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Jorge Prelorán films

Creator:
Preloran, Jorge, 1933-2009  Search this
Names:
University of California, Los Angeles  Search this
Extent:
50 Film reels (50 completed films and 1 film series; 110,600 feet of original film outtakes (51 hours); 412 hours of audiotape; 31 digital books)
22 Linear feet (Papers and photographs)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Film reels
Place:
Patagonia (Argentina and Chile)
Argentina
Date:
1954-circa 2008
Summary:
Documentary filmmaker Jorge Prelorán was best known for his intimate approach to ethnographic film, a style known as "ethnobiography." The majority of Prelorán's films were shot in rural areas of Argentina, particularly the Andean highlands and the Pampas (plains), often in communities of mixed Indian and Spanish heritage. Prelorán documented a wide range of subjects, including art, folk crafts, agriculture, ranching, markets, religious rituals and festivals, and social and cultural change. This collection contains edited films and videos, film outtakes, audio tapes, photographic prints and transparencies, digital books, correspondence, production files, scripts, project files, and press clippings spanning 1954-2008.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains edited films and videos, film outtakes, audio tapes, photographic prints and transparencies, digital books, correspondence, production files, scripts, project files, and press clippings spanning 1954-2008.

The majority of Prelorán's films were shot in rural areas of Argentina, particularly the Andean highlands and the Pampas (plains), often in communities of mixed Indian and Spanish heritage. Prelorán documented a wide range of subjects, including art, folk crafts, agriculture, ranching, markets, religious rituals and festivals, and social and cultural change. Several films focus on natural history and science. There are also a number of experimental and fiction films.

Prelorán formed close friendships with many of the subjects of his films and corresponded with them long after the films were completed. This is reflected in the paper records, as is Prelorán's wide circle of colleagues and collaborators, including anthropologists, musicians, animators, historians, painters, writers, photographers, current and former students at UCLA, and fellow filmmakers. The extensive collection of press clippings, screening notices, and festival catalogs documents Prelorán's influence in Argentina, Europe, and the United States.

In the series of digital books, Prelorán presents the personal stories of individuals involved in creative work. Some books feature subjects profiled in the films, updating or expanding on their stories.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 11 series: (1) Completed Films and Videos, 1954-circa 2008; (2) Film Outtakes, 1960s-1980s; (3) Audio, 1969-2008; (4) Correspondence, 1954-2005 (bulk 1967-1992); (5) Production Files, 1961-1998; (6) Project Files, 1967-1995; (7) UCLA, 1968-2005 (bulk 1980s); (8) Press Clippings, 1960-2005; (9) Photographs, 1961-2000; (10) Books, 1994-1998, undated; (11) Electronic Files, circa 2000-circa 2006
Biographical Note:
Documentary filmmaker Jorge Prelorán was best known for his intimate approach to ethnographic film, a style known as "ethnobiography." In films such as Hermógenes Cayo (Imaginero) (1970), Los Hijos de Zerda (Zerda's Children) (1974), and Zulay Frente al Siglo XXI (Zulay Facing the 21st Century) (1989), Prelorán's protagonists tell their personal stories, while also revealing the stories of their communities and cultures. Prelorán worked in Latin America and the United States, but primarily in his native country of Argentina. His career spanned from 1954 to 2008, including nearly twenty years as a film professor at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).

Prelorán was born May 28, 1933 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. His father, an engineer, was Argentine and had studied at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he met his wife, an American. Prelorán grew up speaking both Spanish and English. Initially pursuing a career in architecture, he studied at the Universidad Nacional de Buenos Aires. He made his first film, Venganza, with neighborhood friends in Buenos Aires in 1954. The film won the Beginner's Festival of Cine Club Argentina that same year. Prelorán was accepted as an undergraduate at the University of California, Berkeley, and studied architecture there for one year. In 1956 he withdrew from UC Berkeley and was drafted into the US Army. Prelorán served in West Germany until 1958. Upon his return he changed educational plans and began formal study of filmmaking, receiving a Bachelor of Arts in Motion Pictures from UCLA in 1960.

Shortly before the end of his service in the US Army, Prelorán married Elsa Dondi, a former classmate from Buenos Aires. They lived together in Los Angeles until Elsa returned to Argentina for the birth of their daughter, Adriana, in 1961. The couple separated shortly thereafter.

Prelorán's professional career as a filmmaker began in 1961 with a commission from the Tinker Foundation of New York for a series of films on the Argentine gaucho. In the course of shooting for these films, Prelorán traveled extensively throughout Argentina, visiting many locations in Patagonia and in the northwest where he would later return to make many of his films. From 1963-1969, Prelorán was under contract at the Universidad Nacional de Tucumán to produce educational films; he also produced a series of short films on Argentine folklife with support from Fondo Nacional de las Artes and under the mentorship of folklorist Augusto Raúl Cortazar, Ph.D.

In the late 1960s, Prelorán became involved with UCLA's Ethnographic Film Program and in 1970 he returned to UCLA as a lecturer for two semesters. Later that year he was a fellow at Harvard University's Film Study Center, where he produced the English-language version of Imaginero (Hermógenes Cayo). Prelorán was the recipient of two Guggenheim Fellowships, in 1971 and 1975, and used those opportunities to produce quite a number of films, including Damacio Caitruz (Araucanians of Ruca Choroy).

Prelorán remarried in 1972. His wife, Mabel Freddi, became a collaborator on his films. She wrote the screenplay for Mi Tia Nora (My Aunt Nora) (1983) and co-directed Zulay Frente al Siglo XXI (Zulay Facing the 21st Century) (1989), among other credited and un-credited roles. After the Argentine military coup of March 1976 and the disappearances of fellow filmmaker Raymundo Gleyzer and Mabel's niece, Haydee, the Preloráns became fearful for their own safety. They fled to the United States, a move that would become permanent. Prelorán accepted a position as associate professor at UCLA's School of Theater, Film and Television. He later joined the faculty as a tenured professor.

During his time at UCLA, Prelorán was twice selected as a Fulbright Scholar, in 1987 and 1994. He continued to produce films, including the Academy Award-nominated documentary short Luther Metke at 94 (1980) and the 7-hour natural history television series Patagonia (1992). After retiring in 1994, Prelorán continued to mentor film students as Professor Emeritus; he also began work in a new medium, creating a series of digital books, "Nos = Otros" ("Sages Amongst Us") (unpublished), featuring individuals engaged in creative and educational pursuits.

Prelorán died at his home in Culver City, CA at the age of 75 on March 28, 2009.

Sources Consulted

UCLA, School of Theater, Film and Television. "Jorge Prelorán 1933 - 2009." Obituary. Last modified March 31, 2009. Accessed April 1, 2009. http://tft.ucla.edu/news/obituary

Jorge Prelorán Collection. Human Studies Film Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

Rivera, Fermín. Huellas Y Memoria de Jorge Prelorán. Documentary film. 2010.

Woo, Elaine."Jorge Prelorán dies at 75; Argentine filmmaker and former UCLA professor." Los Angeles Times, April 5, 2009. Web. 29 Apr 2009.

1933 -- Born May 28 in Buenos Aires, Argentina

1952-1954 -- Studies at the College of Architecture, Universidad Nacional de Buenos Aires, Argentina

1954 -- Completes first film, Venganza, a fictional short

1955 -- Studies at the College of Architecture, University of California at Berkeley

1956-1958 -- Drafted into United States Army, stationed in Schwetzingen, West Germany

1959-1960 -- Earns Bachelor of Arts in Motion Pictures from UCLA

1961-1963 -- Produces films on the Argentine gaucho for the Tinker Foundation, New York

1963-1969 -- Produces films at the Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, Argentina

1968 -- Attends the First International Colloquium on Ethnographic Film at UCLA

1969 -- Shoots film for The Warao People in Venezuela, under a grant from the Ford Foundation to the Ethnographic Film Program at UCLA

1970 -- Lecturer at UCLA School of Theater, Film, and Television Fellow at the Film Study Center, Harvard University

1971 -- Receives first Guggenheim Fellowship; completes several film projects in Argentina

1975 -- Receives second Guggenheim Fellowship; continues filming in Argentina

1976 -- Moves to United States Associate professor at UCLA School of Theater, Film, and Television

1978 -- Guest of Honor at the 2nd Margaret Mead Ethnographic Film Festival at the American Museum of Natural History, New York

1980 -- Academy Award nominee for Luther Metke at 94

1985 -- Guest at the White House for a State Dinner in honor of Argentine President Raul Alfonsin

1986 -- Naturalized as a United States citizen

1987 -- First selection as Fulbright Scholar; begins production of the series Patagonia, en Busca de su Remoto Pasado

1994 -- Second selection as Fulbright Scholar; completes pre-production for the narrative feature film "Vairoletto: The Last Gaucho Outlaw" Retires from UCLA as professor emeritus

2009 -- Dies on March 28 in Culver City, California
Related Materials:
The Human Studies Film Archives holds a copy of Fermín Rivera's edited biographical documentary film, Huellas y Memoria de Jorge Prelorán (HSFA 2015.1.27), as well as transcripts of interviews conducted with Jorge and Mabel Prelorán for the film (in Spanish).

The Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas at Austin, holds the original film for four titles Prelorán produced for the Tinker Foundation (New York, NY). These are: The Llanero; The Gaucho of Corrientes; The Gaucho of the Pampas; and The Gaucho of Salta. The Ransom Center has both English and Spanish versions of these titles. These four films were preserved in 2010 and 2011 with funding from the Tinker Foundation. HSFA holds high quality video masters of all four titles. A fifth film produced for the Tinker Foundation, El Gaucho Argentino, Hoy (The Argentine Gaucho, Today), is held at the HSFA in its Spanish version only.

The Arthur Hall Collection at Temple University, Phildadelphia, Pennsylvania and Ile Ife Films in Belfast, Maine hold a copy of The Unvictorious One that differs from the two versions held at the HSFA.
Provenance:
This collection was donated to the Human Studies Film Archives in two accessions. The first accession, 2007-10, contains the edited films, outtakes, audio recordings, papers, and photographs and was donated by Jorge Prelorán. Materials had been stored at Prelorán's home office and home editing suite before they were packed by the processing archivist and sent to the HSFA. The second accession, 2011-07, contains the digital books and some additional photographs. This accession was donated by Mabel Prelorán. These materials had also been stored at Prelorán's home office and were sent to the HSFA by Mabel Prelorán.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Please contact the archives for information on availability of access copies of audiovisual recordings. Original audiovisual material in the Human Studies Film Archives may not be played.

Various copyrights and restrictions on commercial use apply to the reproduction or publication of film, video, audio, photographs, and the digital books.

Access to the Jorge Prelorán collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
Documentary films  Search this
Biography  Search this
Citation:
The Jorge Prelorán films, Human Studies Film Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
HSFA.2007.10
See more items in:
Jorge Prelorán films
Archival Repository:
Human Studies Film Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-hsfa-2007-10
Online Media:

Alma Thomas papers

Creator:
Thomas, Alma  Search this
Names:
Art in Embassies Program (U.S.)  Search this
Martha Jackson Gallery  Search this
Bader, Franz, 1903-1994  Search this
Breeskin, Adelyn Dohme, 1896-1986  Search this
Johnson, Nathalie J. Cole  Search this
Sarg, Tony, 1882-1942  Search this
Tarbary, Celine  Search this
Taylor, Joshua Charles, 1917-  Search this
Thomas, J. Maurice (John Maurice), 1900 or 1901-  Search this
Extent:
5.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Audiocassettes
Video recordings
Photographs
Date:
circa 1894-2001
Summary:
The papers of Washington, D.C. painter and art educator Alma Thomas, date from circa 1894-2001 and measure 5.5 linear feet. The papers document Thomas's work as a teacher, and her development and success as a painter of the Washington Color School, through biographical material, letters, notes and writings, personal business records, exhibition files, printed materials, scrapbooks, photographs, an audio recording, and two video recordings.
Scope and Contents note:
The papers of Washington, D.C. painter and art educator Alma Thomas, date from circa 1894-2001 and measure 5.5 linear feet. The papers document Thomas's work as a teacher, and her development and success as a painter of the Washington Color School, through biographical material, letters, notes and writings, personal business records, exhibition files, printed materials, scrapbooks, photographs, an audio recording, and two video recordings.

Biographical material includes identity cards, chronologies, an audio recording including a biographical account, and scattered documentation of Thomas's education and teaching careers with D.C. Public Schools, Howard University, and Thomas Garrett Settlement in Wilmington, Delaware. Also found are records relating to Thomas's participation in a summer marionette class taught by Tony Sarg in 1934, and a tour of European art centers which Thomas took in 1958.

Letters relate primarily to the exhibition of Thomas's work and related events and are from galleries, museums, other art institutions, colleagues, and friends including Franz Bader, Adelyn Breeskin, Corcoran Gallery of Art, Howard University Gallery of Art, Martha Jackson Gallery, Nathalie J. Cole Johnson, Vincent Melzac, Celine Tabary, and Joshua Taylor.

Notes and writings include four notebooks and autobiographical writings by Thomas, a "Birthday Book," and an annotated engagement calendar. J. Maurice Thomas's writings about Alma Thomas, her research for a bibliography on James Weldon Johnson, and writings by others, including Jacob Kainen, about Alma Thomas, are also found here.

Exhibition files contain a wide variety of documentation for many group and solo exhibitions of Thomas's work from the early 1950s through a 1998-2000 traveling retrospective exhibition, including solo exhibitions at the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Corcoran Gallery of Art in 1972. The records include letters from Franz Bader Gallery, David Driskell at Fisk University, and Vincent Melzac. Photographs include Thomas with individuals including William Buckner, Jeff Donaldson, David Driskell, James W. Herring, and Vincent Melzac. Also found is a photograph of the 1951 Little Paris Studio Group picturing Lois Mailou Jones, Celine Tabary, Alma Thomas, and others. Two video recordings are of events related to the 1998-2000 retrospective at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art and the Columbus Museum of Art. Records documenting a 1981-1982 exhibition at the Smithsonian National Museum of American Art, A Life in Art: Alma Thomas, includes the script of a video written by Adolphus Ealey.

Personal business records include price lists, gift and loan receipts, and files concerning the Art in Embassies Program, the Martha Jackson Gallery, a benefit auction for the Corcoran School of Art, and the designation of the Thomas family home in Washington, D.C. as a historic property.

Eleven scrapbooks document Thomas's teaching career through the activities of the art classes she taught at Shaw Junior High School.

Printed materials include announcements and catalogs for exhibitions and other events; clippings which document Thomas's career and subjects of interest to her; Christmas cards featuring block prints designed by Thomas; and other programs and publications featuring Thomas.

Photographs are of Alma Thomas, family, and friends and colleagues including Sam Gilliam, James V. Herring, and Nathalie V. Cole Johnson; art classes taught by Thomas; Thomas's homes in Columbus, Georgia and Washington, D.C.; and exhibitions not documented in Series 4: Exhibition Files, including photographs of Alma Thomas at an opening at Barnett Aden Gallery with Alonzo Aden and others.
Arrangement note:
The papers have been arranged into 8 series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1911-2001 (Box 1; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 2: Letters, circa 1930-2001 (Boxes 1-2; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 3: Notes and Writings, circa 1920s-circa 1998 (Box 2; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 4: Exhibition Files, 1951-2000 (Boxes 2-3, OV 7; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 5: Personal Business Records, circa 1950s-1994 (Box 3; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 6: Printed Material, circa 1908-2000 (Boxes 3-5, OV 7; 1.8 linear feet)

Series 7: Scrapbooks, 1930-1946 (Box 5; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 8: Photographs, circa 1894-2001 (Boxes 5-6; 0.6 linear feet)
Biographical/Historical note:
Washington, D.C. painter and art educator Alma Thomas (1891-1978) was known for her abstract paintings filled with dense patterns of color, and was considered a major artist of the Washington Color School.

