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Ann Hamilton on the creation of “at hand”

Creator:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2018-09-07T19:23:08.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, modern  Search this
See more by:
hirshhornmuseum
Data Source:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
YouTube Channel:
hirshhornmuseum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_eKnd-EGCZm4

John Logsdon at the Lemelson Center's Moving Beyond Earth Symposium

Creator:
Lemelson Center, National Museum of American History  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2012-06-26T15:13:43.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
American History  Search this
See more by:
LemelsonCenter
Data Source:
Lemelson Center, National Museum of American History
YouTube Channel:
LemelsonCenter
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_h6-kk0KhPZc

Modern methods of clinical investigation / Annetine C. Gelijns, editor ; Committee on Technological Innovation in Medicine, Institute of Medicine

Author:
Gelijns, Annetine  Search this
Institute of Medicine (U.S.) Committee on Technological Innovation in Medicine  Search this
Howard Hughes Medical Institute  Search this
National Center for Health Services Research  Search this
Physical description:
xviii, 222 p. : ill. ; 24 cm
Type:
Congresses
Date:
1990
Topic:
Medical technology--Evaluation  Search this
Medical innovations--Evaluation  Search this
Medical care--Technological innovations  Search this
Meta-analysis  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_477407

New Korean wave transnational cultural power in the age of social media Dal Youg Jin

Author:
Jin, Dal Yong 1964-  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource
Type:
Electronic resources
Electronic books
History
Place:
Popular culture
Korea (South)
Südkorea
Date:
2016
21st century
Topic:
Popular culture and globalization  Search this
Mass media and globalization  Search this
Technological innovations--Social aspects  Search this
Culture populaire et mondialisation  Search this
Médias et mondialisation  Search this
Innovations--Aspect social  Search this
HISTORY / Asia / Korea  Search this
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Popular Culture  Search this
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Media Studies  Search this
Popular culture  Search this
Pop-Kultur  Search this
Neue Medien  Search this
History  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1156529

The 1933 Chicago World's Fair a century of progress Cheryl R. Ganz

Author:
Ganz, Cheryl  Search this
Subject:
Weltausstellung Chicago 1933-1934  Search this
Century of Progress International Exposition (1933-1934 : Chicago, Ill.) History  Search this
Century of Progress International Exposition (1933-1934 Chicago, Ill.)  Search this
Physical description:
xi, 206 pages, 46 unnumbered pages of plates illustrations (some color), map 26 cm
Type:
Books
History
Place:
Illinois
Chicago
Date:
2008
Topic:
Exhibitions  Search this
Exhibitions--History  Search this
Världsutställningar--historia  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_902362

Innovative Lives: Sarah Will and Mike Schultz

Creator:
Lemelson Center, National Museum of American History  Search this
Type:
Conversations and talks
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2021-05-21T18:24:35.000Z
YouTube Category:
Science & Technology  Search this
Topic:
American History  Search this
See more by:
LemelsonCenter
Data Source:
Lemelson Center, National Museum of American History
YouTube Channel:
LemelsonCenter
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_crjMv5mk3cc

Listen to the silence with Ann Hamilton

Creator:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2020-05-06T15:10:55.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, modern  Search this
See more by:
hirshhornmuseum
Data Source:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
YouTube Channel:
hirshhornmuseum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_v0j9tahblMk

Tecno-sovereignty an indigenous theory and praxis of media articulated through art, technology, and learning by Christopher (Cristóbal) Martínez

Author:
Martínez, Christopher  Search this
Physical description:
ix, 487 pages illustrations (some color) 23 cm
Type:
Books
Academic theses
Thèses et écrits académiques
Date:
2015
Topic:
Indigenous peoples--Effect of technological innovations on  Search this
Indigenous peoples--Education  Search this
Indigenous peoples and mass media  Search this
Indigenous art  Search this
New media art  Search this
Autochtones et médias  Search this
Art autochtone  Search this
Arts médiatiques  Search this
Call number:
GN380 .M36 2015a
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1095940

Digital techniques for heritage presentation and preservation Jayanta Mukhopadhyay, Indu Sreedevi, Bhabatosh Chanda, Santanu Chaudhury, Vinay P. Namboodiri, editors

Author:
Mukhopadhyay, Jayanta (College teacher)  Search this
Sreedevi, Indu  Search this
Chanda, B (Bhabatosh)  Search this
Chaudhury, Santanu  Search this
Namboodiri, Vinay P  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource (275 pages)
Type:
Electronic resources
Electronic books
Date:
2021
Topic:
Historic preservation--Technological innovations  Search this
Cultural property--Protection--Technological innovations  Search this
Préservation historique--Innovations  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1156685

Breaking down barriers usability, accessibility and inclusive design Pat Langdon, Jonathan Lazar, Ann Heylighen, Hua Dong, editors

Author:
Cambridge Workshop on UA and AT (9th : 2018 : Cambridge, England)  Search this
Editor:
Langdon, Patrick 1961-  Search this
Lazar, Jonathan  Search this
Heylighen, Ann  Search this
Dong, Hua  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource (xv, 286 pages) illustrations (some color)
Type:
Congresses
Congrès
Congress
Electronic books
Conference papers and proceedings
Actes de congrès
Date:
2018
Topic:
Self-help devices for people with disabilities  Search this
People with disabilities--Rehabilitation--Technological innovations  Search this
Assistive computer technology  Search this
User interfaces (Computer systems)  Search this
Rehabilitation technology  Search this
Aides fonctionnelles (Médecine physique)  Search this
Technologie informatique adaptée  Search this
Interfaces utilisateurs (Informatique)  Search this
Technologie de la réadaptation  Search this
User interface design & usability  Search this
Robotics  Search this
Rehabilitation  Search this
Civil rights & citizenship  Search this
Technical design  Search this
MEDICAL--Surgery--General  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1156969

