs depict American Indian communities in the southwest including A:shiwi (Zuni), Acoma Pueblo, Diné (Navajo), Hopi, Laguna Pueblo, and Taos Pueblo among many others.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains 203 glass transparencies, 2 nitrate negatives, and 1 autochrome (plus 228 copy negatives and copy transparencies) that were commissioned by Fred Harvey Co. and shot by Carl moon circa 1905-1914. The photographs depict the southwest American Indian communities of A:shiwi (Zuni), Acoma Pueblo, Dine (Navajo), Havasupai (Coconino), Hopi Pueblo, Isleta Pueblo, K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo), Kewa (Santo Domingo Pueblo), Laguna Pueblo, Nambe Pueblo, Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo), San Felipe Pueblo, San Ildefonso Pueblo, Taos Pueblo, Tesuque Pueblo, and White Mountain Apache. Some images were also shot in Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona. The photographs are a mix of portraits, posed action shots, and architecture shots. Some of the photographs appear to have been staged by the photographer. There are a few photographs in this collection that may have been shot by Moon prior to his employment with the Fred Harvey Company.

The copy negatives and transparencies were created by the Museum of the American Indian (NMAI's predecessor museum). There are sometimes multiple copy negatives and copy transparencies per glass plate transparency.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 17 series by culture group or location. Series 1: A:shiwi (Zuni), Series 2: Acoma Pueblo, Series 3: Diné (Navajo), Series 4: Havasupai (Coconino), Series 5: Hopi, Series 6: Isleta Pueblo, Series 7: K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo), Series 8: Kewa (Santa Domingo Pueblo), Series 9: Laguna Pueblo, Series 10: Nambe Pueblo, Series 11: Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo), Series 12: San Felipe Pueblo, Series 13: San Ildefonso Pueblo, Series 14: Taos Pueblo, Series 15: Tesuque Pueblo, Series 16: White Mountain Apache, Series 17: Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona

The collection is physically arranged first by collection type (transparencies and negatives) and then in photo numeric order.
Biographical / Historical:
Born in 1878 in Wilmington, Ohio, Carl E. Moon (originally spelled Karl) took up photography after serving with the Ohio National Guard. He moved to Albuquerque, N.M. in 1903 and opened a photograph studio where he began photographing American Indians in the U.S. southwest region. After publishing and exhibiting many of his photographs nationally, he was commissioned by the Fred Harvey Company in 1907 to take photographs of American Indian communities in the southwest. The Fred Harvey Company was founded by Frederick Henry Harvey and consisted of a chain of successful gift shops, restaurants, and hotels know as Harvey Houses. Moon photographed individuals in his El Tovar Studio in the Grand Canyon, Ariz. and also traveled to communities in the region including A:shiwi (Zuni), Diné (Navajo), Hopi, and Laguna Pueblo, among many others. The Fred Harvey Company used these photographs in their postcards, brochures, and publications for the tourist industry. The Fred Harvey Company also partnered with the Sante Fe Railroad to help generate tourism to the southwest region and Moon became the official photographer for the railroad. Moon also took up drawing and painting and studied with American painter Thomas Moran. Moon stayed with the Fred Harvey Company until 1914.

After Moon left the Fred Harvey Company, he opened a studio in Pasadena, California and continued his career as a photographer and painter. During this period, Moon painted and donated 26 works depicting Southwest American Indians to the Smithsonian Institution (now in the Smithsonian American Art Museum's collection). He also sold 24 oil paintings and 293 photographic prints to Henry E. Huntington that are now part of the Huntington Library in San Marino California. With his wife Grace Purdie Moon, he also produced and illustrated children's books of collected Native American stories and legends. Moon died in San Francisco, Calif. in 1948.
Related Materials:
The Huntington Library in San Marino California holds a large collection of Carl Moon works, including oil paintings and photographic prints. The University of Arizona Libraries, Special Collections also holds photographs shot by Carl Moon and the Smithsonian American Art Museum holds 26 Carl Moon paintings.
Separated Materials:
Two nitrate negatives are stored at an offsite storage facility.
Provenance:
Donated to the Museum of the American Indian by the Fred Harvey Company in 1963.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Some images restricted: Cultural Sensitivity.
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Arizona  Search this
Indians of North America -- New Mexico  Search this
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Fred Harvey Company collection of Carl Moon Southwest photographs, Box and Photo Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.090
See more items in:
Fred Harvey Company collection of Carl Moon Southwest photographs
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-090
Online Media:

Tesuque Pueblo

Collection Photographer:
Moon, Carl, 1878-1948  Search this
Collection Publisher:
Fred Harvey (Firm)  Search this
Extent:
4 Photographs ((2 glass transparencies, 2 copy negatives))
Container:
Box 3 and 404 (film negatives)
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Photographs
Scope and Contents:
T006011 (N31724); T006012 (N31723)

This series contains 2 glass transparencies (plus 2 copy negatives) shot by Carl Moon depicting the old mission at Tesuque Pueblo in New Mexico circa 1907-1914.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Some images restricted: Cultural Sensitivity.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Fred Harvey Company collection of Carl Moon Southwest photographs, Box and Photo Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.090, Series 15
See more items in:
Fred Harvey Company collection of Carl Moon Southwest photographs
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-090-ref16

New Mexico

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Before the people there was the land. High mountains in northern New Mexico fork southward, forming arms. One curls westward to embrace the high mesa and plateau land, while the other thrusts directly south to separate the dry grasslands of the east from the fertile valley carved by the Rio Grande. Stories tell that the First People found this land when they emerged onto its surface, born from the womb of Mother Earth.