Thomas was born in Columbus, Georgia, in 1894, and was the eldest of the four daughters of John Harris Thomas and Amelia Cantey Thomas. The family moved to Washington, D.C. in 1906 and Thomas was first introduced to art classes at Armstrong Technical High School. Following her graduation in 1911 she took a course in kindergarten teaching at the Miner Normal School, and subsequently worked as a substitute teacher in the Washington, D.C. public school system until 1914, when she took a teaching position on the Eastern shore of Maryland. From 1916 to 1923 she taught kindergarten at Thomas Garrett Settlement House in Wilmington, Delaware.

Thomas originally enrolled at Howard University in Washington, D.C. as a home economics major in 1921, but after studying under Lois Mailou Jones amd James V. Herring in Herring's newly established art department, she earned a Bachelor's degree in Fine Art in 1924, and became the first person to graduate from the program. Thomas then began her teaching career at Shaw Junior High School in Washington, D.C. that lasted from 1924, until her retirement in 1960. During this time she established community arts programs that would encourage her students to develop an appreciation of fine arts. Activities included marionette programs, distribution of student-designed holiday menu cards for dinners given for soldiers at the Tuskegee Veterans' Hospital, art clubs, lectures, and student exhibitions. In 1943 she became the founding vice president of Barnett Aden Gallery, which was established by James V. Herring and Alonzo Aden and was the first integrated gallery in Washington, D.C.

In 1934 Thomas earned an M.A. degree in Art Education from Columbia University. At American University in Washington, D.C., she studied creative painting under Joe Summerford, Robert Gates, and Jacob Kainen from 1950 to 1960, and began to break away from representational painting and experiment more seriously with Abstract Expressionism. In 1958 she participated in a tour of the art centers of Western Europe under the auspices of the Tyler School of Fine Arts at Temple University in Philadelphia.

Following her retirement from teaching in 1960, Thomas devoted herself full-time to painting, and continued to develop her signature style. She was inspired by nature and the desire to express beauty through composition and color, and refused to be constrained by societal expectations related to her race, gender, and age, achieving her greatest success in the last decade of her life. Her work was exhibited at the Dupont Theatre Art Gallery, Franz Bader Gallery, and the Howard University Gallery of Art, before she was honored in 1972 with exhibitions at the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

Thomas's work has been exhibited at the White House and can be found in the permanent collections of major museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the National Museum of Women in the Arts, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.
Separated Materials note:
In 1979, J. Maurice Thomas loaned papers for microfilming. Most, but not all, of the loaned material was later donated and is described in this finding aid. Loaned materials not donated at a later date are available on reels 1541-1543 and are not described in the container listing of this finding aid.
Provenance:
J. Maurice Thomas, the artist's sister, loaned portions of the collection for microfilming in 1979. Most, but not all of this material was then later donated in several accretions by J. Maurice Thomas, between 1979 and 2004. Charles Thomas Lewis, Thomas' nephew, gave additional papers in 2010.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate copies requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Alma Thomas papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Painters -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Educators -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Topic:
Painting, American  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Washington Color School (Group of artists)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Audiocassettes
Video recordings
Photographs
Citation:
Alma Thomas papers, circa 1894-2001. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.thomalma
See more items in:
Alma Thomas papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-thomalma
Online Media:

Playbill for Comin' Uptown

Published by:
Playbill, American, founded 1884  Search this
Used by:
Winter Garden Theatre, American, founded 1911  Search this
Subject of:
Gregory Hines, American, 1946 - 2003  Search this
Larry Marshall, American, born 1943  Search this
Robert Jason Jackson, American  Search this
Saundra McClain, American  Search this
Medium:
ink on paper
Dimensions:
H x W: 9 1/4 x 6 x 1/4 in. (23.5 x 15.2 x 0.6 cm)
Type:
theater programs
Place used:
New York City, New York, United States, North and Central America
Date:
December 1979
Topic:
African American  Search this
Broadway Theatre  Search this
Musical Theatre  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Kayla Deigh Owens
Object number:
2011.45.21
Restrictions & Rights:
Playbill used by permission. All rights reserved, Playbill Inc.
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Memorabilia and Ephemera
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd553d368d6-5368-4bb2-911e-f84de9a22707
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2011.45.21
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
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Online Media:

The Crisis Vol. 18 No. 3

Published by:
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, American, founded 1909  Search this
Edited by:
W.E.B. Du Bois, American, 1868 - 1963  Search this
Illustrated by:
Frank Walts, American  Search this
Medium:
ink on paper
Dimensions:
9 3/4 x 6 3/4 x 1/8 in. (24.8 x 17.1 x 0.3 cm)
Type:
magazines (periodicals)
Place printed:
New York City, New York, United States, North and Central America
Date:
July 1919
Topic:
African American  Search this
Education  Search this
Literature  Search this
Mass media  Search this
Politics (Practical)  Search this
Race relations  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Bobbie Ross in memory of Elizabeth Dillard
Object number:
2012.84.3
Restrictions & Rights:
Public Domain
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Documents and Published Materials-Published Works
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5fc5d2f1a-22f1-42b5-bb5b-bed2a76d8689
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2012.84.3
2 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
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Article from The Phildadelphia Evening Bulletin entitled, "African Agrees with African Series", 3/31/72, consists of a rebuttal by an African student at Temple University to an article previously published by the author of the column, who criticized th...

Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Container:
Box 13, Folder 5
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1972
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Eliot Elisofon Field collection / Manuscript Materials / X-9B: Press Releases
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref41411

Fred Becker papers

Creator:
Becker, Fred, 1913-2004  Search this
Names:
Atelier 17  Search this
Mary Ryan Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
United States. Office of War Information  Search this
Burlin, Paul, 1886-1969  Search this
Hayter, Stanley William, 1901-1988  Search this
Hugo, Ian, 1898-1985  Search this
Nin, Anaïs, 1903-1977  Search this
Singer, Gail  Search this
Todd, Ruthven, 1914-1978  Search this
Van Duyn, Mona  Search this
Extent:
3.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Lectures
Photographs
Prints
Sketchbooks
Sketches
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Transcripts
Date:
1913-2004
bulk 1940-2000
Summary:
The papers of printmaker and educator Fred Becker measure 3.4 linear feet and date from 1913 to 2004, with the bulk from 1940-2000. The collection documents Becker's work as a professional artist and educator through biographical material, personal and professional correspondence, writings, interviews, personal business records, gallery and exhibition files, project files, photographic material, printed material, and artwork.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of printmaker and educator Fred Becker measure 3.4 linear feet and date from 1913 to 2004, with the bulk from 1940 to 2000. The collection documents Becker's work as a professional artist and educator through biographical material, personal and professional correspondence, writings, interviews, personal business records, gallery and exhibition files, project files, photographic material, printed material, and artwork.

Biographical material includes a birth certificate and announcement, résumés and other biographical writings, as well as memorial materials and obituaries. Also included are letters and photographs concerning Becker's WWII appointment with the Office of War Information in China. Correspondence reflects relationships with colleagues and friends including Stanley William Hayter, Gail Singer, and Mona Van Duyn, professional organizations, museums and galleries, as well as family. The Writings series contains essays and artist statements written by Becker, articles and essays written about Becker by others, and writings by poets Ruthven Todd and Mona Van Duyn. Lectures are featured in written form, as well as audio recordings. Interviews include transcripts and audio and video recordings.

Personal business records include various studio artwork inventories and information regarding artwork donation and sale at auction, in addition to documents related to Becker's role as an art instructor. In the gallery and exhibition files are detailed records of gallery and museum exhibitions, as well as correspondence with specific galleries including the Mary Ryan Gallery. Project files include documentation of various residencies and government art programs Becker participated in, a symposium on Atelier 17, as well as significant bodies of work.

Photographic materials document Becker's artwork, including images of works by fellow artists S.W. Hayter and Paul Burlin. Photograph formats include slides, transparencies, negatives, and black and white prints. Printed material includes exhibition catalogs, clippings and invitations. Also found are various artworks including sketchbooks, loose sketches, prints, and a partial letterpress mock-up of Winter of Artifice, printed by author Anaïs Nin, with various etching illustrations by Ian Hugo.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged in 10 series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, circa 1913-2004 (0.1 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, circa 1940s-2001 (0.7 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 3: Writings, circa 1940s-1993 (0.1 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 4: Interviews, circa 1976-2004 (0.2 linear feet; Boxes 1-2)

Series 5: Personal Business Records, circa 1939-1990s (0.1 linear feet; Box 2)

Series 6: Exhibition and Gallery Records, circa 1950-2002 (0.2 linear feet; Box 2)

Series 7: Project Files, circa 1957-1993 (0.1 linear feet; Box 2)

Series 8: Photographic Material, circa 1930s-1999 (0.3 linear feet; Box 2)

Series 9: Printed Material, circa 1930s-2002 (0.8 linear feet; Boxes 2-3)

Series 10: Artwork, circa 1940-1989 (0.6 linear feet; Boxes 3-4)
Biographical / Historical:
Fred Becker (1913-2004) was a printmaker and art educator in Amherst, Massachusetts. Becker was born in 1913 in Oakland, California. He attended New York University beginning in 1933, where he enrolled in architecture coursework before focusing on printmaking and drawing. Becker was employed by the Works Progress Administration from 1935 to 1939. His early work of this period often incorporated nightclub scenes depicting jazz musicians. In 1940, Becker was one of the first students to enroll in classes at the New York iteration of Atelier 17, led by printmaker Stanley William Hayter. There Becker engaged with more abstract forms in his art-making, and arrived at an expressionist style by the 1950s. He served in the China Division of the United States Office of War Information (OWI) from 1945 to 1946.

Becker taught at the Tayler School of Art at Temple University in Philadelphia, from 1946 to 1948; at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, from 1948 to 1968; and at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst from 1968 until his retirement in 1986. University of Massachusetts, Amherst's Herter Gallery was the site of his retrospective in 1999. Becker and his wife, painter Jean Morrison (1917-1995), had two children Carla and Anton. Fred Becker exhibited widely in print annuals and solo shows, as well as in the context of his participation in the Works Progress Administration and Atelier 17, New York. His prints are represented in a number of museum collections including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York.
Provenance:
The Fred Becker papers were donated to the Archives of American Art in 2018 by Becker's daughter Carla Becker.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Fred Becker papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art teachers -- Massachusetts  Search this
Artists -- Massachusetts  Search this
Printmakers -- Massachusetts  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- China  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Lectures
Photographs
Prints
Sketchbooks
Sketches
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Transcripts
Citation:
Fred Becker papers, 1913-2004, bulk 1940-2000. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.beckfred
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Fred Becker papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-beckfred

Peggy Bacon papers

Creator:
Bacon, Peggy, 1895-1987  Search this
Names:
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.) -- Students  Search this
Kraushaar Galleries  Search this
Alder, Jules  Search this
Bacon, Charles Roswell, 1868-1913  Search this
Brook, Alexander, 1898-1980  Search this
Bunner, Rudolph Francis  Search this
Lay, Charles Downing, 1877-1956  Search this
Remsen, Ira, 1846-1927  Search this
Schmidt, Katherine, 1898-1978  Search this
Varian, Dorothy, 1895-1985  Search this
Extent:
4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Drawings
Date:
1893-1973
bulk 1900-1936
Summary:
The papers of printmaker, illustrator, caricaturist, and writer Peggy Bacon measure 3.6 linear feet and date from 1893 to 1973, with the bulk of materials dating from 1900 to 1936. Much of the collection consists of family correspondence, although writings, photographs, artwork, and personal business records from Bacon's late career are also found.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of printmaker, illustrator, caricaturist, and writer Peggy Bacon measure 3.6 linear feet and date from 1893 to 1973, with the bulk of materials dating from 1900 to 1936. Much of the collection consists of family correspondence, although writings, photographs, artwork, and personal business records from Bacon's late career are also found.

Correspondence is found between Peggy Bacon and her parents, Elizabeth and Charles Roswell Bacon. Letters to her mother describe in detail her life as an art student and artist at the Art Students League; summer schools in Port Jefferson, Long Island and Provincetown, Massachusetts; the Woodstock artists' colony; and her early years in New York City. Letters from her husband, Alexander Brook, to her mother are also present. Letters to Bacon include letters from her early teacher Jonas Lie, and from friends and fellow artists Catherine Wiley, Dorothy Varian, Katherine Schmidt, Anne Rector Duffy, and others. Her parents' extensive correspondence includes letters to her father from the artists Jules Adler, Rudolph Bunner, Ira Remsen, and Charles Downing Lay.

The collection also contains Peggy Bacon's school reports and writing assignments, a marriage certificate, scattered poetry manuscripts and notes by Peggy Bacon, and fiction manuscripts by Charles Roswell Bacon. Personal business records date from the 1960s and 1970s and include publisher's royalty statements, gallery sales statements, and scattered business correspondence with Antoinette Kraushaar and other staff at the Kraushaar Galleries. Photographs depict Bacon and her family, friends, homes, and works of art. Artwork includes several original drawings and sketches by Bacon, as well as artwork by Alexander Brook, Charles Roswell Bacon, and others.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 7 series:

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1893-1913 (Box 1; 2 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1893-1939, 1969-1972 (Boxes 1-3; 3 linear feet)

Series 3: Personal Business Records, 1897-1934, 1963-1972 (Box 4; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 4: Writings, 1905-1920 (Boxes 4-5; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1905-1935, 1973 (Box 5; 3 folders)

Series 6: Photographs, circa 1900-1963 (Box 5, OV 6; 4 folders)

Series 7: Artwork, undated (Box 5, OVs 6-8; 9 folders)
Biographical Note:
Peggy Bacon was born in 1895 in Ridgefield, Connecticut, and grew up an only child after the death of two younger brothers in infancy. Her parents, Charles Roswell Bacon and Elizabeth Chase Bacon, had met at the Art Students League, where her father had studied with Robert Henri. Her father pursued a career in painting and writing until his suicide in 1913, and her mother painted miniatures.

A child of artists, Bacon began to draw at a very early age, and by age ten she was already earning money for her illustrations, drawings of literary characters made for dinner place cards. She did not attend school until 1909, when her parents sent her to a boarding school in Summit, New Jersey. She began her formal art training shortly after her father's death, enrolling in the School of Applied Arts for Women at the end of 1913. In the summer of 1914, she attended Jonas Lie's landscape class in Port Jefferson, Long Island, and continued private studies with him in New York City. Lie gave Bacon her first solo exhibition in 1915. From 1915 until 1920, she studied at the Art Students League under John Sloan, Kenneth Hayes Miller, George Bellows, Mahroni Young, and others. In the summers, she took classes first in Provincetown, Massachusetts, and then in Woodstock, New York, where she studied with Andrew Dasburg.

