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Glass Lantern Slide and Lecture Scripts

Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref32850
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Newport -- Warren House-Tunnard Garden

Former owner:
Tanner Family  Search this
Gardner, Samuel F.  Search this
Lawton, Robert  Search this
Lawton, Penelope  Search this
Austin, Samuel Reverend  Search this
Henderson, Francis  Search this
Brinley, Fanny S.  Search this
Lawrence, Sallie C.  Search this
Paul, Allen G.  Search this
Paul, Florence S.  Search this
Warren, George  Search this
Warren, Katherine Urquhart  Search this
Preservation Society of Newport County  Search this
Gardener:
Pleitez, Eusebio  Search this
Landscape designer:
Tunnard, Christopher  Search this
Provenance:
Newport Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Warren House-Tunnard Garden (Newport, Rhode Island)
United States of America -- Rhode Island -- Newport -- Newport
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, site plans, photocopies of articles.
General:
This Modernist garden was created right after World War II, designed by Christopher Tunnard. It still survives today, perhaps the only existing commissioned landscape design by the man who influenced many of the United States most celebrated postwar architects and landscape architects. At only 65' x 42', the garden has an extreme austerity in design with a hint of luxury in its fountains, thick hedges and sculpture. The plants are cut and trimmed into an ordained shape, and the pattern is designed to be seen from the ground, where its curves interlock and turn back on themselves. Only two kinds of trees are used - lime (Tilia) and arbor vitae (Thuja); and three kinds of permanent plants - ivy (Hedera), box (Buxus) and yew (Taxus). The lime trees will eventually be pleached into an architectural block to throw the ground pattern into even greater contrast. The ivy is in slightly raised mounds, edged in places with small summer flowers. The bedding plants are purple and white petunias with carnations and lemon-yellow thunbergias." The sculpture, 'Chimerical Font,' by Jean Arp, is golden bronze centered on a plinth in a black lacquered rectangular pool. The other pools (two circular, one biomorphic) are shallow and painted white. Of note are the unusual shapes of the pruned boxwoods in the shapes of question marks and semi-colons; the colorful flowers; and the 6th linden along the left and end wall, now covered in Boston ivy, and originally painted white to complete a design that very much relied on strong figure-ground relationship.
Christopher Tunnard (1910-1979) was born in Canada, moved to England in 1929 and received a diploma from the Royal Horticultural Society the following year. The period of the eclectic Arts and Crafts movement (which he characterized as "romantic trivialization" of garden design) prompted him to introduce his Modernist views of landscape design. This approach avoided decoration, sentimentality and classical allusion "in favor of functional minimalist designs that provided a friendly and hospitable milieu for rest and recreation." After 10 years practicing garden and landscape work, he immigrated to America at the invitation of Walter Gropius to teach at Harvard's Graduate School of Design (1938-1943). Following the War, Tunnard taught city planning at Yale, advancing to professor and chairman of this department; he did little garden design from that point forward, making this 1949 garden probably one of his last commissions. For the final thirty years of his life, Tunnard put his energies into urban planning and the preservation of historic buildings; his publications in this area include "Man-made America: Chaos or Control?" (1963) which won the 1964 National Book Award in Science, Philosophy and Religion. It is perhaps ironic that Christopher Tunnard ended up of very much the same sentiment as his American patron, Mrs. George W. (Katherine) Warren, founder of the Preservation Society of Newport County (1945). In "Pioneers of American Landscape Design," (2000), Lance Neckar notes that "by the time of his death, he had come full circle to be identified with conservation-and-preservation-oriented attributes toward city revitalization which were antithetical to the Modern movement" that Tunnard had originally espoused.
Tunnard's patrons, George and Katherine Warren, who purchased the property on Mill Street in 1933, chose a part of Newport that was then considered "the other side of the tracks" by their social set, most of whom resided out on Ocean Drive. In New York, where the couple lived "off season," Katherine Warren collected modern art and was on the Advisory Committee of the Museum of Modern Art. Interesting to note that the garden was commissioned in 1949 and distinguished by its functional, minimalist modern design in sharp contrast with its early Federal-style house. The Warrens also added two glass-enclosed rooms on the first and second floors of their home on the garden side, presumably to enjoy this new garden to its full extent. Mrs. Warren died in 1976, bequeathing her home to the Preservation Society of Newport County, which moved its offices to this location in 1977. While the Preservation Society of Newport County owned the property, the garden was heavily shaded by a large beech tree and had become overgrown. It was maintained as they found it without major renovation. The current owner moved into the Mill Street house in 1994 and restored the Tunnard garden in 2001 and has proven to be a conscientious caretaker of this rare, nationally significant garden.
Persons associated with the garden include Tanner Family (former owners, 1776-1807); Samuel F. Gardner (former owner, 1807-1809); Robert Lawton (former owner, 1809-1810); Penelope Lawton (former owner, 1810-1822); Reverend Samuel Austin (former owner, 1822-1826); Francis Henderson (former owner, 1826-1857); Fanny S. Brinley (former owner, 1857-1863); Sallie C. Lawrence (former owner, 1863-1886); Allen G. Paul (former owner, 1886-1916); Florence S. Paul (former owner, 1916-1932); George and Katherine Warren (former owners, 1932-1977); Preservation Society of Newport County (former owner, 1977-1994); Christopher Tunnard (landscape designer, 1949); Eusebio Pleitez (gardener, 2001- ).
Related Materials:
Warren House-Tunnard Garden related holdings consist of 1 folder (10 digital images)
Additional photographs are also located in the collections of the Preservation Society of Newport County.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Rhode Island -- Newport  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File RI201
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Rhode Island
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref10575

