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Festival Recordings: Smithsonian Narrative Stage: Last Run of John Bull; National Air and Space Museum, Why Popular?

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Working at the Smithsonian Program 1996 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Recorder:
Ruland, Tim  Search this
Ruland, Marcella  Search this
Artist:
Day, Richard  Search this
Goffney, Andrew  Search this
Withuhn, William L.  Search this
McMahon, Helen C.  Search this
Pernell, Lou  Search this
Ceruzzi, Paul  Search this
Performer:
Day, Richard  Search this
Goffney, Andrew  Search this
Withuhn, William L.  Search this
McMahon, Helen C.  Search this
Pernell, Lou  Search this
Ceruzzi, Paul  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette, analog)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1996 July 5
Track Information:
101 Planning Exhibitions / Andrew Goffney, William L. Withuhn, Richard Day.

102 Stories from the Field,Research; Planning Exhibitions / Helen C. McMahon, Lou Pernell, Paul Ceruzzi.
Local Numbers:
FP-1996-CT-0113
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, July 5, 1996.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Railroads -- Trains  Search this
Locomotives  Search this
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Space Shuttle Program (U.S.)  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
B-17 bomber  Search this
Function:
Exhibitions
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1996 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1996, Item FP-1996-CT-0113
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1996 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1996 Festival of American Folklife / Series 5: Working at the Smithsonian / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk548f6a1bd-3f75-4d0c-9f9a-79cf2f36b7d3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1996-ref2529

Festival Recordings: Smithsonian Narrative Stage: Women, National Museum American Indian; Conservation Columbia Capsule

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Working at the Smithsonian Program 1996 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Ruland, Tim (recorder)  Search this
Ruland, Marcella (recorder)  Search this
Performer:
Ballard, Amy  Search this
Grant, Lauren  Search this
Gaynor, Margaret C.  Search this
McManus, Ed  Search this
Baker, Mary T.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette, analog)
Culture:
African Americans -- 1960-1970  Search this
Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1996 July 7
Local Numbers:
FP-1996-CT-0122;FP-1996-CT-0122-7 and FP-1996-CT-0122-8 (merged)
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, July 7, 1996.
Track Information:
101 Women in the Workplace / Amy Ballard, Lauren Grant, Margaret C. Gaynor. 102 Conservation / Ed McManus, Mary T. Baker.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
American Indian  Search this
Gender  Search this
occupational folklore  Search this
Space Shuttle Program (U.S.)  Search this
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Chemistry  Search this
Aerospace industries  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1996 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1996, Item FP-1996-CT-0122
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1996 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1996 Festival of American Folklife / Series 5: Working at the Smithsonian / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk58ca42311-f52b-4250-b606-d085eb54984e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1996-ref2538

Hasselblad Space Shuttle Reels

Creator:
United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Hasselblad USA  Search this
Extent:
7.46 Cubic feet (11 flat boxes with 4 reels in each.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
70mm (photographic film size)
Date:
1984-1993
Summary:
Modified Hasselblad cameras have been used during space flight as early as the 1960s. During NASA's Space Transportation System (STS), crewmembers had 70mm handheld Hasselblad cameras to use in addition to the cameras mounted within the shuttle. Images within this collection mostly include Earth observations and flight deck activities from twenty-two space shuttle missions during the 1980s and early 1990s.
Scope and Contents:
This donation consists of forty-four 70mm color positive film reels containing still photography captured by a Hasselblad camera during the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Transportation System (STS), better known the Space Shuttle Program. The reels include images, mostly Earth observational and orbital photographs, from twenty-two missions during the 1980s and early 1990s.
Arrangement:
Arranged chronologically by mission.
Biographical / Historical:
Hasselblad cameras have been used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as early as Project Mercury in the 1960s. The cameras were later developed, modified, and employed in foundational human spaceflight programs as such the Apollo missions. By the beginning of Space Shuttle era in the 1970s, Hasselblad cameras were standard use for still photography in space. During NASA's Space Transportation System (STS), crewmembers had 70mm handheld Hasselblad cameras to use on the flight deck in addition to the cameras mounted within the shuttle. When shuttle missions returned to Earth, flight films went to the Johnson Space Center lab for processing post-flight. NASA kept the originals, and masters were created to be distributed to authorized interested parties. Hasselblad likely retained copies of the film to review functionality and troubleshoot technical issues.
Provenance:
Hasselblad Inc., Gift, 2021, NASM.2022.0002
Restrictions:
While there are no restrictions on access, please note that the National Air and Space Museum Archives is currently unable to safely review or reproduce this collection due to conservation concerns.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Space Shuttle Program (U.S.)  Search this
Space photography  Search this
Genre/Form:
70mm (photographic film size)
Citation:
Hasselblad Space Shuttle Reels, NASM.2022.0002, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2022.0002
See more items in:
Hasselblad Space Shuttle Reels
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg2c662bdb9-acea-4c19-ad36-0c44a8117278
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2022-0002
Online Media:

Robert C. Truax Collection

Creator:
Truax, Robert Collins, 1917-2010  Search this
Extent:
11.99 Cubic feet
12.95 Linear feet (21 Legal Size Boxes, 1 Slim Legal Size, 3 Shoe Boxes, 1 Flat Box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1929-2005
bulk 1980-2000
Summary:
Robert Truax was one of the great originals of American rocketry and a major proponent and inventor of ultra-low-cost rocket engine and vehicle concepts.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of material relating to the career of Robert Collins Truax including correspondence, photographic material, technical drawings, technical manuals and reports, presentation and conference materials, papers by Truax, news clippings, published materials and business records for Truax Engineering, Inc.

