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Sam DeVincent Collection of Illustrated American Sheet Music, Series 8: Geography

Creator:
DeVincent, Sam, 1918-1997  Search this
Extent:
100 Boxes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1794-1987
Summary:
Sam DeVincent loved music and art and began collecting sheet music with lithographs at an early age.

Series 8: Geography is divided into three sections: the United States, Foreign Countries, and Natural Features.

An overview to the entire DeVincent collection is available here: Sam DeVincent Collection of Illustrated American Sheet Music.
Scope and Contents note:
The Geography Series is divided into three sections: the United States, Foreign Countries, and Natural Features. The more than 13,000 sheets date from 1830-1987 and include undated sheets that are probably earlier. The series comprises 33 cu. ft.

Song sheets about individual states of the United States are arranged alphabetically by State and the District of Columbia, and also by Area and are located in Subseries 8.1-8.52. North and South Carolina are listed together under "The Carolinas;" North and South Dakota are together under "The Dakotas." The Subseries 8.50-8.52 includes the Geographical Areas: New England, The South, and The West.

All songs about the Mississippi and Suwannee (Swanee) Rivers are in 8.51: The South. Songs about the Missouri River, the Pacific Ocean, and the Rocky Mountains are in 8.52: The West. Songs about other rivers that cross political boundaries (both US and foreign) are in 8.128: Water Features.

Foreign Countries listed alphabetically by country are covered in Subseries 8.53-8.126 which also includes several Geographical Areas such as Latin America, Scandinavia, and South Pacific. Because boundaries and names have changed over the course of time, some countries and regions are under their earlier political names. Examples: Bohemia (not the Czech Republic), Burma (not Myanmar), and Macedonia (not Albania, Greece, or old Yugoslavia).

In some cases, it was difficult to place the song. Our understanding of other cultures led to some very mixed images, both visual and verbal. Thus the Area category "Araby/Orient/Desert." Music with Spanish lyrics may be found under a country name or under the Area, "Latin America."

The final section Natural Features includes Subseries 8.127: Land Features and Subseries 8.128: Water Features. Note that "desert" songs have been place in subseries 8.121: Araby/Orient/Desert. Rivers that are primarily in one state or country are located in that specific state's Subseries. For example, the Hudson River is in Subseries 8.35: New York.. Mississipi and Swanee (Swanee) River songs are located in Subseries 8.51: The South. Other U.S. and foreign rivers, such as the Ohio and The Danube, that cross several boundaries are located in Subseries 8.128: Water Features.

The Ephemera file, arranged in the same subseries as the music, is described following the Container List. The Geography Ephemera file constitutes six (6) document boxes (2 cu. ft.).
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 6 subseries.

8.1: United States

8.2: United States (U. S. Regions)

8.3: Foreign Countries(Afghanistan - Italy)

8.4: Foreign Countries (Japan - Vietnam) & (Foreign Regions)

8.5: Natural Features

8.6: Ephemera
Materials in Other Organizations:
Sam DeVincent Collection of American Sheet Music, Lilly Library, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana

This collection contains duplicates of materials in the Smithsonian collection, as well as materials acquired by Mr. DeVincent after the donation to the Smithsonian. The phonograph records described above were transferred to the University of Missouri at Kansas City.
Materials in the Archives Center, National Museum of American History:
Donald J. Stubblebine Collection of Musical Theater and Motion Picture Sheet Music and Reference Material, 1843-2010 (AC1211)
Forms Part Of:
Series 8: Geography forms part of the Sam DeVincent Collection of Illustrated American Sheet Music .

An ongoing, updated list of DeVincent topical series is available via the Smithsonian finding aid portal.
Provenance:
This collection was purchased by the Smithsonian Institution in 1988 from Sam and Nancy Lee DeVincent.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Citation:
The Sam DeVincent Collection of Illustrated American Sheet Music, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0300.S08
See more items in:
Sam DeVincent Collection of Illustrated American Sheet Music, Series 8: Geography
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0300-s08
Online Media:

Thomas Evance Receipt Book

Creator:
Warshaw, Isadore, d. 1969  Search this
Evance, Thomas, -1777  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (1 box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Receipts
Date:
1753-1775
Scope and Contents:
A book of receipts for payments made by Thomas Evance to various individuals for purchases and payment of debts.

Items listed include:

A Mahogany Bedstead

A dark Bay Horse

64 1/2 l (?) Loaf Sugar

House Rent

Rum

Mahogany Table and Silver punch ladle

Hams and Sugar

Citron and lot of Books

33 Barrels Rice

Breeches pattern and 6 pair cotton hose

Cutt Bob Wigg

Riding chair

3 Cord wood for Building a Brick Chimney

29 lbs. rice

2 lbs. pitch

Bag Herrings

Black horse

Roan horse

Madeira

One Ton Coal

For freight of 32,000 shingles

For wages due [me as] overseer to [his] plantation at Santee

For Two Negro's [sic] sent up this year

For Paving [his] yard- finding Bricks

4 Windsor chairs

For a fence between him (Thomas Evance) and Mr. Porcher

For one years hire -as overseer to his (Thomas Evance) plantation at Wambaw.

(?S.C.)

For one year's Gazette

For 50 Bushels corn

For freight and 2 passages to Santee for 2 barrels Old Antigua Rum
Biographical / Historical:
Thomas Evance Evance was a merchant in Charles Town, South Carolina. He cited the Papers of Henry Laurens, 2:212n., as the source of the information.
Restrictions:
The collection is too fragile for viewing; contact Archives Center staff for details.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Plantations  Search this
Slavery -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts -- 18th century
Receipts -- 18th century
Citation:
Thomas Evance Receipt Book, 1754-1774, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0289
See more items in:
Thomas Evance Receipt Book
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0289

Charleston, [South Carolina?], spring

Collection Source:
Numismatics, Division of, NMAH, SI.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Bratter, Herbert Max, 1900-1976 (economist)  Search this
Container:
Box 53, Folder OF137
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1950
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Herbert M. Bratter Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
The Herbert M. Bratter Collection
The Herbert M. Bratter Collection / Series 8: Moving Image
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0137-ref638

Oral history interview with John Weber

Creator:
Weber, John, 1932-2008  Search this
Widgeon Point Charitable Foundation  Search this
Interviewer:
McElhinney, James, 1952-  Search this
Names:
Dwan Gallery (Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
Dwan Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Martha Jackson Gallery  Search this
Widgeon Point Charitable Foundation  Search this
Extent:
62 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2006 March 21-April 4
Scope and Contents:
An interview of John Weber conducted 2006 March 21 and April 4, by James McElhinney, for the Archives of American Art, at Weber's home, in Chatham, New York.
Weber discusses his education at St. Catherine's Military School in Anaheim, California, and Admiral Farragut Academy in St. Petersburg, Florida; attending the Citadel in South Carolina and then joining the Navy; attending Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio, after getting out of the Navy; accepting a job at the Dayton Art Institute on the curatorial staff and working for the director, Thomas C. Colt; moving to New York and attending the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University; working at the Martha Jackson Gallery and his involvement in various influential shows there, including "Environments, Spaces, Situations," and "New Forms, New Media"; moving to Los Angeles in 1962 to work for the Dwan Gallery; getting involved with land artists, including Robert Smithson, Michael Heizer, and Walter De Maria; moving back to New York to take on the directorship of the East Coast location of the Dwan Gallery, in SoHo, then the newest gallery neighborhood; opening his own gallery, the John Weber Gallery, on West Broadway in 1972; his involvement with the Fluxus Group and Arte Povera; the international nature of the art world in the 1960s and 70s; his business arrangements with artists, including the monthly stipends he gave them as advances on sales; his relationships with collectors, including Giuseppe Panza di Biumo and Emily and Burton Tremaine; his advocacy of Aboriginal art; the studios of Robert Smithson and Claes Oldenburg; his belief in the importance of originality; his adverse reaction when he first saw a piece by Dan Flavin; his interaction with art critics, including Irving Sandler and Grace Gluck; and his experience with art fairs. He also recalls Kirk Varnedoe, Jim Dine, Michael Goldberg, Jean Tinguely, Martial Raysse, Arman, Yves Klein, Franz Kline, Andre Emmerich, Mary Boone, Sol LeWitt, Andy Warhol, Gilberto Zorio, Richard Long, Hamish Fulton, Anina Nosei, Sven Lukin, Robert Ryman, Alighiero Boetti, Konrad Fischer, Ivan Karp, Paula Cooper, Angela Westwater, Jeff Koons, Joseph Beuys, Hans Haacke, Leo Castelli, Tom Otterness, Joyce Nereaux, Dorothea Rockburne, Eva Hesse, Lucas Samaras, and Joseph Hirshhorn, among others.
Biographical / Historical:
John Weber (1932-2008) is an art dealer from Chatham, New York. James McElhinney (1952- ) is a painter and educator of New York, New York.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 2 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hrs., 11 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Art dealers -- New York (State)  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Economic aspects  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Function:
Artists' studios
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.weber06
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-weber06