The Spanish and later the Mexicans also found this land, as they wound their way north on horseback or in carretas, following the course of the long, wild river, and establishing a permanent connection - the Camino Real - between northern New Mexico and Mexico. Then, from Texas, California, Oklahoma, came still others, determined to transform the land and tame the river. And today people still come, on family odysseys that began in Italy, Lebanon, Iran, Czechoslovakia, India, Poland, Japan, or Germany. In one short stretch, the Rio Grande recounts this history as it passes near old communities like San Juan Pueblo and Embudo, then the new atomic city, Los Alamos, and then Albuquerque, a city of a half-million people.

Five hundred years after Columbus, the complex engagement between Europe and America, which his voyage has come to symbolize, continued to produce patterns of accommodation and resistance that were presented in the 1992 Festival program. Conflicting uses and meanings for the same land seem inevitable in New Mexico, where more than 70% of the land is managed by the state or federal government, and where a significant percentage of local income is derived from tourism. Cultural traditions of New Mexico's diverse communities were not seen, at the Festival, as immutable heirlooms passed down from one generation to the next. Rather, visitors could see how today's New Mexicans shape traditions by the conflicted choices they make today, weaving a design that can never be wholly foreseen.

José Griego and Andrew Wiget were Curators, with Philippa Jackson as Research & Program Coordinator and Francesca McLean as Program Assistant.

The New Mexico program was made possible with the support of the State of New Mexico, Bruce King, Governor; with the collaboration of the Department of Tourism, the Office of Cultural Affairs, the New Mexico Arts Division, and the Museum of International Folk Art; and with the assistance of the Tourism Association of New Mexico.
Fieldworkers and consultants:
Fieldworkers

Tomás Atencio, Charles Carillo, Beaumont Chrisner, Patricia D'Andrea, Tobias Duran, Judith Goldberg, José Griego, Jim Harris, Stanley Hordes, Theodore Jojola, Kenneth Keppeler, Gina L'Acqua; Enrique Lamadrid, Katherine Liden, Jack Loeffler, Felix Lopez, Helen Lucero, Gwendolyn Mintz, Lynn Moncus, Stephan Moore, Pat Music, A. Rudy Padilla, Patricia Ruiz, Marilee Schmit, Glenda Sours, Elizabeth Taliman, Soge Track, Sandra Turner, Maria Varela, Marta Wiegle, Peter White

Consultants

Olivia Cadaval, Richard Kennedy
Presenters:
Charles Carrillo, Andrew Connors, José Griego, Kenneth Keppeler, Enrique Lamadrid, Felix Lopez, Tessie Naranjo, Gilbert Sanchez, Maria Varela, Andrew Wiget
Participants:
New Mexico Crafts

Charles Carrillo, santero, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Cordelia Coronado, 1933-, weaver, Medanales, New Mexico

Frances Naranjo Dennis, 1949-, potter, Santa Clara Pueblo, New Mexico

Austin "Slim" Green, saddle maker, Tesuque, New Mexico

Sam Leyba, 1950-, muralist, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Felix Lopez, 1942-, santero, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Irene E. Lopez, 1949-, weaver, Española, New Mexico

José Benjamin Lopez, 1947-, santero, Española, New Mexico

Jerome Lujan, santero, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Deana McGuffin, 1950-, bootmaker, Clovis, New Mexico

Wilberto Miera, adobe worker, furniture maker, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Patricio Mora, 1937-, -- paño -- artist, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Madelyn Naranjo, 1915-, potter, Santa Clara Pueblo, New Mexico

Felipe Ortega, potter, cook, La Madera, New Mexico

Alberto Parra, 1954-, adobe worker, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Carolina Paz, potter, -- quiote -- maker, Tortugas, New Mexico

Lydia Pesata, 1942-, basket maker, storyteller, Dulce, New Mexico

Eliseo Rodriguez, 1915-, straw applique, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Paula Rodriguez, 1915-, straw applique, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Timothy P. Roybal, 1947-, furniture maker, Española, New Mexico

Bonifacio Sandoval, 1922-, tin worker, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Thelma Sheche, 1928-, fetish carver, Zuni Pueblo, New Mexico

Ada Suina, potter, Cochiti Pueblo, New Mexico

Elizabeth Taliman, 1953-, bead worker, cook, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Carmen Romero Velarde, 1928-, adobe worker, cook, Ranchos de Taos, New Mexico

Priscilla Vigil, 1919-2001, potter, cook, storyteller, Tesuque, New Mexico

Maria Vergara Wilson, -- colcha -- embroiderer, La Madera, New Mexico

Home and Garden

Paulette Atencio, 1947-, storyteller, Chama, New Mexico

Alice Hoppes, 1939-2003, cook, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Edward Kretek, 1927-1997, cook, Deming, New Mexico