Projects and programs referenced in this collection include the Knievel Rocket Car (Truax X-2 Sky-Cycle); X-3 Volksrocket; amphibious launchers, including the "Sea Dragon," "Sea Horse," and SEALAR (Sea Launched Rocket); the Space Shuttle program; the Gemini and Apollo programs; Rocketdyne LR89 Liquid-Fuel Motors; Rand Project; the Corona Reconnaissance Satellite; and Project Private Enterprise.

The researcher should note that the collection also contains audio-visual material. These items are not included in the finding aid but the NASM audio-visual archivist can assist you regarding access.
Arrangement:
This collection was arranged into series by the processing archivist. There was no original order when the collection was received.

Series 1: Personal & Business Papers

Series 2: Papers Authored by R.C. Truax

Series 3: Drawings

Series 4: Images

4:1 - Slides

4:2 - Photos, Negatives & Floppy Discs
Acronyms:
Numerous acronyms were used by the creator when labeling his file units. Some will be obvious to the researcher but the archivist has identified some acronyms that might be more unclear. Not all acronyms were able to be identified.

AFRL - Air Force Research Lab

ATD - Advanced Technology Development

BAA - possibly Broad Agency Announcement

BMDO - Ballistic Missile Defense Organization

CDRL - Contract Data Requirements List?

CPAI - Chemical Propulsion Information Agency

ITAR - International Traffic in Arms Regulations

KACST - King Abdulaziz City for Science & Technology

MSFC - Marshall Space Flight Center

PMRF - Pacific Missile Range Facility

RSLP - Rocket Systems Launch Program

SEALAR - Sea Launch & Recovery

TEI - Truax Engineering Inc.

TPIPT - Technology Planning Integrated Product Teams
Biographical / Historical:
Robert Truax (1917-2010) was one of the great originals of American rocketry and a major proponent and inventor of ultra-low-cost rocket engine and vehicle concepts. A longtime member of the American Rocket Society (serving as its president in 1957,) He received the Robert H. Goddard award for outstanding work in liquid propellant rockets as well as the Legion of Merit citation for his conceptual work on making the "Polaris" guided-missile submarine a primary naval weapon. Truax was also inducted into the Air Force Space and Missile Pioneers Hall of Fame in 2003.

Inspired by Robert Goddard, Truax began building rockets when he was a teenager in California. From 1936 to 1939, while enrolled at the United States Naval Academy, he tested liquid-fueled rocket motors. During the late 1940s, he organized the US Naval Missile Test Center's propulsion laboratory at Point Mugu, California, and headed rocket development within the Navy's Bureau of Aeronotics where he advanced the concept of a staged combustion system upon which the Space Shuttle's main engines would eventually rely. In 1946, Truax led a team that interrogated the rocket engineer for Nazi Germany, Wernher von Braun.

By 1955, however, his proposal for a submarine-launched ballistic missile had failed to win Navy approval and he joined the Air Force's newly established Western Development Division (WDD) From 1955 to 1958, Captain Truax headed the Thor intermediate-range ballistic missile (IRBM) development program. Truax studied the sea launching of rockets, such as the Sea Bee and Sea Horse projects. In 1959 he retired as a Captain, and headed the Aerojet-General Advanced Development Division and Aerojet's Sea Dragon project in the Advanced Development Division until leaving in 1967. In 1966 Robert Truax founded Truax Engineering Inc. (TEI,) which studied sea launch concepts similar to the earlier Sea Dragon—the Excalibur, the SEALAR (Sea Launched Rocket,) and the Excalibur S. Here his low-cost booster program plan was elaborated and further studied, but he was again unable to interest NASA or the USAF in the concept of cheap access to space.

In the 70's and early 80's, Truax, heretofore prominent in scientific communities, emerged in popular culture. Literally building rockets from his own backyard in Saratoga, Truax built both of Evel Knievel's "Skycycles" for his 1974 for attempt to jump the Snake River Canyon. He later competed in the original X-prize competition to send a private astronaut into suborbital flight.

Robert Truax, died on September 17 aged 93, as a key figure in the rocket research that took America into the space age, while also being an inspiration to the do-it-yourself, back-yard amateur.
Provenance:
Truax Estate, gift, 2016
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Permissions Requests
Topic:
Truax X-3 Volksrocket  Search this
SEALAR (Sea Launched Rocket)  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Space Shuttle Program (U.S.)  Search this
Kneival Rocket Car (Truax X-2 Sky-Cycle)  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
RAND  Search this
North American Aviation, Inc. Rocketdyne Division  Search this
Citation:
Robert C. Truax Collection, Acc. 2016-0008, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2016.0008
See more items in:
Robert C. Truax Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg2263b6530-2539-40a0-9d6a-78b8f3e274e8
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2016-0008
Online Media:

Assembling and supplying the ISS the Space Shuttle fulfills its mission David J. Shayler

