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Dominick Labino papers, 1929-1975

Creator:
Labino, Dominick, 1910-1987  Search this
Labino, Dominick, 1910-1987  Search this
Topic:
Glass sculpture  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Glass, Colored  Search this
Glass fibers -- Technological innovations  Search this
Theme:
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Craft  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)7825
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)209992
AAA_collcode_labidomi
Theme:
Lives of American Artists
Craft
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_209992

Ann Hamilton on the creation of “at hand”

Creator:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2018-09-07T19:23:08.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, modern  Search this
See more by:
hirshhornmuseum
Data Source:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
YouTube Channel:
hirshhornmuseum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_eKnd-EGCZm4

What Caused the Roaring Twenties? Not the End of a Pandemic (Probably)

Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine  Search this
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Conversations and talks
Blog posts
Published Date:
Mon, 03 May 2021 16:20:51 +0000
Topic:
Custom RSS  Search this
See more posts:
Smithsonian Article Database
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_722e0188fd41b5ab869fd84790a004b7

Science and technology in the service of conservation : preprints of the contributions to the Washington Congress, 3-9 September 1982 / edited by N.S. Brommelle and Garry Thomson

Author:
Brommelle, N. S  Search this
Thomson, Garry  Search this
International Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works  Search this
Physical description:
185 p. : ill. ; 30 cm
Type:
Congresses
Date:
1982
C1982
Topic:
Art objects--Conservation and restoration--Technological innovations  Search this
Museum conservation methods--Technological innovations  Search this
Call number:
N8560 .S416
N8560.S416
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_161775

Delta Wing Phoenix VI B Jr.

Manufacturer:
Delta Wing Kites and Gliders Incorporated  Search this
Dimensions:
Wingspan: 9 m (29 ft 5 in)
Length: 2.7 m (9 ft)
Weights: Empty, 19 kg (41 lb)
Gross, 109 kg (241 lb)
Type:
CRAFT-Aircraft
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Credit Line:
Gift of Bill Bennett.
Inventory Number:
A19840715000
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Location:
Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA
Hangar:
Boeing Aviation Hangar
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nv96ed774d9-5b56-401c-b1e8-b77c10a1a867
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nasm_A19840715000
Online Media:

James A. E. Halkett Papers

Creator:
Halkett, James A. E. (physicist)  Search this
Wesolowski, Sigmund A.  Search this
Source:
Medical Sciences, Division of (NMAH, SI)  Search this
Names:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology  Search this
Former owner:
Medical Sciences, Division of (NMAH, SI)  Search this
Extent:
0.15 Cubic feet (1 box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Theses
Masters theses
Manuscripts
Diaries
Date:
1948-1951.
Scope and Contents note:
Halkett and Wesolow(ski) materials show the process of technological innovation through laboratory protocols. They also demonstrate the various alternatives explored in the search for effective artificial circulation by using materials which would not damage or clot blood and that could be sterilized. The evolution of the pumping mechanism and power source, the design and materials of the pump itself, and a series of catheters (cannulae) or varying shapes and materials are described as a workable solution is found. Secondly, diversity of techniques developed to solve the problems of artificial circulation and their contributions to that work are documented.

The 2018 addenda documents the life and career of physicist James A.E. Halkett. It includes papers relating to his education, his U.S. Navy service, his work with various employers, his research in various fields including radio, metallurgy, ordnance, and radioactivity. Some of the papers relate to his work with General Electric in developing the proximity fuse. The papers include letters; notes, including lab notes, graphs and charts; reports; drawings; photographs; training and operational manuals; bibliographic card files; journals, conference materials and other publications; and miscellany.
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into three series.