Bacon's circle was formed at the Art Students League, and the League's summer school in Woodstock. She met her husband, Alexander Brook, in Woodstock, and they were married in 1920. Both were active in the Woodstock Artists Association. Other artists in their close-knit group included Dorothea Schwarz (Greenbaum), Anne Rector (Duffy), Betty Burroughs (Woodhouse), Katherine Schmidt (Kuniyoshi Shubert), Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Molly Luce, Dorothy Varian, Edmund Duffy, Dick Dyer, David Morrison, and Andrew Dasburg. Many from this group were involved in the short-lived satirical magazine at the League called Bad News, published in 1918 with several of Bacon's earliest satirical drawings. Her first book, The True Philosopher and Other Cat Tales, was published in 1919. Brook and Bacon traveled to England in 1920, where their daughter Belinda was born. A son, Sandy, was born in Woodstock in 1922. In the early 1920s, Brook worked with Juliana Force at the Whitney Studio Club, and they were involved in the cultural life that sprang up around the gallery, which featured up-and-coming artists. For many years, Bacon and her family split their time between New York and Woodstock, and later summered in Cross River, NY. After divorcing Brook in 1940, Bacon spent summers in Ogunquit, Maine.

Though she initially thought of herself as a painter, she built her reputation on her drawings and prints, which often satirized the people around her in their natural habitats - artists in life classes, at dances, and in social situations, or a throng of people in a museum, on a city sidewalk, or a ship's deck. She became sought after for her illustrations and witty, topical verse in magazines such as Dial, Delineator, The New Yorker, New Republic, Fortune, and Vanity Fair. She helped to establish the American Print Makers, an artists' organization based in the Downtown Gallery which sought greater exhibition opportunities for printmakers. Bacon illustrated over sixty books, nineteen of which she also wrote, between 1919 and 1966, including many children's books and a successful mystery novel called The Inward Eye (1952). In 1933 she received a Guggenheim Fellowship and used it to complete a collection of caricatures of art world figures called Off With Their Heads (1934), the success of which prompted a spate of commissions for caricatures. Bacon stopped making caricatures in 1935, but they include some of her best-known work.

Bacon exhibited frequently, in New York and in major museum exhibitions nationally, showing her prints, drawings, pastels, and watercolors. She had over thirty solo exhibitions at such venues as Montross Gallery, Alfred Stieglitz's Intimate Gallery, and the Downtown Gallery, and was represented by Rehn Galleries and later Kraushaar Galleries. Bacon also taught extensively in the 1930s and 1940s, at the Fieldston School, Art Students League, Hunter College, Temple University, the Corcoran Gallery, and other places. In the 1950s, she returned to painting. She made her last prints in 1955. In the early 1970s, Bacon's eyesight failed, and she eventually went to live with her son in Cape Porpoise, Maine. She died in 1987.
Related Material:
Among the other resources relating to Peggy Bacon in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Bacon, May 8, 1973; and letters to Bernice and Harry Lurie from Peggy Bacon, 1969-1977. Additional Peggy Bacon papers are available at Syracuse University.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Peggy Bacon in 1973 and Kraushaar Galleries in 2008.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Drawings
Citation:
Peggy Bacon papers, 1893-1972. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.bacopegg
See more items in:
Peggy Bacon papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-bacopegg
Online Media:

Adela Akers papers

Creator:
Akers, Adela, 1933-  Search this
Names:
Tyler School of Art  Search this
Extent:
2.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Date:
1960-2009
Summary:
The papers of fiber artist and educator Adela Akers measure 2.6 linear feet and date from 1960 to 2009. Her career as an artist and her tenure at the Tyler School of Art, Temple University, are documented through scattered biographical material; correspondence; subject files on galleries, projects, weaving technique, research, workshops, and fiber arts organizations; writings; exhibition announcements, clippings, and other printed material; photographs; and artwork, including one sketchbook.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of fiber artist and educator Adela Akers measure 2.6 linear feet and date from 1960 to 2009. Her career as an artist and her tenure at the Tyler School of Art, Temple University, are documented through scattered biographical material; correspondence; subject files on galleries, projects, weaving technique, research, workshops, and fiber arts organizations; writings; exhibition announcements, clippings, and other printed material; photographs; and artwork, including one sketchbook.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 7 series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1970s, 1991-1998 (Box 1; 3 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1985-1987 (Box 1; 3 folders)

Series 3: Subject Files, 1960-2007 (Box 1; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 4: Writings, 1973-1995 (Box 1; 3 folders)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1962-2009 (Box 1-2, 6; 6 folders)

Series 6: Photographic Materials, 1960-2008 (Box 2-3; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 7: Artwork, circa 1960s-1980s (Box 3-6, OV 7; 1.1 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Adela Akers (1933- ) is a fiber artist and educator living and working in Guerneville, California.

Akers was born in Santiago de Compostela, Spain, and was raised in Havana, Cuba. She came to the United States as a student in 1957 and studied at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and Cranbrook Academy of Art. In 1965 she served as a weaving advisor in Peru for the Alliance for Progress and was an artist in residence at Penland School of Crafts from 1968-1970. From 1972 to 1995 Akers was a professor and chair of fiber arts at the Tyler School of Art at Temple University in Philadelphia. Her weavings consist of zigzags, checkerboard patterns, and simple geometric shapes.
Related Material:
Also found at the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Adela Akers, 2008 Mar. 4-6, conducted by Mija Riedel.
Provenance:
The collection was donated in 2009 and 2011 by Adela Akers.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Adela Akers papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Educators -- California  Search this
Fiber artists -- California  Search this
Weaving -- Technique  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Citation:
Adela Akers papers, 1960-2009. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.akeradel
See more items in:
Adela Akers papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-akeradel

General: United Aircraft Corporation

Collection Creator:
Junkin, Hattie Meyers, 1896-1985  Search this
Container:
Box 3, Folder 13
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
1939
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
See more items in:
Hattie Meyers Junkin Papers
Hattie Meyers Junkin Papers / Series 1: General Correspondence / 1.3: Business correspondence
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-xxxx-0171-ref90
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Marvin Harris papers

Creator:
Harris, Marvin, 1927-2001  Search this
Names:
Columbia University  Search this
University of Florida. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Extent:
42.27 Linear feet (85.5 document boxes, 1 oversize box, 4 record storage boxes, 90 computer disks, 19 cassette tapes, 1 7" sound reel, 3 vinyl records, and 1 map folder)
Note:
Boxes 88-91 (formerly designated off-site boxes 1-4) are stored off-site. Advanced notice must be given to view these materials.
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
New York (N.Y.)
Mozambique
Rio de Contas (Brazil)
Arembepe (Brazil)
Chimborazo (Ecuador)
Date:
1945-2001
Summary:
This collection contains the professional papers of anthropologist Marvin Harris. Harris was a prominent anthropologist, best known for developing the controversial paradigm of cultural materialism. He authored several important books in the field of anthropology and taught at Columbia University and The University of Florida. The papers include correspondence, research materials, his publications, unpublished manuscripts, conference papers, lectures, subject files, teaching files, computer files, and photographs.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains the professional papers of anthropologist Marvin Harris. The papers include correspondence, research materials, his publications, unpublished manuscripts, conference papers, lectures, subject files, teaching files, computer files, and photographs.

His research files document his ethnographic field work in Rio de Contas, Brazil, both for his dissertation and his racial categorization project; his research on forced labor in Mozambique; his videotape study in New York City households; and his India sacred cattle research. The collection also contains his research on food preferences and aversions, his files as a research consultant for the McKinsey Global Institute, and photos from his field work in Chimborazo, Ecuador and Arembepe, Brazil.

Over the course of his career, Harris also participated in several conferences and invited lectures. The collection contains some of the papers he presented as well as audio recordings of his lecture "Levi-Strauss and the Clam: An Open and Shut Case" and a recording of a radio interview. Also present in the collection are materials relating to conference sessions and symposiums that he organized, including the 1967 AAA session on Anthropology and War and his 1983 Wenner-Gren symposium on Food Preferences and Aversions.

Additional materials that may be of interest are materials documenting Harris' activism in the 1960s at Columbia University, which include his anti-Vietnam War activities, as well as his involvement in the student protests of 1968 at Columbia University. The collection also contains Harris' CIA, FBI, and Department of State records that he obtained through Freedom of Information Act requests, photographs from Harris' service in the army in the 1940s, and photos taken in Brazil by Pierre Verger.

Harris corresponded with several prominent anthropologists, many of whom were Latin American specialists. Some of his noteworthy correspondents include Napoleon Chagnon, Derek Freeman, Morton Fried, Conrad Kottak, Sidney Mintz, Anthony Leeds, Claude Levi-Strauss, Darcy Ribeiro, Anisio Teixeira, Charles Wagley, and Karl Wittfogel. Also of special interest is his correspondence with leading figures in the Mozambique and Portuguese liberation movements, including Antonio Figuereido, Eduardo Mondlane, and General Humberto Delgado.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 10 series: (1) Correspondence, 1952-2001; (2) Research, 1949-1997; (3) Writings, 1955-2001; (4) Professional Activities, 1960-1999; (5) Name Subject Files, 1951-2001; (6) University, 1947-1999; (7) Biographical Files, 1954-1999; (8) Writings by Other People, 1961-2000; (9) Photographs, 1945-1996; (10) Computer Files, 1980-2000
Biographical Note:
Marvin Harris was a prominent anthropologist, best known for developing the controversial paradigm of cultural materialism. He authored several important books in the field of anthropology, most notably The Rise of Anthropological Theory (1968) and Cultural Materialism (1979) as well as books that reached a wider audience, such as Cows, Pigs, Wars and Witches (1974) and Cannibals and Kings (1977).

Harris was born in Brooklyn, New York on August 18, 1927. After serving in the U.S. Army Transportation Corps (1945-47), he received his B.A. (1948) and Ph.D. (1953) from Columbia University. His first anthropology course was taught by Charles Wagley, who was influential in Harris' decision to become an anthropologist. Harris joined the faculty at Columbia University after earning his doctorate and served as chair of the Department of Anthropology from 1963 to 1966. In 1980, he left Columbia for a position as Graduate Research Professor at University of Florida, where he stayed until his retirement in 2000.

It was in The Rise of Anthropological Theory that Harris coined the phrase "cultural materialism," a subject he further elaborated on in Cultural Materialism. Cultural materialism, Harris explains, is a scientific research strategy "based on the simple premise that human social life is a response to the practical problems of earthly existence" (1979, xv). Harris applied the paradigm to explain various cultural patterns, such as food preferences and taboos, changes in U.S. family structure, and the collapse of Soviet and East European state socialism. One of his most controversial theories was that the Hindu prohibition of slaughtering and consuming cows in India arose because it was more economically beneficial to use cattle as draft animals than as meat. He challenged Napoleon Chagnon's views that Yanomami men were inherently more aggressive and violent by explaining that it was the pursuit of animal protein that was the cause of Yanomami warfare. Harris similarly argued that protein deficiency was the reason why the Aztecs practiced cannibalism.

Harris presented his theories beyond academic circles to a general audience by contributing a monthly column to Natural History Magazine. He also authored several popular books. In addition to Cows, Pigs, Wars and Witches and Cannibals and Kings, Harris also wrote America Now (1981), Good to Eat (1985), and Our Kind (1989). Harris also authored and edited several editions of two college-level introductory textbooks: Culture, People, Nature (first published as Culture, Man, and Nature in 1971) and Cultural Anthropology (first published in 1983, later editions coauthored with Orna Johnson). According to Harris, the 1975 edition of Culture, People, Nature "was the first anthropology textbook to be written cover to cover in a gender-neutral mode of discourse" (12/3/93 letter from Harris to Deborah S. Rubin, "Furlow - [The Teaching of Anthropology]", Series 3. Writings, Marvin Harris Papers).

Although Harris is primarily known for his work as a theoretician, he also conducted ethnographic fieldwork throughout his career. Harris traveled to Rio de Contas, Brazil in 1950-51 to conduct research for his dissertation, "Minas Velhas: A Study of Urbanism in the Mountains of Eastern Brazil." This research was also the subject of his book Town and Country in Brazil (1958) and his chapter, "Race Relations in Minas Velhas, a Community in the Mountain Region of Central Brazil" in Race and Class in Rural Brazil (Charles Wagley, 1952). He continued his research in Brazil in 1953-54 while serving as a research advisor for the Ministry of Education in Rio de Janeiro. As field leader of the Columbia-Cornell-Harvard-Illinois Summer Field Studies Program, Harris returned to Brazil in 1962 to study fishing villages in Arembepe. Prior to that, he also served as field leader for the program in Chimborazo, Ecuador in 1960.

In 1956-57, Harris conducted field research in Mozambique, at the time under Portuguese rule. He initially intended to study the influence of Portuguese rule on race relations, comparing the race relations in Brazil and Mozambique. He soon became aware, however, of the political brutalities that the Portuguese government was imposing on the people of Mozambique. Consequently, Harris decided to focus his research on labor exploitation in the colony. Antonio de Figueiredo, who later became an important figure in the Mozambique liberation movement, served as an informal assistant to Harris. Harris was also friends with Eduardo Mondlane, president of FRELIMO, the Mozambican Liberation Front. Because Harris was openly critical of the Portuguese government, he was forced to leave Mozambique before he completed his research. When he returned to the United States, Harris published Portugal's African "Wards" (1958), a critical evaluation of Portugal's colonialism. His publication was influential in eradicating the forced labor system in Mozambique a few years later.

Harris' activism extended to the social and political unrest at home during the 1960s. He was vice-chairman of Vietnam Facts, an organization of professors in the United States who were against the Vietnam War, and was one of the organizers of the Ad Hoc Teaching Committee on Vietnam. In 1967, he brought an academic focus to war by organizing a symposium on the subject with Morton Fried and Robert Murphy at the American Anthropological Association's (AAA) annual meeting. Together, they edited War: The Anthropology of Armed Conflict and Aggression (1968), a compilation of the papers presented at the conference. During the 1968 student uprising at Columbia University, Harris was one of the few faculty members that openly sided with the students. Harris criticized the actions of the university administrators in his article, "Big Busts on Morningside Heights" (1968).

Due to his experiences in Mozambique, Harris also began to think about the distinctions between emic and etic perspectives, which he discusses in his book, The Nature of Cultural Things (1964). During the 1960s-70s, Harris experimented with the use of video recordings as an etic approach to collecting ethnographic data. He collaborated with the Bronx State Hospital to videotape domestic life in two Puerto Rican and two African American families. He also videotaped and coded behavioral streams of two Caucasian and two African-American families in New York City for his NSF funded project, "Patterns of Authority and Subordination in Low-Income Urban Domiciles." In 1965 and 1992, Harris returned to Brazil to study racial categorizations and identifications, specifically the emic and etic differences in the perception of race. He published several papers on the subject, including "The Structural Significance of Brazilian Racial Categories" (1963), "Referential Ambiguity in the Calculus of Brazilian Racial Identity" (1970), and "Who are the Whites?" (1993).

During the 1980s, Harris was troubled by the rising popularity of postmodernist theory within anthropology. He believed that anthropology was a science and was concerned about the harmful consequences of postmodernist theory to the field. He organized a AAA session on postmodernism called "Anti-anti Science" in 1989 and participated in multiple conference sessions on the subject, including a 1993 session on "The Objectivity Crisis: Rethinking the Role of Science" at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) meeting. "Anthropology and Postmodernism," a revised version of his AAAS paper was published as a chapter in Science, Materialism, and the Study of Culture (Martin F. Murphey and Maxine L. Margolis, 1995). Harris also criticized postmodernist theory in his final book, Theories of Culture in Postmodern Times (1999).

While Harris thought that postmodernism was moving anthropology further away from science, behavior scientists began to see the relevancy of cultural materialism in their own research. In 1986, Harris was invited to give an address at the annual conference of the Association for Behavioral Analysis (ABA). His paper was titled, "Cultural Materialism and Behavior Analysis: Common Problems and Radical Solutions." He also participated in a symposium on "The Integration of Cultural Materialism and Behavior Analysis" at the 1991 ABA annual meeting.