Electric Guitar Video Documentation

Creator:
Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation.  Search this
Extent:
7.5 Cubic feet (15 boxes )
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Videotapes
Date:
1996 November 11-16
Summary:
This week-long event explored the intersection of technology and music in the 20th century; it included oral and video histories, exhibitions, concerts, and a symposium discussing the cultural significance of the electric guitar as instrument, technology, and symbol.
Scope and Contents:
The collection contains original, master, and reference videos in several formats: BetaCam SP, 3⁄4" U-matic, 1⁄2" VHS, digital audio tape (DAT), and compact disks (CD). The collection documents Electrified, Amplified, and Deified: The Electric Guitar, Its Makers, and Its Players, as part of the Lemelson Center's series of New Perspectives. Through a series of public events, the Lemelson Center explored the intersection of technology and music in the 20th century. The week-long event included oral and video histories, exhibitions, concerts, and a symposium discussing the cultural significance of the electric guitar as instrument, technology, and symbol and an electronic fieldtrip for school age children.

The collection is arranged into four series: Series 1, Oral Histories, 1996; Series 2, Symposium and Other Programs, 1996; Series 3, Innovative Lives and Electronic Fieldtrip Presentation, 1996; and Series 4, Miscellaneous, 1996, undated. Each series is further divided into subseries arranged by format—BetaCam SP, digital audio tape (DAT), 3⁄4" U-Matic, and 1⁄2" VHS. The symposium footage has multiple camera angles resulting in Camera A and Camera B.

The oral histories contain interviews with some of the best known electric guitar manufacturers, luthiers, and accessory makers discussing major twentieth-century technological and cultural trends. The interviews were conduct by Reuben Jackson, Marge Oustrushko, Robert Santelli and Matt Watson. The interviewees include: Junior Brown; John Ingram; Duke Kramer; Ted McCarty; Pat Metheny; Les Paul; G.E. Smith; Paul Reed Smith; Joe Louis Walker; and Tom Wheeler.

Les Paul was interviewed as part of the Lemelson Center's series Portraits of Invention. Legendary guitarist and innovator Les Paul discusses his work with Marc Pachter, Counselor to the Secretary of the Smithsonian. Additionally, Les Paul discusses his work with Matt Watson.

The Acoustic Guitar Concert held at NMAH's Hall of Musical Instruments on November 14, 1996, included a performance by Howard Aldin, guitarist. Martha Morris, Deputy Director, NMAH; Art Molella, Director, Lemelson Center; and James Weaver, Curator, NMAH provided opening remarks.

The symposium, New Sounds, and other programs explored events surrounding the invention of the electric guitar, past and present technological innovations, and contributions made by early pioneers of guitar making. Two evening concerts included performances by some of the country's finest electric guitarists—Howard Aldin, Jim Hall, Junior Brown, Joe Louis Walker, and The Ventures.

New Sounds explores the intersection of technology and music in the 20th century, focusing on the invention and diffusion of the electric guitar. The symposium brings together inventors, historians, and musicians for a day of conversation and inquiry.

The morning sessions addressed Inventing and Popularizing the Electric Guitar with National Museum of American (NMAH) Curator, Charles McGovern, and Innovators and Entrepreneurs Panel Discussion with participants Ted McCarty, Duke Kramer, John Hall, Richard R. Smith, and moderator Tom Wheeler.

The afternoon sessions addressed The Electric Guitar in Context with an introduction by NMAH archivist, Reuben Jackson, and historians, Susan Horning, James Kraft, and Rebecca McSwain discussing relationships among invention, economics, labor, race, and technological enthusiasm. After the session the panelists fielded audience questions.

The Innovative Lives Presentation and Electronic Fieldtrip were presented in cooperation with the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland, OH. Robert Santelli, Director of Education at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, along with Paul Reed Smith and G.E. Smith, described the invention of the electric guitar, demonstrated the different types of music played on a variety of guitars, and answered student questions about musical innovation and the electric guitar. Student's participation included: Kenmore Middle School (Arlington, VA); Robert Frost Middle School (Rockville, MD); Paul Junior High School (Washington, D.C.); Elkhart Community Schools (Indiana); and Cleveland, OH area middle schools.

The Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation was founded in 1995 at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History through a generous gift from the Lemelson Foundation. The Center's mission is: to document, interpret, and disseminate information about invention and innovation; to encourage inventive creativity in young people; and to foster an appreciation for the central role invention and innovation play in the history of the United States. The Innovative Lives series brings together Museum visitors and especially, school age children, and American inventors to discuss inventions and the creative process and to experiment and play with hands-on activities related to each inventor's product. This collection was recorded by the Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into four series.