Oral history interview with Philip Simmons

Interviewee:
Simmons, Philip, 1912-2009  Search this
Interviewer:
Douglas, Mary F., 1956-  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Festival of American Folklife  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Philip Simmons Foundation, Inc.  Search this
Southeastern Blacksmith Association  Search this
DeKoven, Ira  Search this
Extent:
30 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
2001 April 4-5
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Philip Simmons conducted 2001 April 4-5, by Mary Douglas, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in Simmons' home and workshop, Charleston, South Carolina.
Simmons speaks of his childhood and early education; jobs shining shoes and delivering papers at age 8; also at age 8, working as an apprentice to Peter Simmons in his blacksmith shop on Calhoun Street; Philip Simmons's attraction to blacksmithing and the action of the shop; being hired by Peter Simmons at age 13 in the blacksmith's shop where he has worked for 79 years. He also describes his apprenticeship and talks about blacksmithing as an ongoing learning experience; the necessity of adapting skills to an evolving market, from making wagons and horse shoes to ornamental iron work, and equipment for cargo shipments; the affect of the economic boom after World War II; drawing inspiration from nature and "God's creations in Charleston" for design ideas; working with wrought iron, mild steel, brass, and lead; making his own tools; craft as a representation of the past; giving demonstrations at the Smithsonian's Folklife Festival in Washington, D.C. in 1976 and 1977 (through John Vlach's invitation) and a gate he made at the festival that was purchased by the Smithsonian and featured in Southern Living; his 1982 lunch with Ronald Reagan on the occasion of receiving a National Folk Award; meeting other blacksmiths through the Southeastern Regional Blacksmith Conference; the public's understanding and reception of blacksmithing; recognition, awards, and publicity for his work; involvement with craft educational programs at schools, museums, and churches; the function of the Philip Simmons Foundation; blacksmithing in Charleston as a national tourist attraction; the relationship of farming and blacksmithing by slaves to his own blacksmithing; the impact of travel on his work; working with Ira DeKoven; his interest in preserving traditions; corporate versus private commissions; the importance of mechanical drawing skills; preserving old piece, salvage work; his retirement because of arthritis; current interest in sketching and drawing; family life with his wife and three children; and his involvement with the community.
Biographical / Historical:
Philip Simmons (1912-2009) was a blacksmith from Charleston, South Carolina. Mary Douglas (1956- ) is the curator at the Mint Museum of Craft and Design in Charlotte, North Carolina.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 4 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hr., 7 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
For more information on how to access this interview contact Reference Services.
Topic:
Blacksmithing -- Equipment and supplies  Search this
Blacksmithing -- Study and teaching  Search this
Blacksmithing -- Technique  Search this
Blacksmiths -- South Carolina -- Charleston -- Interviews  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Ironworkers -- South Carolina -- Charleston -- Interviews  Search this
Metal-workers -- South Carolina -- Charleston -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.simmon01
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-simmon01

Oral history interview with Peggie L. Hartwell

Interviewee:
Hartwell, Peggie L., 1939-  Search this
Interviewer:
Malarcher, Patricia  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Extent:
80 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2002 June 3 and July 10
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Peggie Hartwell conducted 2002 June 3-July 10, by Patricia Malarcher, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in the artist's apartment, on Central Park West, New York, N.Y.
Hartwell speaks of growing up on a farm with her extended family in Springfield, S.C.; female quiltmakers and male storytellers in her family; drawing in sand as a child; her mother's move to Brooklyn; joining her mother and father in New York; growing up in Brooklyn; her awareness of the many cultures in New York and being surrounded by art, including her mother's crocheting and her father's a cappella group; taking tap dancing lessons; experimenting with art in public school; working at various factory jobs after high school until "reconnecting" with art; studying with dancer Syvilla Fort at the Katherine Dunham School of Dance in New York; Fort encouraging her to draw on the studio walls and sew costumes; touring internationally with the theater group Harlem Rhythm USA from 1965 to 1972; her return to the U.S. and receiving a theater degree at Queens College; working at an insurance company to support her art; exhibiting her black and white, pen-and-ink drawings; the narratives and "oral histories" in her quilts; the meaning of various fabrics and colors; participating in "quilting communities" such as the Women of Color Quilters Network, Empire Quilters, and the American Quilter's Society; her lectures, workshops, and residencies; working with children;narratives inspired by childhood memories; her move back to South Carolina; themes in her quilts and "quilting styles" (improvisational, traditional, contemporary, and African American); serving on the board of the New York Chapter of the Women of Color Quilters Network; and planning the exhibition "Threads of Faith" for the New York Bible Association. She also comments on John Cage, Cuesta Benberry, Asadata Dafora, Francelise Dawkins, Carolyn Mazloomi, Edjohnetta Miller, Arthur Mitchell, Harriet Powers, Faith Ringgold, Marie Wilson, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Peggie L. Hartwell (1939- ) is a quiltmaker of Summerville, S.C. Patricia Malarcher is a fiber artist.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 8 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hr., 50 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
African American quilts  Search this
African American women artists -- South Carolina -- Interviews  Search this
African American quiltmakers -- South Carolina -- Interviews  Search this
Fiber artists -- South Carolina -- Interviews  Search this
Fiberwork  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.hartwe02
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-hartwe02