Geraldine Kretek, 1929-, cook, Deming, New Mexico

Gertrude Kretek, cook, Deming, New Mexico

Consuela Martinez, 1948-, curandera, Mora, New Mexico

Elizabeth Taliman, cook, bead worker, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Maclovia Zamora, 1931-, cook, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Range

Ganados del Valle -- Ganados del ValleEstafanita Martinez, 1968-, weaver, Tiera Amarilla, New MexicoNorma Martinez, 1963-, weaver, Chama, New MexicoSophie Martinez, 1959-, weaver, Tierra Amarilla, New MexicoNena Russan, 1964-, weaver, Chama, New Mexico

Ramah Navajo Sheep Camp -- Ramah Navajo Sheep CampKatie C. Henio, Ramah, New MexicoSamuel Henio, 1952-, Pine Hill, New MexicoAnnie L. Pino, 1925-2006, Ramah, New MexicoLorraine Wayne, Ramah, New Mexico

Mountain Spirit Dancers -- Mountain Spirit DancersFreddy Apache, 1963-, dancer, Mescalero, New MexicoAbraham Chee, 1959-, dancer, drum maker, Mescalero, New MexicoNathaniel Chee, Sr., 1936-2004, drummer, singer, Mescalero, New MexicoNathaniel Chee, Jr., dancer, Mescalero, New MexicoSamuel Chee, 1970-, dancer, drum maker, Mescalero, New MexicoJoseph Geronimo, 1949-, drummer, singer, drum maker, Mescalero, New Mexico

Philip Pike, dancer, Mescalero, New Mexico

Jose Castro, charro, La Mesa, New Mexico

Thelma Castro, charro, La Mesa, New Mexico

Banjo Garcia, camp cook, Continental Divide, , New Mexico

Cindy Jo Gainer Graham, 1959-, ranch skills, Tatum, New Mexico

R.W. Hampton, 1957-, ranch skills, guitarist, vocalist, Sedan, New Mexico

James Keith, farrier, blacksmith, Tucumcari, New Mexico

Pete Lewis, 1938-, ranch skills, fiddler, Dell City, New Mexico

Musicians

Antonia Apodaca, 1923-, accordion, vocals, Rociada, New Mexico

Fernando Cellicion, flute, Zuni Pueblo, New Mexico

Vodra Dorn, 1957-, vocals, Albuquerque, New Mexico

William Dorn, 1952-, vocals, sermon traditions, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Juan Manuel Flores, guitar, Las Cruces, New Mexico

J.P. Lewis, 1950-, guitar, Dell City, New Mexico

Charla Nettleton, 1955-, bass, Mesilla Park, New Mexico

Cleofes Ortiz, fiddle, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Buster Payne, 1915-, fiddle, Eunice, New Mexico

Floyd Trujillo, 1934-, vocals, bone carver, Abiquiu, New Mexico

Gretchen Van Houton, 1963-, fiddle, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Cipriano Vigil, 1941-, guitar, fiddle, vocals, Tesuque Pueblo, New Mexico

Johnny Whelan, 1946-, guitar, poetry, Las Cruces, New Mexico

Luther Whelan, 1975-, harmonica, bass, poetry, Las Cruces, New Mexico

Los Alegres -- Los AlegresFrank Jaramillo, 1950-, bass, Ranchos de Taos, New MexicoJulia Jaramillo, 1922-, mandolin, Ranchos de Taos, New MexicoPablo Trujillo, 1916-, bass, Ranchos de Taos, New Mexico

Los Reyes de Albuquerque -- Los Reyes de AlbuquerqueMiguel Archibeque, 1938-, guitar, vocals, Albuquerque, New MexicoIsidro Chavez, 1921-, guitar, Albuquerque, New MexicoRay Flores, trumpet, Albuquerque, New MexicoLorenzo Martinez, violin, Albuquerque, New MexicoRoberto Martinez, 1929-, vihuela, guitar, vocals, Albuquerque, New MexicoAngela Perez, 1970-, violin, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Plaza Dancers

Los Bernalillo Matachines -- Los Bernalillo MatachinesTheresa Acosta, 1952-, dancer, Bernalillo, New MexicoCharles J. Aguilar, 1946-, violin, Bernalillo, New MexicoRalph Chavez, dancer, Bernalillo, New MexicoJohn Crespin, 1952-, dancer, Bernalillo, New MexicoJocelyn Duran, dancer, Bernalillo, New MexicoJoseph R. Garcia, 1950-, dancer, Bernalillo, New MexicoEddie D. Gutierrez, dancer, Bernalillo, New MexicoLeroy J. Lovato, 1955-, dancer, Bernalillo, New MexicoLaurence Lucero, 1966-, dancer, Bernalillo, New MexicoPhillip Montano, 1961-, dancer, Albuquerque, New MexicoLeonard Prairie, dancer, Bernalillo, New MexicoMelanie Wiggins, dancer, Bernalillo, New Mexico

Los Comanches de la Serna -- Los Comanches de la SernaDavid Antonio Gonzales, 1965-, dancer, Ranchos de Taos, New MexicoFrancisco Gonzales, 1941-, singer, dancer, Ranchos de Taos, New MexicoMoises Romero, dancer, Ranchos de Taos, New MexicoJulian Struck, dancer, Ranchos de Taos, New Mexico