Author:
Shayler, David 1955-  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource (xix, 350 pages) illustrations (some color)
Type:
Electronic resources
Electronic books
Date:
2017
Topic:
Space stations--Design and construction  Search this
Aerospace & aviation technology  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Technical design  Search this
Popular science  Search this
TECHNOLOGY & ENGINEERING--Engineering (General)  Search this
Call number:
TL797 .S539 2017 (Internet)
Restrictions & Rights:
1-user
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1147338

Jacques Tiziou Space Collection

Names:
United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Extent:
146 Cubic feet (204 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Moon -- Exploration
Date:
bulk 1960s through 2010
Summary:
Jacques Tiziou (1939-2017) was a professional journalist and photographer, concentrating on aerospace topics. This collection includes materials from Tiziou's archive of historical documents, photography, and ephemera from the space program (both national and international) as well as his own photography and writings.
Scope and Contents:
Always an avid collector, Tiziou amassed an impressive archive of both historical documents and collectible memorabilia from the space program (both national and international), including over 800 cubic feet of press files, films, photography (including autographed crew photographs) and various souvenirs, from Sputnik to the US Space Shuttle Program. This archival collection consists of 146 cubic feet of materials drawn from Tiziou's original collection, including documents, ephemera, photographs, slides, and video/film, created or collected by Jacques Tiziou on space flight history. Much of the material was gathered from various sources such as NASA, but the collection also contains Tiziou's own photographs and writings.
Arrangement:
The material in the "Files" series has been removed from Tiziou's original file boxes and rehoused into new acid-free containers preserving the original order of each box's contents. The collection's boxes have been rearranged into subseries grouped by regional identity (USA, USSR, International, etc.) and then alphabetically by broad subject matter.

The "Photography" series has not yet been processed.
Biographical / Historical:
Jacques Tiziou (1939-2017) was a professional journalist and photographer, concentrating on aerospace topics. Born in Montélimar, France, he began his career while still a teen as a freelance journalist, and even before graduating in 1962 from the French engineering school Estaca he had worked for various European publications, radio, and television. Between 1965 and 1968, he was the Editor in Chief of the first Encyclopedia of Space and in 1969 he published A l'assault de la lune (A Storm of the Moon). Tiziou then moved to Florida, where he closely followed the Apollo and Skylab programs as a correspondent for Aviation Magazine, French TV channels and photo agencies, including Dalmas, Gamma, and Sygma (Corbis). While in Florida, Tiziou became friends with most American astronauts, and entertained them at his home. Tiziou was also interested in space policy affairs, and after the end of the Skylab program, he moved to Washington DC. Jacques Tiziou was awarded the Silver Feathers and Gold of the French Press, was named a correspondent for the Air and Space Academy in 1993, and was elected to the French National Academy of Air and Space in 1993.
Provenance:
Jacques-Jean Tiziou, Gift, 2018, NASM.2018.0078.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Supersonic transport planes  Search this
Artificial satellites  Search this
Ballistic missiles  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
Space flight  Search this
Space vehicles  Search this
Cold War -- 1950-1970  Search this
Apollo Project  Search this
Mercury Project  Search this
Gemini Project  Search this
Soyuz Program (Russia)  Search this
Saturn 5 Launch Vehicle  Search this
Space Shuttle Program (U.S.)  Search this
Project Vanguard  Search this
Vostok (manned satellite)  Search this
Citation:
Jacques Tiziou Space Collection, Acc. 2018.0078, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2018.0078
See more items in:
Jacques Tiziou Space Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg275fd61ff-7ccf-42e9-b351-e9b69d2081e8
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2018-0078

Kennedy Space Center Photograph Collection

Creator:
John F. Kennedy Space Center  Search this
Names:
Space Shuttle Program (U.S.)  Search this
Extent:
17.44 Cubic feet (16 boxes))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Date:
bulk 1974-2002
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of approximately sixteen cubic feet of Kennedy Space Center press release photographs, both black and white and color. Most of the photography is concerned with the Space Shuttle missions, and includes imagery of the following: astronauts, including official portraits; astronaut training; launch preparations; shuttle launches; and astronauts during the space missions. There are also a few images of unmanned launch preparations and launch.
Provenance:
Kennedy Space Center, Gift, 2004
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Space Shuttle Orbiter  Search this
Space vehicles  Search this
Space flight  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Astronauts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Kennedy Space Center Photograph Collection, Accession 2004-0042, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2004.0042
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg2ed811f76-d667-4cf5-805b-0e5d0ecacdba
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2004-0042

Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) Drawings

Creator:
Jet Propulsion Laboratory (U.S.)  Search this
United States. National Imagery and Mapping Agency. Geodesy & Geophysics  Search this
Names:
Shuttle Radar Topography Mission  Search this
Extent:
0.79 Cubic feet (Two letter boxes.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Technical drawings
Technical manuals
Date:
1999
Summary:
This collection consists of drawings, inspection report sheets, and a manual relating to the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists the following relating to the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission: JPL inspection report sheets; the manual, "Cargo Systems Manual (CSM): Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM)," which includes technical drawings of the antennas; and nineteen J size drawings of the SRTM.
Arrangement:
Arrangement by type.
Biographical / Historical:
In 2000, the Space Shuttle Endeavour carried the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) payload into orbit. Shuttle astronauts used the payload, manufactured by the AEC-Able Engineering Co., to map in high detail and three dimensions more than 70 percent of the Earth's surface--the most complete and accurate rendering of the planet's land masses ever attempted. To acquire this data, the SRTM used a novel hardware system that featured a main antenna located in the Shuttle payload bay, a folding mast (in the mast canister) that extended 60 meters from the Shuttle, and then another antenna system that was positioned at the end of the mast (the outboard structure). It was this dual antenna system — the largest rigid structure then flown in space — that produced, through interferometry (a technique for combining the information obtained from the two, separate antennas), a three-dimensional mapping of the Earth. The mission was a joint undertaking of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the Department of Defense's National Imagery and Mapping Agency. The military will use the highest resolution data from SRTM for terrain navigation for planes and cruise missiles. A lower resolution data set will be made available to civilian scientists and other users.
Provenance:
Transfer from NASM Space History Department, 2019, NASM.2019.0051
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Space Shuttle Program (U.S.)  Search this
Topographical surveying  Search this
Astronautics, Military  Search this
Genre/Form:
Technical drawings
Technical manuals -- 20th century
Citation:
Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) Drawings, NASM.2019.0051, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2019.0051
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg2f1925ae1-70ab-42b2-8b75-e09709047bf1
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2019-0051

