Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
215 documents - page 1 of 11

Delegate

Published by:
MelPat Associates, American, 1965 - 1986  Search this
Created by:
C. Melvin Patrick, American, died 1985  Search this
Subject of:
WLIB, American, founded 1941  Search this
National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education, American, founded 1969  Search this
American Bridge Association, American, founded 1932  Search this
National Association of Black Social Workers, American, founded 1968  Search this
Interracial Council for Business Opportunity, American, founded 1963  Search this
One Hundred Black Men, Inc., American, founded 1963  Search this
National Association of Market Developers, American, founded 1953  Search this
Vulcan Society, American, founded 1940  Search this
National Urban League, American, founded 1910  Search this
Opportunities Industrialization Center of America, Inc., American, founded 1964  Search this
Prince Hall Freemasonry, founded 1784  Search this
National Urban Coalition, American, founded 1967  Search this
National Newspaper Publishers Association, American, founded 1827  Search this
Top Ladies of Distinction, Inc., American, founded 1964  Search this
The Links, Incorporated, American, founded 1946  Search this
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, American, founded 1909  Search this
Lambda Kappa Mu Sorority, Inc., American, founded 1937  Search this
Carats, Inc., American, founded 1959  Search this
Chi Eta Phi Sorority, Inc., American, founded 1932  Search this
National Medical Association, American, founded 1895  Search this
National United Church Ushers Association of America, Inc., American, founded 1919  Search this
Vernon Jordan, American, born 1935  Search this
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., American, founded 1906  Search this
Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, American, founded 1914  Search this
Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, American, founded 1920  Search this
National Dental Association, American, founded 1913  Search this
National Funeral Directors and Morticians Association, Inc., American, founded 1924  Search this
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, American, founded 1913  Search this
Connectional Lay Council, American, founded 1948  Search this
Chi Delta Mu Fraternity, Inc., American, founded 1913  Search this
Shriners International, American, founded 1870  Search this
Daughters of Isis, American, founded 1910  Search this
Iota Phi Lambda Sorority, Inc., American, founded 1929  Search this
National Association of Negro Business and Professional Women's Clubs, Inc., American, founded 1935  Search this
Congressional Black Caucus, American, founded 1971  Search this
Morehouse Alumni Association, American, founded 1900  Search this
Morris Brown College, American, founded 1881  Search this
Dr. Ralph Bunche, American, 1903 - 1971  Search this
Lionel Hampton, American, 1908 - 2002  Search this
National Urban League Guild, American, founded 1946  Search this
Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA), International, founded 1844  Search this
Alliance for Women in Media, American, founded 1951  Search this
Eleanor Holmes Norton, American, born 1937  Search this
Vernon Jordan, American, born 1935  Search this
Medium:
ink on paper
Dimensions:
H x W x D: 10 13/16 × 8 7/16 × 1/2 in. (27.5 × 21.4 × 1.3 cm)
Type:
magazines (periodicals)
Place made:
Harlem, New York City, New York, United States, North and Central America
Place depicted:
Atlanta, Fulton County, Georgia, United States, North and Central America
Martha's Vineyard, Oak Bluffs, Dukes County, Massachusetts, United States, North and Central America
Date:
1981
Topic:
African American  Search this
Advertising  Search this
Associations and institutions  Search this
Business  Search this
Communities  Search this
Fraternal organizations  Search this
Fraternities  Search this
Government  Search this
HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges and Universities)  Search this
Journalism  Search this
Labor  Search this
Mass media  Search this
Men  Search this
Political organizations  Search this
Politics  Search this
Professional organizations  Search this
Religious groups  Search this
Social life and customs  Search this
Sororities  Search this
U.S. History, 1969-2001  Search this
Urban life  Search this
Women  Search this
Women's organizations  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Anne B. Patrick and the family of Hilda E. Stokely
Object number:
2012.167.15
Restrictions & Rights:
Public domain
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Documents and Published Materials-Published Works
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5af48a13c-8c71-4105-9526-479c0bc3bb3e
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2012.167.15
2 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View <I>Delegate</I> digital asset number 1
  • View <I>Delegate</I> digital asset number 2

Caroline Jones Advertising, Inc. Agency Reel

Collection Creator:
Jones, Caroline Robinson, 1942-2001 (advertising executive)  Search this
Extent:
1 Videocassettes (U-matic)
Container:
Box 110, Item AC0552-OV0006
Type:
Archival materials
Moving Images
Videocassettes (u-matic)
Date:
1994 August 12
Scope and Contents:
Demonstrates the agency's primary mission: to sell products through advertising and promotions that accurately reflect the ethnic and cultural diversity of consumers. Includes print, television, radio, and public relations for special events. Clients include: Trump, Disney, Hanes, Western Union, Pepsi, Greyhound, Goodyear, Prudential, Binaca, Ryder, Seagram's, Miller, Stroh's, Canon, L'Oreal, Ore-Ida, Westinghouse, DeKuyper, Bankers Trust, Bahama Ministry of Tour¬ism, Minolta Yuki Kobayashi, Entre Marketing and Sales, Associated Black Charities, National Urban League, Kentucky Fried Chicken, Mountain Dew, Isuzu, United Negro College Fund, Anheuser-Busch, Minority Affairs, New York City Public Schools, Partners for a Drug-Free America, and the Brown Egg Council of New England, Perrier, Dakkar Noir, and a community service announcement from Andrew Young concerning Denny's Restaurant chain.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
See more items in:
Caroline R. Jones Papers
Caroline R. Jones Papers / Series 7: Audiovisual Materials / 7.3: Videotapes / 7.3.1: Agency Reels and Compilations
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8ad7eb7c9-1180-4144-bee1-beadc91c855d
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0552-ref939

Monograph, "The Issues and Challenges of Air Transportation: A Symposium in the Public Interest to be Sponsored by Connecticut General Life Insurance Company, Hartford, Connecticut, November 1, 2 and 3, 1961," Advisory Committee to the Connecticut Gene...

Collection Creator:
Wheatland, Richard, II, 1923-2009  Search this
Container:
Box 5, Folder 4
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
1961
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Collection Citation:
New York Airways Collection, Acc. NASM.1992.0052, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
New York Airways Collection
New York Airways Collection / Series 2: 1973 Acquisition
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg22f46f577-2d4e-48d9-b68c-df79d1aa1a42
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-1992-0052-ref704
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Monograph,

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2008 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Plans (drawings)
Digital images
Contracts
Videotapes
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Negatives
Correspondence
Audiocassettes
Notes
Audiotapes
Slides (photographs)
Business records
Photographic prints
Memorandums
Date:
June 25-July 6, 2008
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 2008 Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 5 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: Bhutan: Land of the Thunder Dragon

Series 3: NASA: Fifty Years and Beyond

Series 4: Special Events

Series 5: Texas: A Celebration of Music, Food, and Wine
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 2008 Smithsonian Folklife Festival was produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
The 2008 Festival, as in previous years, brought together exemplary practitioners of diverse traditions from communities across the United States and around the world. The ongoing goal of the Festival is to encourage the vitality of these traditions by presenting them on the National Mall so that tradition-bearers and the public can learn from one another and understand cultural differences in a respectful way.