Concha Dancers -- Concha DancersAdeline Concha, 1973-, dancer, bead worker, Taos Pueblo, New MexicoBenito Concha, 1965-, drummer, flautist, dancer, Taos Pueblo, New MexicoCelestina Concha, 1937-, dancer, bead worker, Taos Pueblo, New MexicoJodie Concha, dancer, bead worker, Taos Pueblo, New MexicoMichelle Concha, dancer, bead worker, Taos Pueblo, New MexicoMike Concha, 1932-, vocals, drummer, dancer, Taos Pueblo, New MexicoNicolas Concha, dancer, Taos Pueblo, New MexicoDonna Sandoval, 1964-, dancer, bead worker, Taos Pueblo, New MexicoSonny Spruce, dancer, Taos Pueblo, New MexicoBransen Velarde, dancer, Taos Pueblo, New Mexico
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1992, Series 4
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1992-ref34

Dale Jenkins postcard and photograph collection

Creator:
Jenkins, Dale  Search this
Extent:
145 Postcards
11 Photographic prints
0.5 Linear feet
Culture:
Havasupai (Coconino)  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Tesuque Pueblo  Search this
K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo)  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
Inupiaq (Alaskan Inupiat Eskimo)  Search this
Suquamish  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Cayuse  Search this
Northern Paiute (Paviotso)  Search this
Nuwuvi (Southern Paiute)  Search this
Plains Apache (Kiowa Apache)  Search this
Inunaina (Arapaho)  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Indians of Central America -- Panama  Search this
Indians of Central America -- Guatemala  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Postcards
Photographic prints
Place:
Temuco (Chile)
Cuzco (Peru)
Date:
1890-1939
Summary:
This collection consists of 145 postcards and 11 photographs depicting indigenous peoples of the Americas, with dates ranging 1890 – 1930s. The bulk of the collection consists of postcards of Native communities throughout the United States, and includes portrait images, dwellings, basket-making, weaving, and crafts.
Scope and Contents:
The Dale Jenkins postcard and photograph collection consists of 145 postcards and 11 photographs with dates ranging 1890 – 1930s. The images depict indigenous peoples of the Americas, and spans a large geographical breadth extending from the Arctic in the north to Chile and Peru in South America. The bulk of the collection consists of postcards of Native communities throughout the United States, with a significant number of images depicting various Pueblo and Southwest cultural groups; many of these latter postcards were produced by the Fred Harvey Company. A number of the postcards and photographs include portrait images, dwellings, basket-making, weaving, and crafts. Also of particular note are 13 scenes of daily life at a number of different Indian Boarding Schools at the turn of the twentieth century. Finally, in addition to the postcard images are 11 photographs consisting of cabinet cards and other photographic prints.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged into 11 series, organized thematically (Indian Boarding Schools) and then regionally by location or culture group. Series 1: Indian Boarding Schools, Series 2: Arctic/Subarctic, Series 3: Northwest Coast, Series 4: California, Series 5: Great Basin/Plateau, Series 6: Southwest, Series 7: Plains, Series 8: Northeast/Great Lakes, Series 9: Southeast, Series 10: Mexico/Central America, Series 11: South America
Biographical / Historical:
Dale Jenkins is a retired Financial Planner living in California, having previously worked in the Aerospace industry. He has collected late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century American photographs and postcards for over 30 years. In addition to archival collections donated to the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of the American Indian, Jenkins has also donated postcard and photograph collections to the California Museum of Photography, the California Historical Society, and the Museum of the City of New York.
Provenance:
This collection was donated by Dale Jenkins in 2013 and 2014.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Education  Search this
Off-reservation boarding schools -- Photographs  Search this
Education -- Carlisle Indian School  Search this
Mille Lacs Band of Chippewa Indians. Minnesota  Search this
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Dale Jenkins postcard and photograph collection, NMAI.AC.069, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.069
See more items in:
Dale Jenkins postcard and photograph collection
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-069
Online Media:

Southwest

Collection Creator:
Jenkins, Dale  Search this
Extent:
45 Postcards
6 Photographic prints
Container:
Photo-folder 15
Photo-folder 16
Photo-folder 17
Photo-folder 18
Photo-folder 19
Photo-folder 20
Photo-folder 21
Photo-folder 22
Photo-folder 23
Photo-folder 24
Oversize 1
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Postcards
Photographic prints
Date:
1890-1939
Scope and Contents:
This series contains 45 postcards and 6 photographic prints. The images include depictions of activities such as weaving, basket making, pottery making, bread-baking, and selling crafts. Communities represented include Acoma Pueblo, Akimel O'odham (Pima), A:shiwi (Zuni), Chimayo, Cochiti Pueblo, Diné (Navajo), Havasupai (Coconino), Hopi Pueblo, Hualapai (Walapai), K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo), Laguna Pueblo, Mojave (Mohave), Tesuque Pueblo, and Tohono O'odham (Papago). The only individual specifically identified is Elle of Ganado [Diné (Navajo)], a well-known and celebrated weaver of the time. A large number of these postcards were produced by the Fred Harvey Company which partnered with the Santa Fe Railroad in the early 20th century to generate tourism in the American Southwest.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Dale Jenkins postcard and photograph collection, NMAI.AC.069, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.069, Series 6
See more items in:
Dale Jenkins postcard and photograph collection
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-069-ref506