Series 1: James A. E. Halkett Papers

Series 2: Sigmund A. Wesolowski Papers

Series 3: H.J. Sugarman Papers
Biographical/Historical note:
James A. E. Halkett and Sigmund A. Wesolowski, M.D. (now named Adam Wesolow) experimented on an early mechanical heart. In 1948, James Halkett and William Sewell succesfully bypassed the left side of a cat's heart. Modifications in the pump and surgical procedures allowed Dr. Sigmund A. Wesolowski and others to achieve long-term survival of animals after bypass surgery. Halkett and Wesolowski went on to other projects. Although Wesolowski published articles on this work, neither went on to develop this technology for trials with human subjects.
Provenance:
Collection donated by James A. E. Halkett and Adam Wesolow, May 6, 1985.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Occupation:
Surgeons  Search this
Topic:
Medical sciences  Search this
Heart pump  Search this
Medical Equipment  Search this
Heart, Artificial  Search this
Heart -- Surgery  Search this
Biophysics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Theses
Masters theses
Manuscripts
Diaries -- 20th century
Citation:
James A. E. Halkett Papers, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0220
See more items in:
James A. E. Halkett Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0220

Lockwood-Greene Records

Source:
Mechanical and Civil Engineering, Division of (NMAH, SI)  Search this
History of Technology, Division of, NMAH, SI  Search this
Creator:
Lockwood Greene Engineers, Incorporated  Search this
Lockwood-Greene Company  Search this
Whitman, David  Search this
Greene, Stephen  Search this
Lockwood, Amos  Search this
Former owner:
History of Technology, Division of, NMAH, SI  Search this
Mechanical and Civil Engineering, Division of (NMAH, SI)  Search this
Extent:
270 Cubic feet (233 boxes, 850 oversize folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Linen tracings
Paper flimsies
Business records
Design drawings
Blueprints
Patents
Specifications
Reports
Photograph albums
Photographs
Trade literature
Date:
1784-2004, undated
bulk 1915-1930
Summary:
The engineering firm that became Lockwood Greene was founded by David Whitman, a mill engineer, in 1832. Amos D. Lockwood, a consultant, succeeded Whitman and entered a partnership with Stephen Greene in 1882. The firm specialized in industrial engineering and construction; they designed and built a wide variety of structures and work environments worldwide over the next century. Lockwood Greene was acquired by CH2M HILL in December, 2003. Before its acquisition by CH2MHILL it was reportedly the oldest industrial engineering, construction, and professional services firm in the United States.
Scope and Contents:
The Lockwood Greene records are a comprehensive range of documents related to the appraisal, building, construction, design, evaluation, and engineering of facilities for a variety of clients. The material covers the entire period of industrialization of the United States, and, provides a thorough record of the textile industry, both in New England and the South. Some of the textile mills are documented with unusual completeness, showing water and steam power layouts, factory village plans, and landscaping schedules. A broad range of other building typologies is also covered, including projects with public or retail functions, such as early automobile showrooms, hospitals, apartments and private dwellings, churches, and schools.

In-depth study of the company's earliest history is hampered by a scarcity of records, many of which were lost in the great fire that destroyed Boston's city center in 1872. Nevertheless, graphic and textual evidence does exist within the collection that illuminates these early projects, in addition to the fabric of surviving buildings. The Lockwood Greene records document several commissions that the firm would return to again and again over the course of many decades as clients requested plant additions, upgrades to mechanical and operating systems, and other substantive changes. Researchers are encouraged to examine the blueprints, elevations, and plans for these later additions in order to find illustrations of the firm's earlier interventions at the site. In addition to drawings, other visual evidence for nineteenth-century projects can be found in the company's extensive photo files, which often document structures for which drawings do not exist.

The Lockwood Greene records contain an abundance of graphic and textual evidence for structures designed after 1910 until the 1930s. After this period, visual documentation becomes much more limited. This is partially due to the evolution of drafting tools and information management technologies within the architecture and engineering profession. Lockwood Greene was an early adopter of technological innovations in rendering and data capture, beginning with the introduction of aperture cards and microfilm and extending to the adoption of computer-aided design (CAD) programs. These more modern formats were not part of the acquisition, and, at the time of writing, still reside with the company.