The 2008 Festival celebrated Bhutan's approach to life in the twenty-first century, which it calls the pursuit of "Gross National Happiness." The Bhutanese have chosen a unique path to development, rooted in deep respect for and protection of the kingdom's cultural and natural resources. The 2008 Festival program coincided with Bhutan's centennial celebration of the monarchy and implementation of the country's new democratic constitution. It emphasized the kingdom's protection of culture, community, and environment and was the largest and most comprehensive living exhibition of Bhutanese culture and traditions ever presented outside of the kingdom. Through craft and cooking demonstrations, dance and musical performances, and interactive discussions, the 2008 Festival explored the linkages between Bhutan's natural and cultural resources.

On the occasion of NASA's fiftieth anniversary, the 2008 Festival explored the spirit of innovation, discovery, and service embodied by the agency and its personnel. The program encouraged visitors to participate actively - to ask questions of the roughly one hundred participants who came to Washington from across the United States to represent a cross section of NASA's 18,000 employees and 40,000 contractors and grantees. NASA: Fifty Years and Beyond showcased the role that the men and women of NASA have played in broadening the horizons of American science and culture, as well as the role that they will continue to play in helping to shape the future by stirring the public imagination.

Texas: A Celebration of Music, Food, and Wine focused on the rich heritage of these cultural traditions from every region of the Lone Star State. The sounds of Texas blues, swing, conjunto, country and western, gospel, and Tejano music were a sonic reminder of the state's breathtaking diversity. Texas's culinary traditions - from barbeque to kolache (pastry) making, from chicken-fried steak to Vietnamese specialties - made for an eye-opening and mouth-watering demonstration of the state's regional vastness and cultural range. An exhibit on Texas wine making explored the craft, skills, and terroir of the state's industry.

The 2008 Ralph Rinzler Memorial Concert honored one of Ralph's long-term collaborators, René López, a music aficionado and cultural activist from New York's Puerto Rican community.

The 2008 Festival took place for two five-day weeks (June 25-29 and July 2-6) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 9th Street and 14th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan). It featured three programs and the Rinzler Concert.

The 2008 Program Book included schedules and participant lists for each program; keynote essays and short features provided background on each of the programs.

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage.

Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage

Richard Kennedy, Acting Director; Smithsonian Folklife Festival: Diana Parker, Festival Director; Stephen Kidd, Production Manager; Charlie Weber, Media Specialist; Smithsonian Folkways Recordings: Daniel Sheehy, Curator and Director; Anthony Seeger, Curator and Director, Emeritus; D.A. Sonneborn, Assistant Director; Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections: Jeffrey Place, Archivist; Stephanie Smith, Assistant Archivist; Cultural Heritage Policy: James Counts Early, Director; Cultural Research and Education: Olivia Cadaval, Chair; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist Emeritus; Betty J. Belanus, James Deutsch, Marjorie Hunt, Diana Baird N'Diaye, Peter Seitel (Emeritus), Curators, Folklorists, Education and Cultural Specialists; Christina Díaz-Carrera, Program Specialist; Robert Albro, Geri Benoit, Carla Borden, Irene Chagall, Andrew Cruz, Patrick Delatour, Roland Freeman, Nancy Groce, Frank Proschan, Sita Reddy, Sam-Ang Sam, Jesús "Chucho" Valdés, Patrick Vilaire, Research Associates; Omotayo Jolaosho, Fellow

Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage Advisory Council

Kurt Dewhurst (chair), J. Scott Raecker (vice chair), Michael Asch (ex officio), Mounir Bouchenaki, Anthony Gittens, Mickey Hart, John Herzog (ex officio), Debora Kodish, Richard Kurin (ex officio), Enrique Lamadrid, Ellen McCulloch-Lovell, Libby O'Connell, Cristian Samper (ex officio), Robert Santelli, Cathy Sulzberger

Smithsonian Folkways Advisory Board

Michael Asch (chair), Patricia Shehan-Campbell, Hal Cannon, Don De Vito, Ella Jenkins, Anthony Seeger, Fred Silber

National Park Service

Mary Bomar, Director; Daniel N. Wenk, Deputy Director; Joseph M. Lawler, Regional Director; Margaret O'Dell, Superintendent, National Mall and Memorial Parks

The Festival was supported by federally appropriated funds; Smithsonian trust funds; contributions from governments, businesses, foundations, and individuals; in-kind assistance; and food, recording, and craft sales. General support for this year's Festival came from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center, and the Music Performance Fund, with in-kind support provided through Motorola, Sprint, WAMU-88.5 FM, Whole Foods Market, and WashingtonPost.com.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2008 Smithsonian Folklife Festival forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Folk music  Search this
Folk art  Search this
World music  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Plans (drawings)
Digital images
Contracts
Videotapes
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Negatives
Correspondence
Audiocassettes
Notes
Audiotapes
Slides (photographs)
Business records
Photographic prints
Memorandums
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2008 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2008
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2008 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk530dac77d-3fe2-44b8-a101-73fceb0de6f9
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-2008

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2004 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Slides (photographs)
Correspondence
Negatives
Video recordings
Contracts
Business records
Plans (drawings)
Notes
Videotapes
Memorandums
Photographic prints
Sound recordings
Digital images
Audiotapes
Audiocassettes
Place:
Caribbean Area
Latin America
Haiti
Puerto Rico
Virgin Islands
Date:
June 23-July 4, 2004
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 2004 Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 5 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: Haiti: Freedom and Creativity from the Mountains to the Sea

Series 3: Nuestra Música: Music in Latino Culture

Series 4: Special Events

Series 5: Water Ways: Mid-Atlantic Maritime Communities
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 2004 Smithsonian Folklife Festival was produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
In 2004, the Festival continued its long tradition of presenting the diverse cultural heritage of the people of the United States and the world to large public audiences in an educational, respectful, and profoundly democratic way, with three major programs and the Ralph Rinzler Memorial Concert honoring longtime collaborator, Roland Freeman.

In 2004, the Haitian people marked the bicentennial of their independence. In 1804, inspired by American and French ideals, Haitians fought for their own freedom, abolished slavery, and created the second independent nation in the Western Hemisphere. Haitians have sought freedom and liberty ever since, and through tough times have relied on their rich culture and seemingly boundless creativity to persevere. The Festival program, in the planning for several years, came at what was obviously an important time for Haitians and Americans - particularly Haitian Americans. It provided an excellent opportunity for Haitians to tell their own stories through their skill and artistry, and for Festival visitors to learn from them.

The inaugural program in a planned multi-year sequence, the Latino music program helped the Smithsonian reach out to a major segment of the American population not only as audience, but also as presenters, performers, and spokespeople for their own cultural expressions. Latino music includes a wide variety of traditions now energizing social and community life in the United States. Some are centuries old and reach back to early indigenous, European, and African roots. Others have come to us more recently, with immigrants from south of our border. Sharing these traditions broadly at the Festival contributed to a valuable and needed cultural dialogue, particularly one involving the growing number of Washingtonians of Latino heritage.

The Mid-Atlantic maritime program allowed the Smithsonian to convene a public discussion of "water ways" spanning six eastern seaboard states. Many people and communities depend upon the ocean, coast, bays, and rivers for their livelihoods - whether through commercial fishing and aquaculture or recreation and tourism. At the time of the Festival, homes, jobs, and ways of life were facing unprecedented economic and ecological challenges. The Festival program brought together scores of workers, professionals, and officials who used, monitored, and regulated these water ways to demonstrate their knowledge and inform visitors about the key issues facing them.