Nashville -- Native Nook

Former owner:
McAlexander, Alexander  Search this
Smith, Paul R.  Search this
Cannon, Charles Grady Mr. Mrs.  Search this
Landscape architect:
Armistead, Tara  Search this
Landscape designer:
Wells, Steven  Search this
Horticulturist:
Hudson, B. C.  Search this
Sculptor:
Tamboli, Roy  Search this
Provenance:
Garden Club of Nashville  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Native Nook (Nashville, Tennessee)
United States of America -- Tennessee -- Davidson County -- Nashville
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes a worksheet and garden plans.
General:
Located on less than one acre, Native Nook is a young garden begun in 1996 and designed primarily as a teaching garden. The owner wishes to show that native plants can be successful in an urban landscape. Indigenous woodies which provide the background for perennial beds, an herb terrace, a garden house, and seating areas also provide winter interest in the perennial beds. Garden rooms have been loosely created to satisfy the owner's specific interests and desires. The perennial beds are arranged to create mystery, drawing the visitor along halls to the back gate.
Persons associated with the property and garden include: Alexander McAlexander (former owner, 1925); Paul R. Smith (former owner, 1968 - 1975); Dr. and Mrs. Charles Grady Cannon (former owner, 1975 - 1995); Tara Armistead (landscape architect, 1995 - 1996); Steven Wells (landscape designer, 1995); B. C. Hudson (horticulturist, 1995 - 2000); and Roy Tamboldi (sculptor, 1996).
Related Materials:
Native Nook related holdings consist of 1 folder (11 35 mm. slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Tennessee -- Nashville  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File TN057
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Tennessee
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref10958

Westminster West -- Hayward Garden

Gardener:
O'Donnell, Helen  Search this
Owner:
Hayward, Mary  Search this
Hayward, Gordon  Search this
Provenance:
Garden Club of Dublin (New Hampshire)  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Hayward Garden (Westminster West, Vermont)
United States of America -- Vermont -- Windham -- Westminster West
Scope and Contents:
Hayward Garden includes 63 digital images and a folder that includes worksheets, photocopies of articles and additional images including a pamphlet about a musical program created for and perfomed in the garden in 2014 as a the Yellow Barn summer program.
General:
The owners describe their one and one-half acre ornamental garden as a new garden in an old place, with its 200 year-old colonial farmhouse and attached barn, low stone walls, and old farm building foundations that have been repurposed as distinctive garden rooms within surrounding meadows and woods. They purchased the property in 1983 and spent about one year clearing the land of scrap metal and other debris, brambles and weed trees, a rotting barn, dead trees, and an old Nash Metropolitan automobile. The garden style is English, with a rectilinear format from south to north softened by lush growth in season and more evident in the long Vermont winter. The design began by drawing a straight line from the front door of the house to a 75-year-old apple tree. There is a crab apple orchard along that main axis that can be seen from the house. Brick and pea stone gravel walks, 90-foot long mixed borders, and an herb garden laid out in formal parterres are either parallel or perpendicular to the central axis of the garden. The 14 garden rooms are delineated by clipped hedges of varying heights, many of yew but also other plant materials for variation. There are four places to sit within the garden: a gazebo at the far end reached through a tunnel of pleached copper beech, an outdoor dining room on pavers under tall trees, a bench slightly above and overlooking their spring garden, and another bench next to a shed near the herb garden.
Creating a garden in harmony with the rural location was important to the owners, who subsequently purchased 19 adjacent acres and preserved the meadows and woods with the Vermont Land Trust. To instill harmony in the diverse garden rooms the owners adhere to three themes: hedges for structure, black locust posts and terra cotta containers for materials, and burgundy and other reds for the color that recurs throughout the garden rooms. Since the entire garden is unified it is possible to add variations without muddling the design. Honoring the long gone dairy farms they have turned the foundations of a milking parlor into a garden room that has low, drought tolerant plants growing among the stone flooring and three rusted milk cans. The cracked cement foundation of a former silo was turned into a pond with a fountain built into a stone wellhead and a statue of Buddha on the shore.
Gordon Hayward has written many articles for Horticulture, Taunton's Fine Gardening, and regional magazines using his own garden to teach design aesthetics and their practical application. Topics include the effective placement of planted and unplanted containers and other garden ornaments, how to build a small fountain, the importance of proportions to design, how to set vertical posts, and tips on outdoor seating and dining rooms. Good design is illustrated by reshaping lawns to complement planted borders or trees, through consistent choices of decorative materials, through applying the principles of theme and variation when choosing what to put in the garden, and through planning for the winter garden with berries and crab apples for birds and good "bones" that become evident in winter.
Persons associated with the garden include: Gordon Hayward (owner, garden designer, and gardener, 1983- ), Mary Hayward (owner, garden designer, and gardener, 1983- ), Ephraim and Lydia Johnson Ranney, and their descendants in the Buxton and Reed families (former owners, circa 1790-1983); Helen O'Donnell (gardener, 2008-2015).
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Vermont -- Westminster West  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File VT019
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Vermont
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref11360