Oral history interview with Eric Rhein

Interviewee:
Rhein, Eric, 1961-  Search this
Interviewer:
Kerr, Theodore  Search this
Names:
Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project  Search this
Extent:
8 Items (sound files (9 hrs., 29 min.), digital, wav)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2017 February 26-April 16
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Eric Rhein conducted 2017 February 26-April 16, by Theodore Kerr, for the Archives of American Art's Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project, at Mana Contemporary in Jersey City, New Jersey.
Rhein speaks of his youth in Kentucky, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and New York State's Hudson Valley; as a child, creating within the immersive educational community experience of his father's university art teaching, including a focus on ceramics; the personal influence of his uncle Lige Clarke, a gay rights pioneer; early sexual experiences; formative experiences in art making and theatrical endeavors in high school; attending the School of Visual Arts in New York City, while simultaneously being immersed in New York's East Village art scene; early work in puppetry, including work for George Balanchine; significant romantic relationships; the shifts of his studio from the East Village, to Long Island City, and most recently to Jersey City; his devoted carrying of memories of friends who died of complications from AIDS; artwork made in response to the AIDS crisis; receiving his HIV diagnosis in 1987, and its implications for his life and artwork; finding support through groups like The Healing Circle and Friends In Deed; the relationship between creativity, nature, and spirituality; initial and ongoing work with Visual AIDS; HIV stigmatization in relation to body image and appearance; his extreme bodily fragility, near-death expereince, and subsequent return to physical vitality; resiliency; medical care he received for HIV-related illnesses and the lifesaving effect of protease inhibitors; the genesis, forms, and evolution of his AIDS memorial, "Leaves;" art-making as a form of AIDS activism, as well as emotional evolution; his body of work as a memoir to his life's experience; the use & significance of salvaged and recycled materials; the genesis and significance of his "Lazarus" photographic self-portrait; the realities of long-term HIV survivorship, psychological vulnerability, and his commitment to continue healing; art-making as a way of isolating from the world; the sense of community among artists touched by HIV/AIDS; returning to the School of Visual Arts from1998 to 2000, and receiving a Master's Degree; immersing himself in spirituality, including Native American and Eastern belief systems and healing arts; transformative experiences on Fire Island; the global reach of his art; different understandings of HIV/AIDS among younger generations; the showing of his work, and achieving recognition, in a context outside of HIV; the art world's market-driven mechanisms; his recent exhibitions, including internationally; torsos as a motif in his work; and the genesis and significance of his 2015 work, "The Order." Rhein also recalls: Philip Mullen, Jack Nichols, Steve Yates, Randy Wicker, Peter Cusack, Rika Burnham, Peter Lewton-Brain, Kermit Love, Abby Krey, Greer Lankton, Richard Hunt, Lincoln Kirstein, Steven Lonsdale, Billy Wonder, Bill Stelling, Ann Craig, Douglas Ferguson, David Salle, Jackie Winsor, Petah Coyne, Mats Gustafson, Ted Muehling, Huck Snyder, Antonio Lopez, Ross Bleckner, Annie Sprinkle, John Dugdale, Dr. Paul Bellman, David Hirsch, Frank Moore, Connie Butler, Robert Mapplethorpe, Edward Albee, Hugh Steers, Roland Waden, Russell Sharon, Luis Frangella, Wilfredo Vela, Arnie Zane, Carlos Rodriguez, John Sex, Joe Piazza, Ken Davis, William Weichert, Ramsey McPhillips, Hannah Wilke, David Nelson, Nancy Brooks Brody, Joy Episalla, Hunter Reynolds, Stephen Vider, Gail Thacker, Rafael Sanchez, Mark Isaacson, Ralph Cutler, Michael Von Uchtrup, Chrys Skleros, Bruce Bergman, Jim Pepper, Bill Olander, Barbara Hunt McLanahan, Andrew Zobler, Pavel Zoubok, Richard Anderson, Kris Nuzzi, Seth Joseph Weine, Walt Cessna, Spencer Cox, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Interviewee Eric Rhein (1961- ) is a mixed-media artist living and working in New York, New York. Interviewer Theodore Kerr (1979- ) is a writer and organizer in New York, New York.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
For information on how to access this interview contact Reference Services.
Topic:
Artists -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Mixed media (Art)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.rhein17
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-rhein17

Oral history interview with Paul Craft

Interviewee:
Craft, Paul, 1904-1981  Search this
Interviewer:
Phillips, Harlan B. (Harlan Buddington), 1920-  Search this
Creator:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Names:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Extent:
58 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1965 June 3
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Paul Craft conducted 1965 June 3, by Harlan Phillips, for the Archives of American Art New Deal and the Arts Project.
Biographical / Historical:
Paul Craft (1904-1981) was a museum director and Federal Art Project Administrator in Columbia, South Carolina and Cinncinati, Ohio.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound tape reel. Reformatted in 2010 as 2 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hr., 2 min.
Provenance:
This interview conducted as part of the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts project, which includes over 400 interviews of artists, administrators, historians, and others involved with the federal government's art programs and the activities of the Farm Security Administration in the 1930s and early 1940s.
Topic:
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Museum directors -- South Carolina -- Columbia -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.craft65
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-craft65

DeWitt's Pills

Maker:
DeWitt International Corporation  Search this
Measurements:
overall: 8.7 cm x 1.5 cm; 3 7/16 in x 9/16 in
overall: 3 1/4 in x 2 7/8 in x 5/8 in; 8.255 cm x 7.3025 cm x 1.5875 cm
Object Name:
otc preparation
Object Type:
Drugs
Place made:
United States: South Carolina, Greenville
Associated place:
United States: Louisiana, Saint Martinville
Date made:
ca 1980
Subject:
Pain & Neuralgia Drugs  Search this
Rheumatism & Arthritis Drugs  Search this
Credit Line:
The Fournet Drugstore Collection
ID Number:
1985.0475.410
Accession number:
1985.0475
1985.0475
Catalog number:
1985.0475.410
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Medicine
Balm of America
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a0-e143-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_326481
Online Media:

Adolph A. Weinman papers

Creator:
Weinman, Adolph A. (Adolph Alexander), 1870-1952  Search this
Names:
National Academy of Design (U.S.)  Search this
National Sculpture Society (U.S.)  Search this
Extent:
10.3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Sketches
Date:
1890-1959
Summary:
The collection measures 10.3 linear feet, dates from 1890 to 1959, and documents the career of early twentieth century sculptor Adolph A. Weinman. Found within the papers are scattered biographical materials; project files for Weinman's sculpture and commissions; correspondence with colleagues, friends and family, and letterpress books containing copies of letters concerning specific sculpture commissions; files concerning Weinman's membership in the National Sculpture Society and the National Academy of Design; records concerning works of art held by dealers and in exhibitions and other miscellaneous financial materials; notes and a notebook; writings and speeches by Weinman; sketches and sketchbooks; printed materials; photographs and glass negatives. This material not only reflects the diversity of projects executed by this prolific sculptor, but illustrates the process of creation for many of his more important works.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of American sculptor Adolph Weinman measure 10.3 linear feet and date from 1890 to 1959. Found within the collection are scattered biographical materials; project files for Weinman's sculpture and commissions; correspondence with colleagues, friends and family, and letterpress books containing copies of letters concerning specific sculpture commissions; a substantial body of files concerning Weinman's membership in the National Sculpture Society and the National Academy of Design; records concerning works of art held by dealers and in exhibitions and other miscellaneous financial materials; notes and a notebook; writings and speeches by Weinman; sketches and sketchbooks; printed materials; photographs and glass negatives. This material not only reflects the diversity of projects executed by this prolific sculptor, but illustrates the process of creation for many of his more important works.

Much of the collection (6.0 linear feet) consists of project files documenting many of Weinman's sculpture and commissioned public and architectural pieces through correspondence, contracts, financial records, notes, drawings, printed material, and photographs. A complete list of each project or sculpture file is found in the Container Listing. Also found are scattered biographical materials, general correspondence, files relating to Weinman's membership in the National Sculpture Society and the National Academy of Design, scattered financial files, notes and writings, art work, printed materials, and photographs.
Arrangement:
Most materials have been arranged in chronological order, except for artwork and photographs which are arranged primarily according to subject matter. Glass plate negatives from the Project Files Series and Photographs Series have been removed and housed separately in Boxes 10-13 and are so noted in the Series Description/Container Listing Section at the appropriate folder title. Oversized material from various series has been housed in Box 14 and OV folders 15-22 and are listed with each appropriate series.