The Lockwood-Greene collection will be of interest to historians of architecture and engineering, as well as those that study the history of business and labor relations. It provides extensive textual and documentary evidence on the evolution and growth of American engineering and the increasing professionalization of the discipline through specialization during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Rich holdings of architectural drawings, photographs, and specifications provide unparalleled resources that trace the evolution of industrial buildings and their typologies; experimentation with building materials and systems, particularly with regards to fireproofing; and the history of textile manufacture in the United States. In addition, there is also rich visual and documentary evidence of the changing relationships between corporations and their employees through photographs, plans, and designs for company towns and mill villages, as well as through corporate records that illustrate the work culture of Lockwood Greene itself. The Lockwood-Greene collection will be of special interest to historic preservationists as the awareness of the significance of industrial and vernacular buildings continues to grow, and detailed design drawings and other visual material will be of especial value for restoration, rehabilitation, and adaptive-reuse projects.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into six series.

Series 1, Project Drawings, Renderings, and Plans, 1784-1969, undated

Series 2, Photographs and Slides, 1881-2001, undated

Subseries 2.1: Photo Albums, 1906-1934

Subseries 2.2: Photographic Files, 1881-1956

Subseries 2.3: Spartanburg Office Photographic File, 1948-1974

Subseries 2.4: Spartanburg Office Photographic File, 1919-1999

Subseries 2.5: Project Negatives and Transparencies, 1956-1970

Subseries 2.6: Project Slides and Transparencies, 1985-2001

Subseries 2.7: Project Slides and Transparencies, Culls, 1974-2001

Subseries 2.8: Project Slides and Transparencies, Corporate Photography, 1976-1998

Subseries 2.9: Photograph Album Covers, 1920, undated

Series 3: Job Files, 1872-1957, undated

Subseries 3.1, Specifications, 1913-1942, undated

Subseries 3.2: List of Drawings, 1872-1951, undated

Subseries 3.3: Project Files, 1919-1969, undated

Subseries 3.4: Reports, 1913-1969

Subseries 3.5: Job Cost Records, 1913-1957, undated

Series 4, Corporate Records and History, 1881-2004, undated

Subseries 4.1: Meeting Minutes, 1913-1995

Subseries 4.2: Corporate Files, 1891-2004, undated

Subseries 4.3: Historical Research and Reference Files and Photographs, 1881-1983, undated

Subseries 4.4: Corporate Publications, 1917-2001, undated

Series 5, Non-Lockwood Greene Publications, 1910-1984, undated

Series 6, Audio-Visual, 1964
Biographical / Historical:
Lockwood Greene, one of the nation's oldest engineering firms, traces it roots to 1832, when Rhode Island native David Whitman began a machinery repair service. Riding the wave of the early industrial revolution in textile manufacturing, Whitman added mill design services to his repertoire, which formed the backbone of a flourishing consulting business for the rest of the century. Whitman was one of the first itinerant mill engineers or "doctors" that traveled throughout New England advising various industrialists on the placement, design, and construction of their factories and the layout of the complicated system of machinery and shafting that they contained. His largest commission was the design of the Bates Manufacturing Company complex in Lewiston, Maine, which was incorporated in 1850 and soon became one of the largest textile producers in New England.

Upon Whitman's death in 1858, his unfinished work was assumed by Amos D. Lockwood, a prominent mill agent and astute businessman who had built a name for himself in Connecticut and Rhode Island. The successful completion of the projects at Lewiston brought enough additional demand for Lockwood's services to prompt him to relocate to Boston, where he formally opened an independent consulting office with partner John W. Danielson in 1871. For the next ten years, A.D. Lockwood & Company was involved in a least eight major mill design projects, half of which were for new construction. One of these projects, the design and construction of the Piedmont Manufacturing Company in Greenville (now Piedmont), South Carolina was especially significant and is considered to be a prototype for the Southern textile industry.