Middleburg -- The Hill School Arboretum

Former owner:
Clark, Stephen C. Jr.  Search this
Clark, Jane Forbes  Search this
Arboretum designer:
Rowley, Polly P.  Search this
Committee head:
Rowley, Polly P.  Search this
Landscape architect:
Starke, Barry W.  Search this
Tindall, Ian  Search this
Foster, Susie  Search this
Committee member:
Augenblick, Barbara  Search this
Morency, Mike  Search this
Hoovler, Karen  Search this
Gardener:
Vella, Matthew  Search this
Dornin, Bob  Search this
Looney, Greg  Search this
Faculty:
Dornin, Bob  Search this
Looney, Greg  Search this
Provenance:
Fauquier and Loudoun Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
The Hill School Arboretum (Middleburg, Virginia)
United States of America -- Virginia -- Loudoun -- Middleburg
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets and photocopies of articles and images.
General:
The arboretum was created on the 132-acre farm that was donated to the private pre-K through 8th grade Hill School in 1992. A landscaping committee decided that the mission of the arboretum would be to grow examples of both native and alien trees that have adapted to the region to be used as an environmental teaching facility for children and as a community resource. The initial plan was broken into stages, planting was done over several years, and the vision for the arboretum was that it would look like a country estate in 100 years. Eight distinct areas were identified that would be planted over time with more than 200 species of trees and shrubs in combinations that emphasize differing leaf shapes and bark textures for the children to study. Planning included respect for the instinctive pathways of children pursing daily activities while also promoting appreciation and respect for the natural environment. The arboretum provides habitat for birds and wildlife, another aspect that would be incorporated into the curriculum of the school.
When there was dissatisfaction with the contractors hired for the work members of the committee took charge themselves. There were drainage problems in some areas and the location of differing stands of trees had to be determined in part by soil conditions. Young trees were purchased that were easier to transplant successfully and less costly, although some of the specialty trees had to be kept in the chairwoman's nursery for three years until they were ready to be planted out. Community support included donations of tons of manure and humus from nearby farms.
Persons associated with the garden include Stephen C. Clark, Jr. and Jane Forbes Clark (former owners, 1945-1992); Polly P. Rowley (arboretum designer and committee head, 1992- ); Barry W. Starke (ASLA), Earth Design Associates (landscape architect, 1992-1993); Ian Tindall and Susie Foster, HOH Associates (landscape architects, 1992-1993); Barbara Augenblick, Mike Morency and Karen Hoovler (Hill School committee, 1992-1995); Matthew Vella (gardener, 1992-1998); Bob Dornin and Greg Looney (Hill School grounds supervisor and gardener, 1992-1998).
Related Materials:
The Hill School Arboretum related holdings consist of 1 folder (22 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Virginia -- Middleburg  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File VA490
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Virginia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref18854

Philadelphia -- Las Parcelas

Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Las Parcelas (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
United States of America -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia County -- Philadelphia
Scope and Contents:
The folders include worksheets, detailed descriptions of the garden and its history and evolution, garden plans, and other information.
General:
This 6,468 square-foot garden was begun on vacant land in the Kensington section of Philadelphia by the Norris Square Neighborhood Project (NSNP), with assistance from the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society in what was a drug-infested neighborhood. The garden's name, Las Parcelas, refers to the unique combination of more than 40 attractive plots, or parcels, each with its own special feature. Wood-trimmed beds contain vegetables, flowers, and herbs. Neighbors built "La Casita" (the little house), a reproduction of housing that existed in Puerto Rico before World War II that with its kitchen is a tool to teach children about traditional ways of living. Market stands enable the sale of produce from the garden, while an "environmental park" includes many trees and shrubs. Brightly painted garden structures (including "La Casita"), furnishings, and murals enliven the scene. Las Parcelas is the result of the determined and cooperative nature of the entire community.
Las Parcelas is only one of many community greening projects in Norris Square Greene Countrie Towne which dramatize the efforts of the entire neighborhood. Neighborhood leadership has formed a group of community garden activists known as Groupo Motivos to help maintain gardens, parks and street trees for the good of the community. All ages are represented in the garden, with the dominant group being in their late 40's and 50's. Heavy youth involvement in the garden comes from close association with the youth programs of NSNP. In addition to Philadelphia Green and NSNP, Las Parcelas has benefitted from the Weed and Seed Program of the Department of Justice, which aids in taking back neighborhoods from drug dealers. NSNP also coordinates programs with Swarthmore College, Pennsylvania State University, and four other state universities that give voluntary support to the garden. All of this activity is directly facilitated by NSNP.
Related Materials:
Las Parcelas related holdings consist of 2 folders (22 35 mm. slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File PA354
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Pennsylvania
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref16526