Series 1, Oral Histories, 1996

Subseries 1, BetaCam SP, 1969 (originals) Subseries 2, BetaCam SP, 1996 (masters) Subseries 3, Digital Audio Tape (DAT), 1996 (originals) Subseries 4, 1⁄2" VHS, 1996 (reference copies) Subseries 5, CD-ROMs, 1996 (reference copies)

Series 2, Symposium and Other Programs, 1996

Subseries 1, BetaCam SP, 1996 (originals)

Subseries 2, BetaCam SP, 1996 (masters)

Subseries 3, 3⁄4" U-matic SP, 1996 (masters)

Subseries 4, 1⁄2" VHS, 1996 (reference copies)

Series 3, Innovative Lives and Electronic Fieldtrip Presentation, 1996

Subseries 1, BetaCam SP, 1996 (original)

Subseries 2, BetaCam SP, 1996 (masters)

Subseries 3, 1⁄2" VHS, 1996 (reference copies)

Series 4, Miscellaneous, 1996, undated

Subseries 1, BetaCam SP, undated (originals)

Subseries 2, BetaCam SP, undated (masters)

Subseries 3, Digital Audio Tape (DAT), 1996 (originals)

Subseries 4, 1⁄2" VHS, undated

Subseries 5, CD-ROM (reference copy), 1996
Biographical / Historical:
Just the words "electric guitar" can conjure up images in our minds. Jimi Hendrix playing "The Star-Spangled Banner." The neighbor's kid whose band practices in the garage. Leather jackets, motorcycles, and slicked-back hair. A Fender Stratocaster. Or a Gibson Flying V or Les Paul. Music that is, depending on your generation, either too loud or not quite loud enough. Rock and roll. Jazz. Blues. Country. The sound of an electric guitar is familiar to most of us. How did that happen? Why has the work of the people who invented, designed, and popularized this instrument become so much a part of everyday life?

These questions and others were raised during Electrified, Amplified, and Deified: The Electric Guitar, Its Makers, and Its Players, the second in the Lemelson Center's annual series on New Perspectives on Invention and Innovation. From November 9-16, 1996, the Center, in cooperation with the National Museum of American History Division of Cultural History, sponsored concerts, movies, interviews, makers' displays, an exhibit, and a symposium, all spotlighting those inventors and players who plugged in and forever changed the sound of American music.
Provenance:
This collection was created by the Lemelson Center and NMAH staff from the Division of Music, Sports and Entertainment in November of 1996.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research butthe original videos are stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Series 1, Oral Histories, the Les Paul oral history interviews are restricted Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning intellectual property rights. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Musical instruments industry -- 20th century  Search this
Music -- 20th century  Search this
Musicians  Search this
Musical instruments -- 20th century  Search this
Guitar -- 20th century  Search this
Electric Guitar -- 1920-2000  Search this
Genre/Form:
Videotapes -- 1990-2000
Citation:
Electric Guitar Video Documentation, 1996 November, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0610
See more items in:
Electric Guitar Video Documentation
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep889eac379-42e1-4156-b5ed-df7b41e6829f
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0610
Online Media:

Higher education and the NII : from vision to reality : Monterery conference proceedings, September, 1995 / sponsoring organizations, American Library Association ... [et al.]

Title:
Monterey conference proceedings, September, 1995
Author:
American Library Association  Search this
Educom  Search this
National Information Infrastructure (U.S.)  Search this
Subject:
National Information Infrastructure (U.S.)  Search this
Physical description:
vii, 188 p. ; 28 cm
Type:
Congresses
Place:
United States
Date:
1995
1996
Topic:
Education, Higher--Data processing  Search this
Education, Higher--Effects of technological innovations on  Search this
Information networks  Search this
Computer networks  Search this
Call number:
LB2324 .H63 1995
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_488184

Coordination and information : historical perspectives on the organization of enterprise / edited by Naomi R. Lamoreaux and Daniel M.G. Raff

Author:
Lamoreaux, Naomi R  Search this
Raff, Daniel M. G  Search this
Physical description:
viii, 337 p. : ill. ; 24 cm
Type:
Congresses
Place:
United States
Date:
1995
Topic:
Industrial organization (Economic theory)  Search this
Business intelligence  Search this
Comparative organization  Search this
Industrial organization--History  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_527146

Lockwood-Greene Records

Creator:
Lockwood Greene Engineers, Incorporated  Search this
Lockwood-Greene Company  Search this
Whitman, David  Search this
Greene, Stephen  Search this
Lockwood, Amos  Search this
Former owner:
National Museum of American History (U.S.). Division of History of Technology  Search this
National Museum of American History (U.S.). Division of Mechanical and Civil Engineering  Search this
Extent:
270 Cubic feet (233 boxes, 850 oversize folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Linen tracings
Paper flimsies
Business records
Design drawings
Blueprints
Patents
Specifications
Reports
Photograph albums
Photographs
Trade literature
Date:
1784-2004, undated
bulk 1915-1930
Summary:
The engineering firm that became Lockwood Greene was founded by David Whitman, a mill engineer, in 1832. Amos D. Lockwood, a consultant, succeeded Whitman and entered a partnership with Stephen Greene in 1882. The firm specialized in industrial engineering and construction; they designed and built a wide variety of structures and work environments worldwide over the next century. Lockwood Greene was acquired by CH2M HILL in December, 2003. Before its acquisition by CH2MHILL it was reportedly the oldest industrial engineering, construction, and professional services firm in the United States.
Scope and Contents:
The Lockwood Greene records are a comprehensive range of documents related to the appraisal, building, construction, design, evaluation, and engineering of facilities for a variety of clients. The material covers the entire period of industrialization of the United States, and, provides a thorough record of the textile industry, both in New England and the South. Some of the textile mills are documented with unusual completeness, showing water and steam power layouts, factory village plans, and landscaping schedules. A broad range of other building typologies is also covered, including projects with public or retail functions, such as early automobile showrooms, hospitals, apartments and private dwellings, churches, and schools.