The collection has been arranged into 10 series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1890-1950 (Boxes 1, 14, OVs 15, 22; Reel 5884; 4 folders)

Series 2: General Correspondence, 1897-1954 (Boxes 1-2, OV 15; Reels 5884-5886; 1.4 linear feet)

Series 3: Organization Files, 1916-1952 (Boxes 2-3; Reels 5886-5887; 0.9 linear feet)

Series 4: Financial Material, 1910-1953 (Box 3; Reel 5887; 3 folders)

Series 5: Notes, 1918-1952 (Box 3; Reel 5887; 14 folders)

Series 6: Writings, 1929-1952 (Box 3; Reel 5887; 14 folders)

Series 7: Artwork, 1892-1933 (Boxes 3, 14, OVs 16-19; Reels 5887-5888; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 8: Project Files, 1896-1955 (Boxes 3-8, 10-14, OVs 15-22; Reels 5888-5891; 6.0 linear feet)

Series 9: Printed Material, 1891-1959 (Box 8, OV 21; Reel 5892; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 10: Photographs, 1903-1950 (Boxes 9, 13, OV 21; Reel 5892; 0.2 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
American sculptor, Adolph Alexander Weinman was born on December 11, 1870 in Germany and came to New York City in 1880. At the age of fifteen, he attended evening classes at Cooper Union. He later studied at the Art Students League. When he was twenty years old, he entered the studio of Philip Martiny and later worked with Olin Warner, Augustus Saint-Gaudens, Charles Henry Niehaus, and Daniel Chester French. In 1904, Weinman opened his own studio, and in the same year created the Destiny of the Red Man for the St. Louis Exposition. In 1923, he moved his studio to Forest Hills, New York, where he lived until his death.

Among Weinman's more notable sculpture commissions are the General Alexander Macomb Memorial in Detroit, Michigan, Alexander Johnston Cassatt and Samuel Rea for the Pennsylvania Railroad Terminal in New York City, the Seated Lincoln for Hodgenville, Kentucky, and sculptural group Riders of the Dawn at Brookgreen Gardens, South Carolina. In 1915, he designed The Rising Sun and Descending Night fountains for the Panama-Pacific Exposition in San Francisco. In the following year he designed the "Mercury" dime and "Walking Liberty" half dollar for the U. S. Mint. Weinman also created friezes for the U. S. Supreme Court building, and pediments for the National Archives building, the U. S. Post Office Department Building, and for the Jefferson Memorial, all in Washington, D. C.

Weinman was a member of many organizations, including the National Sculpture Society, of which he was president from 1927 to 1930, the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the National Institute of Arts and Letters, the National Academy of Design, and the New York City Art Commission.

Adolph A. Weinman died on August 8, 1952, in Port Chester, New York.
Separated Material:
The Archives of American Art also holds microfilm of materials lent for microfilming. Reel 283 contains biographical materials, a contract, correspondence, photographs, scrapbooks, and miscellaneous materials, dating 1888-1952. Reel 414 includes correspondence exchanged between Weinman and the Corcoran Gallery of Art and the Medallic Art Company between 1930 and 1952. Lent materials were returned to the lenders and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
In 1971 and 1972, Adolph Weinman's sons, Howard and Robert A. Weinman, lent the Archives of American Art material for microfilming. Howard Weinman also donated material in 1972 and Robert A. Weinman gave papers in 1976.
Restrictions:
A digitized version of the microfilm of this collection is available online via the Archives of American Art website.
Rights:
The Adolph A. Weinman papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Sculpture, American  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Sketches
Citation:
Adolph A. Weinman papers, 1890-1959. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.weinadol
See more items in:
Adolph A. Weinman papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-weinadol
Online Media:

John Quincy Adams Ward papers in the New York Historical Society

Creator:
Ward, John Quincy Adams, 1830-1910  Search this
Names:
Interstate and West Indian Exposition (Charleston, South Carolina: 1901-1902)  Search this
Library of Congress  Search this
Louisiana Purchase Exposition (1904 : Saint Louis, Mo.)  Search this
World's Columbian Exposition (1893 : Chicago, Ill.)  Search this
Adams, Herbert, 1858-1945  Search this
Appleton, Thomas Gold, 1812-1884  Search this
Bitter, Karl Theodore Francis, 1867-1915  Search this
Borglum, Gutzon, 1867-1941  Search this
Chilton, R. S.  Search this
Cushing, Robert  Search this
Dana, Paul  Search this
French, Daniel Chester, 1850-1931  Search this
Herber, C. A.  Search this
Johnson, Robert Underwood, 1853-1937  Search this
Orr, Alexander Ector, 1831-1914  Search this
Potter, Edward Clark, 1857-1923  Search this
Richards, T. Addison (Thomas Addison), 1820-1900  Search this
Ruckstull, F. W. (Fred Wellington), 1853-1942  Search this
Thomas, Charles N.  Search this
Extent:
2 microfilm reels
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Microfilm reels
Date:
1857-1915
Scope and Contents:
Correspondence regarding the St. Louis Exposition, the World's Columbian Exposition, the South Carolina Interstate and West Indian Exposition, statuary in New York City and the Library of Congress, the Washington statue in Newburyport, Mass. Letters from Robert Cushing in Italy pertain to the supervision of the execution of Ward's marble statuary group in Carrara. Correspondents include Herbert Adams, Thomas Gold Appleton, Karl Bitter, Gutzon Borglum, Daniel Chester French, Robert Underwood Johnson, Thomas Addison Richards, Edward Clark Potter, Alexander E. Orr, R. S. Chilton, Paul Dana, F. Wellington Ruckstuhll, Charles N. Thomas, C. A. Herber and Ward's wife.
Biographical / Historical:
Sculptor; New York, N.Y.
Provenance:
Lent 1973 by New York Historical Society.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Topic:
Sculpture, American  Search this
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.wardjohn
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-wardjohn

[Willie Ann Wright photographs]

Creator:
Wright, Willie Ann  Search this
Names:
Doyle, Sam, 1906-1985  Search this
Extent:
8 Items ((on a partial microfilm reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1983
Scope and Contents:
Eight photographs of Sam Doyle, his paintings, and his home in Frogmore on St. Helena's Island, S.C., taken by Willie Anne Wright in April 1983.
Provenance:
Donated 1988 by Willie Ann Wright.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Folk artists -- South Carolina  Search this
Painters -- South Carolina  Search this
Self-taught artists -- South Carolina  Search this
Topic:
African American painters -- South Carolina  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.wrigwill
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-wrigwill

Elizabeth O'Neill Verner letter

Creator:
Verner, Elizabeth O'Neill, 1883-1979  Search this
Extent:
1 Item ((on partial microfilm reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1961 Nov. 22
Scope and Contents:
Verner writes to her cousin Clara Verner about becoming a "professional artist."
Biographical / Historical:
Printmaker; South Carolina.
Provenance:
Donated 1984 by Elizabeth Verner Hamilton, Verner's daughter.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Printmakers -- South Carolina  Search this
Topic:
Women artists -- South Carolina  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.verneliz
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-verneliz