Pittsburgh -- Garden Dreams Urban Farm and Nursery

Former owner:
Schwartz, Mindy J.  Search this
Nicholas, Barbara K.  Search this
Allegheny City vacant property program  Search this
Production manager:
Reiff, Hannah  Search this
Outreach manager:
Madden, Robert  Search this
Provenance:
Garden Club of Allegheny County  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Garden Dreams Urban Farm and Nursery (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania)
United States of America -- Pennsylvania -- Allegheny -- Pittsburgh
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets and photocopies of articles.
General:
Three previously vacant city lots comprise this one-third acre urban farm and nursery garden focused on growing organically, providing a community gathering place, and teaching about sustainable land use. Ecologically sound practices are their main feature. The farm keeps bees for pollination and chickens for their eggs and to provide manure for the compost. Garden structures are fabricated from found or re-used objects and discarded building materials, such as PVC pipes that are too old to be used for their intended purpose but can serve as hoops for floating row covers. The business is recognized for its ingenuity, craftiness and thrift, as well as for creating a green space in a struggling neighborhood. They grow 100 varieties of tomatoes including heirlooms, dozens of sweet and hot peppers, many kinds of eggplants, greens and herbs. Flowers that are grown may be edible or are attractive to pollinating bees and other beneficial insects, including sunflowers, alyssum, coneflowers and native asters.
Since the urban lots contained detritus from demolished buildings and other debris, they had to be excavated, leaving craters that were filled with leaf mulch courtesy of the local public works agency. The organic matter decomposed into the degraded soil creating an excellent growing medium. Subsequent testing showed that the produce grown there was not contaminated and safe.
Persons associated with the garden include: Allegheny City vacant property program (former owners, 1996); Mindy J. Schwartz and Barbara K. Nicholas (former owners, 1996); Hannah Reiff (production manager, 2010- ); Robert Madden (outreach manager, 2008- ).
Related Materials:
Garden Dreams Urban Farm and Nursery related holdings consist of 1 folder (8 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Pennsylvania -- Pittsburgh  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File PA740
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Pennsylvania
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref16554

Why Poetry Is Experiencing an Awakening

Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine  Search this
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Conversations and talks
Blog posts
Published Date:
Fri, 16 Apr 2021 18:40:20 +0000
Topic:
Custom RSS  Search this
See more posts:
Smithsonian Article Database
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_974a827ff5b63b9fbe36c0da8024716d

Leon Berkowitz and Ida Fox Berkowitz papers

Creator:
Berkowitz, Leon, 1919-1987  Search this
Names:
Washington Workshop Center for the Arts  Search this
Burton, Scott  Search this
De Kooning, Elaine  Search this
Fox, Ida  Search this
Kern, Helmuth F.  Search this
Okamura, Arthur  Search this
Ulbricht, John, 1926-  Search this
Extent:
3.02 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Date:
circa 1900-1986
Summary:
This collection, which measures 3.02 linear feet and dates from circa 1900 to 1986, documents the lives of painter and educator Leon Berkowitz and his first wife, poet Ida Fox Berkowitz, and provides insight into the cultural and artistic climate in 1940s and 1950s Washington D.C. through correspondence, notes, sketches, photographs, printed material, and audio cassettes.
Scope and Content Note:
The collection measures 3.02 linear feet and dates from circa 1900 to 1986. In addition to documenting the artistic development of Leon Berkkowitz and, to a lesser extent, Ida Fox, the collection provides insight into the cultural and artistic climate in Washington D.C. during the 1940s and 1950s.