From 1988-90, Harris served as president of the General Anthropology Division of AAA. In 1991, he was given the honor of presenting the Distinguished Lecture at the AAA annual meeting. His talk was titled, "Anthropology and the Theoretical and Paradigmatic Significance of the Collapse of Soviet and East European Communism." That same year, The Rise of Anthropological Theory was designated a Social Science Citation Classic.

Harris died at the age of 74 on October 25, 2001.

Sources Consulted

Margoline, Maxine L. and Conrad Phillip Kottak. "Marvin Harris (1927-2001)." American Anthropologist. 105(3) (2003): 685-688.

Curriculum Vitae. Series 7. Biographical Files. Marvin Harris papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

Harris, Marvin. "Cultural Materialism is Alive and Well and Won't Go Away Until Something Better Comes Along." In Assessing Anthropology,edited by Robert Borofsky, 62-76. New York: McGraw Hill, 1994.

Chronology

1927 -- Born August 18 in Brooklyn, New York

1945-1947 -- Served in U.S. Army Transportation Corps

1948 -- B.A. from Columbia College

1950-1951 -- Field research in Brazil

1953 -- Ph.D. in Anthropology from Columbia University Field research in Brazil

1953-1954 -- Research Advisor, National Institute of Pedagogical Studies, Rio de Janeiro. Brazilian Ministry of Education

1953-1959 -- Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University

1956-1957 -- Field research in Mozambique

1959-1963 -- Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University

1960 -- Field leader of Columbia-Cornell-Harvard-Illinois Summer Field Studies Program in Chimborazo, Ecuador

1962 -- Field leader of Columbia-Cornell-Harvard-Illinois Summer Field Studies Program in Arembepe, Bahia, Brazil. NSF

1963-1980 -- Professor, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University

1963-1966 -- Chair, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University

1965 -- Field Research in Brazil

1965-1972 -- Video Tape Methodology and Etic Ethnography

1969-1974 -- Principle Investigator, Videotape Studies of Urban Domiciles

1968-1969 -- Visiting Distinguished Professor, Central Washington State College

1976 -- Field Research in India

1980-2000 -- Graduate Research Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Florida

1983-1984 -- Consultant, United Nations Fund for Population Activities

1984 -- McMurrin Professor, University of Utah, Fall

1991-1992 -- Consultant, McKinsey and Company Global Institute

1991 -- Presented AAA Distinguished Lecture, "Anthropology and the Theoretical and Paradigmatic Significance of the Collapse of Soviet and East European Communism" The Rise of Anthropological Theory designated Social Science Citation Classic

1992 -- Field Research in Brazil

2001 -- Died October 25

Selected Bibliography

1952 -- Harris, Marvin. "Race Relations in Minas Velhas." In Race and Class in Rural Brazil, edited by Charles Wagley, 51-55. Paris: UNESCO, 1952.

1956 -- Harris, Marvin. Town and Country in Brazil. New York: Columbia University Press, 1956.

1958 -- Harris, Marvin, and Charles Wagley. Minorities in the New World. New York: Columbia University, 1958. Harris, Marvin. Portugal's African "Wards". New York: The American Committee on Africa, 1958.

1959 -- Harris, Marvin. "The Economy Has No Surplus?" American Anthropologist 51 (1959): 189-199. Harris, Marvin. "Labor Emigration Among the Mozambique Thonga: Cultural and Political Factors." Africa 29 (1959): 50-56.

1963 -- Harris, Marvin, and Conrad Kottack. "The Structural Significance of Brazilian Racial Categories." Sociologia 25 (1963): 203-209.

1964 -- Harris, Marvin. "Racial Identity in Brazil." Luso-Brazilian Review 1 (1964): 21-28. Harris, Marvin. The Nature of Cultural Things. New York: Random House, 1964. Harris, Marvin. Patterns of Race in the Americas. New York: Walker and Company, 1964.

1965 -- Harris, Marvin. "The Myth of the Sacred Cow." In Man, Culture and Animals, edited by A. Vayda and A. Leeds, 217-228. Washington: American Association for the Advancement of Science, 1965.

1966 -- Harris, Marvin. "The Cultural Ecology of India's Sacred Cattle." Current Anthropology 7 (1966): 51-66. Harris, Marvin, and George Morren. "The Limitations of the Principle of Limited Possibilities." American Anthropologist 58 (1966): 122-127.

1967 -- Harris, Marvin, Morton Fried, and Robert Murphy, eds. "The Anthropology of War and Aggression." Special Supplement, Natural History (December 1967): 30-70.

1968 -- Harris, Marvin. "Big Bust on Morningside Heights." The Nation 206 (1968): 757-763. Harris, Marvin. The Rise of Anthropological Theory. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell, 1968. Harris, Marvin, Morton Fried, and Robert Murphy, eds. War: The Anthropology of Armed Conflict and Aggression. New York: Natural History Press, 1968.

1970 -- Harris, Marvin. "Referential Ambiguity in the Calculus of Brazilian Racial Identity." Southwestern Journal of Anthropology 26 (1970): 1-14.

1971 -- Harris, Marvin. Culture, Man and Nature: An Introduction to General Anthropology. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell, 1971.

1974 -- Harris, Marvin. Cows, Pigs, Wars and Witches: The Riddles of Culture. New York: Random House, 1974.

1976 -- Harris, Marvin, and William Divale. "Population, Warfare, and the Male Supremacist Complex." American Anthropologist 78 (1976): 521-538.

1977 -- Harris, Marvin. Cannibals and Kings: The Origins of Cultures. New York: Random House, 1977.

1979 -- Harris, Marvin. Cultural Materialism: The Struggle for a Science of Culture. New York: Random House, 1979.

1981 -- Harris, Marvin. America Now: The Anthropology of a Changing Culture. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1981.

1982 -- Harris, Marvin, A. Vaidynathan, and K.N. Nair. "Bovine Sex and Species Ratios in India." Current Anthropology 23 (1982): 365-383.

1983 -- Harris, Marvin. Cultural Anthropology. New York: Harper and Row, 1983.

1984 -- Harris, Marvin. "Animal Capture and Yanomamo Warfare: Retrospect and New Evidence." Journal of Anthropological Research 40 (1984): 183-201.

1985 -- Harris, Marvin. Good to Eat: Riddles of Food and Culture. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1985.

1987 -- Harris, Marvin. "Cultural Materialism: Alarums and Excursions." In Waymarks: The Notre Dame Inaugural Lectures in Anthropology, edited by Kenneth Morre, 107-126. Notre Dame: Notre Dame Press, 1987. Harris, Marvin, and Eric Ross, eds. Food and Evolution: Toward a Theory of Human Food Habits. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1987. Harris, Marvin, and Eric Ross. Death, Sex and Fertility: Population Regulation in Preindustrial and Developing Societies. New York: Columbia University Press, 1987.

1988 -- Harris, Marvin. Why Nothing Works: The Anthropology of Daily Life. New York: Touchstone, 1988.

1989 -- Harris, Marvin. Our Kind: Who We Are, Where We Came From, and Where We're Going. New York: Harper and Row, 1989.

1991 -- Harris, Marvin. "Anthropology: Ships that Crash in the Night." In Perspectives on Social Science: The Colorado Lectures, edited by Richard Jessor, 70-114. Boulder, CO.: Westview, 1991. Harris, Marvin, Thomas Headland, and Kenneth Pike, eds. Emics and Etics: The Insider/Outsider Debate. Newbury Park, CA: Sage, 1991. Harris, Marvin. "The Evolution of Human Gender Hierarchies: A Trial Formulation." In Sex and Gender Hierarchies, edited by Barbara Miller, 57-79. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1991.

1992 -- Harris, Marvin. "Distinguished Lecture: Anthropology and the Theoretical and Paradigmatic Significance of the collapse of Soviet and East European Communism." American Anthropologist 94 (1992): 295-305.

1993 -- Harris, Marvin, Josildeth Gomes Consorte, Joseph Lang, and Bryan Byrne. "Who are the White? Imposed Census Categories and the Racial Demography of Brazil." Social Forces 72 (1993): 451-462.

1994 -- Harris, Marvin. "Cultural Materialism is Alive and Well and Won't Go Away Until Something Better Comes Along." In Assessing Anthropology, edited by Robert Borofsky, 62-76. New York: McGraw Hill, 1994.

1995 -- Harris, Marvin. "Anthropology and Postmodernism." In Science, Materialism, and the Study of Culture, edited by Martin Murphy and Maxine Margolis, 62-77. Gainsville, FL: University Press of Florida, 1995.

1999 -- Harris, Marvin. Theories of Culture in Postmodern Times. Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira Press, 1999.
Related Materials:
More of Marvin Harris' correspondence can be found in the papers of William Duncan Strong. Researchers may also want to consult the Human Studies Film Archives, which holds video oral histories of Charles Wagley (HSFA 89.10.5) and Lambros Comitas (HSFA 89.10.20), both of whom discuss Harris in their interviews.
Separated Materials:
An open reel video from the collection was transferred to the Human Studies Film Archives (HSFA 2011.10.1). The video relates to Series 2: Research; Sub-series 2.6: Videotape Research--"[Macy's Santa Claus study]"
Provenance:
The papers of Marvin Harris were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by his daughter, Susan Harris.
Restrictions:
Access to student records (consisting of graded materials and student recommendation letters), grant proposals sent to Harris for review by grant agencies, and part of his faculty recruitment files are restricted until 2081. Series 10. Computer Files are also restricted due to preservation concerns.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Food habits  Search this
Race  Search this
Anthropology  Search this
Cattle -- India  Search this
Citation:
Marvin Harris papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.2009-27
See more items in:
Marvin Harris papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2009-27

Correspondences 1985-1986 [Fall/Spring]

Collection Creator:
Harris, Marvin, 1927-2001  Search this
Container:
Box 6
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
1985-1986
Collection Restrictions:
Access to student records (consisting of graded materials and student recommendation letters), grant proposals sent to Harris for review by grant agencies, and part of his faculty recruitment files are restricted until 2081. Series 10. Computer Files are also restricted due to preservation concerns.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Marvin Harris papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Marvin Harris papers
Marvin Harris papers / Series 1: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2009-27-ref1700

Correspondence

Collection Creator:
Lazzari, Pietro, 1898-1979  Search this
Extent:
1.7 Linear feet (Boxes 1-2)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1895-1998, undated
Scope and Contents note:
This series consists of letters exchanged between Lazzari, family members, and colleagues. Over one hundred letters from the Federal Works Agency and the Treasury Department Section of Painting and Sculpture concern post office murals for towns in Florida, New Jersey, and North Carolina. Five letters from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration contain 23 photographs of astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, Ronald E. Evans, and Harrison H. Schmitt preparing for an Apollo 17 mission to the moon. Lazzari also received at least one letter each from Jacqueline Kennedy, Duncan Phillips, Eleanor Roosevelt, industrialist John Rust, and socialist Norman Thomas.

See Appendix for a list of selected correspondents in Series 2.
Arrangement note:
Correspondence is arranged chronologically.
Appendix: Selected Correspondents in Series 2:
Aguilera, Francisco: undated (1 letter)

Albergo Saturnia, Rome: 1928 (1 letter)

Alberts: Russell Alberts-Laura Langdon Antiques: undated (1 letter)

Alexander Gallery: undated (1 letter)

Allied Publications, Inc.: 1965 (1 letter)

Alterman, Selma: undated (1 letter)

Ambasciata d'Italia: 1950-1973 (3 letters)

Ambasciatore d'Italia: undated and 1971 (2 letters)

America-Italy Society: 1956 (1 letter)

American Academy in Rome: 1955 (2 letters)

American Artists Professional League: 1949-1955 (3 letters)

American Battle Monuments Commission: 1959 (1 letter)

American Commission for Cultural Exchange with Italy (Fulbright grant): 1950-1954 (2 letters)

American Federation of Arts: 1951-1956 (2 letters)

American Red Cross: 1943-1945 (6 letters)

American University: 1947-1967 (5 letters)

Amici, Alfredo: 1948-1959 (6 letters)

Amministrazione Erdi M.se Saverio Patrizi: 1969 (2 letters)

Andori, Adolfo: 1913-1916 (3 letters)

Anderson, Wayne V.: 1956 (1 letter)

Andrade, Victor: undated (1 letter)

Angelelli, Augusta: 1972 (1 letter)

Angiolillo, Giuseppe: 1967-1972 (9 letters)

Anson, Cherrill: 1998 (1 letter)

Appleby, J. Scott: 1952-1961 (9 letters); see Life Insurance Company of Georgia

Aquil, Preta: 1921 (1 letter)

Architectural League of New York: 1955 (3 letters)

Aristide, Zio (?): 1926 (1 letter)

Arndal, Kersten: 1970-1977 (2 letters)

Art Direction -- magazine: 1956 (1 letter)

Art in Federal Buildings, Inc.: 1943 (1 letter)

Art Institute of Chicago: 1944-1956 (11 letters)

Artists Equity Association: undated and 1949-1972 (7 letters)

Artists for Victory: 1942-1943 (7 letters including a prospectus for "America in the War" exhibition)

Artists of Washington, D.C.: undated (1 letter)

Artist's Guild of Washington: 1960 (1 letter)

Associated Architects & Engineers: 1957 (1 letter)

Associated Artists Gallery of Washington: 1961 (1 letter)

Associazione Artistica Internazionale: 1950 (1 letter)

Atomic Energy Clearing House: 1963 (1 letter)

Bache, Martha Moffett: 1949 (1 letter)

Backus, Florence: 1955 (1 letter)

Bader: Franz Bader Gallery: 1950-1976 (3 letters)

Baltimore Museum of Art: undated and 1948-1956 (8 letters); see Breeskin, Adelyn

Banca Commerciale Italiana: 1969 (2 letters)

Bankok Insustries, Inc.: 1972 (1 letter)

Bashir, Mir: 1955 (2 letters)

Bazzanella, Albina: 1926-1928 (2 letters)

Bedi-Rassy Art Foundry: 1952-1962 (4 letters)

Beer, Elsie: 1926-1928 (3 letters)

Bergeson, Mrs.: 1951 (1 letter)

Berkman, Jack: 1949 (1 letter)

Berkowitz, Ida and Leon (Workshop Center of the Arts): 1953-1955 (2 letters)

Berrier, Jean: 1971 (1 letter)

Betts, Luici: 1928 (1 letter)

Birnbaum, Britta: 1963 (1 letter)

Blake, Margaret Day: [1956] (1 letter)

Blanc, Peter: undated and 1948-1950 (4 letters)

Bly?, Edith: undated (1 letter)

Borea, Raimondo: 1971 (1 letter)

Borzani, Gastone: 1918 (1 letter)

Boulner, Bartlet: 1927 (1 letter)

Bowen, Elizabeth: undated (1 letter)

Brambilla, Helen: 1945 (1 letter of recommendation for Lazzari)

Breeskin, Adelyn D. (Baltimore Museum of Art): 1953-1961 (4 letters)

Broders, Dr. Hy: 1941 (envelope only; enclosing photo of unidentified friends)

Brooklyn Museum: 1956 (1 letter)

Brooks Memorial Art Gallery: 1952 (2 letters); see Rust, John

Broude & Hochberg: 1969 (1 letter)

Brown, James W.: 1934 (1 letter)

Bruce, Edward: mentioned in 3 letters dated 1938-1943

Bryn Mawr Club of Washington: 1961 (1 letter)