Office of Commercial Space Transportation Collection [Johnson]

Creator:
United States. Office of Commercial Space Transportation  Search this
Johnson, Sara Madeline  Search this
Extent:
0.79 Cubic feet (2 letter document boxes.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1986
Summary:
This collection consists of documents relating to Madeline Johnson and her role as Director of the Office of Commercial Space Transportation (OCST).
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of documents relating to Madeline Johnson and her role as Director of the OCST, including agendas, memorandums, reports, presentations, her statements in front of Congress, and newspaper articles. Of special interest are the Economic Policy Council's Commercial Space Working Group documents and recommendations to President Reagan on commercializing satellite launches.
Arrangement:
No arrangement.
Biographical / Historical:
President Reagan signed Executive Order 12465 on February 25, 1984, designating the Department of Transportation to be the lead agency for commercial expendable launch vehicles. Later that year, the Office of Commercial Space Transportation (OCST) was established and placed in the Office of the Secretary. Madeline Johnson was selected by then Secretary of Transportation Elizabeth Dole to be the Director of OCST in 1986. During her tenure, Johnson worked to build a cross-government coalition to persuade President Reagan to create the opportunity for a private-sector satellite launching industry; this was especially needed as the Challenger accident had grounded Space Shuttle missions. The OCST was moved from the Office of the Secretary and today resides with the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The OCST now gives final approval of any commercial rocket launch operations involving a U.S. launch operator or a launch from the U.S.
Provenance:
Estate of Sara Madeline Johnson, Gift, 2020, NASM.2020.0015
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Astronautics and state  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
Space Shuttle Program (U.S.)  Search this
Satellites  Search this
Space industrialization  Search this
Citation:
Office of Commercial Space Transportation Collection [Johnson], NASM.2020.0015, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2020.0015
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg2bb7e7e1a-0a57-4ab6-915d-f8424a59cc37
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2020-0015

Pamela A. Melroy Papers

Extent:
17.6 Cubic feet (19 containers)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Technical reports
Photographic prints
Newspaper clippings
Correspondence
Date:
1961-2008
bulk 1980s-2000s
Summary:
This collection consists of 17 cubic feet of papers relating to the life and career of astronaut Pamela A. Melroy.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of 17 cubic feet of correspondence, memoranda, reports, checklists, manuals, notes, photographs, brochures, pamphlets, programs, newsletters, newspaper and magazine articles, and related training materials created or collected by Pamela A. Melroy over the course of her life and career. This material is particularly rich in materials documenting her NASA astronaut career, but also includes significant insight into her USAF career and material relating to her childhood and college years.
Arrangement:
No final arrangement as collection has not been fully processed; box listing is available.
Biographical / Historical:
Pamela Ann Melroy (Col., USAF, Ret.), had a distinguished 26-year career as a pilot in the US Air Force and NASA's Shuttle-era astronaut corps. Melroy is one of only two women to command spaceflight missions, and she is one of the earliest women to fly combat missions, graduate from USAF Test Pilot School, and serve as a military test pilot. Melroy graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Physics and Astronomy from Wellesley College, 1983 and a Master of Science degree in Earth and Planetary Sciences from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1984. Melroy joined the Air Force ROTC program, becoming Cadet Wing Commander and Top Graduate, in 1983. She entered the US Air Force, completed flight training in 1985, and received assignments to fly the McDonnell Douglas KC-10 refueling tanker aircraft. She flew combat missions and supported combat operations in Operation Just Cause and Operation Desert Storm/Desert Shield (1990-1991). She then graduated from Air Force Test Pilot School at Edwards AFB and was assigned to evaluate the C-17 transport aircraft, setting eleven world records in that effort. Rising to the rank of major, serving as aircraft commander and instructor, and flying more than 50 different aircraft, Melroy attained the experience needed to compete for selection as a NASA pilot astronaut. NASA selected Melroy in 1995 in astronaut Class XV. She completed training and technical assignments and flew her first mission as pilot on STS-92 (Discovery) in 2000, attaining the rank of colonel upon completing delivery and installation of the Z1 truss on the International Space Station. Her second flight, STS-112 (Atlantis), occurred in 2002, for delivery and installation of the third ISS truss segment. Melroy then was selected for two very significant roles in the wake of the STS-107 Columbia tragedy in 2003. She first served as Lead for the Crew Module/Crew Equipment recovery and reconstruction effort, and then co-led the subsequent Columbia Crew Survival Investigation Study and resultant published report (NASA SP 2008-565). Melroy's third and final shuttle mission was STS-120 (Discovery) to deliver Node 2 (Harmony) to the International Space Station in 2007. In addition, it included a technically challenging unplanned repair of damaged solar arrays. This mission marked the first time that two spacecraft in orbit simultaneously were commanded by women, Melroy on the shuttle and Peggy Whitson on the space station. Melroy's final assignment before retiring from NASA in 2009 was Chief of the Orion branch of the Astronaut Office, working on development of the next crew vehicle. Upon leaving NASA, she became involved in developing regulations for commercial spaceflight and other pursuits.
Provenance:
Pam Melroy, Gift, 2018, NASM.2018.0034
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
United States Air Force  Search this
Astronauts  Search this
Space Shuttle Program (U.S.)  Search this
Technical manuals  Search this
McDonnell Douglas KC-10  Search this
International Space Station (ISS)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Technical reports
Photographic prints
Newspaper clippings
Correspondence -- 21st century
Citation:
Pamela A. Melroy Papers, NASM.2018.0034, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2018.0034
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg2a22e1f52-ea7e-48df-9823-34270840f9ea
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2018-0034