The collection includes correspondence, primarily between Leon and Ida Fox Berkowitz, notes, sketches, personal photographs, printed material, and a cassette tape. There are notes on Leon Berkowitz's philosophy of painting, reports from a 1940s U.S. Army art therapy project in which he participated, and scattered correspondence, financial records, and promotional materials from the Washington Workshop Center for the Arts and WCFM radio. Also found here are lecture notes and administrative materials relating to Leon's Berkowitz's teaching career, papers he wrote for several education courses, his master's thesis, sporadic business records concerning shipments and sales of paintings and gallery exhibitions, and drafts of catalogs.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into nine series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1934-circa 1974, undated (box 1, 3 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1931-1985, undated (boxes 1-2, 27 folders)

Series 3: Teaching Files, 1939-1950s, 1985-1986, undated (box 2, 4 folders)

Series 4: Exhibitions, 1944-1985, undated (box 2, 4, 10 folders)

Series 5: Washington Workshop Center for the Arts, 1940s-1950s (boxes 2-3, 14 folders)

Series 6: Other Projects, 1944-1985 (box 3, 4 folders)

Series 7: Notes and Writings, 1940s-1971, undated (box 3, 8 folders)

Series 8: Artwork, circa 1950s, undated (box 3, 5 folders)

Series 9: Photographs, circa 1900-1970s (box 3, 5 folders)

Series 10: Interview on Audio Cassette, [1974?] (box 3, 1 folder)
Biographical Note:
Leon Berkowitz (1911-1987), a painter associated with the Washington Color School, was born in Philadelphia (the 1919 birth date given by Berkowitz in Who's Who in American Art is incorrect). He met and married his first wife, Ida Fox, between 1935 and 1937. Berkowitz received a B.F.A. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1942 and an M.A. from George Washington University in 1948.

From 1943 to 1945, he served as a private in the U.S. Army, participating in a psychiatric program involving art therapy at Camp Lee, Virginia. Berkowitz taught art at Eastern and Western high schools in Washington, D.C. from 1945 to 1956 and taught at Western again in the late 1960s. In 1969 Berkowitz became chairman of the Corcoran School of Art's painting department and taught there until his death.

In 1945, the Berkowitzes founded the Washington Workshop Center for the Arts with Helmuth Kern. The Center, an important part of the city's cultural life during the 1940s and 1950s, offered courses in art, music, theatre and dance. Many of the artists who later became prominent in the Washington Color School taught at the center, including Morris Louis, Ken Noland, Gene Davis, Jacob Kainen and Jack Perlmutter. The center also sponsored a retrospective for Willem de Kooning in 1953. The Berkowitzes and Kern were also active in establishing the shortlived (1949-1953) cooperative radio station WCFM.

The center collapsed in 1956, shortly after the Berkowitzes' departure on a sabbatical painting trip to Spain. They spent much of the next decade abroad, including a two-and-a half year stay in Wales and a visit of several months to Jerusalem. During this period, Berkowitz expanded his interest in light, creating paintings by priming canvases with a white ground, then using multiple layers of thin oil paint washes.

Berkowitz had his first one-man museum show at the Corcoran in 1966. Ida Fox died during the 1970s and Berkowitz then married his second wife, Maureen. He continued to paint and exhibit until his death from cancer in 1987.

Poet Ida Fox (1913-197?) was born in Philadelphia. She married Leon Berkowitz between 1934 and 1937 and moved with him to Washington, D.C. where she attended American University from 1942 to 1945. During World War II she worked as a statistician for the U.S. government. In 1945 she cofounded the Washington Workshop Center for the Arts. Fox became its director in 1947, resigning the position in 1955 to accompany her husband to Spain. She published poetry in several literary and artistic periodicals, including a series, "Painting Thru a Poet's Eye," inspired by works of art. In 1970 she published a collection of poetry, In the Wind: An American Poet in Wales (St. David's, Wales: Antiphon Press, 1970), illustrated by Arthur Okamura.
Related Material:
Also available in the Archives of American Art are two audio cassettes of a transcribed oral history interview with Leon and Ida Fox Berkowitz, June 5, 1979.
Provenance:
Leon Berkowitz donated the papers of his first wife, Ida Fox, in 1987. After his death in 1987, his second wife, Maureen Berkowitz, donated his papers to the Archives of American Art. In addition to these two accessions, one folder of material on Leon Berkowitz was donated in 1979. This material was microfilmed on reel 2786.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Microfilmed portion must be consulted on microfilm. Use of unmicrofilmed material requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. research facility.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Philosophy  Search this
Color-field painting  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Leon Berkowitz and Ida Fox Berkowitz papers, circa 1900-1986. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.berkleon
See more items in:
Leon Berkowitz and Ida Fox Berkowitz papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-berkleon

Teaching

Collection Creator:
Berkowitz, Leon, 1919-1987  Search this
Extent:
4 Folders (box 2)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1939-1950s, 1985-1986, undated
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Microfilmed portion must be consulted on microfilm. Use of unmicrofilmed material requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. research facility.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Leon Berkowitz and Ida Fox Berkowitz papers, circa 1900-1986. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.berkleon, Series 3
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Leon Berkowitz and Ida Fox Berkowitz papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-berkleon-ref28