In 1882, Lockwood established a new business, Lockwood, Greene and Company, with Stephen Greene, a professionally-trained civil engineer who had joined the firm in 1879. As the firm grew, it expanded its scope as consultants supplying all of the necessary architectural and engineering services a prospective owner needed to initiate, equip, and run a complete plant. Acting as the owners' representative, the company supervised construction and installation but did not directly act as builders or contractors. Lockwood

Greene's objective expertise was legendary and made it a leader in this emergent field. As Samuel B. Lincoln explains in his history of the company:

"The new firm's knowledge and experience in the textile industry enabled it to analyze samples of cloth and, from such samples, to provide everything necessary for a completed plant to make such goods in any desired quantity. It did not at any time act as selling agents for machinery or equipment, neither did it accept commissions or rebates from suppliers: by this policy it maintained a position as impartial and independent engineer." (pages 105-107)

Greene became president of the company upon Lockwood's death in 1884. Under his leadership, the company expanded into additional industries and designed an array of other industrial building types that would prefigure the diversity of later work. In 1893, the company revolutionized American industry by designing and constructing the first factory whose operating power was provided entirely over electric wires from a remote power plant, rather than relying upon a water source or a stockpiled fuel supply. The Columbia Mills project created a great deal of publicity for the firm and was a signal to other manufacturers that there were viable alternatives to the use of steam power.

As changing economic conditions led Lockwood Greene to move away from its traditional reliance upon the textile manufacturing industry, it was very successful at soliciting projects for a wide variety of structures, from newspaper plants and automotive factories to convention halls and schools. After 1900, Lockwood Greene expanded its operations and opened branch offices in other cities, including Chicago, New York, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Detroit, Atlanta, and Charlotte. In 1915, Edwin F. Greene, president and son of Stephen Greene, reorganized the firm as Lockwood, Greene & Company, Incorporated This new entity served as the parent company and controlled three subsidiaries: one to own and operate cotton mills that Greene had acquired; one to manage other companies' textile mills; and one to provide engineering services.

Lockwood Greene expanded its operations tremendously as the textile industry boomed under wartime demand and in the years following. The severe textile depression from 1923 to 1928 caused the collapse of this structure, however, as Lockwood Greene continued to suffer deep losses in the textile mills that it owned. The parent company was dissolved in 1928 and the engineering subsidiary, which had remained profitable, was salvaged as Lockwood Greene Engineers, Incorporated.

After a rocky start with the onset of the Depression, the company began to prosper during the Second World War and its growth continued steadily throughout the next several decades. In the late 1960s, as a result of declining business, the company's headquarters was transferred from Boston to Spartanburg, South Carolina. In 1981, Phillipp Holtzman USA, a subsidiary of Phillipp Holtzman AG of Frankfurt, Germany, acquired a majority interest in Lockwood Greene. In 2003, CH2M Hill, a global provider of engineering, construction, and operations services based in Denver, Colorado, acquired the company.

From its beginnings under David Whitman, Lockwood Greene has become one of the most diversified engineering firms in the United States. The firm is best known as a designer of industrial and institutional buildings, but the company has become a leader in many additional areas in recent years. Lockwood Greene dominates the market in the design and production of the germ- and dust-free "clean room" facilities required by the pharmaceutical industry and micro-electronics manufacturers. The company has also developed expertise in designing integrated security and networking systems for industrial plants, international port facilities, and military installations worldwide.

Banham, Raynor. A Concrete Atlantis: U.S. Industrial Building and European Modern Architecture, 1900-1925. Cambridge: MIT Press, 1986.

Biggs, Lindy. The Rational Factory: Architecture, Technology, and Work in America's Age of Mass Production. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996.

Bradley, Betsy Hunter. The Works: The Industrial Architecture of the United States. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.

Greene, Benjamin Allen. Stephen Greene: Memories of His Life, with Addresses, Resolutions and Other Tributes of Affection. Chicago, R. R. Donnelley & Sons Company, 1903.

Heiser, William J. Lockwood Greene, 1958-1968, Another Period in the History of an Engineering Business. Lockwood Greene Engineers, Incorporated, 1970.

Lincoln, Samuel B. Lockwood Greene: The History of an Engineering Business, 1832-1958. Brattleboro, Vermont: The Stephen Greene Press, 1960.