In-depth study of the company's earliest history is hampered by a scarcity of records, many of which were lost in the great fire that destroyed Boston's city center in 1872. Nevertheless, graphic and textual evidence does exist within the collection that illuminates these early projects, in addition to the fabric of surviving buildings. The Lockwood Greene records document several commissions that the firm would return to again and again over the course of many decades as clients requested plant additions, upgrades to mechanical and operating systems, and other substantive changes. Researchers are encouraged to examine the blueprints, elevations, and plans for these later additions in order to find illustrations of the firm's earlier interventions at the site. In addition to drawings, other visual evidence for nineteenth-century projects can be found in the company's extensive photo files, which often document structures for which drawings do not exist.

The Lockwood Greene records contain an abundance of graphic and textual evidence for structures designed after 1910 until the 1930s. After this period, visual documentation becomes much more limited. This is partially due to the evolution of drafting tools and information management technologies within the architecture and engineering profession. Lockwood Greene was an early adopter of technological innovations in rendering and data capture, beginning with the introduction of aperture cards and microfilm and extending to the adoption of computer-aided design (CAD) programs. These more modern formats were not part of the acquisition, and, at the time of writing, still reside with the company.

The Lockwood-Greene collection will be of interest to historians of architecture and engineering, as well as those that study the history of business and labor relations. It provides extensive textual and documentary evidence on the evolution and growth of American engineering and the increasing professionalization of the discipline through specialization during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Rich holdings of architectural drawings, photographs, and specifications provide unparalleled resources that trace the evolution of industrial buildings and their typologies; experimentation with building materials and systems, particularly with regards to fireproofing; and the history of textile manufacture in the United States. In addition, there is also rich visual and documentary evidence of the changing relationships between corporations and their employees through photographs, plans, and designs for company towns and mill villages, as well as through corporate records that illustrate the work culture of Lockwood Greene itself. The Lockwood-Greene collection will be of special interest to historic preservationists as the awareness of the significance of industrial and vernacular buildings continues to grow, and detailed design drawings and other visual material will be of especial value for restoration, rehabilitation, and adaptive-reuse projects.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into six series.

Series 1, Project Drawings, Renderings, and Plans, 1784-1969, undated

Series 2, Photographs and Slides, 1881-2001, undated

Subseries 2.1: Photo Albums, 1906-1934

Subseries 2.2: Photographic Files, 1881-1956

Subseries 2.3: Spartanburg Office Photographic File, 1948-1974

Subseries 2.4: Spartanburg Office Photographic File, 1919-1999

Subseries 2.5: Project Negatives and Transparencies, 1956-1970

Subseries 2.6: Project Slides and Transparencies, 1985-2001

Subseries 2.7: Project Slides and Transparencies, Culls, 1974-2001

Subseries 2.8: Project Slides and Transparencies, Corporate Photography, 1976-1998

Subseries 2.9: Photograph Album Covers, 1920, undated

Series 3: Job Files, 1872-1957, undated

Subseries 3.1, Specifications, 1913-1942, undated

Subseries 3.2: List of Drawings, 1872-1951, undated

Subseries 3.3: Project Files, 1919-1969, undated

Subseries 3.4: Reports, 1913-1969

Subseries 3.5: Job Cost Records, 1913-1957, undated

Series 4, Corporate Records and History, 1881-2004, undated

Subseries 4.1: Meeting Minutes, 1913-1995

Subseries 4.2: Corporate Files, 1891-2004, undated

Subseries 4.3: Historical Research and Reference Files and Photographs, 1881-1983, undated

Subseries 4.4: Corporate Publications, 1917-2001, undated

Series 5, Non-Lockwood Greene Publications, 1910-1984, undated

Series 6, Audio-Visual, 1964
Biographical / Historical:
Lockwood Greene, one of the nation's oldest engineering firms, traces it roots to 1832, when Rhode Island native David Whitman began a machinery repair service. Riding the wave of the early industrial revolution in textile manufacturing, Whitman added mill design services to his repertoire, which formed the backbone of a flourishing consulting business for the rest of the century. Whitman was one of the first itinerant mill engineers or "doctors" that traveled throughout New England advising various industrialists on the placement, design, and construction of their factories and the layout of the complicated system of machinery and shafting that they contained. His largest commission was the design of the Bates Manufacturing Company complex in Lewiston, Maine, which was incorporated in 1850 and soon became one of the largest textile producers in New England.

Upon Whitman's death in 1858, his unfinished work was assumed by Amos D. Lockwood, a prominent mill agent and astute businessman who had built a name for himself in Connecticut and Rhode Island. The successful completion of the projects at Lewiston brought enough additional demand for Lockwood's services to prompt him to relocate to Boston, where he formally opened an independent consulting office with partner John W. Danielson in 1871. For the next ten years, A.D. Lockwood & Company was involved in a least eight major mill design projects, half of which were for new construction. One of these projects, the design and construction of the Piedmont Manufacturing Company in Greenville (now Piedmont), South Carolina was especially significant and is considered to be a prototype for the Southern textile industry.