Clippings

Collection Creator:
Berkowitz, Leon, 1919-1987  Search this
Container:
Box 2, Folder 11
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1950s
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Microfilmed portion must be consulted on microfilm. Use of unmicrofilmed material requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. research facility.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Leon Berkowitz and Ida Fox Berkowitz papers, circa 1900-1986. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Leon Berkowitz and Ida Fox Berkowitz papers
Leon Berkowitz and Ida Fox Berkowitz papers / Series 3: Teaching
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-berkleon-ref29

Correspondence

Collection Creator:
Berkowitz, Leon, 1919-1987  Search this
Container:
Box 2, Folder 12
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1939-1950s, 1985-1986, undated
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Microfilmed portion must be consulted on microfilm. Use of unmicrofilmed material requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. research facility.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Leon Berkowitz and Ida Fox Berkowitz papers, circa 1900-1986. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Leon Berkowitz and Ida Fox Berkowitz papers
Leon Berkowitz and Ida Fox Berkowitz papers / Series 3: Teaching
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-berkleon-ref30

Lecture Notes

Collection Creator:
Berkowitz, Leon, 1919-1987  Search this
Container:
Box 2, Folder 13
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Microfilmed portion must be consulted on microfilm. Use of unmicrofilmed material requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. research facility.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Leon Berkowitz and Ida Fox Berkowitz papers, circa 1900-1986. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Leon Berkowitz and Ida Fox Berkowitz papers
Leon Berkowitz and Ida Fox Berkowitz papers / Series 3: Teaching
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-berkleon-ref31

Student Art Tours

Collection Creator:
Berkowitz, Leon, 1919-1987  Search this
Container:
Box 2, Folder 14
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Microfilmed portion must be consulted on microfilm. Use of unmicrofilmed material requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. research facility.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Leon Berkowitz and Ida Fox Berkowitz papers, circa 1900-1986. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Leon Berkowitz and Ida Fox Berkowitz papers
Leon Berkowitz and Ida Fox Berkowitz papers / Series 3: Teaching
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-berkleon-ref32

Lilian Swann Saarinen papers

Creator:
Saarinen, Lilian Swann, 1912-1995  Search this
Names:
Cambridge Art Center  Search this
Cranbrook Academy of Art -- Faculty  Search this
G Place Gallery (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Knoll Associates, inc.  Search this
Massachusetts Institute of Technology -- Faculty  Search this
Midtown Galleries (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Otava Publishing Company  Search this
Reynal & Hitchcock  Search this
Armitage, Merle, 1893-1975  Search this
Crosby, Caresse, 1892-  Search this
Eames, Charles  Search this
Eames, Ray  Search this
Koch, Carl  Search this
Kreis, Henry, 1899-1963  Search this
Milles, Carl, 1875-1955  Search this
Moholy-Nagy, László, 1895-1946  Search this
Moholy-Nagy, Sibyl, 1905-  Search this
Saarinen, Eero, 1910-1961  Search this
Saarinen, Eliel, 1873-1950  Search this
Saarinen, Loja  Search this
Venturi, Robert  Search this
Weese, Harry, 1915-1998  Search this
Extent:
9 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Blueprints
Diaries
Illustrations
Sketches
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Date:
circa 1909-1977
Summary:
The papers of Cambridge sculptor and illustrator, Lilian Swann Saarinen, measure nine linear feet and date from circa 1909 to 1977. The collection documents Saarinen's career through correspondence with artists, architects, publishers, and gallery owners; writings and notes, including manuscripts and illustrations for children's books and publications; project and teaching files; financial records; artwork, including numerous project sketches; and photos of Saarinen and her artwork. Saarinen's personal life is also documented through diaries and correspondence with friends and family members, including Eero Saarinen, to whom she was married from 1939-1953.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Cambridge sculptor and illustrator, Lilian Swann Saarinen, measure nine linear feet and date from circa 1909 to 1977. The collection documents Saarinen's career through correspondence with artists, architects, publishers, and gallery owners; writings and notes, including manuscripts and illustrations for children's books and publications; project and teaching files; financial records; artwork, including numerous project sketches; and photos of Saarinen and her artwork. Saarinen's personal life is also documented through diaries and correspondence with friends and family members, including Eero Saarinen, to whom she was married from 1939-1953.

Biographical material consists of resumes and biographical sketches, as well as a 1951 blueprint for the Eero Saarinen and Associates Office Building in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan.

Correspondence documents Saarinen's personal and professional life through letters to and from Eero Saarinen and other family members, including six letters from Loja Saarinen; correspondence with artists and architects, including Merle Armitage, Charles and Ray Eames, Carl Koch, Henry Kreis, Carl Milles, Laszlo and Sibyl Moholy-Nagy, Robert Venturi, and Harry Weese; and friends and colleagues at the Cranbrook Academy of Art and Knoll Associates. Also documented is Saarinen's business relationship with Midtown Galleries and Caresse Crosby, and publishers and publications including Child Life, Interiors, Otava Publishing Company, and Reynal & Hitchcock, Inc.