Lockwood Greene Engineers, Incorporated The Lockwood Greene Story: One-Hundred-Fifty Years of Engineering Progress. Spartanburg, South Carolina: Lockwood Greene Engineers, Incorporated; undated.
Related Materials:
Materials at the Smithsonian Instituion Libraries

"[Trade catalogs from Lockwood, Greene & Co.]", Trade Literature at the American History Museum Books, Smithsonian Institution Libraries
Provenance:
This collection was donated by Lockwood Greene, Spartanburg, South Carolina, 1997 (original drawings). An addendum to the collection was donated by CH2M HILL in 2007.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research use. One film is tored at an off-site facility and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Researchers must handle unprotected photographs with gloves. Researchers must use reference copies of audio-visual materials. When no reference copy exists, the Archives Center staff will produce reference copies on an "as needed" basis, as resources allow. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Reproduction permission from Archives Center: fees for commercial use. All duplication requests must be reviewed and approved by Archives Center staff.
Topic:
Architects  Search this
Architecture, Commercial  Search this
Architecture, Domestic  Search this
Building materials  Search this
Buildings  Search this
Construction industry  Search this
Company towns  Search this
Textile mills  Search this
Mills  Search this
Manufacturing industries  Search this
Industrial engineering  Search this
Industrial buildings -- Design and construction  Search this
Industrial buildings  Search this
Engineering  Search this
Factories -- Power supply  Search this
Factories -- Design and construction  Search this
Factories  Search this
Cotton textile industry  Search this
Commercial buildings  Search this
Electric power production  Search this
Genre/Form:
Linen tracings
Paper flimsies
Business records
Design drawings
Blueprints
Patents
Specifications
Reports
Photograph albums
Photographs -- 21st century
Photographs -- 20th century
Trade literature
Photographs -- 1890-1900
Citation:
Lockwood Greene Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1113
See more items in:
Lockwood-Greene Records
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1113
Online Media:

National Science Foundation progress report on PLATO and TICCIT Technological Innovation in Education

Collection Collector:
Information, Technology and Society, Division of, NMAH, SI.  Search this
Pool, Ithiel de Sola, 1917-  Search this
Container:
Box 2, Folder 19
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Collection Restrictions:
Unrestricted research access on site by appointment.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Ithiel deSola Pool Collection, 1919-1984, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Ithiel de Sola Pool Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0713-ref552

3. Bali and West Java

Collection Creator:
Dunham, S. Ann (Stanley Ann)  Search this
Container:
Box 4
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1989
Collection Restrictions:
The S. Ann Dunham papers are open for research.

Electronic records are unavailable for research. Please contact the reference archivist for additional information.

Access to the S. Ann Dunham papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
S. Ann Dunham papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
S. Ann Dunham papers
S. Ann Dunham papers / Series 1: Field notebooks
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2011-04-ref102
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3 (women in coastal villages)

Collection Creator:
Dunham, S. Ann (Stanley Ann)  Search this
Container:
Box 3
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1983
Collection Restrictions:
The S. Ann Dunham papers are open for research.

Electronic records are unavailable for research. Please contact the reference archivist for additional information.

Access to the S. Ann Dunham papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
S. Ann Dunham papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
S. Ann Dunham papers
S. Ann Dunham papers / Series 1: Field notebooks / WID (Women in Development):
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2011-04-ref89
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  • View 3 (women in coastal villages) digital asset number 1
  • View 3 (women in coastal villages) digital asset number 2
  • View 3 (women in coastal villages) digital asset number 3

Listen to the silence with Ann Hamilton

Creator:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2020-05-06T15:10:55.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, modern  Search this
See more by:
hirshhornmuseum
Data Source:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
YouTube Channel:
hirshhornmuseum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_v0j9tahblMk

Bob Greenberg Selects: Connections

Creator:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2018-02-26T20:11:46.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Design  Search this
See more by:
cooperhewitt
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
YouTube Channel:
cooperhewitt
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_GulBsSxMRQQ

Advertising in Ms. Magazine

Collection Creator:
Woman's Building (Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
Container:
Box 7, Folder 3
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1976-1980
Collection Citation:
Woman's Building records, 1970-1992. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Woman's Building records
Woman's Building records / Series 1: Administrative Files / 1.4: Publicity and Outreach
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-womabuil-ref292
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Advertising in Ms. Magazine digital asset number 1

Other Air Cushion Vehicles [Articles and Brochures - Deric Technological Innovation Ltd. through Hovermarine Ltd.]