The 2004 Festival took place for two five-day weeks (June 23-27 and June 30-July 4) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 10th Street and 14th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan). It featured three programs and the Rinzler Concert.

The 2004 Program Book included schedules and participant lists for each program; keynote essays provided background on the Festival and on each of the programs (with versions in Kreyòl and Spanish of the respective essays).

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage.

Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage

Richard Kurin, Director; Richard Kennedy, Deputy Director; Smithsonian Folklife Festival: Diana Parker, Festival Director; Stephen Kidd, Production Manager; Arlene L. Reiniger, Program Specialist; Charlie Weber, Media Specialist; Smithsonian Folkways Recordings: Daniel Sheehy, Director and Curator; Anthony Seeger, Director Emeritus; D.A. Sonneborn, Assistant Director; Ralph Rinzler Archives: Jeffrey Place, Archivist; Stephanie Smith, Assistant Archivist; Save Our Sounds: Frank Proschan, Project Director; Cultural Heritage Policy: James Early, Director; Cultural Research and Education: Olivia Cadaval, Chair; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist Emeritus; Betty J. Belanus, Olivia Cadaval, Nancy Groce, Marjorie Hunt, Diana Baird N'Diaye, Peter Seitel, Cynthia Vidaurri, Nilda Villalta, Curators, Folklorists, Education and Cultural Specialists; Carla Borden, Program/Publications Manager; John W. Franklin, Program Manager; Roland Freeman, Ivan Karp, Corinne Kratz, Worth Long, René López, Kate Rinzler, Sam-Ang Sam, Laura Schneider, Rajeev Sethi, Chucho Valdez, Research Associates

Folklife Advisory Council

Kurt Dewhurst (chair), Judy Mitoma (vice-chair), Michael Doucet, Anthony Gittens, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Debora Kodish, Enrique Lamadrid, Worth Long, J. Scott Raecker, Robert Santelli, Ricardo Trimillos, John Herzog (ex-officio)

Folkways Advisory Council

Michael Asch (chair), Phyllis Barney, Hal Cannon, Don De Vito, Ella Jenkins, Anthony Seeger (ex-officio), Fred Silber

National Park Service

Fran P. Mainella, Director; Donald W. Murphy, Deputy Director; Terry R. Carlstrom, Regional Director, National Capital Region

The Festival was supported by federally appropriated funds; Smithsonian trust funds; contributions from governments, businesses, foundations, and individuals; in-kind assistance; and food, recording, and craft sales. Major funding for this year's programs came from Whole Foods Market and the Music Performance Fund, a Festival sponsor for 34 years. Telecommunications support for the Festival was provided by Motorola, Nextel, Pegasus, and Icom America. Media partners included WAMU 88.5 FM, American University Radio, and WashingtonPost.com, with in-kind support from Signature Systems and Go-Ped.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2004 Smithsonian Folklife Festival forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Food habits  Search this
World music  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
Folk music  Search this
Folklore  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Slides (photographs)
Correspondence
Negatives
Video recordings
Contracts
Business records
Plans (drawings)
Notes
Videotapes
Memorandums
Photographic prints
Sound recordings
Digital images
Audiotapes
Audiocassettes
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2004 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2004
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2004 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk55ccc5401-3a5b-49e2-9690-18dafed37081
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-2004

Special Events

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
The fourth annual Ralph Rinzler Memorial Concert featured the revival of interest in klezmer music, traditional instrumental music of the Jews of Eastern Europe. Heavily influenced by the existing folk genres in the area - e.g., Romanian, Russian, Polish, Ukrainian, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Gypsy - and traditional Jewish cantillation, klezmer was filtered through Jewish ears and consciousness. Immigrant klezmer musicians who came from Eastern Europe to America during the early 20th century found a ready market for their skills. Many large American cities had Jewish neighborhoods filled with large young families. Yiddish was spoken by the vast majority. The newly arrived klezmorim found work using the old repertoire at weddings, society, labor union, and synagogue functions. Those adept at reading music could also find employment in Yiddish theaters. American-born musicians began to perform klezmer music in the mid-1920s.

After 1960, however, klezmer music became dormant, awaiting rediscovery and revitalization through the efforts of the dedicated scholars and performers of the klezmer revival. Many of the revivalists, such as those who were featured in the Rinzler Concert, returned to Jewish music after serious careers in Anglo American old time music. They have redefined the old music, lending a patina of artistry to the old, once-derogatory term klezmer, that had conjured up the image of a musical simpleton only capable of playing old Yiddish tunes poorly.

The 1998 Festival also celebrated Folkways at 50 through a series of concerts. Folkways Records was a touchstone of the early folk music revival through its support of many influential artists and its participation in many events. Its founder Moses Asch housed Sing Out! magazine during its early years; he recorded at the Newport Folk Festival; he published the recordings of generations of researchers and scholars - including some such as Ralph Rinzler who would eventually have a major influence on the Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Moreover, the philosophies of Folkways and the Folklife Festival were similar: to celebrate cultural diversity and human artistry; to provide an educational framework through which to understand cultural manifestations; and to encourage people to delve as deeply as they wish into the subject matter by providing substantial supplemental material - liner notes in the case of Folkways and program books and sign panels in the case of the Folklife Festival. Three 50th anniversary concerts included:

Children's Matinee

Music for children was one of the most influential parts of Folkways Records - many people heard their first Folkways record in a classroom. Moses Asch thought children should be exposed to good, authentic music from many cultural traditions. This concert celebrated not only the contributions of musicians who perform for children but the creativity of children themselves.

Folkways Founders/U.S. Postal Service Folk Musicians Stamp Concert

In 1998 the U.S. Postal Service issued a stamp series commemorating four important figures in the folk music revival of the 1950s and 1960s: Lead Belly, Woody Guthrie, Sonny Terry, and Josh White. All four artists recorded for Moses Asch. To honor these men who played prominent roles in both Folkways and 20th-century American music, musicians whose styles have been strongly influenced by them performed at an evening concert.

Heartbeat: Voices of First Nations Women Concert

Because most traditional Native women's music is performed in private settings - in their homes or during tribal ceremonies - very little of this music has been heard outside the women's own communities. Some of the artists featured on a new Smithsonian Folkways recording of Native women's music were featured in a concert that celebrated both the release of the album (itself an outgrowth of a 1995 Festival program) and the half-century that Folkways Records and Smithsonian Folkways Recordings had been introducing wider audiences to community-based music.

Henry Sapoznik was Curator of the Ralph Rinzler Memorial Concert, and Kate Rinzler was Coordinator. For the children's matinee and Folkways Founders concerts, Anthony Seeger and Amy Horowitz were Curators and Ivy Young was Coordinator. For Heartbeat: Voices of First Nations Women, Howard Bass and Rayna Green were Curators.