Writings and Notes document Saarinen's work on several children's publications, including Picture Book Zoo (1935) and Who Am I? (1946), through correspondence, notes, manuscript drafts, and extensive sketches. This series also includes Saarinen's ideas for other publications and incorporates some early writings and notes, as well as typescripts of her reminiscences about Eliel Saarinen, the Saarinen family, and the Cranbrook Academy of Art.

Diaries consist of bound diary volumes, loose-leaf journal entries, and heavily annotated engagement calendars, documenting Saarinen's personal life, artistic aspirations, and career development from the 1930s-1970s. This material provides a deeply personal view of the emotional landscape of Saarinen's life, her struggles to balance her identity as a working artist with the roles of wife, mother, and homemaker, and the complex, and often competing, relationships within the renowned architectural family into which she married.

Project files document Saarinen's work on book cover designs, federal and post office commissions in Bloomfield, Indiana, Carlisle, Kentucky, and Evanston, Illinois, reliefs for the Crow Island School in Winnetka, Illinois, and other important commissions including the Harbor National Bank Clock in Boston, Massachusetts, the KLM Airlines installation at JFK Airport, the Fountain of Noah sculpture at the Northland Center in Detroit, Michigan, and the interior of Toffenetti's restaurant in Chicago, Illinois. Also documented is her role in designs for the Gateway Arch in St. Louis, with Eero Saarinen.

Teaching files document Saarinen's "Language of Clay Course" which she taught at Cambridge Art Center and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Financial records document exhibition and sales expenses for two exhibitions, including her show at G Place Gallery in 1944.

Printed material consists of clippings about Saarinen and her family, exhibition announcements and catalogs for herself and others, and reference files from the 1930s-1940s, primarily comprising clippings of animals.

Additional printed material documenting Saarinen's career can be found in one of two scrapbooks found in the collection. An additional scrapbook consists of clippings relating primarily to Saarinen's parents.

Artwork comprises extensive sketches, particularly animal and figure sketches, in graphite, crayon, ink, pastel, and watercolor. The sketches demonstrate in particular Saarinen's developing interest in and skill with animal portraiture from her childhood to the 1960s.

Photographs are primarily of artwork and Saarinen's 1944 exhibition at G Place Gallery. Also found are one negative of Saarinen, probably with Eero Saarinen, and a group photo including Lilian, Eero, and Eliel Saarinen with the model for the Detroit Civic Center, circa 1940s.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 11 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, circa 1930s-1960s (3 folders; Box 1, OV 12)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1920-1974 (1.9 linear feet; Boxes 1-2, 8, OV 12)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, 1920s-1973 (1.3 linear feet, Boxes 2-3, 8, OVs 13-16)

Series 4: Diaries, 1930-1973 (1.4 linear feet, Boxes 3-5, 8)

Series 5: Project Files, 1931-1966 (1.7 linear feet, Boxes 5-6, 8, OVs 17-19)

Series 6: Teaching Files, 1966-1970 (3 folders, Box 6)

Series 7: Financial Records, 1940s-1970s (2 folders, Box 6)

Series 8: Printed Material, circa 1930s-1970s (0.2 linear feet, Box 6)

Series 9: Scrapbooks, circa 1909-1974 (2 folders; Boxes 6, 9)

Series 10: Artwork, circa 1920s-circa 1960s (1.7 linear feet, Boxes 6-7, 9-10, OVs 20-27)

Series 11: Photographs, circa 1940s, 1977 (0.5 linear feet, Boxes 7, 11, OV 27)
Biographical / Historical:
Cambridge artist and sculptor, Lilian Swann Saarinen (1912-1995), studied at the Art Students League with Alexander Archipenko in 1928, and later with Albert Stewart and Heninz Warneke from 1934-1936, before moving to Michigan where she studied with Carl Milles at the Cranbrook Academy of Art from 1936-1940. Saarinen was an accomplished skier and a member of the 1936 US Olympic ski team.

At Cranbrook, Swann met architect Eero Saarinen, whom she married in 1939. She subsequently worked with Saarinen's design group on a variety of projects, including the Westward Expansion Memorial, which later became known as the "Gateway Arch" in St. Louis. Lilian and Eero had a son, Eric, and a daughter, Susie, before divorcing in 1953.

Saarinen, who had developed an affinity for drawing animals in childhood, specialized in animal portraits in a variety of sculptural media. In 1939, she exhibited her sculpture Night, which depicted Bagheera the panther from Rudyard Kipling's Jungle Book, at the World's Fair. The sculpture was placed in the Boston Public Garden in 1986. In the 1930s and 1940s Saarinen was commissioned to work on a variety of architectural projects, including reliefs for post offices in Bloomfield, Indiana, Carlisle, Kentucky, and Evanston, Illinois, and the Crow Island School in Winnetka, Illinois. She also executed commissions for the Harbor National Bank in Boston, KLM (Royal Dutch Airlines) at JFK Airport, the Northland shopping Center in Detroit Michigan, and Toffenetti's Restaurant in Chicago.