Buckingham Palace: 1971 (1 letter)

Bureau of Copyrights and Patents, Library of Congress: 1936-1955 (3 letters)

Burleighfield International Arts Centre: 1977 (1 letter)

Buxton, P. S.: 1969 (1 letter)

Cahill, Holger: see Works Progress Administration

Caldwell, Henry Bryan: 1951 (1 letter from Lazzari)

Calfee, William H.: 1967 (1 letter)

California: University of California at Berkeley: 1986 (1 letter)

California: University of California at Los Angeles: 1970 (1 letter)

Canali, Paola: undated (1 letter)

Cani, Edward: undated (1 letter)

Capital Park Apartments: mentioned in a letter dated 1962

Carbela: 1929 (1 letter)

Carbonati, Antonio: 1927 (2 letters)

Carnassale, Enrico: 1914-1916 (2 letters)

Carolan, Anna B. (The Little Gallery): 1947 (2 letters)

Casella, E. and M.: 1917-1918 (4 letters)

Caserma, Luisa.: 1914-1917 (2 letters)

Catholic University of America: 1964 (1 letter)

Caulfield, Patricia: 1949 (1 letter)

Central States Joint Board: 1977 (1 letter)

Chapel, Maria: 1970-1973 (3 letters)

Chase, Ralph H.: 1959-1961 (2 letters)

Child, Col. Sargent B.: 1968 (1 letter from Corcoran)

City of New York Department of Correction (Riker's Island mural): 1936-1937 (2 letters)

Civil Service Commission Club: 1949 (1 letter)

Clark, Joseph (Senator from Pennsylvania): 1962 (1 letter)

Clemens, Cyril ( -- Mark Twain Journal): -- 1971 (1 letter)

Cohen, Evelyn: see Lazzari, Evelyn

Cohen, Lester: 1956 (1 letter)

Colladay, Edward F.: 1932 (1 letter)

Conant, Howard (New York University): 1956 (1 letter)

Connolley, Robert Emmet: 1947-1950 (8 letters)

Console Generale d'Italia: 1965 (1 letter)

Constantino, C.: 1967 (1 letter)

Cook, Elizabeth: [1946] (1 letter)

Cooke: Hereward Lester Cooke Foundation: 1974-1975 (3 letters); see National Aeronautics and Space Administration; see National Gallery of Art

Cooper, Alice J.: 1927 (1 letter)

Corcoran Gallery of Art: undated and 1951-1981 (37 letters)

Corsi, Emma and W. Edward: 1928 (1 letter)

Cosgrove, Jessica (Mrs. John O'Hara Cosgrove): 1928-1930 (22 letters)

Cosgrove, John O'Hara (editor of -- New York World): -- undated and 1927-1929 (7 letters)

Costintin, Celestino and Emilia: 1916-1971 (6 letters)

Cotzia, Pasquale: 1966-1968 (2 letters)

Coughlin, Clarence John: 1948 (1 letter)

Crimi: undated (1 letter)

Crosby, Caresse (Crosby Gallery of Modern Art): undated and 1945-1969 (14 letters)

Crossley, Kay A.: 1966 (1 letter)

Cullen, Amelia: undated (1 letter)

Cusumono, Stefano: 1947-1951 (3 letters)

Daloni, Edith B.: 1928 (1 letter)

Damer, Veffarghi: 1919 (1 letter)

Damiani, Angelo: 1921 (1 letter)

Dane, C. K.: 1965 (1 letter)

Dean, Edward: 1940 (1 letter)

Debs: Eugene V. Debs Foundation: 1965-1966 (3 letters including 6 photographs with Norman Thomas); see United Auto Workers

de Chetelat, Mr.: mentioned in letter dated 1928

de Chirico, Giorgio: mentioned in undated invitation from Ambasciatore d'Italia

DeLano, Agnes: undated (1 letter)

De Medio, Americo: 1963-1976 (32 letters)

De Medio, Vincenzo: undated and 1970-1977 (3 letters)

Demiddi, Alberto: undated and 1972 (3 letters)

De Mont, Nany and Eugene: undated (1 letter)

Dernay, Eugene: 1945-1959 (4 letters)

Design in Steel Award Program: 1972 (1 letter)

Dictionary of International Biography: 1974 (1 letter)

Diller, Burgoyne: see Federal Art Project

Dipanfilo, Pio: 1949-1968 (10 letters)

Di Raimondo, Vicenzo: 1920-1928 (7 letters)

District of Columbia Board of Commissioners: 1959 (1 letter)

District of Columbia Department of Public Welfare: 1958 (1 letter)

District of Columbia Juvenile Court: 1964 (1 letter)

District of Columbia Recreation Board: 1963 (1 letter)

Dole (?), Louis: 1923 (1 letter)

Dollinger, Josef: undated (1 letter)

Donaldson, Leota L.: undated (2 letters)

Donaldson, Renee: undated (1 letter)

Douglas, Paul F.: 1951 (1 letter)

Dretzin, S. C.: 1950 (1 letter)

Draper, Warren A.: 1944 (1 letter)

Dumbarton College: 1949-1951 (3 letters)

Duncan and Duncan Chinese Shop: 1964 (1 letter)

Dunham, Dr. G. C.: 1944 (1 letter re: portrait of Dr. Sawyer)

Duproix, Eunice: 1928 (1 letter)

Durbin, Jack: 1960 (1 letter)

Editions du Griffon, Neuchatel, Suisse: 1964 (3 letters)

Edsor, Mary: 1928 (1 letter)

Elenbrock, Gretel: 1927 (3 letters)

Elkins: Stella Elkins Tyler School of Fine Arts of Temple University: 1956 (1 letter)

Eng, Ernest: 1959 (1 letter)

Ernesto Desideri: 1915 (3 letters)

Evening Star -- newspaper, Washington, D.C.: 1957 (1 letter)

Farmers Educational and Cooperative Union: 1944 (1 letter)

Fasola, Roberto: 1948-1949 (2 letters)

Federal Art Project: 1938-1939 (4 letters)

Federal Works Agency, Public Buildings Administration: 1940-1947 (70 letters re: murals for the Brevard, N.C. post office, the North Bergen, N.J. post office, and the Jasper, Florida post office, including a contract, 2 photographs, and 2 sketches for a mural)

Federal Works Agency, Work Projects Administration: 1941-1942 (2 letters)

Fellowship of Reconciliation and War Resisters League: [1945] (1 letter)

Ferargil Gallery: 1941 (1 letter)

Ferreri, Elena: 1938 (1 letter)

Figoullo, Adriano: 1912 (1 letter)

Fiore, Ilario and Titta: 1966-1967 (5 letters)

Fitzwater, Aldace: 1950 (1 letter)

Florentine Gallery: 1956 (4 letters)

Fogle, Bruce: 1927 (1 letter)

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations: 1956 (1 letter)

Force, Mrs.: undated (1 letter)

Foreign Service of the United States of America: 1950 (3 letters)

Foresti, Arnaldo: 1948-1949 (2 letters)

Fortas, Abe: 1956 (1 letter)

Fortune -- magazine: 1944-1956 (2 letters)

Francis, Emily A.: 1951 (3 letters)

Franco, Johan: 1966 (2 letters)

Frankel, Samuel: undated (1 letter)

Freeman: Carl M. Freeman Associates, Inc.: 1963 (1 letter)

Frisine, Robert: 1967 (1 letter)

Frost, Phillip: 1981 (1 letter)

Fujita, Mr.: 1957 (1 letter)

Fulbright grant: see American Commission for Cultural Exchange with Italy

Fuller, Eve Alsman (Miami, Fl. post office): 1938 (1 letter)

Gabetti: undated (1 letter)

Galarza, Ernesto and Mae: (National Farm Labor Union; National Agricultural Workers Union): undated and 1944-1978 (27 letters); see Landon School for Boys; see Perkins, Milo

Galerie Internationale: 1965 (1 letter)

Galerie Schindler: undated and 1965-1972 (12 letters)

Gallaudet College: 1963-1970 (14 letters, including a contract)

Gallenga: 1951 (1 letter)

Gaspari, Mario P.: 1966 (1 letter)

Georgetown University Fine Arts Club: 1960 (1 letter)

George Washington University: 1965 (1 letter)

Giovannetti, Alberto: 1966 (1 letter)

Giovanni, Sebastiani: 1921 (1 letter)

Giricosnelli, Emilio: 1918 (1 letter)

Gobbi, Adolfo: 1928 (1 letter)

Goldberg, Dorothy and Arthur: 1964-1965 (3 letters)

Goldsmith, Alberto R.: 1947-1968 (3 letters)

Gonzales, Angelino: 1951-1975 (11 letters)

Gotham Book Mart: 1968 (1 letter)

Graham, John: 1948 (1 letter)

Granati, Pasquale: 1918 (1 letter)

Grand Central Art Galleries: 1956 (1 letter)

Grant, Blanche C.: undated (1 letter)

Grebanier, Barnard: 1961 (1 letter)

Greene, Hope Margaret: 1926-[1927] (2 letters)

Gualdi, Luigi: 1947-1949 (11 letters)

Guarino, A.: undated letters to Mabel McMahon and Guiolitta Sartori

Guggenheim: John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation: 1937-1971 (5 letters)

Guggenheim: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum: 1956-1960 (3 letters)

Gutheim, Frederick: 1956 (1 letter)

Haarlem House, Inc.: 1926 (1 letter)

Hahn, Rosemarie E.: 1961 (1 letter)

Halle, Kay: 1972 (1 letter)

Hammerle, Brooke: 1966 (1 letter)

Hansen, Jane: 1954 (1 letter)

Hardman, Virginia: undated (1 letter)

Harrison & Abramovitz, Architects: 1956 (1 letter)

Harrison, Charles H.: 1949 (1 letter)

Hart, Earl: mentioned in an undated letter

Hartley, Bettina: undated (1 letter)

Hartman Galleries, Inc.: 1973 (1 letter)

Hayward: City of Hayward, California: 1965 (1 letter)

Health, Education, and Welfare Employees' Association: 1962 (1 letter)

Hechinger, June: undated (1 letter)

Heilbron, Edna: 1972 (1 letter)

Heinemann, Mark: undated (1 letter)

Herzbrunn, Josef: 1949 (1 letter)

Heywood, Carmen: 1948 (1 letter)

Hollander, Cornelia: undated (1 letter)

Holvey, Sam: undated (1 letter)

Holy See: Permanent Observer of the Holy See: 1966 (1 letter)

Hom Gallery: 1972 (1 letter)

Horrocks, E. Joan: 1971 (1 letter)

Hotel Beau Site, Rome: 1928 (1 letter)

Hotel de la Ville, Rome: 1928 (1 letter)

Hotel Hassler, Rome: 1928 (1 letter)

Hotel Pension Alexandra, Rome: 1928 (1 letter)

Hotel Windsor, Rome: 1928 (1 letter)

Hough, Edith Louise: 1952 (1 letter)

Illinois State Historical Library: 1965 (1 letter)

Il Messaggero: 1928 (1 letter)

Immigration and Naturalization Service: 1976 (1 letter)

Institute for International Education: 1963 (1 letter)

Institute for the Arts of the Archdiocese of Washington: 1978 (2 letters)

Institute of Contemporary Art: 1956 (2 letters)

Institute of Gerontology: 1970 (1 letter)

International Directory of Arts: 1982 (1 letter)

Isherwood, Christopher: undated (1 letter)

Istituzione Maddalena Aulina: 1966 (1 letter)

Jacometti, Nesto: 1972 (1 letter)

Jaffe, Norman: 1964 (1 letter)

Janus, Virginia: 1929 (2 letters)

Jelleff: Frank R. Jelleff, Inc.: 1949 (1 letter)

Jennoff?, Peter L.: undated (1 letter)

Jewish Social Service Agency: 1967 (1 letter)

Johnston, L. R.: 1932 (2 letters)

Jones, Dorothea and Stuart E.: 1955 (3 letters)

Jones, George Lewis: 1961 (1 letter)

Jopp, Fred Gilman: 1936 (1 letter)

Josephy, Diane ( -- Time): -- 1968 (1 letter)

Junior Council of the Museum of Modern Art: 1956-1960 (2 letters)

Jurin, Benjamin M.: undated (1 letter)

Kagy, Virginia and Sheffield: 1948 (1 letter)

Kahles, Jessie: 1940-1948 (3 letters)

Kennedy, Jacqueline: May 19, 1960

Letters from White House Social Secretary: 1961-1963 (5 letters)

Kerensky, Alexander: 1965 (1 letter)

King Features Syndicate, Inc.: 1943 (1 letter)

King, Marion: 1952 (1 letter)

King, Rufus: 1975 (1 letter)

Kneifel, Mr.: 1956 (1 letter from Lazzari)

Kramer, Herbert (Congregazione del Preziosissimo Sangue): 1950 (1 letter)

Krishnamurti, Jack: 1959 (1 letter)

Kurzland, Toby: 1991 (1 letter)

La Follia: 1926 (1 letter)

La Galleria: 1972 (1 letter)

Landon School for Boys: 1944 (1 letter re: Ernesto Galarza)

Landu, Consuelo: 1948 (1 letter)

Lanier, Fanita: see Ruffiner, Willis E.

La Revue Moderne: 1961 (3 letters)

La Rocca, Principessa de: 1968 (1 letter)

Latif, Bilkeer: undated (1 letter)

Law, L. S.: 1932 (2 letters of recommendation for Lazzari)

Lawton, Thomas: 1974 (1 letter)

Lazzari, Attilio: 1922 (1 letter)

Lazzari, (Grace) Elizabeth Paine: undated and 1920-1951 (69 letters)

Letters from Pietro to Elizabeth: 1928-1929 (52 letters)

Lazzari, Evelyn Cohen: undated and 1948-1965 (6 letters)

Letters from Pietro to Evelyn: undated and 1932-1966 (49 letters, including one with a photograph of friends)

Lazzari, Fernanda (sister) and Vittoria: 1915-1949 (11 letters)

Lazzari, Leno: 1918-1929 (2 letters)

Lebanon: Embassy of Lebanon, Washington: 1956 (1 letter)

Lee, Amy: Nov 01, 1974 (letter from Lazzari); 1975 (1 letter)

Lee, Dal: 1954 (1 letter)

Lee, Pearl: undated (1 letter)

Levy, Sid A.: undated (1 letter)

Library of Congress: undated and 1965-1982 (6 letters)

Licciardi, Pietro: undated (1 letter)

Licinio Cappelli: 1949 (1 letter)

Life Insurance Company of Georgia: 1954 (2 letters)

Little Gallery: see Carolan, Anna B.

Lobatini, G.: undated (1 letter)

Loccatelli, Giulio: 1956-1958 (2 letters)

Lombaro (?), Patricia: 1961 (1 letter)

Loughlin, Dr. John J.: 1936-1940 (2 letters)

Lousine, L.: undated (1 letter)

Luccia, Enrico: undated and 1928-1977 (19 letters)

Lucibello, Luigi: Jan 12, 1965

Lucifero, Alfonso: Jan 13, 1912 (letter from Ministero delle Finanze)

Macpherson, Suzanne: 1957 (2 letters)

Maddux, Yolanda A.: undated (1 letter)

Maezawa, Kezuko: 1956 (1 letter)

Magrini, Livia: 1967-1970 (5 letters)

Makovich, L.: 1950 (1 letter)

Manca, Albino (sculptor): 1971 (1 letter)

Mangravite, Peppino (Columbia University): 1956 (1 letter)

Mann: Charles Z. Mann Gallery: 1966 (1 letter)

Mannarino, Matina: 1968 (1 letter)

Maresciallo, Mr.: undated (1 letter from Lazzari)

Mark, Ginevra: undated (1 letter)

Marlor, Clark S.: 1981 (1 letter)

Marquis Company: 1950-1981 (3 letters)

Maryland: University of Maryland: 1972 (1 letter)

Mattei, Cristina: 1950 (a death announcement)

Mayfield, Mrs. David: 1938 (1 letter)

McAfee, Don: 1955-1969 (3 letters); see Watergate Construction Corp.