The Ralph Rinzler Memorial Concert was made possible with support from The Recording Industries Music Performance Trust Funds, the Ruth Mott Fund, Friends of the Festival, and Kate Rinzler. Support for Folkways at 50 came from BMI (the American performance rights organization), the United States Postal Service, M.A.C.E. (Mississippi Action for Community Education), Global Arts/Media Foundation, P.A.C.E.R.S. (Program for Academic and Cultural Enhancement of Rural Schools) Small Schools Cooperative & Community Celebration of Place Project, KOCH International, Smithsonian Magazine, Smithsonian Institution National Museum of American History, TRO, The Richmond Organization, Columbia Records and Sony Music Entertainment, Michael Asch, Walter Beebe and the New York Open Center, Andrew Dapuzzo and Disctronics, David Glasser, Charlie Pilzer, and Airshow Mastering, Inc., Judith DeMaris Hearn, Ella Jenkins, Richard Kurin, Mark Miller and Queens Group, Inc., Microsoft Corporation/Media Acquisitions Department, Arnold L. Polinger, Razor & Tie Entertainment, and The Recording Industries Music Performance Trust Funds.
Participants:
Folkways at 50 Anniversary Concerts

Children's Matinee

Ella Jenkins, Chicago, Illinois

Larry Long, Minneapolis, Minnesota

Slater Huff, Packers Bend, Alabama

CHILDREN FROM MONROE HIGH SCHOOL, PACKERS BEND, ALABAMA -- CHILDREN FROM MONROE HIGH SCHOOL, PACKERS BEND, ALABAMAAngel Carstarphen, Packers Bend, AlabamaLaKecia Carstarphen, Packers Bend, AlabamaPaulette Carstarphen, Packers Bend, AlabamaAdrienn Cheeseboro, Packers Bend, AlabamaKimberly Cheeseboro, Packers Bend, AlabamaLatonya Cheeseboro, Packers Bend, AlabamaYshika Cheeseboro, Packers Bend, AlabamaRapheal Davis, Packers Bend, AlabamaDomoneek McCoy, Packers Bend, AlabamaTromesha Packer, Packers Bend, AlabamaBryant Timmons, Packers Bend, AlabamaPatricia Tunstall, Packers Bend, Alabama

CHILDREN FROM T.W. MARTIN HIGH SCHOOL, GOODSPRINGS, ALABAMA -- CHILDREN FROM T.W. MARTIN HIGH SCHOOL, GOODSPRINGS, ALABAMAShawn Bromley, Goodsprings, AlabamaCourtney Dotson, Goodsprings, AlabamaJon Dotson, Goodsprings, AlabamaStephanie Hicks, Goodsprings, AlabamaRyan Logan, Goodsprings, AlabamaBrandon Morris, Goodsprings, AlabamaJada Parker, Goodsprings, AlabamaCameo Raney, Goodsprings, AlabamaBrandon Reynolds, Goodsprings, AlabamaJosh Salter, Goodsprings, AlabamaLandon Waid, Goodsprings, AlabamaSabrina Williams, Goodsprings, Alabama

Folkways Founders, U.S. Postal Service Folk Musicians Stamp Concert

Arlo Guthrie, Housatonic, Massachusetts

Abe Guthrie, Housatonic, Massachusetts

Annie Guthrie, Housatonic, Massachusetts

Cathy Guthrie, Housatonic, Massachusetts

Sarah Guthrie, Housatonic, Massachusetts

Toshi Reagon, Brooklyn, New York

Josh White, Jr., Detroit, Michigan

THE WILLIE FOSTER BLUES BAND -- THE WILLIE FOSTER BLUES BANDWillie Foster, 1922-, Greenville, MississippiJohn Horton, III, Greenville, MississippiRoosevelt Rogers, Greenville, MississippiRichard E. Taliaferro, Greenville, MississippiLarry Wright, Leland, Mississippi

Heartbeat: Voices of First Nations Women Concert

Sharon Burch, Santa Rosa, California

Cedric Goodhouse, Fort Yates, North Dakota

Sissy Goodhouse, Fort Yates, North Dakota

Christina Gonzalez, Schurz, Nevada

Delgadina Gonzalez, Schurz, Nevada

JOY HARJO AND POETIC JUSTICE -- JOY HARJO AND POETIC JUSTICECharlie Baca, Albuquerque, New MexicoRichard Carbajal, Phoenix, ArizonaJoy Harjo, Hollywood, CaliforniaDerek James, Los Angeles, CaliforniaJohn Williams, Albuquerque, New MexicoSusan Williams, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Judy Trejo, Wadsworth, Nevada

TZO'KAM -- TZO'KAMJoyce Fossella, Vancouver, British Columbia, CanadaJudy Lemke, North Vancouver, British Columbia, CanadaIrma Rabang, Sumner, WashingtonMaria Stiglich, Langley, British Columbia, CanadaFreda Wallace, Vancouver, British Columbia, CanadaFlora Wallace, Vancouver, British Columbia, CanadaRussell Wallace, North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Mary Youngblood, Sacramento, California

Ralph Rinzler Memorial Concert

Sid Beckerman, clarinet

Lauren Brody, accordion, piano, vocals

Steven Greenman, violin

Margot Leverett, clarinet, saxophone

Paul Pincus, tenor saxophone

Mark Rubin, bass, tuba

Henry Sapoznik, banjo, vocal, producer, director

Peter Sokolow, keyboard, vocal, musical director

Michael Spielzinger, drums

Steven Weintraub, dance instructor
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1998 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1998, Series 5
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1998 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk53d2039c2-0605-4994-b705-d53a980428a9
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1998-ref45

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2006 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Plans (drawings)
Digital images
Negatives
Photographic prints
Audiotapes
Video recordings
Correspondence
Slides (photographs)
Business records
Memorandums
Videotapes
Contracts
Audiocassettes
Notes
Place:
Caribbean Area
Latin America
Mexico
Colombia
Guatemala
Peru
El Salvador
Chile
Belize
Brazil
Cuba
Puerto Rico
Date:
June 30-July 11, 2006
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 2006 Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 5 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: Alberta at the Smithsonian

Series 3: Carriers of Culture: Living Native Basket Traditions

Series 4: Nuestra Música: Latino Chicago

Series 5: Special Events
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 2006 Smithsonian Folklife Festival was produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
The 2006 Festival, celebrating its 40th year on the National Mall of the United States, again presented a compelling, research-based sampling of the diverse traditions of America and the world to large public audiences in an educational, respectful, and profoundly democratic way. Employing a format it had both pioneered and mastered, the Festival illustrated the vital, living aspect of cultural heritage and provided a forum for discussion of issues of contemporary concern.

For the first time, the Festival featured a Canadian province - Alberta, which had just completed its own celebration of its centennial. Albertans have created a dynamic home for diverse peoples - aboriginal inhabitants, settlers, and later immigrants - in a varied and dramatic landscape. They've built large world-class industries - oil and gas, ranching, farming, forestry - as well as two large, modern metropolises, Calgary and Edmonton, all the while being creative in the arts and sciences. Festival visitors could see how Alberta's oil sands are mined and processed, witness ranching skills, appreciate fine Native craftsmanship, hear ballads from talented singer-songwriters, and experience their contemporary "Theatresports." The Festival program resulted from close collaboration between the Smithsonian and its Albertan partners, and was a testament to how good will and common purpose can effectively cross borders and serve the educational and cultural interests of Canadians, Americans, and a broader visiting public.

The same kind of engaged collaborative partnership was illustrated through the Carriers of Culture program that brought together the Festival, the National Museum of the American Indian, Michigan State University Museum, and a network of Native basket makers' organizations around the United States. The collaboration was built upon the needs of basket makers themselves, in the face of various challenges to their living heritage. Basket makers need access to trees, bushes, and plants untainted by pollutants; they need recognition, appreciation, and access to markets as well as opportunities to train the next generation. Festival visitors could meet scores of basket makers from dozens of Native communities from every part of the United States. They demonstrated their masterful techniques, making baskets of meaning and delight in every imaginable shape and texture. Their participation in the Festival, including sales at the marketplace and related public programs and consultations at the National Museum of the American Indian, was part of a cultural self-help strategy, shaped by participatory research, and aiming to assure the vitality of long-lived traditions.