Odd Halseth collection of negatives and photograph

Creator:
Halseth, Odd S.  Search this
Extent:
158 Negatives (photographic) (black and white)
4 Photographic prints (black and white)
Culture:
Puye Pueblo  Search this
K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo)  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Kewa (Santo Domingo Pueblo)  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
San Ildefonso Pueblo  Search this
Piipaash (Maricopa)  Search this
Jemez Pueblo  Search this
Zia Pueblo  Search this
Yoeme (Yaqui) [Pascua Yaqui]  Search this
Tesuque Pueblo  Search this
Cochiti Pueblo  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Photographic prints
Photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Date:
1920-1925
Summary:
The collection consists of negatives and photographs made by Halseth from 1920 to 1925 in Arizona and New Mexico.
Scope and Contents:
The collection consists of negatives and photographs made by Halseth from 1920 to 1925 in Arizona and New Mexico. The materials are primarily informal, outdoor group and individual portraits of Akimel O'odham (Pima), Diné (Navajo), Yoeme (Yaqui) [Pascua Yaqui], Piipaash (Maricopa), K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo), Zia Pueblo, San Ildefonso Pueblo, Jemez Pueblo, Cochiti Pueblo, Kewa (Santo Domingo Pueblo), and Tesuque Pueblo men, women, and children. In addition among the Akimel O'odham photographs are depictions of dwellings, potters, ladle makers, baskets, the construction of an oven, food preparation, dwellings, and mattress factory wokers; among the K'apovi ceremonials and village views; among the Zia pottery and portraits of and paintings by Velino Shije Herrera; among the Jemez ceremonials and village views; among Kewa ovens; and among San Ildefonso village views and paintings by Awa Tsireh. The collection also includes photogrpahs depicting the pictographs at Puye.
Arrangement note:
Negatives Arranged by negative number (N32893-N33051)

Prints Arranged by print number (P19345-P19346, P19630-P19631)
Biographical/Historical note:
Born in 1893 in Moss, Norway, Halseth was an anthropologist, museum director, educator, author, art critic, and lecturer. As a young man he studied electrical engineering and anthropology in Germany and served both Norway and the United States during World War I. While in San Diego for military training, he met archaeologist Edgar L. Hewett and after the war accepted a position with Hewett as the curator of art at the San Diego Museum. In 1923, he moved to Santa Fe, where he was on both the staff of the School of American Research and the Museum of New Mexico. After four years, Halseth was appointed director of the newly established Arizona Museum in Phoenix and in 1929 initiated the excavation of the Pueblo Grande Indian ruins and founded the Pueblo Grande Museum. Halseth was also Phoenix's head archaeologist and superintendent of the city's Division of Archaeology. Active in his field, Halseth was a fellow of the American Anthropological Association, a member of the Society of American Archaeology, and the author of numerous publications on Arizona archaeology and indigenous arts and crafts. He retired in 1960.
Provenance:
Historically, the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation managed all photographic materials separately. This collection description represents current management practices of organizing and contextualizing related archival materials.
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment.
Rights:
Restricted: Cultural Sensitivity
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian.
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Arizona -- Photographs  Search this
Indians of North America -- New Mexico -- Photographs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Photographic prints
Black-and-white negatives
Citation:
Odd Halseth collection of negatives and photographs, 1920-1925, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.038
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-038