Space Shuttle Discovery (OV-103) Datapack

Creator:
United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Names:
Space Shuttle Program (U.S.)  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot ((1 box))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Reports
Date:
bulk 2011
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of four volumes of the Space Shuttle Discovery (OV-103) Datapack. Volume I was prepared by The Boeing Company and contains data divided into the following sections: Introduction; Space Shuttle System Overview; Shuttle Program Flight / Mission Numbering Systems; Space Shuttle Program Milestone; Space Shuttle Elements' Initial Space Shuttle System Requirements; Major Program Sites; Kennedy Space Center; Orbiter Vehicle Structural Components; Dimensions and Weights; Orbiter Vehicle Features; Vehicle Coordinate System; Orbiter Vehicle Systems Descriptions; Mission Profiles; Post Program Hazardous Material Safing; Orbiter Vehicle Access; Space Shuttle and Orbiter Vehicle Documentation; Orbiter Vehicle History; STS-133 Last Flight of OV-103 Discovery; and Engineering Drawings. Volume II contains the Space Shuttle Program Requirements Control Board Change Requests and Presentations, including Space Shuttle Program Change Requests and Presentations; End State Flow Review Freeze Point; Delta End State Requirements; Line Replaceable Unit; Display Site Requirements; Transition and Retirement Configurations; Final Configuration Requirements Mission Equipment - Cargo Support Launch Site Installations; Crew Compartment Confirmation Drawings; and Orbiter Configuration Verification Report. Volume III contains information on the Space Shuttle Closeout Requirements, including: Orbiter End State Requirements; Space Shuttle End State Subsystem Requirements; and the Orbiter Fleet Safing Document. Volume IV contains the Flight Requirements Document for STS-133, the OV-103 Middeck Locker Layout Drawings and General History, including: Composite Schedule History; Space Shuttle Program Manifest; Management Integration Flight History; and Space Shuttle Missions Summary (OV103 flights only).
Biographical / Historical:
Discovery was the third Space Shuttle orbiter to fly in space. It entered service in 1984 and retired from spaceflight as the oldest and most accomplished orbiter, the champion of the shuttle fleet. Discovery flew on 39 Earth-orbital missions, spent a total of 365 days in space, and traveled almost 240 million kilometers (150 million miles)--more than the other orbiters. It shuttled 184 men and women into space and back, many of whom flew more than once, for a record-setting total crew count of 251. Because Discovery flew every kind of mission the Space Shuttle was meant to fly, it embodies well the 30-year history of U.S. human spaceflight from 1981 to 2011. Named for renowned sailing ships of exploration, Discovery is preserved as intact as possible as it last flew in 2011 on the 133rd Space Shuttle mission. NASA transferred Discovery to the Smithsonian in April 2012 after a delivery flight over the nation's capital.
Provenance:
NASA, Gift, 2012, but transferred to Archives from Space History in 2017
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Space Shuttles, Discovery (OV-103)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Reports
Citation:
Space Shuttle Discovery (OV-103) Datapack, Accession 2017-0041, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2017.0041
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg2b384473b-2e31-45a3-b3af-3c045c5282d8
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2017-0041

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Space Station Freedom Viewgraph Presentation