McGinnis, Paul: 1988 (1 letter)

McIlhenny, Henry P.: 1949 (1 letter)

McIntyre, W. A.: undated (1 letter)

McKeogh, Elsie: 1954 (1 letter)

McKonish, Margaret: 1949 (1 letter)

McMahon, Mabel: undated (1 letter from A. Guarino)

Meert, Margaret Mullin: 1948 (2 letters)

Meeting House Gallery: 1972 (1 letter)

Meguin, A.: undated (1 letter)

Menard, G.: 1928 (1 letter)

Men of Achievement: 1974-1975 (2 letters)

Mensh, Elizabeth: 1978 (1 letter)

Merritt, Polly: undated (1 letter)

Messina, Joseph R.: 1971 (1 letter)

Metropolitan Museum of Art: 1951 (1 letter)

Miami Museum of Modern Art: 1965-1968 (7 letters)

Miki, Suizan: undated (1 letter)

Mills, Harrington: 1933 (1 letter)

Ming, Wang (National Art & Frame Co.): 1968 (1 letter)

Mitchell, Austin: 1946 (1 letter)

Montgomery County Art Association: 1961 (1 letter)

Moore, Norman Perry: 1927-1928 (2 letters)

Moore, Paul: 1970 (1 letter)

Morey, Mr.: [1950] (1 letter)

Morott, Aristodemi: 1918 (1 letter)

Morrison, Lillian: 1971 (1 letter)

Mortot, Virgilio: undated and 1962-1964 (4 letters)

Morvidi, Maria: 1918 (1 letter)

Moskin, Ruth: undated (1 letter)

Mullins, Mrs.: undated (1 letter)

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston: undated and 1955 (2 letters)

Museum of Fine Arts, Houston: 1964 (2 letters)

Museum of Modern Art: 1949-1973 (3 letters); see Junior Council of the Museum of Modern Art

Myers, Eugene Ekander: 1976 (1 letter)

National Academy of Design: [1939] (1 letter)

National Aeronautics and Space Administration: 1962-1973 (5 letters including 4 photographs of artwork and 23 photographs of astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, Ronald E. Evans, and Harrison H. Schmitt preparing for an Apollo 17 mission to the moon; an Apollo translunar/transearth trajectory plotting chart; an Apollo lunar orbit chart; and an Apollo earth orbit chart); see Cooke: Hereward Lester Cooke Foundation

National Cyclopedia of American Biography: 1979 (1 letter)

National Gallery of Art: undated and 1956-1974 (7 letters)

National Housing Center: 1961 (2 letters)

National Investigations Committee on Aerian Phenomena: 1957 (1 letter)

National Society of Arts and Letters: 1952 (1 letter)

National Society of Mural Painters: 1940-1963 (3 letters)

National Student Art Tour: 1949 (1 letter)

National Sugar Refining Company: 1938 (1 letter)

Neale, Rosamund: 1961 (1 letter)

Neilson, Robert Hude: 1928 (1 letter)

Nelson, Helen Ewing: undated (1 letter)

New American Library: 1953 (1 letter)

Newlin, Ben: 1979 (1 letter)

New Society for Art and Literature: 1947 (1 letter)

Nichol, Jean: 1926 (2 letters)

Nichol, Nella: 1929 (1 letter)

Nilsen, Laila: 1946 (1 letter)

Nobili, A.: undated letter written on reverse of photograph of Nobili painting

Nuova Critica Europea: 1969 (1 letter)

O'Connor, Don: 1960 (1 letter)

O'Connor, FrancisV.: 1968 (1 letter)

Oggi: 1967 (1 letter)

Okamoto, Yoichi R.: undated (1 letter)

Oklahoma Art Center: 1969 (1 letter)

Oklahoma Museum of Art: 1988 (1 letter)

Olson: Charles Olson Archives, University of Connecticut: 1975-1976 (3 letters)

Oregon State Library: 1957 (1 letter)

Orlando, Teresa: undated and 1949-1971 (3 letters)

Ottiani, Giuseppe: 1909 (1 letter)

Palmieri, Renato: 1928 (1 letter)

Park, Marlene: 1979 (1 letter)

Pavia, Dagoberto: 1959 (1 letter)

Pavia, Goffredo: 1921-1924 (7 letters)

Palmieri, Renato: 1957 (1 letter)

Palombi, Angelo: 1921 (1 letter)

Pan American Union: 1944-1945 (2 letters)

Parsons, Betty (Betty Parsons Gallery): undated and 1949-1973 (9 letters)

Passedoit Gallery: 1956 (1 letter)

Pensione Boos, Rome: 1928 (1 letter)

Pensione Girardet, Rome: 1928 (1 letter)

Perentine, Giuseppe (Nino): 1927-1950 (3 letters)

Peresson, I.: 1971 (1 letter)

Peretti, Luigi: undated (1 letter)

Perkins, Milo: 1944 (1 letter re: Ernesto Galarza)

Perna, Giorgio: undated (1 letter)

Peterson, Esther: 1978 (1 letter)

Philadelphia Department of Public Property: 1960 (1 letter)

Philadelphia Museum of Art: 1965-1966 (3 letters)

Phillips, Duncan: 1954 (1 letter)

Pirucchini, Maria: 1927 (1 letter)

Pope Paul VI: mentioned in 7 letters dated 1966, including 2 photographs of Lazzari with bust of the Pope; see Fiore, Ilario; see Giovannetti, Alberto; see Institute for the Arts of the Archdiocese of Washington

Preissler, Audrey: 1970 (1 letter)

Print Collector's Quarterly: 1949 (1 letter)

Print Council of America: 1963 (1 letter)

Prospersin, Eugenio: 1941 (1 letter)

Pyramid Club: 1956 (1 letter)

Quick, Robert B.: 1972 (1 letter)

Quinzi, Amerigo: 1920-1925 (2 letters)

Rady, Cabell: 1958 (1 letter)

Rahill, William Allen: 1954 (1 letter from Lazzari)

Raker, J. M.: 1928 (1 letter)

Ramakrishna-Vivekananda Center: undated (1 letter)

Randall, Megan: 1975 (1 letter)

Rassegna Nazionale di Arti Figurative: 1948 (1 letter)

Rattu, Salvatore: undated and 1926-1966 (13 letters)

Reeves, Rosser: 1947 (1 letter)

The Reporter -- magazine: 1956 (1 letter)

Reuther, Victor: see United Auto Workers

Reynolds, D.: 1939 (1 letter from Lazzari)

Rhine, J. B.: 1949 (1 letter)

Ricca, Roberta: undated (1 letter)

Rieder (?), Baronessa: 1934 (1 letter)

Rioffo, Angela: 1959-1962 (2 letters including 2 photographs of friends)

River Road Gallery, Louisville, Ky.: 1941-1943 (4 letters)

Rivoi, Swami: undated (1 letter)

Robson, John: 1958 (1 letter)

Rocca Sinibalda: 1920 (1 letter)

Rockefeller, Nelson A.: 1946 (1 letter)

Rodman, Selden: undated (1 letter)

Rollins College: 1933-1942 (4 letters)

Roosevelt, Eleanor: Nov 09, 1945 and a letter dated 1964 concerns a viewing of the Roosevelt portrait bust); see White House; see Roosevelt Library

Roosevelt: Franklin D. Roosevelt Library at Hyde Park: 1963-1965 (8 letters, including typescripts of speeches); see United Auto Workers

Ross, Fred: 1949 (1 letter)

Rosso, Giulio: undated letter of recommendation by Lazzari

Roth, Maurice: 1993 (1 letter including 2 photographs of Lazzari's work)

Rothschild, Anselm A.: undated (1 letter)

Rowan, Edward: see Federal Works Agency

Rowan, Leata: undated (1 letter)

Rowantrees Pavilion: see Thompson, Lin

Rowin, Fran: 1976 (2 letters)

Rowland, Creelman: undated (1 letter)

Ruffner, Willis E. (lawyer for Fanita Lanier): 1944 (1 letter)

Russell, N. F. S.: 1932 (1 letter)

Rust, John and Thelma: 1952-1954 (38 letters, including an application from Lazzari for a grant from the John Rust Foundation, including a clipping about Rust and 3 photographs of cotton pickers); see West Tennessee Historical Society

St. Louis, Bertha: undated (1 letter)

Sanderson, W. A. (Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation): 1958 (1 letter)

San Francisco Museum of Art: 1967 (1 letter)

Sartori, Guiolitta: undated letter from A. Guarino

Satterlee & Smith, Architects: 1962 (1 letter)

Savini, Renata: 1965-1967 (3 letters)

Scheetz, June Rice: undated (1 letter)

Schoenberg, Rose: 1967 (1 letter)

Schurmer, Zaira E.: 1947 (2 letters)

Schwarz -- magazine: 1957 (1 letter)

Scigliano, Peppino Cosenza: 1910 (2 letters)

Sebastiani, G.: undated (1 letter)

Selmi, Gabriella: undated (1 letter)

Sevareid, Eric: 1956 (1 letter)

Sheen, Rev. Fulton J.: 1970 (1 letter)

Simotti, Aristide (friend who was prisoner of war): 1911-1925 (62 letters)

Sinisca: undated (1 letter)

Sirony, Simone: 1955-1964 (8 letters)

Smart: David and Alfred Smart Museum of Art: 1991-1996 (4 letters)

Smith, George: 1926-1927 (2 letters)

Smithsonian Institution: undated and 1947-1976 (8 letters)

Snyder, Nell H.: 1969 (1 letter)

Society of American Etchers: 1944 (1 letter)

Society of American Graphic Artists: 1956 (2 letters)

Society of Washington Artists: 1960-1961 (2letters)

Society of Washington Printmakers: 1976 (2 letters)

Sound View Press: 1991 (1 letter)

Spiral Group: see Strantin, Wally

Stevenson, Adlai: see White House

Stewart, George: 1932 (1 letter)

Strantin, Wally and Edward: 1950-1951 (2 letters)

Stroppoghetti, Arturo: 1923 (1 letter)

Stubbs, Kenneth: [1948] (1 letter)

Studer, Alfredo and Clara: 1947-1976 (15 letters)

Sweeney, James Johnson: 1949 (1 letter)

Syracuse University: 1964 (1 letter)

Taylor, Prentiss: 1972 (1 letter)

Teller, Douglas H.: 1963 (1 letter)

Terenz, Don Umberto: 1960 (1 letter)

Thames and Hudson, Ltd.: 1974 (1 letter)

Thomas, Norman: 1963-1965 (2 letters)

Thomen, Luis Francisco (Ambassador from Dominican Republic): undated (1 letter)

Thompson, Lin: 1950-1951 (3 letters)

Thurston, Charles D.: 1927-1928 (4 letters)

Tibet Society: 1975 (1 letter)

Timpenado, Cesare: 1927 (1 letter)

Tirrocelli (?), A.: 1917 (1 letter)

Toledo Museum of Art: 1957 (1 letter)

Toscanini, Arturo: mentioned in 2 letters dated 1928

Tosello, Alfredo: 1947-1949 (2 letters)

Tosi, Elisa: 1929 (1 letter)

Treasury Department, Section of Painting and Sculpture: 1936-1939 (53 letters concerning the Arlington, N.J. post office, the Sanford, N.C. post office, and the New York World's Fair Sculpture Competition)

Truman: Harry S Truman Library at Independence, Mo.: 1963 (1 letter)

Turkish Embassy, Washington, D.C.: 1958-1959 (4 letters including a photograph of Lazzari)

Tyler, Richard O.: 1958 (1 letter)

Ugolini, Luigi: 1969 (1 letter)

Ungar, Harold and Mildred: 1965 (1 letter)

United Auto Workers (U.A.W.): 1963-1971 (9 letters); see Debs: Eugene V. Debs Foundation

United Scenic Artists of America: [1939] (1 letter)

United States Civil Service Commission: 1944 (2 letters)

United States Department of Agriculture: 1945-1967 (10 letters)

United States Department of Labor: undated (1 letter)

United States Information Agency: 1959 (1 letter)

United States Information Service: Jul 09, 1964

University Settlement: 1946 (2 letters)

Upham, Elizabeth: 1948 (1 letter)

Van De Bries, Enri: 1973 (1 letter)

Vangell?, Raphaele: undated (1 letter)

Van Smith, Anne: 1949 (1 letter)

Venice Biennale: 1948-1954 (3 letters)

Vermont Marble Company: 1955 (1 letter)

Veschi, Signora: undated (1 letter)

Vickery, Ruth Bacon: 1929 (1 letter)

Victoria Hotel, Rome: 1928 (2 letters)

Virginia Museum of Fine Arts: 1956 (1 letter)

Visher, John: 1956 (1 letter)

Vosseller, Harold: 1948 (1 letter)

Wagner, Edward A. (Dell Publishing Co.) and Julia: 1954-1976 (5 letters)

Waldo, M. V.: 1945 (1 letter)

Warren, Susan and Louise: undated (1 letter)

Washington Gallery of Modern Art: undated (1 letter)

Washington is Wonderful: see Jones, Dorothea and Stuart E.

Washington-Lee High School: 1961 (1 letter)

Washington, Walter E. (Mayor of Washington, D.C.): 1976 (1 letter); Oct 19, 1976 (1 letter from Franz Bader)

Washington Water Color Association: undated and 1961 (3 letters)

Watergate Construction Corp.: 1968-1969 (4 letters); see Don McAfee

Watson, Ernest W. (editor, -- Art Instruction -- and -- American Artist -- ): 1939-1949 (3 letters)

Watson, Forbes: see Art in Federal Buildings, Inc.