Prentiss Taylor papers

Creator:
Taylor, Prentiss, 1907-1991  Search this
Names:
American University (Washington, D.C.). Fine Arts Dept. -- Faculty  Search this
Golden Stair Press  Search this
Society of Washington Printmakers (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Field, Rachel, 1894-1942  Search this
Hughes, Langston, 1902-1967  Search this
Hurston, Zora Neale  Search this
Kahlo, Frida  Search this
Landeck, Armin, 1905-  Search this
O'Neill, Eugene, 1888-1953  Search this
Pinckney, Josephine, 1895-1957  Search this
Rivera, Diego, 1886-1957  Search this
Robeson, Paul, 1898-1976  Search this
Robinson, Bill, 1878-1949  Search this
Stein, Gertrude, 1874-1946  Search this
Toklas, Alice B.  Search this
Van Doren, Mark, 1894-1972  Search this
Van Vechten, Carl, 1880-1964  Search this
Extent:
20.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Drawings
Writings
Sketchbooks
Prints
Sound recordings
Date:
1885-1991
Summary:
The collection measures 20.4 linear feet, dates from 1885 to 1991 (bulk dates 1908-1986) and documents the career of Harlem Renaissance lithographer, teacher, and painter Prentiss Taylor. The collection consists primarily of subject/correspondence files (circa 16 ft.), reflecting Prentiss' career as a lithographer and painter, his association with figures prominent in the Harlem Renaissance, notably Carl Van Vechten and Langston Hughes, his activities as president of the Society of Washington Printmakers and other art organizations, his work in art therapy treating mental illness, and his teaching position at American University. The subject files contain mostly correspondence, but many include photographs and printed material. Also included are biographical, financial, legal and printed material; several hundred photographs; notes and writings; sketchbooks, drawings and a few prints by Taylor; and scrapbooks dating from 1885-1956.
Scope and Content Note:
The collection measures 20.4 linear feet, dates from 1885 to 1991 (bulk dates 1908-1986) and documents the career of Harlem Renaissance lithographer, teacher, and painter Prentiss Taylor. The collection consists primarily of subject/correspondence files (circa 16 ft.), reflecting Prentiss' career as a lithographer and painter, his association with figures prominent in the Harlem Renaissance, notably Carl Van Vechten and Langston Hughes, his activities as president of the Society of Washington Printmakers and other art organizations, his work in art therapy treating mental illness, and his teaching position at American University. The subject files contain mostly correspondence, but many include photographs and printed material. Also included are biographical, financial, legal and printed material; several hundred photographs; notes and writings; sketchbooks, drawings and a few prints by Taylor; and scrapbooks dating from 1885-1956.

The Langston Hughes files contain photocopies of letters from Hughes, greeting cards, ten original photographs of Hughes, and an autographed card printed with Hughes' poem, The Negro Speaks of Rivers. In addition, there is a contract between Hughes and Taylor, witnessed by Carl Van Vechten, forming the Golden Stair Press, through which many of Hughes' poems were printed with illustrations by Taylor. A rare edition of their first publication, The Negro Mother, is found here. Also found in this file is a 1932 final copy of Scottsboro Limited, another collaborative effort between Taylor and Hughes that focused on a case where nine black youths were falsely accused of raping two white women. The collection contains extensive correspondence about Taylor's lithograph of the same title and the printing of the publication. Other rare Harlem Renaissance publications found within Taylor's papers include Golden Stair Broadsides, Opportunity Journal of Negro Life, The Rebel Poet, and Eight Who Lie in the Death House, several of which were also illustrated by Taylor.

Prentiss Taylor's long association with Langston Hughes and other figures of the Harlem Renaissance stemmed from his early friendship with Carl Van Vechten. Taylor's papers contain correspondence with Van Vechten, autographed copies of Van Vechten's booklets, and numerous photographs of notable Harlem Renaissance figures, many taken by Van Vechten, including Zora Neale Hurston, Bill "Bojangles" Robinson, Eugene O'Neill, Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo, Paul Robeson, and many others. Also found are period photographs of Charleston, South Carolina and Harlem street scenes.

95 letters from Rachel Field, 75 letters from Langston Hughes, 3 letters from Armin Landeck, 46 letters from Josephine Pinckney, 1 letter from Gertrude Stein, 7 letters from Alice B. Toklas, 1 postcard from Mark Van Doren, and 25 letters from Carl Van Vechten are photocopies. Originals of the Hughes and Toklas letters are located at the Yale University Library. Location of the remaining original letters are unknown.

The Prentiss Taylor papers offer researchers insight into the rich cultural documentation of the Harlem Renaissance and the development of twentieth-century printmaking as an American fine art.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into ten series. The largest series housing Subject Files is arranged alphabetically, primarily by name of correspondent, maintaining Taylor's original arrangement. The remaining series are arranged in chronological order. Oversized material from various series has been housed in Box 21 (Sol) and OV 22 and is noted in the Series Description/Container Listing Section at the appropriate folder title with see also/see references.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1918-1985, undated (Box 1; 6 folders)

Series 2: Miscellaneous Receipts, 1929-1986, undated (Box 1; 11 folders)

Series 3: Insurance Records, 1960-1976 (Box 1; 1 folder)

Series 4: Notes, 1921-1984, undated (Box 1; 18 folders)

Series 5: Writings, 1924-1971, undated (Box 1-2; 51 folders)

Series 6: Art Work, 1916-1975, undated (Box 2; 14 folders)

Series 7: Scrapbooks, 1885-1956 (Box 2, 21; 10 folders)

Series 8: Printed Material, 1914-1990, undated (Box 2-3, 21; 29 folders)

Series 9: Photographs, 1908-1984, undated (Box 3, 21; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 10: Subject Files, 1885-1991, undated (Box 3-21, OV 22; 18.0 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Prentiss Taylor was born in 1907 at the Washington, D. C. residence of his maternal grandmother, his birth assisted by his grandmother's cook, affectionately known as Cookie Belle.

In the 1920s, Taylor studied painting with Charles W. Hawthorne in Provincetown, but turned to lithography in the late 1920s to early 1930s during his enrollment at the Art Students League in New York City. He received further training in that medium at the George C. Miller workshop in New York. During this period, he also designed costumes for the American-Oriental Revue. Taylor worked primarily in the printmaking medium for the rest of his life, experimenting with various techniques and compositions and ultimately achieving a status as one this country's great lithographers. Taylor depicted mostly realistic and narrative scenes of subjects and themes that reflected his personal interests in music, architecture, religion and social justice.

During his time in New York, Taylor developed close friendships with poet Langston Hughes and writer Carl Van Vechten. He collaborated with Hughes in the formation of the Golden Stair Press to produce publications reflecting the ideas of the Harlem Renaissance. Taylor created a number of prints and illustration for the press and its publications.

After returning to Washington, D.C., Taylor's work was included in exhibitions at the Corcoran Gallery, the Smithsonian Institution, the Baltimore Museum of Art and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond. He was represented by the Franz Bader Gallery in Washington, D.C., and by the Bethesda Art Gallery in Maryland. In 1942, Taylor was elected President of the Society of Washington Printmakers, a position he held for thirty-four years. He also worked as an art therapist for more than thirty years and taught oil painting at American University from 1955-1975.