Nuestra Música: Latino Chicago reflected another substantive partnership. The Festival joined the Smithsonian Latino Center and Chicago's Old Town School of Folk Music to present a small sampler of Chicago's Latino cultural heritage. More than a million Latinos - largely from Mexico, but also from Puerto Rico and just about every nation in Latin America - have made the Chicago area their home. Cultural institutions, dozens of community-based dance groups, and myriad shops, clubs, and restaurants indicate the growth and vitality of the community. Music is both a measure and symbol of that vitality. On the Mall, visitors joined in Mexican folk and contemporary dances, heard the beat of Puerto Rican bomba and plena, and enjoyed Andean music and song. Through the Festival's live performances, as well as through the related Grammy-nominated Smithsonian Folkways series of Latino recordings, the Smithsonian sought to provide a means for Americans to understand each other, to speak, listen, and be heard.

Finally, the Been in the Storm So Long concert series at the Festival represented an important collaboration between the Festival and the new National Museum of African American History and Culture. The Festival itself grew in part from events on the Mall during the Civil Rights Movement, and thousands of leading figures of African American culture have graced its stages and illustrated their traditions through its programs over the preceding four decades. To initiate the partnership, the Museum and the Festival featured musicians from New Orleans: folks who were hit with the devastation of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, but nonetheless strove, with determination and grace, to continue the cultural traditions that give their communities their unique character and uplifting spirit so admired and appreciated around the world. Concerts featured New Orleans jazz, rhythm & blues, and sacred music.

The 2006 Festival took place for two five-day weeks (June 30-July 4 and July 7-11) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 7th Street and 14th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan). It featured three programs and Special Events that included the Ralph Rinzler Memorial Concert and Been in the Storm So Long.

The 2006 Program Book included schedules and participant lists for each program; keynote essays provided background on the Festival and on each of the programs (with a Spanish version of the Latino music essay).

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage.

Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage

Richard Kurin, Director; Richard Kennedy, Deputy Director; Smithsonian Folklife Festival: Diana Parker, Festival Director; Stephen Kidd, Production Manager; Charlie Weber, Media Specialist; Smithsonian Folkways Recordings/Smithsonian Global Sound: Daniel Sheehy, Curator and Director; Anthony Seeger, Curator and Director, Emeritus; D.A. Sonneborn, Assistant Director; Ralph Rinzler Archives: Jeffrey Place, Archivist; Stephanie Smith, Assistant Archivist; Cultural Heritage Policy: James Counts Early, Director; Cultural Research and Education: Olivia Cadaval, Chair; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist Emeritus; Betty J. Belanus, Olivia Cadaval, Nancy Groce, Marjorie Hunt, Diana Baird N'Diaye, Frank Proschan, Peter Seitel (Emeritus), Cynthia Vidaurri, Curators, Folklorists, Education and Cultural Specialists; John W. Franklin, Program Manager; Research Associates: Robert Albro, Geri Benoit, Carla Borden, Patrick Delatour, Roland Freeman, Kip Lornell, Mara Mayor, Joan Nathan, Sita Reddy, Sam-Ang Sam, Preston Scott, Cynthia Vidaurri, Patrick Vilaire, Nilda Villalta; Fellows: Bernard L. Bakaye, Gary Burns, Julie Chenot, Chiara Bortolotto, Sharon C. Clarke, Trinidad Gonzales, Navina Jafa, Susan Keitumetse, Mary Kenny, Reina Prado, Laurajane Smith, Will Walker, Amy Winston

Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage Advisory Council

Kurt Dewhurst (chair), Judy Mitoma (vice-chair), Michael Asch (ex officio), Michael Doucet, Anthony Gittens, John Herzog (ex officio), Debora Kodish, Enrique Lamadrid, Worth Long, Libby O'Connell, J. Scott Raecker, Robert Santelli

Smithsonian Folkways Advisory Board

Michael Asch (chair), Phyllis Barney, Hal Cannon, Don De Vito, Ella Jenkins, Anthony Seeger (ex officio), Fred Silber

National Park Service

Fran P. Mainella, Director; Donald W. Murphy, Deputy Director; Joseph M. Lawler, Regional Director; Vikki Keys, Superintendent, National Mall and Memorial Parks

The Festival was supported by federally appropriated funds; Smithsonian trust funds; contributions from governments, businesses, foundations, and individuals; in-kind assistance; and food, recording, and craft sales. General support for this year's programs included the Music Performance Fund, with in-kind support for the Festival provided through Motorola, Nextel, WAMU 88.5-FM, WashingtonPost.com, Whole Foods Market, Pegasus Radio Corp., and Icom America. The Folklore Society of Greater Washington generously provided hospitality for participants, as it had for many years. The Festival was co-sponsored by the National Park Service.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2006 Smithsonian Folklife Festival forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Folk music  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folk art  Search this
World music  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Plans (drawings)
Digital images
Negatives
Photographic prints
Audiotapes
Video recordings
Correspondence
Slides (photographs)
Business records
Memorandums
Videotapes
Contracts
Audiocassettes
Notes
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2006 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2006
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2006 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk53e1d2935-ccf8-4dc1-bb79-89ef3219ceaa
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-2006

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2007 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Plans (drawings)
Slides (photographs)
Negatives
Correspondence
Notes
Digital images
Audiocassettes
Audiotapes
Photographic prints
Contracts
Business records
Memorandums
Videotapes
Date:
June 27-July 8, 2007
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 2007 Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 5 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: Mekong River: Connecting Cultures

Series 3: Northern Ireland at the Smithsonian

Series 4: Roots of Virginia Culture: The Past is Present

Series 5: Special Events
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 2007 Smithsonian Folklife Festival was produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
At its inception in 1967, the Folklife Festival was conceived as an act of cultural democracy, a vehicle for cultural conversation, and a means of cultural conservation. Held on the National Mall around the Fourth of July, it provided an important forum where Americans and others could explain, express, demonstrate, and perform their cultural traditions. "Back home," the Festival would encourage traditions within practitioners' communities; stimulate cultural research and documentation efforts; boost sales of crafts, music, and food; lead to public recognition by government leaders and the media; increase tourism and economic development; and inspire educational programs in schools. The 2007 Festival continued in that mold, with three programs and the Ralph Rinzler Memorial Concert, dedicated to long-time collaborator Bess Lomax Hawes.

The Roots of Virginia Culture program helped mark the 400th anniversary of the founding of Jamestown. For the nation that subsequently emerged, Jamestown set in motion relationships among Native Americans, English, and Africans. They interacted through war, slavery, and strife, as well as through a growing economy and an unfolding democracy to define, in large measure, American culture and traditions. Musicians, artisans, cooks, boat builders, farmers, archaeologists, and genealogists from Virginia (including its Native communities), England (mainly Kent County), Senegal and Mali came to the 2007 Festival to demonstrate root traditions, cultural parallels, and the ways their expressions and those of later immigrants formed a dynamic American heritage. The work of many scholars and colleagues on three continents enabled the Festival to tell that story, including Jamestown 2007, the Kent County Council, and the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture, who supported and guided the program.