George Hubbard Pepper photograph collection

Creator:
Pepper, George H. (George Hubbard), 1873-1924  Search this
Extent:
1292 Negatives (photographic)
23 Photographic prints (black & white)
Culture:
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Purepecha (Tarasco)  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Cochiti Pueblo  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Jemez Pueblo  Search this
K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo)  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
Nambe Pueblo  Search this
Picuris Pueblo  Search this
Pojoaque Pueblo  Search this
Puye Pueblo  Search this
San Felipe Pueblo  Search this
San Ildefonso Pueblo  Search this
Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo)  Search this
Sandia Pueblo  Search this
Santa Ana Pueblo  Search this
Taos Pueblo  Search this
Tesuque Pueblo  Search this
Zia Pueblo  Search this
Hopi [Hano]  Search this
Pikuni (Piegan) [Blackfeet Nation, Browning, Montana]  Search this
San Carlos Apache  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Mexica (Aztec) (archaeological culture)  Search this
Pueblo (Anasazi) (archaeological)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Place:
New Mexico
Texas
New York
Montana
Arizona
Basin
Illinois
Mexico
Southwest
Guatemala
Ecuador
Utah
Plains
Date:
1895-1918
Summary:
George Hubbard Pepper specialized in the study of cultures of the American Southwest and Ecuador. Tribes which he studied are Acoma, Aztec, Blackfeet, Cochiti, Hopi, Isleta, Jemez, Laguna, Nambe, Navajo, Picuris, Pojuaque, Puye, San Carlos Apache, San Felipe, San Ildefonso, San Juan, Sandia, Santa Ana, Santa Clara, Taos, Tarascan, Tesuque, Ute, Zia, and Zuni. Photographs in the collection are of an excavation in Tottenville, New York, 1895; Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Cañon, New Mexico: Hyde Expedition, 1896-1900; and expeditions to the occupied Pueblos of the Southwest, 1904; Mexico, 1904, 1906; Guatemala; and Ecuador, 1907. There are also photos which complement a study Pepper did of the technique of Navajo weaving, and miscellaneous scenic and personal photos.
Arrangement note:
Collection arranged by item number.
Biographical/Historical note:
George Hubbard Pepper was born on February 2, 1873 in Tottenville, Staten Island, New York. As a young boy he exhibited a strong interest in archaeology and after his graduating from high school followed encouragement from Prof. Fredric W. Putnam to study at the Peabody Museum of Harvard University, where Pepper stayed from 1895-96. In 1896 he was appointed assistant curator of the Department of the Southwest in the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. From 1896 to 1900, Pepper was a member of the Hyde Exploring Expedition, which conducted excavations at Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Canyon, New Mexico. In 1904, he conducted an ethnological survey of the occupied pueblos of the Southwest and at the same time continued his study of the weaving techniques of the Navajo. Pepper also participated in excavations in the yacatas of the Tierra Caliente of Michoacan in Mexico sponsored by George Gustav Heye, and in 1907 he went with Marshall Saville on an expedition to the Province of Manabi in Ecuador, also for Heye. In 1909 Pepper was appointed assistant curator in the Department of American Archaeology at the University Museum of Philadelphia, but after only a year there he joined the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation in New York City, where he stayed until his death. In 1914 he excavated a Munsee cemetery of the historic period near Montague, New Jersey and in the following year he went on the exploration of the Nacoochee mound in the old Cherokee region in Georgia. In 1918 he joined the Hawikku explorations of the Hendricks-Hodge Expedition in New Mexico. Pepper died on May 13, 1924, in New York City. George H. Pepper was a co-founder of the American Anthropological Association, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the American Ethnological Society of New York, a member of the American Folklore Society, and a corresponding member of the Academia Nacional de Historia of Ecuador. A complete bibliography of his works can be found in Indian Notes, v. 1, no. 3, July 1924, pp. 108-110. The George Hubbard Pepper Papers are in the Latin American Library, Tulane University Library, New Orleans, Louisiana.
Provenance:
According to Frederick Dockstader, director of MAI from 1960 to 1975, in a letter dated March 26, 1968, the collection was given to MAI by Pepper. However, the 1965 Annual Report (p. 26) states that the Photographic Department acquired through the donation of Mrs. Jeannette Cameron approximately 500 new negatives pertaining to field work done by her father from 1900-1910; and the 1966 Annual Report (p. 9) states that many papers of Dr. George H. Pepper were acquired through the courtesy of his daughter, Mrs. Jeanette Cameron.
Restrictions:
Access restricted. Researchers should contact the staff of the NMAI Archives for an appointment to access the collection.
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Photographic prints
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.034
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-034

Charles Morgan Wood photograph collection

Creator:
Wood, Charles Morgan  Search this
Extent:
142 Photographic prints
12 Copy negatives
Culture:
San Ildefonso Pueblo  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Tesuque Pueblo  Search this
Hopi-Tewa  Search this
Kewa (Santo Domingo Pueblo)  Search this
Nambe Pueblo  Search this
K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo)  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Taos Pueblo  Search this
Hopi [First Mesa]  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Copy negatives
Place:
Santa Fe (New Mexico)
Walpi (Arizona)
Navajo Indian Reservation
Casa Grande (Ariz.)
Date:
1908-1925
Summary:
This collection includes photographic prints and copy negatives made by Charles Morgan Wood between 1908 and 1925 of indigenous communities and archaeological sites within Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona. The communities photographed include the San Ildefonso Pueblo, Isleta Pueblo, Diné (Navajo), Tesuque Pueblo, Hopi-Tewa, Kewa (Santo Domingo Pueblo), Nambe Pueblo, K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo), Laguna Pueblo, A:shiwi (Zuni), Hopi Pueblo, Acoma Pueblo, and Taos Pueblo.
Scope and Contents:
Series one includes photos taken in Arizona between 1908-1925. Photos include landscapes, buildings, and portraits of living communities posing or engaging in tasks, such as decorating pottery, blanket weaving, and grinding corn. The depicted communities include the Hopi-Tewa, Hopi Pueblo, and Diné (Navajo). Also included are photographs of archaeological sites within Arizona, including several pictographs at Betatakin. A few prints document the Diné (Navajo) mud-bathing for a head dance. Catalog numbers include N36036, N41315, P07121-P0145; P07152-P07168

Series two includes photos taken between 1920-1925 in New Mexico. Some photos depict archaeological sites and prehistoric ruins, including photos of the Bandelier National Monument, the Inscription Rock in El Morro, and cliff-dwellings in Rito de los Frijoles. This series also depicts houses, buildings, and portraits taken among living communities, including the San Ildefonso Pueblo, Diné (Navajo), Isleta Pueblo, Tesuque Pueblo, Kewa (Santo Domingo Pueblo), Taos Pueblo, Acoma Pueblo, Hopi Pueblo, Hopi-Tewa, and K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo). Several photos also document women selling pottery and the A:shiwi (Zuni) rain dance. Catalog numbers include N36029-N36035; N36037-N36039; P07072-P07120; P07146-P0151; P07169-P07207.