In 1882, Lockwood established a new business, Lockwood, Greene and Company, with Stephen Greene, a professionally-trained civil engineer who had joined the firm in 1879. As the firm grew, it expanded its scope as consultants supplying all of the necessary architectural and engineering services a prospective owner needed to initiate, equip, and run a complete plant. Acting as the owners' representative, the company supervised construction and installation but did not directly act as builders or contractors. Lockwood

Greene's objective expertise was legendary and made it a leader in this emergent field. As Samuel B. Lincoln explains in his history of the company:

"The new firm's knowledge and experience in the textile industry enabled it to analyze samples of cloth and, from such samples, to provide everything necessary for a completed plant to make such goods in any desired quantity. It did not at any time act as selling agents for machinery or equipment, neither did it accept commissions or rebates from suppliers: by this policy it maintained a position as impartial and independent engineer." (pages 105-107)

Greene became president of the company upon Lockwood's death in 1884. Under his leadership, the company expanded into additional industries and designed an array of other industrial building types that would prefigure the diversity of later work. In 1893, the company revolutionized American industry by designing and constructing the first factory whose operating power was provided entirely over electric wires from a remote power plant, rather than relying upon a water source or a stockpiled fuel supply. The Columbia Mills project created a great deal of publicity for the firm and was a signal to other manufacturers that there were viable alternatives to the use of steam power.

As changing economic conditions led Lockwood Greene to move away from its traditional reliance upon the textile manufacturing industry, it was very successful at soliciting projects for a wide variety of structures, from newspaper plants and automotive factories to convention halls and schools. After 1900, Lockwood Greene expanded its operations and opened branch offices in other cities, including Chicago, New York, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Detroit, Atlanta, and Charlotte. In 1915, Edwin F. Greene, president and son of Stephen Greene, reorganized the firm as Lockwood, Greene & Company, Incorporated This new entity served as the parent company and controlled three subsidiaries: one to own and operate cotton mills that Greene had acquired; one to manage other companies' textile mills; and one to provide engineering services.

Lockwood Greene expanded its operations tremendously as the textile industry boomed under wartime demand and in the years following. The severe textile depression from 1923 to 1928 caused the collapse of this structure, however, as Lockwood Greene continued to suffer deep losses in the textile mills that it owned. The parent company was dissolved in 1928 and the engineering subsidiary, which had remained profitable, was salvaged as Lockwood Greene Engineers, Incorporated.

After a rocky start with the onset of the Depression, the company began to prosper during the Second World War and its growth continued steadily throughout the next several decades. In the late 1960s, as a result of declining business, the company's headquarters was transferred from Boston to Spartanburg, South Carolina. In 1981, Phillipp Holtzman USA, a subsidiary of Phillipp Holtzman AG of Frankfurt, Germany, acquired a majority interest in Lockwood Greene. In 2003, CH2M Hill, a global provider of engineering, construction, and operations services based in Denver, Colorado, acquired the company.

From its beginnings under David Whitman, Lockwood Greene has become one of the most diversified engineering firms in the United States. The firm is best known as a designer of industrial and institutional buildings, but the company has become a leader in many additional areas in recent years. Lockwood Greene dominates the market in the design and production of the germ- and dust-free "clean room" facilities required by the pharmaceutical industry and micro-electronics manufacturers. The company has also developed expertise in designing integrated security and networking systems for industrial plants, international port facilities, and military installations worldwide.

Banham, Raynor. A Concrete Atlantis: U.S. Industrial Building and European Modern Architecture, 1900-1925. Cambridge: MIT Press, 1986.

Biggs, Lindy. The Rational Factory: Architecture, Technology, and Work in America's Age of Mass Production. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996.

Bradley, Betsy Hunter. The Works: The Industrial Architecture of the United States. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.

Greene, Benjamin Allen. Stephen Greene: Memories of His Life, with Addresses, Resolutions and Other Tributes of Affection. Chicago, R. R. Donnelley & Sons Company, 1903.

Heiser, William J. Lockwood Greene, 1958-1968, Another Period in the History of an Engineering Business. Lockwood Greene Engineers, Incorporated, 1970.

Lincoln, Samuel B. Lockwood Greene: The History of an Engineering Business, 1832-1958. Brattleboro, Vermont: The Stephen Greene Press, 1960.

Lockwood Greene Engineers, Incorporated The Lockwood Greene Story: One-Hundred-Fifty Years of Engineering Progress. Spartanburg, South Carolina: Lockwood Greene Engineers, Incorporated; undated.
Related Materials:
Materials at the Smithsonian Instituion Libraries

"[Trade catalogs from Lockwood, Greene & Co.]", Trade Literature at the American History Museum Books, Smithsonian Institution Libraries
Provenance:
This collection was donated by Lockwood Greene, Spartanburg, South Carolina, 1997 (original drawings). An addendum to the collection was donated by CH2M HILL in 2007.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research use. One film is tored at an off-site facility and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Researchers must handle unprotected photographs with gloves. Researchers must use reference copies of audio-visual materials. When no reference copy exists, the Archives Center staff will produce reference copies on an "as needed" basis, as resources allow. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Architects  Search this
Architecture, Commercial  Search this
Architecture, Domestic  Search this
Building materials  Search this
Buildings  Search this
Construction industry  Search this
Company towns  Search this
Textile mills  Search this
Mills  Search this
Manufacturing industries  Search this
Industrial engineering  Search this
Industrial buildings -- Design and construction  Search this
Industrial buildings  Search this
Engineering  Search this
Factories -- Power supply  Search this
Factories -- Design and construction  Search this
Factories  Search this
Cotton textile industry  Search this
Commercial buildings  Search this
Electric power production  Search this
Genre/Form:
Linen tracings
Paper flimsies
Business records
Design drawings
Blueprints
Patents
Specifications
Reports
Photograph albums
Photographs -- 21st century
Photographs -- 20th century
Trade literature
Photographs -- 1890-1900
Citation:
Lockwood Greene Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1113
See more items in:
Lockwood-Greene Records
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep85090342a-0c7e-4667-8b37-fa0e8309b5ac
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1113
Online Media:

The Real McCoy: Audio Tour with Robert Hall

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
James, Portia P.  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Baker, Henry E. (Henry Edwin), 1859-1928  Search this
Banneker, Benjamin, 1731-1806  Search this
Carver, George Washington, 1864?-1943  Search this
Davidson, Shelby J. (Shelby Jeames), 1868-1930  Search this
Forten, James, 1766-1842  Search this
Harper, Solomon, 1893-  Search this
Jennings, Thomas L.  Search this
Joyner, Marjorie Stewart, 1896-1994  Search this
Latimer, Lewis Howard, 1848-1928  Search this
Matzeliger, Jan Ernst, 1852-1889  Search this
McCoy, Elijah, 1844-1929  Search this
Montgomery, Benjamin  Search this
Morgan, Garrett A., 1877-1963  Search this
Murray, George W. (George Washington), 1853-1926  Search this
Rillieux, Norbert, 1806-1894  Search this
Temple, Lewis  Search this
Walker, C. J., Madam, 1867-1919  Search this
Woods, Granville, 1856-1910  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Narration
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1989
Scope and Contents:
During the audio tour of exhibition, The Real McCoy: African-American Invention and Innovation, narrator Robert Hall presents contributions made by black inventors to American technology from 1619 to 1930. Inventions and innovations by Benjamin Banneker, Elijah McCoy, Lewis Latimer, James Forten, Lewis Temple, Norbert Rillieux, Ned (slave), Benjamin Montgomery, George Washington Carver, Solomon Harper, Madame C.J. Walker, and Marjorie Joyner, among others, are highlighted. This history, challenges, and successes of patent licensing for inventions created by black inventors, including the question of patents for inventions created by slaves, are discussed.
Audio tour narration. Part of The Real McCoy: Afro-American Invention and Innovation 1619-1930 Audiovisual Materials. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
The exhibition - The Real McCoy: African-American Invention and Innovation, 1619-1930 - focused on outstanding black inventors, as well as anonymous innovators, who, as slaves, craftsmen and workers, made important contributions to the United States. Included are actual inventions, such an Jan Matzelieger's "shoe-lasting" machine, which revolutionized shoe production, and Garrett Morgan's safety hood and automatic traffic signal, forerunners of the modern gas mask and traffic stop light. The exhibition examines such topics as African influences on Colonial technology and how the slave system stymied technological innovation. Individual inventors such as Lewis Temple, Elijah McCoy, James Forten, and Norbert Rillieux are profiled. Also featured are artifacts from some of the expositions of the late 19th-century, which celebrated this new surge of black inventiveness. The exhibition was curated by Portia James and organized by the Anacostia Museum. It was held at the museum from May 1989 - May 1990.
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
African American inventors  Search this
Inventors  Search this
Inventions  Search this
Technology  Search this
Technological innovations  Search this
Patents  Search this
Patent laws and legislation  Search this
Slaves  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Narration
Citation:
The Real McCoy: Audio Tour with Robert Hall, Exhibition Records AV03-026, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-026, Item ACMA AV002680
See more items in:
The Real McCoy: Afro-American invention and innovation, 1619-1930 exhibition records
The Real McCoy: Afro-American invention and innovation, 1619-1930 exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-026: The Real McCoy: Afro-American Invention and Innovation, 1619-1930 audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa746804e5f-9980-4f67-a702-5c39979397ea
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-026-ref505

The Real McCoy: Lewis Temple, Jan E. Matzeliger, and Norbert Rillieux

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
James, Portia P.  Search this
Reinckens, Sharon A.  Search this
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Matzeliger, Jan Ernst, 1852-1889  Search this
Rillieux, Norbert, 1806-1894  Search this
Temple, Lewis  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
3 Video recordings (open reel, 1 inch)
3 Video recordings (VHS)
1 Sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Documentary films
Narration
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1990
Scope and Contents:
The exhibition, The Real McCoy: African-American Invention and Innovation, included three short documentary films: Lewis Temple and Hunting the Whale, Jan E. Matzeliger, and Norbert Rillieux. Lewis Temple and Hunting the Whale provides an overview of early 19th century whaling industry and tools, including the toggle head harpoon invented by blacksmith Lewis Temple. The short documentary about Jan Matzeliger provides an overview of the shoe industry and shoe making, including the refining of Matzeliger's idea and success of his shoe-lasting machine. The short documentary about Norbert Rillieux covers the history of sugar production and manufacturing from early sugar processing through the development of Rillieux's sugar refining process and the installation of Rillieux's device at Theodore Packwood's Myrtle Grove Plantation. All three documentaries provide historical background of three inventors' families and life, respectively.
Short documentary films. Part of The Real McCoy: Afro-American Invention and Innovation 1619-1930 Audiovisual Materials. AV000926 includes all three short films, dated 19910606. AV003326 includes Norbert Rillieux only (film image direction is sideways), dated 19890505. AV003324: Jan E. Matzeliger, undated. AV003433: outtakes, edited voiceover narration by Portia James for Lewis Temple and Hunting the Whale, dated 19890517. AV000226: loop tape of Norbert Rillieux with captions, undated. AV000227: loop tape of Lewis Temple and Hunting the Whale with captions, dated 19920526. AV000228: loop tape of Lewis Temple and Hunting the Whale with captions, undated.
Biographical / Historical:
The exhibition - The Real McCoy: African-American Invention and Innovation, 1619-1930 - focused on outstanding black inventors, as well as anonymous innovators, who, as slaves, craftsmen and workers, made important contributions to the United States. Included are actual inventions, such an Jan Matzelieger's "shoe-lasting" machine, which revolutionized shoe production, and Garrett Morgan's safety hood and automatic traffic signal, forerunners of the modern gas mask and traffic stop light. The exhibition examines such topics as African influences on Colonial technology and how the slave system stymied technological innovation. Individual inventors such as Lewis Temple, Elijah McCoy, James Forten, and Norbert Rillieux are profiled. Also featured are artifacts from some of the expositions of the late 19th-century, which celebrated this new surge of black inventiveness. The exhibition was curated by Portia James and organized by the Anacostia Museum. It was held at the museum from May 1989 - May 1990.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003326