Among early immigrants to Virginia were Scots and Irish from Ireland - people who contributed mightily to the new nation. The second program, Northern Ireland at the Smithsonian, focused on the cultural life of those "back home." The 2007 Festival program came at a very important time in the history of the island region. In the months preceding the Festival, leaders of the two major parties, Unionist (Protestant) and Republican (Catholic) had just agreed to form a self-government to help surmount "The Troubles" that had long plagued the region. Music, crafts, occupational traditions, and culinary arts were flourishing. Cultural expressions, often means of resistance and conflict, increasingly came to foster understanding, reconciliation, and the economy. This was particularly evident in a massive arts effort, "Rediscover Northern Ireland," which sought to acquaint Americans with the region. Numerous scholars, cultural organizations (led by the Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure and the Northern Ireland Arts Council), and civic-minded corporate sponsors came together to design and fund the program, as well as its Washington presence at the Festival. Such public-private partnerships, increased American tourism, and economic investment should help to promote reconciliation and stability.

Similar sensibilities inspired Mekong River: Connecting Cultures, which brought together musicians, artisans, cooks, and other cultural exemplars from Cambodia, China, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam. The program followed the 3,000-mile river from its highland origins on the Tibetan Plateau through Yunnan Province of China to the delta of southern Vietnam. Many Americans are familiar with the region because of war. But beyond the conflicts are rich, interrelated cultures. Although national identities are important and persistent, ethnic communities are distributed across national boundaries. Occupational and artisanal traditions, such as fishing, farming, and weaving, transcend citizenship. Religious beliefs have inspired a wide variety of performance and celebratory expressions. This is a politically, economically, and culturally dynamic area whose future is increasingly tied to global concerns. Millions of Americans from the region make their home in the United States - in the nation's capital, in Virginia, in Maryland, and in many other states. Americans and other visitors to the Festival were able to learn more about this important region thanks to the governments of Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Vietnam, and Yunnan Province, China; the Rockefeller, Ford, Luce, and McKnight foundations; and institutional colleagues such as Thailand's Sirindhorn Anthropology Centre, Vietnam's Museum of Ethnology, Cambodia's Amrita Performing Arts, China Yunnan International Culture Exchange Center, and Connecticut College.

The 2007 Festival took place for two five-day weeks (June 27-July 1 and July 4-8) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 7th Street and 14th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan). It featured three programs and the Rinzler Concert.

The 2007 Program Book included schedules and participant lists for each program; keynote essays and short features provided background on the Festival and on each of the programs.

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage.

Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage

Richard Kurin, Director; Richard Kennedy, Deputy Director; Smithsonian Folklife Festival: Diana Parker, Festival Director; Stephen Kidd, Production Manager; Charlie Weber, Media Specialist; Smithsonian Folkways Recordings: Daniel Sheehy, Curator and Director; Anthony Seeger, Curator and Director, Emeritus; D.A. Sonneborn, Assistant Director; Ralph Rinzler Archives: Jeffrey Place, Archivist; Stephanie Smith, Assistant Archivist; Cultural Heritage Policy: James Counts Early, Director; Cultural Research and Education: Olivia Cadaval, Chair; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist Emeritus; Betty J. Belanus, Olivia Cadaval, James Deutsch, Nancy Groce, Marjorie Hunt, Diana Baird N'Diaye, Peter Seitel (Emeritus), Curators, Folklorists, Education and Cultural Specialists; John W. Franklin, Program Manager; Research Associates: Robert Albro, Geri Benoit, Carla Borden, Patrick Delatour, Roland Freeman, Kip Lornell, Joan Nathan, Frank Proschan, Sita Reddy, Sam-Ang Sam, Preston Scott, Cynthia Vidaurri, Patrick Vilaire, Nilda Villalta; Fellows: Patrick Alcedo, Bill Anthes, Tressa Berman, Sara Broulette, Uma Chandru, Adriana Cruz-Manjarrez, Marie-Yvonne Curtis, Peter Glazer, Israel Lazaro, Julie McGee, Brett Pyper, Sita Reddy, Carole Rosenstein

Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage Advisory Council

Kurt Dewhurst (chair), Judy Mitoma (vice-chair), Michael Asch (ex-officio), Michael Doucet, Anthony Gittens, John Herzog (ex-officio), Debora Kodish, Enrique Lamadrid, Worth Long, Libby O'Connell, J. Scott Raecker, Robert Santelli

Smithsonian Folkways Advisory Board

Michael Asch (chair), Patricia Shehan-Campbell, Hal Cannon, Don De Vito, Ella Jenkins, Anthony Seeger, Fred Silber

National Park Service

Mary Boman, Director; Daniel N. Wenk, Deputy Director; Joseph M. Lawler, Regional Director; Stephen Lorenzetti, Acting Superintendent, National Mall & Memorial Parks

The Festival was supported by federally appropriated funds; Smithsonian trust funds; contributions from governments, businesses, foundations, and individuals; in-kind assistance; and food, beverage, recording, and craft sales. General support for this year's Festival came from the Music Performance Fund, with in-kind support provided by Motorola, Sprint Nextel, Whole Foods Market, WAMU-88.5 FM, WashingtonPost.com, Thermador, Propex Inc., Pegasus Radio Corp., and Icom America.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2007 Smithsonian Folklife Festival forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Folk music  Search this
World music  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Plans (drawings)
Slides (photographs)
Negatives
Correspondence
Notes
Digital images
Audiocassettes
Audiotapes
Photographic prints
Contracts
Business records
Memorandums
Videotapes
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2007 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2007
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2007 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk58b80d2b1-1088-422d-ba40-0838086ba5ed
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-2007

Minutes

Extent:
8.70 cu. ft. (9 document boxes) (7 12x17 boxes) (1 16x20 box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Date:
1846-1995
Descriptive Entry:
These records are the official minutes of the Board. They are compiled at the direction of the Secretary of the Smithsonian, who is also secretary to the Board, after approval by the Regents' Executive Committee and by the Regents themselves. The minutes are edited, not a verbatim account of proceedings. For reasons unknown, there are no manuscript minutes for the period from 1857 through 1890; and researchers must rely on printed minutes published in the Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institution instead. Minutes are transferred regularly from the Secretary's Office to the Archives. Minutes less than 15 years old are closed to researchers. Indexes exist for the period from 1907 to 1946 and can be useful.
Historical Note:
The Smithsonian Institution was created by authority of an Act of Congress approved August 10, 1846. The Act entrusted direction of the Smithsonian to a body called the Establishment, composed of the President; the Vice President; the Chief Justice of the United States; the secretaries of State, War, Navy, Interior, and Agriculture; the Attorney General; and the Postmaster General. In fact, however, the Establishment last met in 1877, and control of the Smithsonian has always been exercised by its Board of Regents. The membership of the Regents consists of the Vice President and the Chief Justice of the United States; three members each of the Senate and House of Representatives; two citizens of the District of Columbia; and seven citizens of the several states, no two from the same state. (Prior to 1970 the category of Citizen Regents not residents of Washington consisted of four members). By custom the Chief Justice is Chancellor. The office was at first held by the Vice President. However, when Millard Fillmore succeeded to the presidency on the death of Zachary Taylor in 1851, Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney was chosen in his stead. The office has always been filled by the Chief Justice since that time.