Prentiss Taylor died October 7, 1991 in Washington, D.C.
Related Material:
Prentiss Taylor papers are also located at the Yale University Library.
Separated Material:
The Archives of American Art also holds material lent for microfilming (reel 1392) including three notebooks detailing Taylor's lithographs, a gift and sales notebook, a guestbook, exhibition announcements, and a brochure. Lent materials were returned to the lender and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
Prentiss Taylor lent the Archives of American Art material for microfilming in 1978. Papers were donated in 1978 and 1984 by Taylor, and in 1992 and 2004 by his companion, Roderick S. Quiroz, for the estate of Prentiss Taylor.
Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website.
Rights:
The Prentiss Taylor papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art teachers -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Lithography -- 20th century -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Lithographers -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Painters -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Art therapy  Search this
Harlem Renaissance  Search this
Printmakers -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Drawings
Writings
Sketchbooks
Prints
Sound recordings
Citation:
Prentiss Taylor papers, 1885-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.taylpren
See more items in:
Prentiss Taylor papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-taylpren
Online Media:

Russell, Xanthus, and Mary Smith family papers

Creator:
Smith family (Philadelphia, Pa.)  Search this
Names:
Smith, Mary Priscilla, 1819-1874  Search this
Smith, Mary Russell, 1842-1878  Search this
Smith, Russell, 1812-1896  Search this
Smith, Xanthus, 1839-1929  Search this
Extent:
5.12 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketchbooks
Writings
Scrapbooks
Tintypes
Drawings
Daguerreotypes
Ambrotypes
Photographs
Sketches
Date:
1793-1977
bulk 1826-1977
Summary:
The Russell, Xanthus, and Mary Smith family papers comprise 5.12 linear feet and are dated 1793-1977, bulk 1826-1977. Correspondence, writings, artwork, financial records, printed material, miscellaneous items and photographs provide documentation of the lives and works of painter, illustrator and poet, Russell Smith, and his son, painter Xanthus Smith, and scattered documentation of the lives of his wife, painter and educator Mary Priscilla Smith, and daughter and painter Mary Russell Smith.
Scope and Content Note:
The Russell, Xanthus, and Mary Smith family papers comprise 5.12 linear feet and are dated 1793-1977, bulk 1826-1977. Correspondence, writings, artwork, financial records, printed material, miscellaneous items and photographs provide documentation of the lives and works of painter, illustrator and poet, Russell Smith, and his son, painter Xanthus Smith, and scattered documentation of the lives of his wife, painter and educator Mary Priscilla Smith, and daughter and painter Mary Russell Smith.

Family papers include correspondence, writings, printed material, and miscellaneous items. Correspondence, the bulk of which is comprised of letters to and from Russell and Xanthus Smith, covers both personal and professional matters. Among the correspondents are family, friends, colleagues, and arts organizations. Writings, printed material, and miscellaneous items in this series refer either to the entire Smith family or multiple individuals. Miscellaneous items also concern Horace Binder, father-in-law of Xanthus Smith.

The Russell Smith papers are comprised of biographical information, writings, artwork, and financial records. Biographical information includes some personal documents such as passports and marriage certificates. Among Russell Smith's writings are an autobiography, transcripts of correspondence, and notes. Artwork consists of loose pages and sketch books containing sketches and drawings in pencil, ink, and watercolor. His financial records are cash books recording professional and personal expenses, and receipts and memorabilia from the family's 1851-1852 travels in Europe. The printed material consists of loose clippings and a scrapbook of clippings from Philadelphia newspapers, as well as a small number of exhibition catalogs.

The Xanthus Smith papers consist of biographical information, artwork, financial records, and printed material. Among the writings are his unpublished autobiography, biographies of his father and sister, impressions of the Centennial art exhibition, journals, notes, and poems. Artwork consists of loose sketches in pencil and ink, and sketchbooks containing sketches and finished drawings in pencil and ink, some colored with gouache or watercolor washes. Financial records are cash books recording personal and professional expenses. Printed material includes clippings and a scrapbook.

The Mary Smith papers consist of writings, sketches, and printed material. The papers of her mother, Mary Priscilla Smith, are comprised of writings and printed material.

Photographs are of people, artwork, and miscellaneous subjects. People represented are Russell and Mary Priscilla Smith, their children Xanthus and Mary Smith, and several other relatives including Xanthus's wife and Russell's sister, granddaughter, and uncle. Photographs include ambrotypes, daguerreotypes, and tintypes, along with glass negatives and a small number of original prints. Copy prints have been produced from the glass negatives and other cased photographs. Photographs of artwork are of paintings by Russell Smith, Xanthus Smith, and other artists.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 6 series:

Series 1: Smith Family Papers, 1793-1977 (Box 1; 0.9 linear ft.)

Series 2: Russell Smith Papers, 1805-1954 (Boxes 1-2; 1.2 linear ft.)

Series 3: Xanthus Smith Papers, 1850-1953 (Boxes 3-4; 1.9 linear ft.)

Series 4: Mary Smith Papers, 1852-1877 (Box 5; 4 folders)

Series 5: Mary Priscilla Smith Papers, 1839-1874 (21 folders)

Series 6: Photographs, circa 1845-1934 (Box 6-7, MGP 3, Black Cabinet; 0.9 linear ft.)

Microfilm reel numbers and frames are referenced at folder headings in parenthesis when known. Glass plate negatives are housed separately and closed to researchers.
Biographical Note:
Russell Smith (1812-1896) was a native of Glasgow, Scotland whose family came to the United States in 1819 and settled near Pittsburgh. The Smith children were educated at home, and Russell showed an early interest in art. His first formal training in portraiture and landscape painting was in Pittsburgh under James Reid Lambdin. Around 1827, Smith began painting backdrops for theaters and within 6 years had achieved a national reputation for his theatrical painting. In 1835 he moved to Philadelphia to paint for the Walnut Street Theater, and soon received commissions to paint for theaters in Boston and Washington. Around this time, he also began writing poetry. Even while engaged in theatrical work, Smith continued to paint landscapes which were exhibited at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and the Artists' Fund Society of Philadelphia as early as 1834.

Russell Smith married Mary Priscilla Wilson, a flower painter and teacher of French and drawing, in 1838. By the 1840s, in addition to painting landscapes and theatrical backdrops, Smith was advertising his services as an "illustrator for lectures on various branches of natural science painted in distemper." He accompanied the scientific expeditions of geologists William Barton Rogers and Henry Darwin Rogers to Virginia and the Susquehanna and Juniata River valleys of Pennsylvania in 1844 and 1845 as an illustrator. During this period, Smith also traveled extensively in New Hampshire and upstate New York for summer painting expeditions. The Smiths traveled to Europe with their two children in 1851-1852, touring Wales, Scotland, Switzerland, Italy, the Netherlands, London, and Paris. Smith visited major museums and private collections, as well as architectural attractions, making sketches and keeping detailed notes of the trip.

Smith continued painting landscapes well into old age, even though his long out of fashion works were rejected with increasing frequency by the juries of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. He died in 1896.

Born in Milestown, Pennsylvania in 1819, Mary Priscilla Smith (1819-1874) studied at a female seminary in Germantown, Pennsylvania operated by noted educator William Russell (Russell Smith's uncle) in Germantown, Pennsylvania, and at Charles Picot's school in Philadelphia. She eventually became a teacher of French, drawing, and painting at the Picot school, and later taught at a school established by William Russell in Philadelphia.

At her husband's urging, Mary Priscilla Smith, already an accomplished flower painter, began painting figures and landscapes, and participated in exhibitions of the Artists' Fund Society exhibitions. After becoming a mother, she painted very little but taught her children, Xanthus and Mary, to draw and paint. Mary Priscilla Smith died in 1874.

Xanthus Smith (1839-1929) was born in Philadelphia and was educated at home. During the family's European tour of 1851-1852 he saw a wide variety of art and, upon returning home, began painting with enthusiasm. Around 1858 he enrolled in a cast drawing class at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts.

At the start of the Civil War Xanthus Smith enlisted in the Navy, where he served as clerk to the commander of a flagship guarding Port Royal, South Carolina. He began producing detailed drawings of the ships both for official purposes and his own enjoyment. After the war, he continued painting ships and exhibited many of these paintings at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Further commissions of Civil War subjects followed, and Xanthus Smith was soon recognized as the foremost painter of Civil War naval battle scenes.

In the 1880s, Xanthus Smith began painting European landscapes, probably based on his father's sketches made during their 1851-1852 tour of Europe. By the 1900s, he was concentrating on portraiture and figure subjects, and continued painting well into old age. His final years were spent in an unsuccessful attempt to publish his autobiography, "An Unvarnished Tale." Xanthus Smith died in 1929.