Series three includes several photos of Mesa Verde National Park in Colorado, taken between 1920 and 1925. Structures include a view of a Spruce-tee house, Cliff palace, the Balcony house, and "Navajo Canon." Catalog numbers include P07066-P07071.

Prints include P07066-P07207. Copy negatives include N36029-N36039, N41315.
Arrangement:
Arranged intro three series geographically. Arranged by catalog number within each series.
Biographical / Historical:
Charles Morgan Wood was born in 1879. He was a manufacturer and author from Dayton, Ohio. He retired to Tucson in 1923 where he pursued interests in writing, western history, and book collecting. At the time of his death in 1927, he was gathering material for a history of the Apache Indians.

Biography adapted from Arizona Historical Society.
Provenance:
Gift of Charles Morgan Wood, 1925.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).

P07133 and P07139 are restricted due to cultural sensitivity.
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Topic:
Archeology -- Mesa Verde, Colorado  Search this
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Charles Morgan Wood photograph collection, image #, NMAI.AC.167; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.167
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-167

Anne Forbes collection

Creator:
Forbes, Anne, 1919-  Search this
Source:
United States. Indian Arts and Crafts Board  Search this
Names:
Indian Arts Fund (Santa Fe, N.M.)  Search this
Herrera, Joe, 1923-2001  Search this
Herrera, Velino  Search this
Martinez, Julian, -1943  Search this
Martínez, María Montoya  Search this
Toledo, José Rey, 1915-1994  Search this
Former owner:
United States. Indian Arts and Crafts Board  Search this
Extent:
472 Photographic prints
1 Linear foot
Culture:
Cochiti Pueblo  Search this
Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo)  Search this
Taos Pueblo  Search this
Tesuque Pueblo  Search this
Picuris Pueblo  Search this
K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo)  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
Jemez Pueblo  Search this
Nambe Pueblo  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
San Ildefonso Pueblo  Search this
Santo Domingo Pueblo  Search this
Zia Pueblo  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Notes
Reports
Date:
1948-1977
Summary:
The Anne Forbes collection includes documents and photographs pertaining to her research on Indian arts in the Southwest, United States conducted during 1948-1948 and revisited in 1958. The work culminated in the dissemination of a survey titled "Survey of American Indian Arts and Crafts, Southwest and Northern Plains." Forbes focused mostly on Pueblo paintings having developed personal relationships with several Pueblo painters including Joe Herrera (Cochiti Pueblo), Velino Herrera (Zia Pueblo) and Jose Rey Toledo (Jemez Pueblo).
Scope and Contents:
The bulk of the Anne Forbes collection consists of documentation concerning her survey on American Indian arts and crafts in the Southwest and Northern Plains conducted in 1948-1949 and then revisited in 1958. This includes biographical notes on individual Native artists from New Mexico, Arizona, Montana, Colorado, South Dakota and California as well as notes on museum collections and art dealers whose collections and purchases included Indian art from the Southwest. Forbes also visited Pueblo schools during the 1948-1948 trip in order to examine the status of arts education and collected drawings from students as well as took careful notes on each school. Also included in the Forbes papers are the draft and final reports of Forbes' survey as well as responses to the report from prominent institutions and individuals in the Indian art world such as friend and artist Joe H. Herrera. Supporting materials to Forbes' research includes a collection of Smoke Signals newsletters from 1951 to 1965, which was published by the Indian Arts and Crafts Board, brochures and pamphlets from the Bureau of Indian Affairs concerning education and the arts, and exhibition documents and catalogs from museums featuring Native artists' works from the Southwest and Northern Plains.