The Regents of the Smithsonian have included distinguished Americans from many walks of life. Ex officio members (Vice President) have been: Spiro T. Agnew, Chester A. Arthur, Allen W. Barkley, John C. Breckenridge, George Bush, Schuyler Colfax, Calvin Coolidge, Charles Curtis, George M. Dallas, Charles G. Dawes, Charles W. Fairbanks, Millard Fillmore, Gerald R. Ford, John N. Garner, Hannibal Hamlin, Thomas A. Hendricks, Garret A. Hobart, Hubert H. Humphrey, Andrew Johnson, Lyndon B. Johnson, William R. King, Thomas R. Marshall, Walter F. Mondale, Levi P. Morton, Richard M. Nixon, Nelson A. Rockefeller, Theodore Roosevelt, James S. Sherman, Adlai E. Stevenson, Harry S. Truman, Henry A. Wallace, William A. Wheeler, Henry Wilson.

Ex officio members (Chief Justice) have been: Roger B. Taney, Salmon P. Chase, Nathan Clifford, Morrison R. Waite, Samuel F. Miller, Melville W. Fuller, Edward D. White, William Howard Taft, Charles Evans Hughes, Harlan F. Stone, Fred M. Vinson, Earl Warren, Warren E. Burger.

Regents on the part of the Senate have been: Clinton P. Anderson, Newton Booth, Sidney Breese, Lewis Cass, Robert Milledge Charlton, Bennet Champ Clark, Francis M. Cockrell, Shelby Moore Cullom, Garrett Davis, Jefferson Davis, George Franklin Edmunds, George Evans, Edwin J. Garn, Walter F. George, Barry Goldwater, George Gray, Hannibal Hamlin, Nathaniel Peter Hill, George Frisbie Hoar, Henry French Hollis, Henry M. Jackson, William Lindsay, Henry Cabot Lodge, Medill McCormick, James Murray Mason, Samuel Bell Maxey, Robert B. Morgan, Frank E. Moss, Claiborne Pell, George Wharton Pepper, David A. Reed, Leverett Saltonstall, Hugh Scott, Alexander H. Smith, Robert A. Taft, Lyman Trumbull, Wallace H. White, Jr., Robert Enoch Withers.

Regents on the part of the House of Representatives have included: Edward P. Boland, Frank T. Bow, William Campbell Breckenridge, Overton Brooks, Benjamin Butterworth, Clarence Cannon, Lucius Cartrell, Hiester Clymer, William Colcock, William P. Cole, Jr., Maurice Connolly, Silvio O. Conte, Edward E. Cox, Edward H. Crump, John Dalzell, Nathaniel Deering, Hugh A. Dinsmore, William English, John Farnsworth, Scott Ferris, Graham Fitch, James Garfield, Charles L. Gifford, T. Alan Goldsborough, Frank L. Greene, Gerry Hazleton, Benjamin Hill, Henry Hilliard, Ebenezer Hoar, William Hough, William M. Howard, Albert Johnson, Leroy Johnson, Joseph Johnston, Michael Kirwan, James T. Lloyd, Robert Luce, Robert McClelland, Samuel K. McConnell, Jr., George H. Mahon, George McCrary, Edward McPherson, James R. Mann, George Perkins Marsh, Norman Y. Mineta, A. J. Monteague, R. Walton Moore, Walter H. Newton, Robert Dale Owen, James Patterson, William Phelps, Luke Poland, John Van Schaick Lansing Pruyn, B. Carroll Reece, Ernest W. Roberts, Otho Robards Singleton, Frank Thompson, Jr., John M. Vorys, Hiram Warner, Joseph Wheeler.

Citizen Regents have been: David C. Acheson, Louis Agassiz, James B. Angell, Anne L. Armstrong, William Backhouse Astor, J. Paul Austin, Alexander Dallas Bache, George Edmund Badger, George Bancroft, Alexander Graham Bell, James Gabriel Berrett, John McPherson Berrien, Robert W. Bingham, Sayles Jenks Bowen, William G. Bowen, Robert S. Brookings, John Nicholas Brown, William A. M. Burden, Vannevar Bush, Charles F. Choate, Jr., Rufus Choate, Arthur H. Compton, Henry David Cooke, Henry Coppee, Samuel Sullivan Cox, Edward H. Crump, James Dwight Dana, Harvey N. Davis, William Lewis Dayton, Everette Lee Degolyer, Richard Delafield, Frederic A. Delano, Charles Devens, Matthew Gault Emery, Cornelius Conway Felton, Robert V. Fleming, Murray Gell-Mann, Robert F. Goheen, Asa Gray, George Gray, Crawford Hallock Greenwalt, Nancy Hanks, Caryl Parker Haskins, Gideon Hawley, John B. Henderson, John B. Henderson, Jr., A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr., Gardner Greene Hubbard, Charles Evans Hughes, Carlisle H. Humelsine, Jerome C. Hunsaker, William Preston Johnston, Irwin B. Laughlin, Walter Lenox, Augustus P. Loring, John Maclean, William Beans Magruder, John Walker Maury, Montgomery Cunningham Meigs, John C. Merriam, R. Walton Moore, Roland S. Morris, Dwight W. Morrow, Richard Olney, Peter Parker, Noah Porter, William Campbell Preston, Owen Josephus Roberts, Richard Rush, William Winston Seaton, Alexander Roby Shepherd, William Tecumseh Sherman, Otho Robards Singleton, Joseph Gilbert Totten, John Thomas Towers, Frederic C. Walcott, Richard Wallach, Thomas J. Watson, Jr., James E. Webb, James Clarke Welling, Andrew Dickson White, Henry White, Theodore Dwight Woolsey.
Topic:
Museums -- Administration  Search this
Museum trustees  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 1, Smithsonian Institution. Board of Regents, Minutes
Identifier:
Record Unit 1
See more items in:
Minutes
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0001
6 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Minutes digital asset number 1
  • View Minutes digital asset number 2
  • View Minutes digital asset number 3
  • View Minutes digital asset number 4
  • View Minutes digital asset number 5
  • View Minutes digital asset number 6

Website Records

Topic:
Tumblr (Electronic resource)
American History Through an African American Lens (Blog)
Facebook (Electronic resource)
YouTube (Electronic resource)
Storify (Electronic resource)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Electronic records
Date:
2012-2017
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of several websites and social media accounts documenting the promotion and marketing of the National Museum and African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) which opened to the public on September 24, 2016.

NMAAHC's primary website was crawled on August 26 (twice) and 28, September 16, 22, 23 (twice), 24 (three times), 25, and 27, 2016. The website includes information about visiting, exhibitions, events, and collections. Some crawls only include top-level pages of the website and extensive detailed collections information is not included in any of the crawls. Due to technical issues, some features of the website may not function properly in this accession.

NMAAHC's Tumblr blog, titled "American History through an African American Lens," was crawled on September 9 and October 4, 2016. Launched in February 2012, it highlights events, objects, and research.

The fundraising website established for the NMAAHC's "Giving Day," also September 24, 2016, was crawled on September 12 and 16, 2016.

The Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (CFCH) website was crawled on September 21, 2016. CFCH organized the "Freedom Sounds: A Community Celebration" festival in honor of the opening of NMAAHC. The festival ran September 23-25, 2016.