Saarinen was a contributing author and illustrator for a variety of publications, including Child Life, Interiors and Portfolio: An Intercontinental Quarterly. In 1935 she illustrated Picture Book Zoo for the Bronx Zoo and in 1946 Reynal & Hitchcock, Inc. published Who Am I?, a children's book which Saarinen wrote and illustrated.

Saarinen taught ceramic sculpture to soldiers for the Red Cross Arts and Skills Unit rehabilitation program in 1945, served on the Visiting Committee to the Museum School at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, from 1959-1964, where she taught ceramics, and later taught a course entitled "The Language of Clay" at the Cambridge Art Center and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. One of Saarinen's private students at Cambridge was her cousin, Edie Sedgwick.

Saarinen died in Cohasset, Massachusetts, in 1995 at the age of 83.
Separated Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds material lent for microfilming (reels 1152 and 1192) including a scrapbook containing clippings, copies of letters and telegrams received, and reproductions of Saarinen's work. There is a copy of Saarinen's book, "Who Am I?", and three albums containing photographs of Saarinen, photographs and reproductions of her work, a list of exhibitions, quotes about her, and writings by her about sculpture. Lent material was returned to the lender and is not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
Lilian Swann Saarinen donated the collection in 1975. She lent additional materials for microfilming in 1976.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Sculptors -- Massachusetts -- Cambridge  Search this
Topic:
Women artists -- Massachusetts  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Illustrated books, Children's  Search this
Gateway Arch (Saint Louis, Mo.)  Search this
Sculpture, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Illustrators -- Massachusetts  Search this
Art commissions  Search this
Art, Municipal  Search this
Genre/Form:
Blueprints
Diaries
Illustrations
Sketches
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Lilian Swann Saarinen papers, circa 1909-1977. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.saarlili
See more items in:
Lilian Swann Saarinen papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-saarlili
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Online Media:

Teaching Files

Collection Creator:
Saarinen, Lilian Swann, 1912-1995  Search this
Extent:
3 Folders (Box 6)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1966-1970
Scope and Contents:
This series consists of three folders relating to a course Saarinen taught at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Cambridge Art Center entitled "The Language of Clay." Found are correspondence and memoranda, course descriptions, notes, and student rosters.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Lilian Swann Saarinen papers, circa 1909-1977. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.saarlili, Series 6
See more items in:
Lilian Swann Saarinen papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-saarlili-ref228

Language of Clay Course, M. I. T.

Collection Creator:
Saarinen, Lilian Swann, 1912-1995  Search this
Container:
Box 6, Folder 6
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1966-1967
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Lilian Swann Saarinen papers, circa 1909-1977. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Lilian Swann Saarinen papers
Lilian Swann Saarinen papers / Series 6: Teaching Files
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-saarlili-ref229

Language of Clay Course, Cambridge Art Center

Collection Creator:
Saarinen, Lilian Swann, 1912-1995  Search this
Container:
Box 6, Folder 5
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1970
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Lilian Swann Saarinen papers, circa 1909-1977. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Lilian Swann Saarinen papers
Lilian Swann Saarinen papers / Series 6: Teaching Files
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-saarlili-ref230

Writings and Notes

Collection Creator:
Saarinen, Lilian Swann, 1912-1995  Search this
Extent:
1.3 Linear feet (Boxes 2-3, 8, OVs 13-16)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1920s-1973
Scope and Contents:
Writings and notes document the writing and publication of Saarinen's Picture Book Zoo and Who Am I?, as well as Saarinen's ideas in draft, typescript and sketch form for other publications such as "Animals and War Machines," a proposed follow-up to Who Am I? titled "Who Helps Who?" and other children's writings such as "Susie Sing All Day" and "What Is Mine?" Documentation consists of correspondence with publishers, drafts and typsecripts of texts, original artwork including preliminary sketches, photos of artwork, and book layouts.

Also found are school writings from the 1920s-1930s; typescripts and handwritten drafts of Saarinen's memories of the Cranbrook Academy of Art, Eliel Saarinen, and the Saarinen family; and miscellaneous writings which include "Sculpture by American Soldiers" in which Saarinen drew on her 1945 experience teaching convalescent soldiers.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Lilian Swann Saarinen papers, circa 1909-1977. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.saarlili, Series 3
See more items in:
Lilian Swann Saarinen papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-saarlili-ref3

Language of Clay Course, M. I. T.

Collection Creator:
Saarinen, Lilian Swann, 1912-1995  Search this
Container:
Box 6, Folder 7
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1966-1967
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Lilian Swann Saarinen papers, circa 1909-1977. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Lilian Swann Saarinen papers
Lilian Swann Saarinen papers / Series 6: Teaching Files
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-saarlili-ref486

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