The photo albums titled "Indian Paintings, Pottery, Pictographs, Prehistoric Murals, Dances, Artists" and "Pueblo Indian Paintings" hold photographs collected and taken by Forbes during her research. The bulk of the photographs are of works of art and are arranged by culture group and artist. There are also a small amount of photographs of the artists themselves and their families.
Arrangement:
The Anne Forbes collection is arranged into two series. Series 1: Indian Arts Research and Supporting Documentation is arranged alphabetically by folder. Series 2: Photo Albums contains two photo albums that have been left in their original orders.
Biographical Note:
Miss Anne Forbes originated from Cambridge Massachusetts. After majoring in art from Bennington College in Vermont, Forbes pursued a Master's degree in social anthropology from Harvard University's Radcliffe College. Taking an interest in Southwest Indian Art, Forbes applied for a fellowship through the Indian Arts Fund for the summer of 1948 to study painting and other techniques used in Pueblo art. Although the fellowship lasted only a summer, Forbes spent the following year visiting various pueblos meeting native artists and purchasing original art works from them. It was at this time that Forbes befriended artists Joe Herrera (Cochiti Pueblo), Velino Herrera (Zia Pueblo) and Jose Rey Toledo (Jemez Pueblo). Forbes also spent time visiting Pueblo schools examining the state of arts education for native children as well as acquiring paintings and drawings made by the Pueblo schoolchildren. In 1958, Forbes sent out a first draft of her "Survey of American Indian Arts and Crafts, Southwest and Northern Plains" which was the culmination of her research on the state of native art at the time with a particular focus on Pueblo artists. Following the release of her report, Forbes did not continue professionally in the world of art instead moving into human relations. Forbes held onto the bulk of her art collection, exhibiting pieces here and there, until donating a large portion of the collection to the National Museum of the American Indian in 2003. A longtime member of the Self-Realization Fellowship, Forbes also donated some of her pieces to that organization.
Separated Materials:
This collection was part of a donation made by Anne Forbes that included 143 paintings and other works of art on paper that are now a part of the NMAI Modern and Contemporary Arts Collection with object numbers 26/3091 to 26/3227 and 26/3854, 26/3855. Artists include Harrison Begay, Theodore Edaaki, Luis Gonzales (Wo Peen), Joe Herrera, Velino Herrera, James Humetewa, Michael Kabotie, Richard Martinez, Theodore Suina, Beatien Yazz and others. For more information on these paintings please contact NMAI Collections at NMAICollections@si.edu.
Provenance:
This collection was donated by Anne Forbes in November of 2003.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Education -- Southwest, New  Search this
Pueblo Artists -- Directories  Search this
Pueblo Artists -- Exhibitions  Search this
Pueblo Artists -- Photographs  Search this
Indian artists -- New Mexico -- Research  Search this
Indian artists -- Arizona -- Research  Search this
Genre/Form:
Notes
Reports
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Anne Forbes Collection, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.060
See more items in:
Anne Forbes collection
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-060

Santo Domingo Sandaro Dance

Artist:
Thomas Vigil, born Tesuque Pueblo ca. 1889-died 1960  Search this
Medium:
watercolor, ink, and pencil on paper
Dimensions:
sheet: 10 5/8 x 14 1/2 in. (26.9 x 46.8 cm)
Type:
Painting
Date:
ca. 1920-1925
Topic:
Figure group\male  Search this
Animal\horse  Search this
Ethnic\Indian\Tesuque  Search this
Ceremony\dance\Santo Domingo Sandaro Dance  Search this
Credit Line:
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Corbin-Henderson Collection, Gift of Alice H. Rossin
Object number:
1979.144.52
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
Smithsonian American Art Museum Collection
Department:
Graphic Arts
Data Source:
Smithsonian American Art Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/vk724af04d9-6bbe-4b75-bac6-6ffdb7a36c49
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:saam_1979.144.52

Santo Domingo Sandaro Dance

Artist:
Thomas Vigil, born Tesuque Pueblo ca. 1889-died 1960  Search this
Medium:
watercolor, ink, and pencil on paperboard
Dimensions:
sheet: 11 1/8 x 14 1/4 in. (28.2 x 36.2 cm)
Type:
Painting
Date:
ca. 1920-1925
Topic:
Figure group  Search this
Animal\horse  Search this
Ethnic\Indian  Search this
Dress\ceremonial\Indian dress  Search this
Ceremony\dance\Santo Domingo Sandaro Dance  Search this
Credit Line:
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Corbin-Henderson Collection, Gift of Alice H. Rossin
Object number:
1979.144.53
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
Smithsonian American Art Museum Collection
Department:
Graphic Arts
Data Source:
Smithsonian American Art Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/vk7edddc14a-241c-457f-b06a-09339d131a3d
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:saam_1979.144.53

Mounted Warrior

Artist:
Thomas Vigil, born Tesuque Pueblo ca. 1889-died 1960  Search this
Medium:
watercolor and pencil on paper
Dimensions:
sheet: 11 x 11 3/8 in. (28.0 x 28.9 cm)
Type:
Painting
Date:
ca. 1920-1950
Topic:
Ethnic\Indian  Search this
Dress\ethnic\Indian dress  Search this
Occupation\military\soldier  Search this
Object\weapon\spear  Search this
Dress\accessory\shield  Search this
Equestrian  Search this
Credit Line:
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Corbin-Henderson Collection, Gift of Alice H. Rossin
Object number:
1979.144.54
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
Smithsonian American Art Museum Collection
Department:
Graphic Arts
Data Source:
Smithsonian American Art Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/vk7c660f16c-6c42-4e2a-9b09-47b42541b8ba
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:saam_1979.144.54

Mounted Warriors

Artist:
Thomas Vigil, born Tesuque Pueblo ca. 1889-died 1960  Search this
Medium:
watercolor and pencil on paper
Dimensions:
sheet: 7 7/8 x 13 in. (20.0 x 32.9 cm)
Type:
Painting
Date:
ca. 1920-1950
Topic:
Figure group\male  Search this
Animal\horse  Search this
Ethnic\Indian  Search this
Dress\ethnic\Indian dress  Search this
Occupation\military\soldier  Search this
Object\weapon\spear  Search this
Dress\accessory\shield  Search this
Credit Line:
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Corbin-Henderson Collection, Gift of Alice H. Rossin
Object number:
1979.144.55
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
Smithsonian American Art Museum Collection
Department:
Graphic Arts
Data Source:
Smithsonian American Art Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/vk7325f1b1a-30dc-4893-ac68-c349e0f97bd8
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:saam_1979.144.55

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