Mary Russell Smith (1842-1878) was born near Jenkintown, Pennsylvania. Her mother provided her with instruction in flower painting and she sketched animals and insects independently. At age fourteen Mary Smith completed her first oil painting and by 1858 had begun compiling a list of her completed pictures. She was encouraged by her parents to pursue a career as a professional artist. From 1859-1869, and in 1876 and 1878, Mary Smith exhibited at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. She also participated in exhibitions at the National Academy of Design in New York, and in the 1876 Centennial Exhibition held in Philadelphia.

From early childhood, Mary Smith enjoyed raising poultry, and chickens became her favorite painting subject. Her paintings of chickens were popular with Philadelphia art collectors, and sought after in England.

Always sickly, Mary Smith died of gastric fever in 1878. At her request, Russell Smith established the Mary Smith Prize, awarded annually by the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, for the best painting exhibited by a woman resident of Philadelphia.
Provenance:
The Smith family papers were donated to the Archives of American Art in 1978 and 1979 by Franklin R. Smith, a family descendent.
Restrictions:
The collection is partially microfilmed. Use of material not microfilmed requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Smith family papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Works of art  Search this
Educators -- Pennsylvania  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 19th century -- Pensylvania  Search this
Landscape painting  Search this
Women painters -- Pennsylvania  Search this
Illustrators -- Pennsylvania  Search this
Poets -- Pennsylvania  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Writings
Scrapbooks
Tintypes
Drawings
Daguerreotypes
Ambrotypes
Photographs
Sketches
Citation:
Smith family papers, 1793-1977, bulk 1826-1977. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.smitfami
See more items in:
Russell, Xanthus, and Mary Smith family papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-smitfami
Online Media:

Amory C. Simons photographic materials

Creator:
Simons, Amory C. (Amory Coffin), 1869-1959  Search this
Names:
Grafly, Charles, 1862-1929  Search this
Extent:
0.7 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Date:
circa 1910-circa 1984
bulk circa 1910-circa 1920s
Summary:
The photographic materials of equestrian sculptor, Amory C. Simons, measure 0.7 linear feet and date from circa 1910 to circa 1984, with the bulk of the material dating from circa 1910 to circa 1920s. The collection includes four letters to Simons, photographic prints, negatives, and glass plate negatives of horses and riders including New York City police and mounted models, and other miscellaneous subjects.
Scope and Contents:
The photographic materials of equestrian sculptor, Amory C. Simons, measure 0.7 linear feet and date from circa 1910 to circa 1984, with the bulk of the material dating from circa 1910 to circa 1920s. The collection includes four letters to Simons, photographic prints, negatives, and glass plate negatives of horses and riders including New York City police and mounted models, and other miscellaneous subjects.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as one series.

Series 1: Amory C. Simons Photographic Materials, circa 1910-circa 1984 (0.7 linear feet; Boxes 1-2)
Biographical / Historical:
Born in Charleston, South Carolina, sculptor and educator Amory Coffin Simons (1869-1959), was known for his animal statuettes, and for his equestrian sculpture in particular.

Simons studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts under John J. Boyle, Charles Grafly, and Thomas Eakins, before moving to Paris and studying at the Académie Julian where he was awarded honorable mention in the 1900 and 1906 Paris Salons. He also received the 1922 Speyer Prize in the annual exhibition at the National Academy of Design in addition to other honors.

Simons moved to Santa Barbara, California, where he taught at the Santa Barbara School of the Arts beginning in the 1920s. He died in California in 1959.
Related Materials:
The Archives of American Art also has the Amory C. Simons papers, ca. 1890-1934. This collection comprises 0.2 linear feet of materials related to Simons's activities as a student and sculptor in Paris.
Provenance:
The collection was a 1968 gift of Mrs. Paul Fitchen, Chester Beach's daughter, who found the papers in her basement. Beach and Simons were close friends.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center.
Rights:
The Amory C. Simons photographic materials are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Equestrian artists -- Photographs  Search this
Equestrian statues -- Photographs  Search this
Animal sculptors  Search this
Sculptors  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Amory C. Simons papers, circa 1910-circa 1984, bulk circa 1910-circa 1920s. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.simoamoc
See more items in:
Amory C. Simons photographic materials
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-simoamoc
Online Media:

Mary Shaffer papers

Creator:
Shaffer, Mary  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Extent:
4.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Date:
1969-2002
Summary:
The papers of internationally renowned glass artist and sculptor, Mary Shaffer, measure 4.2 linear feet and date from 1969 to 2002. Through correspondence, subject files, printed material and photographs the collection provides an overview of many aspects of Shaffer's career, including commissions, exhibitions, her teaching appointments, and the day-to-day administration of her affairs.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of internationally renowned glass artist and sculptor, Mary Shaffer, measure 4.2 linear feet and date from 1969 to 2002. Through correspondence, subject files, printed material and photographs the collection provides an overview of many aspects of Shaffer's career, including commissions, exhibitions, her teaching appointments, and the day-to-day administration of her affairs.

Correspondence files (Series 1) cross-referenced with records organized by subject (Series 2) provide insight into Shaffer's artistic aspirations and techniques, and represent a good overview of Shaffer's important contribution to the American Studio Glass Movement. These two series document her interaction with galleries, museums, and individual clients, her work as an educator, and her participation in glass and sculpture-related conferences and programs both at home and abroad. The collection provides solid documentation of specific methods used by Shaffer in her work, particularly in Series 3: Center-Light Project, which details her choice and designs for glass notching tubes, plate glass, fiber optics, and other materials. Additional commissions and techniques are documented in Series 1 and 2.

Series 4: Printed Material provides a good overview of the progress of Shaffer's career and an understanding of the significance of her work.
Arrangement:
In general, files are arranged either chronologically or alphabetically by subject. Within files material is generally arranged chronologically. Every effort was made to retain Shaffer's original arrangement as it provided context for the records, but some re-arrangement of unfiled material and re-naming of subject headings for clarification was necessary during processing. The collection is arranged as five series:

Series 1: Correspondence, 1973-1998, undated (box 1, OV 5, 0.8 linear ft.)

Series 2: Subject Files, 1969-1997, undated (box 1-3, OV 5, 1.5 linear ft.)

Series 3: -- Center-Light -- Project, 1985-1993 (box 3, OV 5, 0.7 linear ft.)

Series 4: Printed Material, 1973-2002, undated (box 4, OV 5-6, 0.8 linear ft.)

Series 5: Photographs, circa 1970-1990 (box 4, 3 folders)
Biographical Note:
Sculptor and glass artist Mary Shaffer was born in Walterboro, South Carolina, in 1947. As a child she lived in South America and her first language was Spanish. She received her Bachelor of Fine Arts from the Rhode Island School of Design where she studied illustration and minored in painting. Having a mother who believed strongly in the value of travel as education, she also attended the Ecole d'Humanite in Goldern, Switzerland, for several years.

Shaffer is recognized worldwide as one of the founding artists of the American Studio Glass Movement. In the early 1970s she adapted an auto industry technique for shaping windshield glass into a "mid-air slumping," process which allowed her to move glass in a particular way as it was heated. She then began mixing glass and metal tools, casting, dipping and slumping glass from objects found in flea markets and junk yards, and innovatively extending her materials to include "light, bronze, steel, stone and glass, water and sound."