ACMA AV003324

ACMA AV003433

ACMA AV000226

ACMA AV000227

ACMA AV000228
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American inventors  Search this
Inventors  Search this
Inventions  Search this
Technology  Search this
Technological innovations  Search this
Whaling  Search this
Shoe industry  Search this
Shoe machinery industry  Search this
Shoemaking  Search this
Sugar  Search this
Sugar -- Manufacture and refining  Search this
Sugar machinery  Search this
Patents  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Slaves  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Documentary films
Narration
Citation:
The Real McCoy: Lewis Temple, Jan E. Matzeliger, and Norbert Rillieux, Exhibition Records AV03-026, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-026, Item ACMA AV000926
See more items in:
The Real McCoy: Afro-American invention and innovation, 1619-1930 exhibition records
The Real McCoy: Afro-American invention and innovation, 1619-1930 exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-026: The Real McCoy: Afro-American Invention and Innovation, 1619-1930 audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa791d31b9c-dd46-436e-8b85-301dcd6ab575
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-026-ref506

The Real McCoy Exhibit Tour

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
James, Portia P.  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
McCoy, Elijah, 1844-1929  Search this
Rillieux, Norbert, 1806-1894  Search this
Temple, Lewis  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Africa, West
Date:
circa 1989
Scope and Contents:
Tour guide leads visitors through exhibition, The Real McCoy: African-American Invention and Innovation. The tour guide talks about West African influence on pottery, rice production, textiles, sugar cane production, whaling industry, agricultural devices, domestic service devices, and railroad industry in the United States. Norbert Rillieux, Lewis Temple, and Henry Bowman are profiled. The tour guide also talks about patents, the early patent office, and patent applications by blacks. Tour guide answers visitors' questions.
Tour of exhibit; audio only. Part of The Real McCoy: Afro-American Invention and Innovation 1619-1930 Audiovisual Materials. Poor audio quality. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
The exhibition - The Real McCoy: African-American Invention and Innovation, 1619-1930 - focused on outstanding black inventors, as well as anonymous innovators, who, as slaves, craftsmen and workers, made important contributions to the United States. Included are actual inventions, such an Jan Matzelieger's "shoe-lasting" machine, which revolutionized shoe production, and Garrett Morgan's safety hood and automatic traffic signal, forerunners of the modern gas mask and traffic stop light. The exhibition examines such topics as African influences on Colonial technology and how the slave system stymied technological innovation. Individual inventors such as Lewis Temple, Elijah McCoy, James Forten, and Norbert Rillieux are profiled. Also featured are artifacts from some of the expositions of the late 19th-century, which celebrated this new surge of black inventiveness. The exhibition was curated by Portia James and organized by the Anacostia Museum. It was held at the museum from May 1989 - May 1990.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American inventors  Search this
Inventors  Search this
Inventions  Search this
Technology  Search this
Technological innovations  Search this
Patents  Search this
Patent laws and legislation  Search this
Slaves  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
The Real McCoy Exhibit Tour, Exhibition Records AV03-026, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-026, Item ACMA AV001611
See more items in:
The Real McCoy: Afro-American invention and innovation, 1619-1930 exhibition records
The Real McCoy: Afro-American invention and innovation, 1619-1930 exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-026: The Real McCoy: Afro-American Invention and Innovation, 1619-1930 audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa769b8f2d6-7926-408a-84c1-47d3c76d0119
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-026-ref507

Make an Invention

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
3 Video recordings (VHS)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1990
Scope and Contents:
During the workshop, students created three-dimensional models of original inventions or innovations after a guided tour of the museum's exhibition on African American inventors titled 'The Real McCoy: Afro-American Invention and Innovation 1619-1930.' Workshop was recommended for third and fourth grade students. The workshop was held at the Anacostia Museum on February 5, 1990.
Workshop. Related to exhibition 'The Real McCoy: Afro-American Invention and Innovation 1619-1930.' AV002113 and AV002116: dated 19900205. AV002058: undated.
Biographical / Historical:
The exhibition - The Real McCoy: African-American Invention and Innovation, 1619-1930 - focused on outstanding black inventors, as well as anonymous innovators, who, as slaves, craftsmen and workers, made important contributions to the United States. Included are actual inventions, such an Jan Matzelieger's "shoe-lasting" machine, which revolutionized shoe production, and Garrett Morgan's safety hood and automatic traffic signal, forerunners of the modern gas mask and traffic stop light. The exhibition examines such topics as African influences on Colonial technology and how the slave system stymied technological innovation. Individual inventors such as Lewis Temple, Elijah McCoy, James Forten, and Norbert Rillieux are profiled. Also featured are artifacts from some of the expositions of the late 19th-century, which celebrated this new surge of black inventiveness. The exhibition was curated by Portia James and organized by the Anacostia Museum. It was held at the museum from May 1989 - May 1990.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV002116