Weil, Frank L.: 1926-1936 (2 letters)

Weinmann, Eric: 1980 (1 letter including a photograph of artwork)

Wells, John K. (Equitable Life Assurance Society): undated (1 letter)

West Tennessee Historical Society: 1952 (3 letters); see Rust, John

Weyhe: E. Weyhe Gallery: 1949 (1 letter)

White, Sarah: 1929 (1 letter)

Whitney Museum of American Art: 1939-1980 (11 letters)

Whyte Gallery: 1944-1950 (2 letters)

Widdemer, Kenneth D.: 1928 (1 letter)

White House: 1965-1968 (4 letters concerning the presentations of the busts of Eleanor Roosevelt and Adlai Stevenson)

Whittemore, Manvel: 1936 (1 letter enclosing poems)

Who's Who in America: 1979-1980 (2 letters)

Works Progress Administration: 1937-1938 (4 letters)

Workshop Center of the Arts: 1953 (1 letter); see Berkowitz, Ida and Leon

WRC Radio: 1966 (1 letter including a photograph of Lazzari)

WRC-TV: 1967 (1 letter)

Young, June: undated (1 letter)

Young, Louis Butler: 1971 (1 letter)

Zerega, Andrea: 1972-1976 (4 letters, including a résumé)
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Pietro Lazzari papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Pietro Lazzari papers, 1878-1998. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.lazzpiet, Series 2
See more items in:
Pietro Lazzari papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-lazzpiet-ref18

Oral history interview with Paula Colton Winokur

Interviewee:
Winokur, Paula, 1935-  Search this
Interviewer:
Riedel, Mija, 1958-  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Beaver College -- Faculty  Search this
Graphic Sketch Club (Philadelphia, Pa.)  Search this
Helen Drutt Gallery  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts (U.S.)  Search this
Philadelphia Museum of Art  Search this
Temple University. -- Students  Search this
Tyler School of Art -- Students  Search this
Andre, Carl, 1935-  Search this
Blai, Boris, 1893-1985  Search this
Bobrowicz, Yvonne  Search this
Cunningham, Imogen, 1883-1976  Search this
Cushing, Val M.  Search this
De Staebler, Stephen, 1933-2011  Search this
Ferguson, Ken, 1928-  Search this
Heizer, Michael, 1944-  Search this
Higby, Wayne  Search this
Leon, Dennis, 1933-  Search this
Long, Richard, 1945-  Search this
Love, Arlene, 1953-  Search this
Marks, Graham, 1951-  Search this
McKinnell, James  Search this
Mestre, Enrique, 1936-  Search this
Minter, Myrna  Search this
Moran, Lois  Search this
Natzler, Gertrud  Search this
Natzler, Otto  Search this
Nesbitt, Lowell, 1933-1993  Search this
Notkin, Richard  Search this
Randall, Theodore, 1914-1985  Search this
Schulman, Norman, 1924-  Search this
Sedestrom, Carol  Search this
Serra, Richard, 1939-  Search this
Shores, Kenneth, 1928-  Search this
Simon, Sandy  Search this
Slivka, Rose  Search this
Staffel, Rudolf, 1911-2002  Search this
Takaezu, Toshiko  Search this
Vavrek, Ken  Search this
Winokur, Robert, 1933-  Search this
Ólafur Elíasson, 1967-  Search this
Extent:
9 Items (Sound recording: 9 sound files (6 hr., 24 min.))
171 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Place:
Alaska
Hungary
Iceland
Mesa Verde (Calif.)
Rocky Mountains
Stonehenge (England)
Date:
2011 July 21-22
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Paula Colton Winokur conducted 2011 July 21-22, by Mija Riedel, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Winokur's home and studio, in Horsham, Pennsylvania.
Paula speaks of taking drawing and painting classes at the Graphic Sketch Club (now the Fleischer Art Memorial) in Philadelphia at age 11; her first experience handling clay at 13 or 14 when taking a class at the Philadelphia Museum of Art; when her family agreed to send her to college, providing she became a teacher, and she attended the Tyler School of Art at Temple University as a painting major; the influence of her teacher Rudolf Staffel in her sophomore year when she took a ceramics class and fell in love with working in clay; meeting her husband Robert Winokur when they were students at Tyler, getting married in 1958, eventually having two sons; glaze testing to find a palette of glazes to use; moving to Massachusetts and starting Cape Street Pottery for their production pottery; her involvement with NCECA [National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts] and other professional organizations; when she began a 30-year teaching career at Beaver College in 1973 (more recently known as Arcadia University), building their ceramics department; changing from using stoneware to porcelain in 1970; making boxes and architectural forms; how she stopped making functional items when her first child was born and began creating the things she wanted to; the decision in 1982 to make landscapes and how geology, the Artic, and threats to the environment influence her work; the process she uses when creating texture; selling exclusively through the Helen Drutt Gallery beginning in 1973 until the gallery closed in 2011; the important influences in her work of artists such as Michael Heizer, Carl Andre, Richard Long, Richard Serra, Olafur Eliasson, and Steven De Staebler and others; the immense the geologic formations of Mesa Verde, the Rocky Mountains, Stonehenge, Alaska and Iceland are inspiring; various lecturing opportunities and exhibits through the years, as well as a working residency she took advantage of in Hungary in 1994; slowly moving away from glazes and instead using metallic sulfates for color; that her intention is to express the relationship between the internal part of herself and the external world for other people to experience and find something in common; the importance of a liberal arts education for art students; her gelatin and clay prints; the concern over collectors of clay art dying off and no new ones taking their places; that galleries are closing and Internet galleries are the norm; meeting photographer, Imogen Cunningham, and seeing her as a wonderful role model; and the feeling that the high cost of fuel and the invention of newer materials may end ceramic classes. Paula also recalls Lowell Nesbitt, Myrna Minter, Arlene Love, Dennis Leon, Boris Blai, Ted Randall, Val Cushing, Norm Schulman, Jim McKinnel, Gertrud Natzler, Otto Natzler, Ken Ferguson, Rose Slivka, Enrique Mestre, Sandy Simon, Wayne Higby, Richard Notkin, Graham Marks, Toshika Takaezu, Yvonne Bobrowicz, Ken Vavrek, Carol Sedestrom, Lois Moran, and Ken Shores and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Paula Colton Winokur (1935- ) is a ceramist in Horsham, Pennsylvania. Mija Riedel (1958- ) is a curator and writer from San Francisco, California.
General:
Originally recorded as 9 sound files. Duration is 6 hr., 24 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Ceramicists -- Pennsylvania -- Interviews  Search this
Ceramics -- Study and teaching  Search this
Painting -- Study and teaching  Search this
Women artists -- Pennsylvania -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.winoku11
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-winoku11

Woman's Building records

Creator:
Woman's Building (Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
Names:
Feminist Studio Workshop  Search this
Women's Graphic Center (Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
Chicago, Judy, 1939-  Search this
Raven, Arlene  Search this
de Bretteville, Sheila Levant  Search this
Extent:
33.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Slides
Artists' books
Date:
1970-1992
Summary:
The records of the Woman's Building feminist arts organization in Los Angeles measure 33.5 linear feet and date from 1970-1992. Originally founded by artist Judy Chicago, graphic designer Sheila Levant de Bretteville, and art historian Arlene Raven in 1973, the Woman's Building served as an education center and public gallery space for women artists in southern California. The records document both the educational and exhibition activities and consist of administrative records, financial and legal records, publications, curriculum files, exhibition files, grant funding records and artist's works of arts and prints. A significant portion of the collection documents the Women's Graphic Center, a typesetting, design, and printing service operated by The Woman's Building.
Scope and Content Note:
The records of the Woman's Building measure 33.5 linear feet and date from 1970 to 1992. The organization played a key role as an alternative space for women artists energized by the feminist movement in the 1970s. The records document the ways in which feminist theory shaped the Building's founding core mission and goals. During its eighteen year history, the Building served as an education center and a public gallery space for women artists in Los Angeles and southern California; the records reflect both functions of the Building's activities.

The Administrative Files series documents the daily operations of the Building, with particular emphasis on management policies, budget planning, history, cooperative relationships with outside art organizations and galleries, special building-wide programs, and relocation planning. Included in this series are the complete minutes from most Building committees from 1974 through closing, including the Board of Directors and the Advisory Council. The General Publicity and Outreach series is particularly complete, containing publicity notices from most events, exhibits, and programs held at the Woman's Building, including brochures, announcements, programs, invitations, press releases, newspaper clippings, and magazine articles.

The Woman's Building's educational programs centered on courses offered by the Feminist Studio Workshop and the Extension Program. While the Workshop provided a two-year program for women interested in fully developing their artistic talent, the Extension Program offered a broad range of classes, specifically oriented to working women interested in art and art vocations. The records fully document both programs, focusing on the course development and descriptions, teacher contracts, class evaluations, budget planning, and scholarship programs. Although the Archives does not have the entire slide library, there are files concerning the establishment and administration of the library, as well as a few folders of slides.

The Gallery Programs series houses the records of the visual, performing, literary and video arts events held at the Woman's Building. Administrative files detail the daily operation of the gallery spaces. The files in the remaining subseries are primarily arranged by event and contain proposals, announcements, publicity, and artist biographies.

The Women's Graphic Center became a profit-making arm of the Woman's Building in 1981 but the typesetting and design equipment had been used by staff and students since 1975. The records in this series focus on the work produced at the Center, including general projects and artist designs and art prints. Many of the design and printing examples were produced for Woman's Building events and programs.

The Artist's Works of Art series includes artist books, resumes, correspondence, postcards, and samples of art in the form of sketches, drawings, and prints. There is also material related to Woman's Building projects. Especially noteworthy is the "What is Feminist Art?" project where artists gave their responses in various formats and mediums from text to pieces of artwork.

The Printed Materials series contains feminist and art publications not produced by or for the Woman's Building.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 7 series.

Series 1: Administrative Files, circa 1970-1991 (Box 1-9, 32; 9 linear feet)

Series 2: Educational Programs, 1971-1991 (Box 10-14; 4.9 linear feet)

Series 3: Gallery Programs, 1973-1991 (Box 14-20, OV 54; 5.7 linear feet)

Series 4: Women's Graphic Center, circa 1976-1989 (Box 20-23, 32, OV 33-50; 5.6 linear feet)

Series 5: Artists' Works of Art, circa 1972-1990 (Box 24-25, OV 51-53; 1.7 linear feet)

Series 6: Grants, 1974-1992 (Box 25-30; 5.3 linear feet)

Series 7: Printed Material (Not Woman's Building), 1970-1983 (Box 30-31; 1.3 linear feet)
Historical Note:
In 1973, artist Judy Chicago, graphic designer Sheila Levant de Bretteville, and art historian Arlene Raven founded the Feminist Studio Workshop (FSW), one of the first independent schools for women artists. The founders established the workshop as a non-profit alternative education center committed to developing art based on women's experiences. The FSW focused not only on the development of art skills, but also on the development of women's experiences and the incorporation of those experiences into their artwork. Central to this vision was the idea that art should not be separated from other activities related to the developing women's movement. In November of 1973 the founders rented workshop space in a vacated building in downtown Los Angeles and called it The Woman's Building, taking the name from the structure created for the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago. The FSW shared space with other organizations and enterprises including several performance groups, Womanspace Gallery, Sisterhood Bookstore, the National Organization of Women, and the Women's Liberation Union.

When the building they were renting was sold in 1975, the FSW and a few other tenants moved to a three-story brick structure, originally designed to be the administrative offices of the Standard Oil Company in the 1920s. In the 1940s, it had been converted into a warehouse and consisted of three floors of open space, conducive to publically available extension classes and exhibitions offered by the Woman's Building staff and students. By 1977, the majority of the outside tenants had left the Woman's Building, primarily because they were unable to sustain business in the new location. The new building was more expensive to maintain and the FSW staff decided to hire an administrator and to create a board structure to assume the financial, legal, and administrative responsibility for the Building. The funds to operate came from FSW tuition, memberships, fund-raising events, and grant monies.

In 1981, the Feminist Studio Workshop closed, as the demand for alternative education diminished. The education programs of the Building were restructured to better accommodate the needs of working women. The Woman's Building also began to generate its own artistic programming with outside artists, including visual arts exhibits, performance art, readings, and video productions. That same year, the Woman's Building founded the Women's Graphic Center Typesetting and Design, a profit-making enterprises designed to strengthen its financial base. Income generated from the phototypesetting, design, production, and printing services was used to support the educational and art making activities of the Building.

When the graphics business closed in 1988, the Woman's Building suffered a financial crisis from which it never fully recovered. The Building closed its gallery and performance space in 1991.
Related Material:
Among the other resources relating to the Woman's Building in the Archives of American Art is an oral history with Suzanne Lacy on March 16, 1990, March 24, 1990, and September 24, 1990. While not credited as a founding member, Lacy was among the first group of staff of the Woman's Building which she discusses in her interview.

The Getty Research Institute also holds a large collection on the Woman's Building which includes a wide range of material relating to its exhibitions, activities, and projects.
Separated Material:
The Archives of American Art donated 5 boxes of video tape from the collection to the Long Beach Museum of Art, Video Annex in 1994. According to documentation, this was the desire of Sandra Golvin and the Board of Directors of the Woman's Building.
Provenance:
The Woman's Building records were donated to the Archives of American Art in 1991 by Sandra Golvin, President of the Board of Directors. An small addition of a set of "Cross Pollination" posters was donated in 2019 by by ONE Archives at University of Southern California Libraries via Loni Shibuyama, Archives Librarian.
Topic:
Works of art  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Women artists -- California  Search this
Feminism and art  Search this
Arts organizations -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Function:
Nonprofit organizations -- California -- Los Angeles
Genre/Form:
Slides
Artists' books
Citation:
Woman's Building records, 1970-1992. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.womabuil
See more items in:
Woman's Building records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-womabuil
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Nina Martino Papers

Collection Creator:
Martino, Giovanni, 1908-1998  Search this
Extent:
0.5 Linear feet (Box 2)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1942-2013
Scope and Contents:
Nina Martino's papers include documentation on exhibitions, including a retrospective of her work entitled "Illumined Solitude," special events, records of her work as a student at Temple University, and awards. Also found are childhood drawings and ink drawings of figures and animals, as well as watercolor and ink illustrations. Photographs depict Nina as a child, with her family, and her artwork.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Giovanni Martino and Martino family papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Giovanni Martino and Martino family papers, 1913-2013. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution..
Identifier:
AAA.martgiov, Series 3
See more items in:
Giovanni Martino and Martino family papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-martgiov-ref3

Fay Lansner papers

Creator:
Lansner, Fay  Search this
Names:
Hofmann, Hans, 1880-1966  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet ((32 items))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1948-1972
Scope and Contents:
A list of 141 works by Lansner, stating the medium, dimensions, date painted, date sold, and location; 2 bibliographies of articles by and about Lansner; 2 photographs of Lansner; a resume of exhibitions; 9 clippings; 17 catalogs; and 3 pages of notes from a class taught by Hans Hofmann in 1948.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter, tapestry artist; born in 1921 in Philadelphia, Pa. Studied at Temple University, 1945-1947; Columbia University, with Susanne Langer; the Art Students League,1947-1948; the Hans Hofmann School, 1948-1950; and with Fernand Leger, 1950.
Provenance:
Donated 1973 by Fay Lansner.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Painters  Search this
Tapissiers  Search this
Topic:
Painting -- New York (State)  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.lansfay
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-lansfay

Grayce Uyehara Papers

Topic:
Social Justice
Creator:
Uyehara, Grayce  Search this
Donor:
Uyehara, Paul M.  Search this
Uyehara, Paul M.  Search this
Names:
Japanese American Citizens' League  Search this
Extent:
18 Cubic feet (18 boxes)
Culture:
Japanese Americans -- Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Articles
Audio cassettes
Awards
Compact discs
Letters (correspondence)
Memoranda
Minutes
Newsclippings
Newsletters
Oral history
Pamphlets
Photographs
Reports
Slides
Speeches
Videocassettes
Date:
1929-2008
Summary:
The papers document the life and activism of Grayce Uyehara who was a pivotal figure within the Redress Movement and sought reparations for the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II.
Content Description:
The papers document the life and activism of Grayce Uyehara who was a pivotal figure within the Redress Movement and sought reparations for the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II. The collection materials span different social justice topics that Uyehara was involved with outside of Japanese American communities. Geographically, the materials are primarily from her time in Stockton, California; Rohwer, Arkansas; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and Washington, D.C., as well as other places.