Creator:
United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Names:
Space Shuttle Program (U.S.)  Search this
Extent:
0.05 Cubic feet (1 folder)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Transparencies
Date:
bulk 1983-1986
Summary:
Space Station Freedom was a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) project from the 1980s that, although it was never brought to fruition as such, evolved into the International Space Station (ISS). This collection consists of a viewgraph presentation on Space Station Freedom prepared by Terence T. Finn to be given by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) administrator James Montgomery Beggs to President Ronald Wilson Reagan and the Cabinet Council on December 1, 1983.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of a viewgraph presentation on Space Station Freedom prepared by Terence T. Finn to be given by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) administrator James Montgomery Beggs to President Ronald Wilson Reagan and the Cabinet Council on December 1, 1983. The presentation includes information about the United States' space policy; other NASA programs such as the Space Shuttle; advantages of a space station program; and information on the Soviet Salyut space station. The collection also includes talking points (dated November 30, 1983) for the presentation and a NASA publication entitled, "The Space Station: A Description of the Configuration Established at the Systems Requirements Review (SRR)," dated June 1986. Scans of the individual pages of the presentation and a copy of the presentation put together as a PowerPoint file were provided by the donor and these are housed with the collection on a USB flash drive.
Biographical / Historical:
Space Station Freedom was a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) project that, although it was never brought to fruition as such, evolved into the International Space Station (ISS). NASA began developing Freedom in the early 1980s and the project was announced in then-President Ronald Wilson Reagan's 1984 State of the Union address. Many of the design components of Freedom were later incorporated into the ISS. Terence T. Finn was a member of NASA's Space Station Task Force.
Provenance:
Terence T. Finn, Gift, 2013, NASM.2013.0052.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Space stations  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Astronautics and state  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Transparencies
Citation:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Space Station Freedom Viewgraph Presentation, Acc. NASM.2013.0052, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2013.0052
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg26cd3edda-13d7-4bce-b6fc-bf91e1f3dc65
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2013-0052
Online Media:

David M. Brown Papers

Creator:
Brown, David M.  Search this
United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
United States. Navy  Search this
Extent:
11.76 Cubic feet (33 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Mini dv (videotape format).
Technical manuals
Commercial correspondence
Calendars
Reports
Date:
1970-2005
bulk 1980-2002
Summary:
The David M. Brown Papers consist of almost twelve cubic feet of archival material documenting his career as a U.S. Navy flight surgeon, naval aviator, and NASA astronaut. It includes Brown's diaries, manuals, checklists, certificates, workbooks, notebooks, and related training materials.
Scope and Contents:
The David M. Brown Papers reflect Brown's career as a U.S. Navy flight surgeon, naval aviator, and NASA astronaut. Represented in some of the collection's correspondence, memoranda, and other materials is his early interest in becoming an astronaut, his applying to NASA, and his selection by the space agency as an astronaut candidate. Most of this collection consists of materials related to his professional work. A large part of this series is composed of technical manuals, handbooks and checklists. Also included in this grouping are official U.S. Navy/NASA documents, correspondence, memoranda, drafts, worksheets, reports, handouts, briefings, notes, photographs, invitations, programs, pamphlets, books, booklets, guidebooks, magazines, journals, and miscellaneous materials. The rest of the collection contains a small amount of personal materials. This includes personal documents from Brown (birth certificate, passports, etc.), correspondence, day planners, yearbooks, photographs, and miscellaneous materials. The collection also includes 160 mini DV (SD) tapes that Brown shot of the astronaut crew training for STS-107 Columbia.
Arrangement:
The Brown Papers are organized into two broad series. First, is the material pertaining to Brown's personal life. This includes personal documents, correspondence, day planners, yearbooks and photographs. The second series contains papers revolving around Brown's professional life. This includes official U.S. Navy/NASA documents, correspondence, memoranda, notes, drafts, reports, handouts, briefings, a variety of manuals, checklists, handbooks, procedures and instructions, notebooks, photographs, invitations, programs, pamphlets, books, guidebooks, magazines, journals, and miscellaneous materials. Brown's papers are arranged both chronologically and alphabetically. Official and personal documents, correspondence, memoranda, notes, drafts, worksheets, photographs, invitations, programs, pamphlets, magazines, journals, day planners, yearbooks and miscellaneous materials are organized by the former method. Reports, handouts, briefings, manuals, handbooks, checklists, procedures, instructions, books, booklets, and guidebooks are arranged alphabetically by title. The reader will note that the parts of this finding aid containing manuals, handbooks, checklists, procedures, and instructions are further organized into the following groupings: NASA only, corporation/contractor only, jointly-issued NASA and corporation/contractor, and miscellaneous.

The reader should note that this group of material also contains a collection of films pertaining to Brown's life and career as an astronaut. A National Air and Space Museum (NASM) Archives staff person can assist you regarding access to these films.

SERIES I -- Personal Papers

Personal Documents

Correspondence

Day Planners

Yearbooks

Photographs

Miscellaneous Materials

SERIES II -- Professional Papers

Official U.S. Navy/NASA Documents

Correspondence

Memoranda

Notes, Drafts, and Worksheets

Reports, Handouts, and Briefings

Manuals, Handbooks, Checklists, Procedures, and Instructions

Notebooks and Workbooks

Photographs

Invitations, Programs, and Pamphlets

Books

Booklets and Guidebooks

Magazines and Journals

Newsletters

News Clippings

Miscellaneous Materials

Oversized Materials
Biographical / Historical:
David M. Brown was a U.S. Navy officer, flight surgeon, naval aviator, and Space Shuttle astronaut. Born in Arlington, Virginia, on April 16, 1956, Brown earned a B.S. in biology from the College of William and Mary in 1978 and a doctorate in medicine from Eastern Virginia Medical School in 1982. During his years in college, he performed in the Circus Kingdom as an unicyclist, stilt walker, and acrobat. Upon completing an internship at the Medical University of South Carolina, Brown joined the Navy and finished his flight surgeon training in 1984. After a stint as director of medical services at the Navy Branch Hospital in Adak, Alaska, he was then assigned to Carrier Airwing Fifteen which deployed aboard the USS Carl Vinson in the western section of the Pacific Ocean. In 1988, Brown was selected for pilot training, the only flight surgeon chosen for this program in over ten years. Two years later, he was designated a naval aviator and ranked first in his class. Subsequently, Brown was sent for training and carrier qualification in the Grumman A-6E Intruder. In 1991, he was attached to the Naval Strike Warfare Center in Fallon, Nevada, where he served as a Strike Leader Attack Training Syllabus Instructor and a Contingency Cell Planning Officer. The following year, he was sent to serve aboard the USS Independence, flying the A-6E with squadron VA-115. In 1995, he reported to the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School as their flight surgeon. By this time, Brown was qualified in a variety of military aircraft, including the McDonnell Douglas F-18 Hornet and the Northrop T-38 Talon. All told, Brown accumulated over 2,700 hours with 1,700 in high performance military aircraft.