Collection Creator:
Bertelsen, William  Search this
Container:
Box 8, Folder 2
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1968-1985
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Please contact the Audio/Visual Archivist to access the VHS tape that is included in this collection.
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Collection Citation:
Air Cushion Vehicles [Bertelsen] Collection, Accession 1994-0013, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Air Cushion Vehicles [Bertelsen] Collection
Air Cushion Vehicles [Bertelsen] Collection / Series 2: Personal Research
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-1994-0013-ref63

Communications and Emergency Management

Collection Donor:
Blum, Morris  Search this
Collection Creator:
WANN Radio Station (Annapolis, Maryland)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
undated
1946-1999
Scope and Contents:
Materials document WANN Radio's attempts to comply with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) laws, regulations, emergency operation plans and technological innovations. These materials include correspondence, application forms, reports, operation plans, legal documents and training materials. Blum was appointed to the Federal Communications Commission's National Industry Advisory Committee in 1958 and served on subsequent commission committees. His committee work included working on the deployment of CONELRAD, the Cold War predecessor to the Emergency Broadcasting System and Emergency Alert System; the development of the two-tone Emergency Broadcast System attention signal; and field tests to develop the current Emergency Alert System. Blum also served as the first chair of the Maryland State Emergency Communications Committee; thus there is a substantial amount of material relating to these activities. In addition, a statement by Morris Blum before the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in 1963 relating to advertising on broadcast stations is also found among these materials. The materials are arranged in chronological order.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Researchers must use reference copies of audiovisual materials. When no reference copy exists, the Archives Center staff will produce reference copies on an "as needed" basis, as resources allow.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
WANN Radio Station Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0800, Series 8
See more items in:
WANN Radio Station Records
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0800-ref339

[Conference on Modernization and Technological Innovation]

Collection Creator:
Kranzberg, Melvin, Dr., 1917-1995  Search this
Container:
Box 223, Folder 16
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1986
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but is stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Melvin Kranzberg Papers, 1934-1988, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Melvin Kranzberg Papers
Melvin Kranzberg Papers / Series 3: Lectureships and Speeches / 3.1: Lectures and Seminars
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0266-ref3527

National Endowment for the Humanities (Web)

Collection Creator:
Kranzberg, Melvin, Dr., 1917-1995  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1972-1983
Scope and Contents:
General Files, 1972-1980 includes one box with five folders documenting the development of a newspaper series "Courses by Newspaper" and a TV Series "Connections" during the period of 1979-1981.

A grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to "Courses by Newspaper," University Extension, University of California, San Diego, was used to develop Technology and Change (1979), a book edited by John G. Burke and Marshall C. Eakin.

Courses by Newspapers" (CBN) started September 9, 1979, and concurrently the BBC/Time-Life Television Series on PBS began September 30, 1979, narrated by James Burke. James Burke also wrote an accompanying book, Connections.

This subseries also includes drafts of Kranzberg's article "Assessing and Directing Technology," for "Courses By Newspaper," copies of lectures, letters from readers, WQED episodes, clippings (1972-78), and "Educational Packets."

Seminars and Proposals FNEH1, 1978-1983. The National Endowment sponsored seminars in 1978, 1979, and 1980 at Georgia Tech on the general subject of technology and democratic ideals. Requests for additional sponsorship for additional years are included in the box of seven folders related to this subject.

The month-long summer seminar of 1978 for journalists (members of professions outside the field of teaching) was "Machine-Made America: Technology and Democratic Ideals." The dominant theme was the interrelationship between technology and American history. Participants represented a diversity of experience, age, background, and were from all sections of the country. Included in the folders are application statements by participants, seminar evaluations, and performance reports.

The 1979 seminar concentrated on the historical relationship between technology and society in exploring answers to two main questions: To what extent has technology really served to democratize society? And how has society recently moved to democratize society? Facilities at Georgia Tech (including the nuclear reactor) and the General Motors Assembly Plant, Doraville, Ga., were visited.

The 1980 seminar examined the role that technology has played throughout American history, the extent to which technological innovations have helped to democratize American, and topics related to energy.