ACMA AV002058
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset and calendar of events for Jan/Feb 1990.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American inventors  Search this
Inventors  Search this
Inventions  Search this
Technological innovations  Search this
Education -- Museums  Search this
Children  Search this
Museums and community  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Make an Invention, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-026, Item ACMA AV002113
See more items in:
The Real McCoy: Afro-American invention and innovation, 1619-1930 exhibition records
The Real McCoy: Afro-American invention and innovation, 1619-1930 exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-026: The Real McCoy: Afro-American Invention and Innovation, 1619-1930 audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa79a8c3d9e-c1cf-4810-9a89-699b7e2949e9
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-026-ref508

The Real McCoy: Teacher Seminar

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
5 Video recordings (VHS)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1989
Scope and Contents:
Held from June 26 - 29, 1989 at the Anacostia Museum, the teacher seminar consisted of lectures and workshops about black inventors and innovators, and their struggle for recognition. The lectures and workshops were led by experts in history and the patent process, and inventors. Sessions on critical thinking and teaching strategies were also part of the program. Curator Portia James highlighted the exhibition 'The Real McCoy: Afro-American Invention and Innovation 1619-1930.' Dr. West and C.R. Gibbs provided historical context about African American inventors. Pat Ives spoke about historical figures and the patent process, and Bessie Wiley discussed creativity and inventiveness. Other seminar participants included Fred Schmidt, Karen Skilman, young inventor Maurice Scales, Frank Price, inventor Cortland Dugger, and Dr. Jimmie Jackson.
Seminar. Related to exhibition 'The Real McCoy: Afro-American Invention and Innovation 1619-1930.' AV002059: dated 19890626. AV002131 and AV002058: undated. AV002151and AV002060: dated 19890629.
Biographical / Historical:
The exhibition - The Real McCoy: African-American Invention and Innovation, 1619-1930 - focused on outstanding black inventors, as well as anonymous innovators, who, as slaves, craftsmen and workers, made important contributions to the United States. Included are actual inventions, such an Jan Matzelieger's "shoe-lasting" machine, which revolutionized shoe production, and Garrett Morgan's safety hood and automatic traffic signal, forerunners of the modern gas mask and traffic stop light. The exhibition examines such topics as African influences on Colonial technology and how the slave system stymied technological innovation. Individual inventors such as Lewis Temple, Elijah McCoy, James Forten, and Norbert Rillieux are profiled. Also featured are artifacts from some of the expositions of the late 19th-century, which celebrated this new surge of black inventiveness. The exhibition was curated by Portia James and organized by the Anacostia Museum. It was held at the museum from May 1989 - May 1990.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV002131

ACMA AV002151

ACMA AV002060

ACMA AV002058
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American inventors  Search this
Inventors  Search this
Inventions  Search this
Technology  Search this
Technological innovations  Search this
Patents  Search this
Patent laws and legislation  Search this
Teachers  Search this
Education  Search this
teaching  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
The Real McCoy: Teacher Seminar, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-026, Item ACMA AV002059
See more items in:
The Real McCoy: Afro-American invention and innovation, 1619-1930 exhibition records
The Real McCoy: Afro-American invention and innovation, 1619-1930 exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-026: The Real McCoy: Afro-American Invention and Innovation, 1619-1930 audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa766f56be2-8614-4c02-be75-0d1a37d44183
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-026-ref509

The Real McCoy: Exhibition Tour

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
McCoy, Elijah, 1844-1929  Search this
Rillieux, Norbert, 1806-1894  Search this
Temple, Lewis  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1989
Scope and Contents:
Curator Portia James led tour of the exhibition 'The Real McCoy: Afro-American Invention and Innovation 1619-1930.'
Exhibition Tour. Related to exhibition 'The Real McCoy: Afro-American Invention and Innovation 1619-1930.' Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
The exhibition - The Real McCoy: African-American Invention and Innovation, 1619-1930 - focused on outstanding black inventors, as well as anonymous innovators, who, as slaves, craftsmen and workers, made important contributions to the United States. Included are actual inventions, such an Jan Matzelieger's "shoe-lasting" machine, which revolutionized shoe production, and Garrett Morgan's safety hood and automatic traffic signal, forerunners of the modern gas mask and traffic stop light. The exhibition examines such topics as African influences on Colonial technology and how the slave system stymied technological innovation. Individual inventors such as Lewis Temple, Elijah McCoy, James Forten, and Norbert Rillieux are profiled. Also featured are artifacts from some of the expositions of the late 19th-century, which celebrated this new surge of black inventiveness. The exhibition was curated by Portia James and organized by the Anacostia Museum. It was held at the museum from May 1989 - May 1990.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American inventors  Search this
Inventors  Search this
Inventions  Search this
Technology  Search this
Technological innovations  Search this
Patents  Search this
Patent laws and legislation  Search this
Slaves  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
The Real McCoy: Exhibition Tour, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-026, Item ACMA AV002057
See more items in:
The Real McCoy: Afro-American invention and innovation, 1619-1930 exhibition records
The Real McCoy: Afro-American invention and innovation, 1619-1930 exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-026: The Real McCoy: Afro-American Invention and Innovation, 1619-1930 audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7eff6628e-3dc4-47ae-9864-8c309fdb8156
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-026-ref510

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