For a long time, Brown harbored a strong desire to become an astronaut. During the mid 1990s, he applied for admission into the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) astronaut corps. In April 1996, Brown was selected as an astronaut candidate by the space agency and reported to the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas, later that year. By 1998, he completed his training and evaluation, and was qualified for flight assignment as a mission specialist. Initially, Brown was given the task of supporting payload development for the International Space Station (ISS), followed by an assignment on the astronaut support team responsible for Space Shuttle cockpit setup, crew strap-in, and landing recovery. Eventually, he was assigned a flight aboard Space Shuttle Columbia for the STS-107 mission. Columbia was launched from the Kennedy Space center (KSC) on January 16, 2003. This 16-day flight was dedicated to scientific research while in Earth orbit. On February 1, after the successful in-space mission and only minutes from its scheduled landing at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Cape Canaveral, Florida, the orbiter suffered structural failure upon reentry into the atmosphere and disintegrated over Texas and Louisiana. Brown, as well as the other six members of the STS-107 crew, was killed in the accident. Brown logged 15 days, 22 hours and 20 minutes of space flight experience.

The following chronology covers key events in Brown's life, as well as in the realm of space exploration history. Events involving Brown are shown in normal type while those of the latter are shown in bold type.

1956 April 16 -- Brown born in Arlington, Virginia

1957 October 4 -- Russia's successful launch of first artificial satellite,Sputnik 1

1958 January 31 -- Successful launch of first U.S. artificial satellite,Explorer 1

1961 April 12 -- Russia's successful launch of first human into space, Yuri Gagarin aboardVostok 1

1961 May 5 -- Successful launch of first U.S. astronaut into space, Alan Shepard aboard Mercury-Redstone 3 (Freedom 7)

1969 July 16-24 -- Flight ofApollo 11succeeds in landing U.S. astronauts on the moon

1972 -- The Nixon administration approves the Space Shuttle as a national program

1974 -- Brown graduates from Yorktown High School, Yorktown, Virginia

1977 August-October -- Series of five Approach and Landing Tests (within the atmosphere) of Space ShuttleEnterprise

1978 -- Brown graduates from William and Mary College with a B.S. in biology

1981 April 12 -- First launch into earth orbit for the Space Shuttle program byColumbia(STS-1)

1982 -- Brown graduates from Eastern Virginia Medical School with a doctorate in Medicine (M.D.)

1984 -- Brown completes his U.S. Navy flight surgeon training

1986 January 28 -- Space ShuttleChallenger(STS-51-L) explodes shortly after launch, killing all on board

1988 -- Brown is selected by the U.S. Navy for pilot training

1988 September 29 -- Return to flight of the Space Shuttle program byDiscovery(STS-26)

1990 -- Brown is designated as a naval aviator and ranks first in his class

1990 April 24 -- Launch of Space ShuttleDiscovery(STS-31) with Hubble Space Telescope (HST) as payload

1991 -- Brown is attached to the Naval Strike Warfare Center in Fallon, Nevada

1992 -- Brown serves aboard aircraft carrier USS Independence and pilots the Grumman A-6E Intruder aircraft with VA-115

1995 -- Brown reports to U.S. Naval Test Pilot School as the flight surgeon

1996 April -- Brown is selected by NASA as an astronaut candidate (ASCAN)

1998 -- Brown successfully completes his astronaut training and evaluation

1998 October 29 -- Launch of Space ShuttleDiscovery(STS-95) with astronaut John Glenn returning to space after his first orbital flight aboardFriendship 7in 1962

2003 January 16 -- Launch of Brown and the crew of Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-107)

2003 February 1 -- STS-107 disintegrates over Texas and Louisiana shortly before scheduled landing at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, with the loss of Brown and the crew
Provenance:
Paul and Dorothy Brown, Gift, 2006
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Space flight  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Space Shuttles, Columbia (OV-102)  Search this
Space Shuttle Program (U.S.)  Search this
Color photography  Search this
Genre/Form:
Mini DV (Videotape format).
Technical manuals -- 20th century
Commercial correspondence
Calendars
Reports
Citation:
David M. Brown Papers, NASM.2006.0013, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2006.0013
See more items in:
David M. Brown Papers
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg24a029df4-8d5d-4bed-8344-7ab68f118e5a
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2006-0013
Online Media:

Kathryn D. Sullivan Papers

Creator:
Sullivan, Kathryn  Search this
Names:
United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Extent:
11.5 Cubic feet (15 boxes.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1970s - 2010s
Summary:
This collection consists of approximately 11.5 cubic feet of papers, photographs, certificates, and video/film, created or collected by Kathryn Sullivan, spanning her lifetime of achievement.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of approximately 11 cubic feet of papers, photographs, certificates, and video/film, created or collected by Kathryn Sullivan. The papers show her myriad contributions to space science and exploration, and spans her lifetime of achievements.
Arrangement:
This collection has not been processed; only a box listing is available.
Biographical / Historical:
Dr. Kathryn D. Sullivan (b. 1951) has had a long career as a distinguished scientist, astronaut, and oceanographer. She was one of the first six women selected into the NASA astronaut corps in 1978 and was the first American female astronaut to walk in space (October 11, 1984.) During her 15-year NASA career, Dr. Sullivan flew on three space shuttle missions, notably the one that deployed the Hubble Space Telescope. In 1993, Dr. Sullivan left NASA to accept the presidential appointment to the post of Chief Scientist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). From 1996 - 2006, Dr. Sullivan served as President and CEO of the hands-on science center, Central Ohio Science Institute (COSI) in Columbus, Ohio. Dr. Sullivan then served as the Inaugural Director of the Battelle Center for Mathematics and Science Education Policy in the John Glenn School of Public Affairs at the Ohio State University. Dr. Sullivan, a specialist in deep-sea geology, finished her career back at NOAA as the Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere, where she oversaw a broad portfolio of research and technology programs in such diverse areas as fisheries biology, climate and global change, satellite instrumentation and marine biodiversity. Dr. Sullivan was the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum's 2017 Charles A. Lindbergh Chair of Aerospace History; her topic was the development of satellite service of the Hubble Telescope. Dr. Sullivan was also an oceanography officer with the United States Navy Reserve (1988-2006), retiring with the rank of captain.
Provenance:
Kathryn D. Sullivan, Gift, 2018, NASM.2019.0007
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Space Shuttle Program (U.S.)  Search this
Space sciences  Search this
Hubble (Large) Space Telescope  Search this
Oceanography  Search this
Citation:
Kathryn D. Sullivan Papers, NASM.2019.0007, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2019.0007
See more items in:
Kathryn D. Sullivan Papers
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg2f15d66b1-23b3-47f0-97f1-e66162046440
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2019-0007
Online Media:

Space shuttle : developing an icon : 1972-2013 / Dennis R. Jenkins

Author:
Jenkins, Dennis R.  Search this
Subject:
Space Shuttle Program (U.S.) History  Search this
Physical description:
3 volume : illustrations (some color) ; 29 cm
Type:
Books
History
Place:
United States
Date:
2016
Topic:
Space shuttles--Design and construction--History  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1082737

Payload information handbook / prepared by: Erin Myers, MDSSC-KSC

Editor:
Myers, Erin  Search this
Issuing body:
John F. Kennedy Space Center Payload Projects Directorate  Search this
Subject:
Space Shuttle Program (U.S.)  Search this
Physical description:
xvi, 290 pages : illustrations ; 28 cm
Type:
Handbooks, manuals, etc
Date:
1990
Topic:
Space shuttles--Payloads  Search this
Space sciences--Experiments  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1039574

Identification and evaluation of educational uses and users for the STS : working title for this study, Educational planning for utilization of Space Shuttle : ED-PLUSS / by Harry A. Engle prinicipal investigator and David L. Christensen co-principal investigator

Title:
Educational planning for utilization of Space Shuttle : ED-PLUSS
Author:
Engle, Harry A.  Search this
Christensen, David L.  Search this
Author:
George C. Marshall Space Flight Center  Search this
Publisher:
University of Alabama in Huntsville School of Graduate Studies and Research  Search this
Subject:
Space Shuttle Program (U.S.) Public relations  Search this
Physical description:
iv, 123 leaves : illustrations ; 28 cm + 2 microfiches
Type:
Microforms
Place:
United States
Date:
1974
Topic:
Space sciences--Study and teaching  Search this
Astronautics--Study and teaching  Search this
Educational planning  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1039958

Space Shuttle Program mission operation report : orbital flight test reference document

Title:
Orbital flight test reference document
Author:
United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Distributor:
United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration Headquarters Administration Division  Search this
Subject:
Space Shuttle Program (U.S.)  Search this
Physical description:
ix, 220 pages : illustrations ; 28 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
United States
Date:
1981
Topic:
Space shuttles  Search this
Manned space flight--Planning  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1046894

Chronology of space shuttle flights, 1981-2000 / compiled by Judy A. Rumerman with Stephen J. Garber

Author:
Rumerman, Judy A  Search this
Garber, Stephen J  Search this
United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration History Office  Search this
Subject:
Space Shuttle Program (U.S.) History  Search this
Physical description:
34 pages : illustrations ; 28 cm
Type:
Chronology
Chronologies
History
Place:
United States
Date:
2000
[2000]
Topic:
Space shuttles--History  Search this
Space flight--History  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1091824

Space Shuttle missions summary / Robert D. Legler, Floyd V. Bennett ; Mission Operations, Johnson Space Center

Compiler:
Legler, Robert D.  Search this
Bennett, Floyd V.  Search this
Publisher:
United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Author:
Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center Mission Operations Directorate  Search this
Subject:
Space Shuttle Program (U.S.) History  Search this
Physical description:
300 pages in various pagings : color illustrations ; 28 cm
Type:
Electronic resources
Place:
United States
Date:
2011
Topic:
Space shuttles--History  Search this
Space flights--History  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1039960

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