The papers include materials relating to Uyehara's own incarceration; her lobbying work with the Japanese American Citizens League; other activism and grass roots activities; speeches; campaign materials; articles; memos; financial reports; work journals; photographs of the Uyeharas; community newspapers; film slides of redress; personal letters; internal correspondence; leadership conference notes; educational materials; interviews; awards; student theses; pamphlets; booklets; oral histories; maps; meeting minutes; newsletters; directories; and congressional records.
Arrangement:
The collection is unarranged.
Biographical:
Grayce Uyehara was a social worker and pivotal Redress Movement activist who helped lead the reparations campaign for the wrongful incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II. Uyehara was born Ritsuko Kaneda on July 4th, 1919, in Stockton, California. Her parents named her Ritsu, which roughly translates to notions of law and independence, informed by their understanding of the significance of Independence Day. Her father, Tsuyanoshi Kaneda, worked in agriculture and business and performed domestic tasks. Through this, he developed a reliable business working for lawyers, doctors, and school administrators. Her mother, Tome Kaneda, raised their children. Her mother was strict but also encouraged her children to excel at whatever they did. She enrolled them in Japanese and music classes and expected them to help out at church and in the community. Uyehara was the second of seven children, and as the eldest daughter was expected to be a role model for her younger siblings.

In high school, Uyehara belonged to a Japanese student club, excelled in her schoolwork, and was part of the marching band, playing the bassoon. She also played piano for Sunday school at church, which had both English and Japanese services. She became involved in the Japanese American Citizens League (JACL), participating in its oratorical contests. Because of her community service, the elders and her peers in the Japanese American community respected Uyehara.

Uyehara majored in music at the University of the Pacific. She believed music would allow her to start a career as a local Japanese American piano teacher and church organist. She worked many jobs to pay for tuition while her parents helped cover her costs. While in college, she became involved in the Japanese American Young People's Christian Conference (YPCC) in Northern California. Uyehara continued to be recognized for her leadership and competence by becoming the chairperson of the Sacramento YPCC as a college senior.

In January 1942, after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Uyehara was asked by the university president to become an instructor to teach Japanese to young men in military service at the local army base. Citing her patriotic duty, she accepted the position. She was able to finish school before being incarcerated, partly because her mother pushed her to do well and to stay in school. When the Uyehara family prepared to leave their home in April, one of her professors offered to hold their household belongings. Although she satisfied her graduation requirements, she received her degree in absentia. Two of her siblings were also in college when their academic careers were interrupted. She was very upset that her parents did not get to see her graduate because they had sacrificed so much.

The Kaneda family was forcibly relocated to the Stockton Temporary Detention Center in May 1942. At the Stockton Center, she put her service skills to work and assisted other Nisei inmates in organizing a makeshift school for Japanese American youth. Located on the site of the county fairgrounds, the school was forced to hold classes in the grandstands. Through one of her father's contacts, she was able to secure a donation of books, and she became the supervisor in charge of elementary education. Some of the young soldiers that she taught at the base also came to visit her. She spent four months there, and in September of 1942, her family was notified that they would be forcibly moved to Rohwer, Arkansas. While her family traveled ahead, she stayed behind to help close the Stockton Temporary Detention Center.

At Rohwer, Uyehara remained active and continued to hone her leadership and organizational skills. She helped create church services for young people, played the piano at various events, and taught music in junior high-level classes. During this time, she realized that her previous career path as a piano teacher was not realistic. She discovered that the Minnesota State Teachers College was offering scholarships to eligible camp inmates and decided to pursue the opportunity. She left the camp in January 1943 with three other young Nisei. She lived at a boarding house with another Nisei student from the Tule Lake incarceration camp. She had an active social life but found the classes to be unchallenging. During the summer in St. Paul, she stayed with a woman who was active with the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, a liberal group who spoke out against war. Unsure of what to do next, she then returned to Rohwer where she worked at the camp hospital, continually checking for jobs. She found a job listing in Virginia where one of her younger sisters was attending school, and she left Rohwer for the last time. In Virginia, she worked as an editorial secretary. She was grateful that it was not a service job, which was the norm for young Japanese American women. Uyehara's brother, Ben, was attending Temple University in Philadelphia during this time. He assured her that the Quakers would help the Kaneda family with moving from the camp. Convinced, she packed up again and moved further north.

In Philadelphia, Uyehara found an apartment in the Fellowship House, an organization providing workshops on race relations in the city. She began working for Family Services, a social service agency in the Germantown area of Philadelphia as a receptionist and typist, but she also conducted intake interviews with the clients of the agency. She further continued her role as a community leader by becoming involved with the International Institute which assisted immigrants settling in Philadelphia, and became concerned with the needs of the Japanese American population moving in. Working closely with the Institute, she helped form the Philadelphia Nisei Council, which coordinated with the War Relocation Authority. She was the Nikkei representative of the Philadelphia Committee of Social Service Agencies whose role was to assist with relocation problems. Uyehara developed a handbook that detailed practical issues such as the cost of living in the city, how to rent an apartment, and where to find jobs. The Council began a newsletter, so the community could be aware of new people moving in to the area and of community events. She also started youth groups to provide activities and social interaction for high school and college-age youth coming out of the camp experience.

In Philadelphia, Uyehara became re-acquainted with Hiroshi Uyehara, whose mother knew Grayce's mother. They briefly met in Rohwer. He worked at a nearby Westinghouse factory as a draftsman. He had to receive an Army and Navy clearance, and during the wait went on strike. He became a volunteer at the International Institute where they reconnected. They married in 1946. Later, she and her husband were among those who formed the Philadelphia Chapter of the Japanese American Citizens League (JACL) to influence more people on social issues affecting Japanese Americans in a national context. Afterwards, the director of the International Institute arranged for the board to pay her graduate school tuition at the University of Pennsylvania while she worked as a social worker for the agency. She graduated in 1947 with a Masters in Social Work. Within two years of working in the community, she was asked to serve on the Philadelphia Fellowship Commission. She used this opportunity to highlight the perspectives of Japanese Americans.

The Uyehara's first son, Chris, was born in May of 1948. In 1950, they had a second child, Lisa. The International Institute asked her to return as a volunteer, and she started a program to help American servicemen and Japanese brides returning from Japan to adjust to a new life. She worked directly with Japanese women in teaching American customs, including etiquette and cooking lessons. She also provided individual counseling. She was very active with the local Parent Teacher Association (PTA) and became president, creating parent education programs and raising funds for the local school library. Uyehara was also very active in the National Association of Social Workers, the Cub Scouts, the local Presbyterian church, the West Chester Human Relationships Council, and the League of Women Voters. Later, she had two more children, Larry, in 1952, and Paul, in 1955. During this time, she was asked to help in establishing the first day care center for working mothers in West Chester. Despite the low pay, she was instrumental in establishing the center. In addition, she got involved in civil rights issues for African Americans, especially for school desegregation and upgrading placement rates for African American students.

In 1972, Uyehara served as the governor for the Eastern District Council of the JACL. She was on the National Board, and was the vice-president for General Operations, Chapter President, the National Civil Rights Committee, and the National Scholarship Committee. In 1974, Uyehara was the first woman to hold a JACL elected office. From 1973 to 1974, she was on the National Education Committee. She used her organizational skills to rearrange some existing educational programs so that the history of Japanese Americans could become more well known throughout the country. She also prioritized projects within the committee to make the programs more attractive to potential funders. Her ability to effectively organize with the JACL was influenced by the lessons learned in reading Years of Infamy by Michi Weglyn, and in the organizing lessons within African American communities after Brown v. Board of Education was passed.

In 1978, Uyehara was present at the 1978 Salt Lake City Convention when JACL decided to pursue redress, and was asked to be on the National Committee for Redress. Using her experience in improving school districts for African Americans, she worked hard to generate educational materials, bombard congressional offices and speak at various events and community organizations. She was also effective in gaining support from the Presbyterian Church and Jewish organizations. By 1985 she devised a plan to reach people on the East Coast, since there weren't many JACL chapters in major cities there. She retired from her job as a school social worker in order to help the JACL achieve redress. In the spring, she transferred to the Legislative Education Committee (LEC). Her philosophy was "If you're going to do it, you do it right. You just don't talk about it".

Uyehara did a lot of traveling between Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. Her husband was very supportive during this time. The leadership in Washington consisted of JACL officials and four Nikkei congressmen, who recognized Uyehara's work in coalition building and developing political relationships. Whenever a new member of Congress signed on to the Civil Liberties Act, she would send out a press statement, and any significant chapter events would be announced through her "Action Alerts." She also led congressional meetings with people like Senator Inouye, Ralph Neas, and Mike Masaoka because she was very familiar with the legislative process.

Uyehara sent information "vernaculars" to newspapers and newsletter organizations in New York and Los Angeles as well as the Pacific Citizen, so that people could see progress taking place within the redress effort. She urged people to initiate contacts in states like Florida and North Carolina to ensure votes were not lost. If an area had lower numbers of Japanese American constituents, she would ask different contacts to support the redress effort and lobby congress to vote for it. She also used her existing relationships with the American Friends Service Committee, American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), Jewish war veterans, the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) of B'nai B'irth and the American Jewish Committee. Greatly aided by her efforts, the Civil Liberties Act of 1988 was passed. It issued a formal apology from the government and $20,000 to each surviving incarceree. This act also required monuments, museums, and classrooms to teach the history of Japanese American incarceration so similar discrimination would never happen again to others.

After redress was passed, Uyehara was still actively involved in community organizing. She chaired the JACL Legacy Fund campaign, which raised over $5 million to support other JACL programs. She engaged with the Japanese House and Garden in Philadelphia's Fairmount Park, speaking at educational engagements about redress and organizing efforts for residents in her retirement community through the Diversity Committee and the Mental Health Committee. She was a passionate advocate for Japanese Canadian redress. She also helped coordinate the Philadelphia area fundraising effort for the National Japanese American Memorial Foundation. In addition, she enjoyed spending more time with family, gardening, and playing the piano.

In 2014, Uyehara was honored by Asian Americans United with its Standing Up for Justice Award. Uyehara passed away on June 22, 2014, at Virtual Memorial Hospital in Mount Holly, New Jersey. Japanese Americans remember Uyehara for her effectiveness and dedication as an activist, community leader, and the mother of Redress. Her experiences of being discriminated against and having to work to support the family at a young age sensitized her to the plight of working women and the economically disadvantaged. This greatly informed her service not only for Japanese Americans, but for all communities in America.

Sources

Susan Nakaoka. "Nisei Political Activists: The Stories of Five Japanese American Women Master of Arts., (University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), 1999) found in Grayce Uyehara Papers, Box 1, Folder N, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.

Gammage, Jeff. "Grayce Uyehara, fought for interned Japanese-Americans." The Philadelphia Inquirer, https://www.inquirer.com/philly/obituaries/20140624_Grayce_Uyehara fought_for_interned_Japanese-Americans.html June 23, 2014. Last Accessed March 18, 2019.
Provenance:
Collection donated to the Archives Center in 2019 by Paul M. Uyehara.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research use.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Civil rights movements  Search this
Concentration camps -- United States  Search this
Newspapers -- 20th century  Search this
Reparations for historical injustices  Search this
Genre/Form:
Articles -- 20th century
Audio cassettes
Awards
Compact discs
Letters (correspondence) -- 20th century.
Memoranda
Minutes
Newsclippings
Newsletters
Oral history
Pamphlets
Photographs
Reports -- 20th century
Slides
Speeches -- 20th century
Videocassettes
Citation:
Grayce Uyehara Papers, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1480
See more items in:
Grayce Uyehara Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1480
Online Media:

Paul F. Keene papers

Creator:
Keene, Paul F., Jr., 1920-2009  Search this
Extent:
1 microfilm reel
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Microfilm reels
Scrapbooks
Date:
circa 1940-1987
Scope and Contents:
This microfilm collection of the papers of African American painter and educator Paul F. Keene consists of correspondence regarding Keene's application for the Whitney Fellowship, Mr. Whitney's purchase of a painting, and a letter from Humbert Howard regarding an award and exhibition of Keene's painting at the Pyramid Club; diplomas; and painting inventories. Also included is a scrapbook containing portraits of Keene as a student, his time in Paris, and of his exhibitions, as well as a letter from the Whitney regarding an exhibition. Photographs and printed material are also included in the collection. Photographs depict Keene's paintings; family; students at Tyler; Keene and fellow artists in front of Galerie Huit in Paris; Keene's apartment; friends in Paris and Haiti; and Keene teaching at Philadelphia College of Art.
Biographical / Historical:
Paul F. Keene, Jr. (1902-2009) was an African American painter and educator in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. A Tuskegee Airman in WWII, Keene used his G.I. Bill to study at Academie Julian in Paris. While in Paris, he was a founding member of Galerie Huit, a collective gallery for American artists. Keene received a John J. Whitney fellowhip and studied and taught in Haiti from 1952-1954. He also exhibited his work while there. Upon his return to the United States, Keene taught at the Philadelphia College of Art, the Tyler School of Art at Temple University, and at Bucks County Community College.
Provenance:
Microfilmed in 1988 as part of AAA's Philadelphia Arts Documentation Project.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Painters -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Educators -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Topic:
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Identifier:
AAA.keenpaul
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-keenpaul

[Correspondence & MS--Betty Tooker, Temple University]

Collection Creator:
Sturtevant, William C.  Search this
Container:
Box 79
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1992
Scope and Contents note:
"Reply to Adam Kuper's Commentary"
Collection Restrictions:
Files containing Sturtevant's students' grades have been restricted, as have his students' and colleagues' grant and fellowships applications. Restricted files were separated and placed at the end of their respective series in boxes 87, 264, 322, 389-394, 435-436, 448, 468, and 483. For preservation reasons, his computer files are also restricted. Seminole sound recordings are restricted. Access to the William C. Sturtevant Papers requires an apointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
William C. Sturtevant papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
William C. Sturtevant papers
William C. Sturtevant papers / Series 1: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2008-24-ref3308

Oral history interview with Paula Colton Winokur, 2011 July 21-22

Interviewee:
Winokur, Paula Colton, 1935-  Search this
Interviewer:
Riedel, Mija, 1958-  Search this
Subject:
Andre, Carl  Search this
Blai, Boris  Search this
Bobrowicz, Yvonne  Search this
Cunningham, Imogen  Search this
Cushing, Val M.  Search this
De Staebler, Stephen  Search this
Ferguson, Ken  Search this
Heizer, Michael  Search this
Higby, Wayne  Search this
Leon, Dennis  Search this
Long, Richard  Search this
Love, Arlene  Search this
Marks, Graham  Search this
McKinnell, James  Search this
Mestre, Enrique  Search this
Minter, Myrna  Search this
Moran, Lois  Search this
Natzler, Gertrud  Search this
Natzler, Otto  Search this
Nesbitt, Lowell  Search this
Notkin, Richard  Search this
Ólafur Elíasson  Search this
Randall, Theodore  Search this
Schulman, Norman  Search this
Sedestrom, Carol  Search this
Serra, Richard  Search this
Shores, Kenneth  Search this
Simon, Sandy  Search this
Slivka, Rose  Search this
Staffel, Rudolf  Search this
Takaezu, Toshiko  Search this
Vavrek, Ken  Search this
Winokur, Robert  Search this
Beaver College  Search this
Graphic Sketch Club (Philadelphia, Pa.)  Search this
Helen Drutt Gallery  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts (U.S.)  Search this
Philadelphia Museum of Art  Search this
Temple University.  Search this
Tyler School of Art  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Place:
Alaska
Hungary
Iceland
Mesa Verde (Calif.)
Rocky Mountains
Stonehenge (England)
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Ceramicists -- Pennsylvania -- Interviews  Search this
Ceramics -- Study and teaching  Search this
Painting -- Study and teaching  Search this
Women artists -- Pennsylvania -- Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)15988
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)305477
AAA_collcode_winoku11
Theme:
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_305477
Online Media:

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