The top pages of the Smithsonian Institution website which announce the opening of the museum were crawled on September 24, 2016.

NMAAHC's Twitter account, a platform used for microblogging, was crawled on September 8, 21, 23, and 24 (twice), and October 7, 2016. The AskNMAAHC Twitter account, used to answer questions from the public about visiting NMAAHC, was crawled on February 7, 2017, but had been inactive since October 13, 2016. Tweets using two hashtags promoted by NMAAHC and used both for official tweets and by other institutions and the public were also captured. Tweets using "#illuminateNMAAHC" were captured between November 3, 2015, and September 30, 2016, and exported to a spreadsheet. Tweets using "#APeoplesJourney" were crawled on October 3, 2016.

NMAAHC's Storify account, used to document social media campaigns by combining content from several sources, was crawled on October 4, 2016.

NMAAHC's YouTube channel, used for sharing videos, was crawled in two pieces on October 5, 2016.

NMAAHC's Facebook account, used to communicate and share with the public, was crawled on both October 7 and 27, 2016.

Materials are in electronic format.
Topic:
Web sites  Search this
Blogs  Search this
Museums -- Public relations  Search this
Historical museums  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Special events  Search this
Fund raising  Search this
Social media  Search this
Online social networks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Electronic records
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 17-110, National Museum of African American History and Culture, Website Records
Identifier:
Accession 17-110
See more items in:
Website Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa17-110

Event Files

Extent:
9.5 cu. ft. (9 record storage boxes) (1 document box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Brochures
Clippings
Compact discs
Digital versatile discs
Electronic records
Floor plans
Color photographs
Date:
2008-2009
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of records which document planning of special events at the Smithsonian Institution, such as conferences, meetings, lectures, exhibition openings, receptions, and award presentations. Materials include correspondence, memoranda, and notes; proposals; budget summaries; event schedules; agreements; meeting agendas and minutes; program information; lecture papers; press releases and clippings; guest lists; biographical information; photographs; floor plans for events; invitations; and brochures. Some materials are in electronic format.
Topic:
Special events -- Marketing  Search this
Special events  Search this
Congresses and conventions  Search this
Lectures and lecturing  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Award presentations  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Brochures
Clippings
Compact discs
Digital versatile discs
Electronic records
Floor plans
Color photographs
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 16-344, Smithsonian Institution. Office of Special Events and Protocol, Event Files
Identifier:
Accession 16-344
See more items in:
Event Files
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa16-344

Calendars of Events

Extent:
1 cu. ft. (1 record storage box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Date:
1983-2014
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of calendars of events published by the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden documenting exhibitions, lectures, films, public programs, and other events. Some materials were created while the unit was known as the Office of Public Affairs, c. 1976-2003.
Topic:
Art museums  Search this
Art, Modern  Search this
Exhibitions  Search this
Special events  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 15-294, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. Communications and Marketing., Calendars of Events
Identifier:
Accession 15-294
See more items in:
Calendars of Events
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa15-294

Press Books

Extent:
8 cu. ft. (8 record storage boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Clippings
Compact discs
Electronic records
Date:
circa 1976-1985, 1989-1992, 1997-2011
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of records documenting press coverage of exhibitions, events, programs, staff, films, and general news at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. Materials include clippings, media reports, press releases, and related materials. Some materials are in electronic format. Some materials were created while the unit was known as the Office of Public Affairs, c. 1976-2003.
Topic:
Art, Modern  Search this
Art museums  Search this
Special events  Search this
Exhibitions  Search this
Publicity  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Clippings
Compact discs
Electronic records
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 15-292, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. Communications and Marketing., Press Books
Identifier:
Accession 15-292
See more items in:
Press Books
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa15-292

Publicity Records

Extent:
3.69 cu. ft. (3 record storage boxes) (1 16x20 box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Brochures
Manuscripts
Pamphlets
Compact discs
Electronic records
Date:
circa 1980-2015
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of records documenting publicity and outreach activities for the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden and its exhibitions, events, programs, and activities. Materials include brochures, flyers, pamphlets, invitations, announcements, guides, press packets, educational materials, advertisement mockups, stationary, planning documents, survey results, and related materials. Some materials are in electronic format. Some materials were created while the unit was known as the Office of Public Affairs, c. 1976-2003.
Topic:
Art, Modern  Search this
Art museums  Search this
Special events  Search this
Publicity  Search this
Exhibitions  Search this
Museums -- Educational aspects  Search this
Museums -- Public relations  Search this
Genre/Form:
Brochures
Manuscripts
Pamphlets
Compact discs
Electronic records
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 15-293, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. Communications and Marketing., Publicity Records
Identifier:
Accession 15-293
See more items in:
Publicity Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa15-293

Calendars of Events

Extent:
0.5 cu. ft. (1 document box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Date:
2005-2013
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of calendars of events published by the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. In addition to exhibitions, films, lectures, public programs, and other events, some calendars also document new acquisitions. The calendar was expanded to a magazine format from approximately 2008 through 2011.
Topic:
Exhibitions  Search this
Special events  Search this
Art, Modern  Search this
Art museums  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 15-080, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. Communications and Marketing., Calendars of Events
Identifier:
Accession 15-080
See more items in:
Calendars of Events
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa15-080

Special Events Press, 1995-1999

Container:
Box 12 of 18
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 12-497, Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum. Communications and Marketing, Clippings
See more items in:
Clippings
Clippings / Box 12
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-fa12-497-refidd1e1251

Special Events Press, 2001

Container:
Box 12 of 18
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 12-497, Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum. Communications and Marketing, Clippings
See more items in:
Clippings
Clippings / Box 12
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-fa12-497-refidd1e1262

Development Records

Extent:
2.5 cu. ft. (2 record storage boxes) (1 document box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Brochures
Clippings
Manuscripts
Floor plans
Color negatives
Color photographs
Color transparencies
Black-and-white photographs
Audiotapes
Date:
1963-1989
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of records documenting the overall administration of fund raising programs and marketing at the Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum. Topics include management of real property; renovation and expansion of buildings; capital campaigns; legislation; and special events. Materials include correspondence, agreements, legal documents, proposals, planning documents, audiotapes, object lists, financial reports, brochures, clippings, images, floor plans, architectural studies, background materials, and related materials.
Topic:
Art museums  Search this
Fund raising  Search this
Museum finance  Search this
Real property  Search this
Museum buildings  Search this
Museums -- Administration  Search this
Museums -- Law and legislation  Search this
Museums -- Public relations  Search this
Special events  Search this
Genre/Form:
Brochures
Clippings
Manuscripts
Floor plans
Color negatives
Color photographs
Color transparencies
Black-and-white photographs
Audiotapes
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 12-003, Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum. Department of Development and Marketing, Development Records
Identifier:
Accession 12-003
See more items in:
Development Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa12-003

SI marketing committee, 1992

Container:
Box 3 of 4
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 97-060, Cooper-Hewitt Museum. Office of Membership and Special Events, Event Files
See more items in:
Event Files
Event Files / Box 3
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-fa97-060-refidd1e1573

SI marketing committee, 1993

Container:
Box 4 of 4
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 97-060, Cooper-Hewitt Museum. Office of Membership and Special Events, Event Files
See more items in:
Event Files
Event Files / Box 4
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-fa97-060-refidd1e1681

Modify Your Search







or


Narrow By