In the 1970s and 1980s Shaffer taught at the Rhode Island School of Design, Wellesley College, and New York University where she was Director of the Crafts Program in the Department of Art and Art Education. She also managed the Art Center at the University of Maryland in the 1980s. From 1975 on she exhibited her work at O.K. Harris Gallery in New York (a gallery primarily devoted to painting and non craft sculpture), and has also shown in glass-specific or craft venues such as Habatat Galleries in Michigan and Boca Raton, Florida, Hellery Gallery in New York, and Anne O'Brien Gallery in Washington, DC. In 1992 Shaffer completed the installation of her largest sculpture to date, Center-Light, a luminous column of glass and bronze in the three-story open stairwell of the Blumenthal Performing Arts Center in Charlotte, North Carolina, a building designed by architects Cesare Pelli and Associates.

Shaffer's work can be found in the collections of nearly twenty major museums worldwide including the American Craft Museum, the Corning Glass Museum, the Kyoto Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Decorative Arts in Lausanne, Switzerland, and the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian Institution. She has received numerous honors and awards for her work, and has been honored by the American Craft Museum as a Visionary.

Shaffer moved to Marfa, Texas, in 2001 after having been a long-time resident of Bethesda, Maryland, and having studios in Maryland and, later, New York.
Provenance:
The collection was donated to the Archives of American Art by Mary Shaffer in 2002.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Mary Shaffer papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Sculptors  Search this
Women sculptors  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Glass art -- United States -- 20th century  Search this
Glass sculpture  Search this
Glass artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Mary Shaffer papers, 1969-2002. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.shafmary
See more items in:
Mary Shaffer papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-shafmary

Hattie Saussy papers

Creator:
Saussy, Hattie, 1890-1978  Search this
Extent:
1 Reel (ca. 750 items (on 1 microfilm reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Reels
Date:
1896-1983
Scope and Contents:
Five sketchbooks; sketches and photocopies of sketches; a watercolor; an oil painting; designs for greeting cards, theater costumes, sets, advertisements, and stained glass windows; photographs of her family and friends; photocopies of correspondence; clippings; and miscellaneous material from the Hicklin Gallery, Spartenburg, South Carolina.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter; Savannah, Ga.
Provenance:
Lent for microfilming 1983 by J. Logan Sewell.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Painters -- Georgia -- Atlanta  Search this
Topic:
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- History -- Georgia -- Atlanta  Search this
Women artists -- Georgia -- Atlanta  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.saushatt
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-saushatt

Anna Wells Rutledge papers

Creator:
Rutledge, Anna Wells  Search this
Names:
Delphian Club (Baltimore, Md.)  Search this
Tuesday Club (Annapolis, Md.)  Search this
Clarke, Thomas B. (Thomas Benedict), 1848-1931  Search this
Coffee, William John, 1774-1846  Search this
Cowdrey, Mary Bartlett, 1910-1974  Search this
Gilmor, Robert, 1774-1848  Search this
Philip, William Henry, 1829-1882  Search this
Powers, Hiram, 1805-1873  Search this
Extent:
1 Linear foot ((on 2 microfilm reels))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1940-1961
Scope and Contents:
Correspondence and research material. Among the subjects researched are New Orleans artists; 19th century South Carolina newspaper articles on artists; the Delphian Club in Baltimore; the Tuesday Club in Annapolis, Maryland; collector William Henry Philip; the Thomas B. Clarke Collection; William John Coffee; Robert Gilmor; and Hiram Powers. Also included are exhibition catalogs of Maryland artists, a bibliography of the writings of Mary Bartlett Cowdrey, and miscellany.
Biographical / Historical:
Art historian; Charleston, S.C.
Provenance:
Donated 1961 by Anna Wells Rutledge.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Artists -- Maryland  Search this
Artists -- Louisiana -- New Orleans  Search this
Artists -- South Carolina  Search this
Art historians -- South Carolina  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.rutlanna
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-rutlanna

John Goffe Rand papers

Creator:
Rand, John Goffe, 1801-1873  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Date:
circa 1832-1960
bulk 1832-1873
Summary:
The scattered papers of inventor and portrait painter John Goffe Rand measure 0.2 linear feet and date from circa 1832-1960, bulk 1832-1873. Included are biographical sketches, a will, lists of portraits by Rand, a small amount of correspondence, files regarding Rand's invention of the collapsible artists' paint tube, clippings, a photo, and an example of one of the first paint tubes made in a factory.
Scope and Content Note:
The scattered papers of inventor and portrait painter John Goffe Rand measure 0.2 linear feet and date from circa 1832-1960, bulk 1832-1873. Included are biographical sketches, a will, lists of portraits by Rand, a small amount of correspondence, United States patents for the collapsible paint tube invented by Rand and later improvements, printed materials, a photo, and an example of one of the first paint tubes made in a factory.

Biographical Information includes an unpublished biography about Rand, typescripts of an obituary, short biographical sketches, lists of portraits painted by Rand, and a copy of his will. A small amount of correspondence consists of one letter written by Rand in 1864 addressed to his neice and typescripts of letters written by members of Rand's extended family concerning the artist and his works.

Subject files document Rand's invention of the collapsible tin artists' paint tube and include two patents from the United States Patent Office dated 1841 and 1844. The 1844 patent was for improvements to the tube. The patent applications contain diagrams and written descriptions of the tube. There are also clippings about the anniversaries of the invention.

Additional clippings are about members of the Rand family and a painting by Rand. One photograph depicts Rand's gravesite circa 1930. Artifacts include an example of one of the first collapsible paint tubes made in a factory.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 6 series:

Series 1: Biographical Information, 1873-1941, circa 1960 (Box 1; 5 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1864, 1906-1960 (Box 1; 2 folders)

Series 3: Subject Files, 1841-1844, 1941-1956(Box 1; 2 folders)

Series 4: Printed Material, circa 1900 (Box 1; 1 folder)

Series 5: Photographs, circa 1930 (Box 1; 1 folder)

Series 6: Artifact, circa 1832 (Box 1; 1 folder)
Biographical Note:
John Goffe Rand (1801-1873) lived and worked in Boston, London, and New York as a portrait painter and inventor. Rand invented and patented the first collapsible artist's paint tube.

Rand was born in 1801 in Bedford, New Hampshire. As a young man, he worked as an apprentice to a cabinet maker. Although he showed talent, Rand chose to paint houses and signs and found that he excelled at portraiture. Discovered and encouraged by Samuel F. B. Morse, he moved to Boston and by 1828 established his own studio. While temporarly in Charleston, South Carolina, Rand met Miss Lavinia Brainerd whom he later married.

Shortly after their wedding, Lavinia and John Rand travelled to London where John continued to paint portraits. Among those whom he painted were members of the royal family and other figures in the English nobility including Lord Bexley, the Duke and Duchess of Inverness, and the Duke of Sussex.

While in London, Rand invented a collapsible paint tube made of tin for storing artists' mixed oil paints. Prior to this advancement, painters generally mixed pigments with oil in small amounts and stored the extra paint in animal bladders. The tin tube allowed unused paint to be stored and used later without drying out. In 1841, Rand patented the invention with the United States Patent Office. He went on to patent several later improvements. Other later inventions, however, were not as widely received, and most of his ideas were not financially successful.

Upon returning to the United States, John Rand and his wife settled on Long Island where he continued his career in painting portraits. The artist died in 1873.
Provenance:
The John Goffe Rand papers were donated by Rand's great-grandnieces Mary and Katherine Anglemyer in 1981 and 1985.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The John Goffe Rand papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Inventors -- England  Search this
Portrait painters -- England -- London  Search this
Painting -- Equipment and supplies  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
John Goffe Rand papers, circa 1832-1960, bulk 1832-1873. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.randjohn
See more items in:
John Goffe Rand papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-randjohn
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