Correspondence and proposals for additional seminars are in the last three folders. Newspaper clippings, pamphlets, and brochures are in many of the files.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but is stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Melvin Kranzberg Papers, 1934-1988, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0266, Subseries 1.5
See more items in:
Melvin Kranzberg Papers
Melvin Kranzberg Papers / Series 1: Consultation and Advisement, 1958-1987
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0266-ref639

National Science Foundation (NSF)

Collection Creator:
Kranzberg, Melvin, Dr., 1917-1995  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1958-1987
Scope and Contents:
Advisory Plan of Division of Policy Research & Analysis (PRA), 1958-1985 is a division of the National Science Foundation (NSF). Material of this division is contained in five boxes and fifty-one folders in the sequence as received. Kranzberg's PRA records range from 1959 to 1981, and include correspondence related to specific topics, PRA plans, reports, and publications, along with "Country Papers for the NAS Symposium," 1976, mixed with material on technological innovation.

NSF's role in science policy is derived from legislative mandates which direct the NSF to provide analytic support to other agencies as well as to the President's Science Advisor and to assist and to coordinate with the Office of Technology Assessment of the U.S. Congress. Cost-effectiveness and fairness and equity are important considerations in the assessment of policy options.

Policy Research and Analysis (PRA) consists of four study groups and a Special Projects activity. The four study groups are Technology Assessment and Risk Analysis; Innovative Processes and Their Management; Socioeconomic Effects of Science and Technology; and Environment, Energy, and Resources. 6B; Innovation (The Flow of Scientific and Technical Information (STI) in the Innovation Process), 1961-1987 is contained in two boxes with twenty-two folders. This project was commissioned by the National Science Foundation R & D Assessment Program through the Georgia Institute of Technology ". . .to determine and critically assess the present knowledge and understanding of the innovation process." The material consists of correspondence, drafts, and reports by various academic institutions during the period 1973-1987.

Technology Assessment, 1978 is contained in five folders, and consists of verbatim records of everything spoken at two NSF Ad Hoc Advisory Task Force meetings on Technology Assessment. The Chairman was a political economist and the eight panel members had varied backgrounds such as physicist, history professor, industrial engineer, and economist.

The first meeting was held August 6, 1978, and the second was held on August 7, 1978. After the first meeting the concensus was that technology assessment could be considered a subfield of the broader field of policy analysis. The aspect of risk was discusses at length.

Ethical and Human Value Implications of Science and Technology (EHVIST), 1973-1975 consists of five folders, the first containing Important Notice #48 of the NFS dated Feb. 20, 1973, which is directed to presidents of universities and colleges and directors of nonprofit organizations. Proposals may be submitted to either the NEH or to the NSF. Such proposals will have as their primary object the illumination of areas of current concern about ethical or human values, or which have a strong collateral potential for making a scholarly contribution in such areas. Four folders have proposals and the sixth folder contains correspondence and reviewer guidelines for EVHIST proposals.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but is stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Melvin Kranzberg Papers, 1934-1988, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0266, Subseries 1.6
See more items in:
Melvin Kranzberg Papers
Melvin Kranzberg Papers / Series 1: Consultation and Advisement, 1958-1987
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0266-ref683

Technological Innovations and Federal Government Policy

Collection Creator:
Kranzberg, Melvin, Dr., 1917-1995  Search this
Container:
Box 31, Folder 3
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1975-1977
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but is stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Melvin Kranzberg Papers, 1934-1988, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Melvin Kranzberg Papers
Melvin Kranzberg Papers / Series 1: Consultation and Advisement, 1958-1987 / 1.6: National Science Foundation (NSF)
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0266-ref694

Transfer and Use of Technological Innovations by State and Local Governments

Collection Creator:
Kranzberg, Melvin, Dr., 1917-1995  Search this
Container:
Box 34, Folder 3
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1978
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but is stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Melvin Kranzberg Papers, 1934-1988, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Melvin Kranzberg Papers
Melvin Kranzberg Papers / Series 1: Consultation and Advisement, 1958-1987 / 1.6: National Science Foundation (NSF)
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0266-ref723

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