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Moses and Frances Asch Collection

Creator:
Asch, Moses  Search this
Distler, Marian, 1919-1964  Search this
Folkways Records  Search this
Names:
Courlander, Harold, 1908-1996  Search this
Guthrie, Woody, 1912-1967  Search this
Jenkins, Ella  Search this
Leadbelly, 1885-1949  Search this
Ramsey, Frederic, 1915-1995  Search this
Seeger, Pete, 1919-2014  Search this
Extent:
841 Cubic feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Business records
Correspondence
Phonograph records
Photographic prints
Audiotapes
Date:
1926-1986
bulk 1948-1986
Summary:
This collection, which dates from 1926-1986, documents the output of Moses Asch through the various record labels he founded and co-founded, and includes some of his personal papers. The Asch collection includes published recordings, master tapes, outtakes, business records, correspondence, photographs, and film.
Scope and Contents:
The Moses and Frances Asch Collection measures 841 cubic feet and dates from 1926-1987, with some contemporary, relevant correspondence, clippings, and ephemera added after 1987.

Most of the collection consists of audio recordings (commercial 78 rpm and long-playing records, open reel tapes, acetate discs, and test pressings), correspondence with recording artists and producers, artwork, photographs, ephemera, clippings, record production materials, writings, and business papers relating to Folkways Records. Materials relating to Folkways Records can be found primarily in the Correspondence, Folkways Production, Business Records, Photographs, Artwork, Sound Recordings, and Film series.

The collection also contains some biographical materials and personal correspondence, including materials related to Asch's first business, Radio Laboratories, located in the Biographical Materials series. Correspondence, ephemera, photographs, record production materials, business papers, and recordings relating to Asch's record labels before Folkways Records (Asch Recordings, Disc Company of America, Cub Records) are located in the Early Label Materials series as well as the Audio Recordings and Photographs series.
Arrangement note:
The collection is arranged in 10 series:

Series 1: Correspondence, 1942-1987

Series 2: Folkways Production, 1946-1987

Series 3: Business Records, 1940-1987

Series 4: Woody Guthrie papers, 1927-1985

Series 5: Early Label Materials, 1940-1949

Series 6: Biographical Materials, 1926-1987

Series 7: Photographs

Series 8: Artwork

Series 9: Audio Recordings

Series 10: Film

At this time, the collection is partially processed. Please contact rinzlerarchives@si.edu for more information.
Biographical/Historical note:
The son of Yiddish writer Sholem Asch, Moses Asch was born in Poland in 1905. His childhood was spent in Poland, France, Germany, and New York. While young, Asch developed an interest in radio electronics, which ultimately lead him to his life's work, recording the music and sounds of the world. He established several record labels in succession, sometimes partnering with other record companies. Two of his fist record companies, Asch Recordings and DISC Co. of America, went bankrupt. They were followed by his best-known label, Folkways Records, which was founded in 1948 with Marian Distler (1919-1964). He was still working on Folkways recordings when he died in 1986.

Folkways Records sought to document the entire world of sound. The 2,168 titles Asch released on Folkways include traditional and contemporary music from around the world, spoken word in many languages, and documentary recordings of individuals, communities, and current events. Asch's business practices revolved around the commitment to keep every recording issued by Folkways in print, despite low sales. Asch stayed afloat by cutting costs where he could (such as color printing) and offering a high-quality product, meticulously recorded and accompanied by extensive liner notes. In doing this, he could charge a slightly higher price than other commercial outfits. Despite a tenuous relationship with financial solvency, Folkways grew to be not only one of the most important independent record companies in the United States in the 20th century, but also one of the largest and most influential record companies in the world.

Moses Asch's record labels featured famous and lesser known American writers, poets, documentarians, ethnographers, and grass roots musicians on commercial recordings. American folk icon Woody Guthrie recorded on the Asch, Disc, and Folkways labels, and the Asch Collection includes some of his correspondence, lyrics, drawings, and writings. The collection also includes correspondence with other notable musicians and artists such as John Cage, Langston Hughes, Margaret Walker, Huddie "Lead Belly" Ledbetter, Pete Seeger, Peggy Seeger, Ewan MacColl, Alan Lomax, Henry Cowell, and Kenneth Patchen. Also in the collection are ethnographic field notes and photographs by as well as correspondence with Béla Barók, Sidney Robertson Cowell, Harold Courlander, Helen Creighton, Laura Boulton, and Samuel Charters. Asch hired various prominent artists and graphic designers including David Stone Martin, Ben Shahn, John Carlis, and Ronald Clyne to create album cover art for his recordings. Much of the original art and designs for these covers can be found in the Asch Collection.

Asch's output of recordings on various labels, including published recordings, open reel master tapes, outtakes, and acetate disks, in addition to his business papers, correspondence, photographs, and other files were acquired by the Smithsonian Institution in 1987. The collection came to the Smithsonian with the understanding that all 2168 titles under the Folkways label would be kept available in perpetuity.
Provenance:
Ralph Rinzler arranged the Smithsonian's acquisition of the Moses and Frances Asch Collection in 1987, beginning with Asch before his death in 1986 and continuing with extensive discussions between Rinzler and the Asch family. Since its acquisition, archivist Jeff Place and others have added contemporary, relevant correspondence with Folkways artists and related individuals.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at rinzlerarchives@si.edu or (202) 633-7322 for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright restrictions apply. Contact archives staff for additional information.
Topic:
Folk music  Search this
Folk dance music  Search this
Electronic music  Search this
Oral interpretation of poetry  Search this
Oral interpretation of fiction  Search this
Music -- 20th century  Search this
Music -- 19th century  Search this
Music -- 18th century  Search this
Jazz  Search this
Folk music -- United States  Search this
World music  Search this
Sounds  Search this
Vocal music  Search this
Popular music -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Business records
Correspondence
Phonograph records
Photographic prints
Audiotapes
Citation:
Moses and Frances Asch Collection, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.ASCH
See more items in:
Moses and Frances Asch Collection
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-asch
Online Media:

Smithsonian Jazz Oral History Program Collection

Collector:
National Museum of American History (U.S.). Archives Center  Search this
Producer:
National Museum of American History (U.S.). Dept. of Public Programs  Search this
America's Jazz Heritage  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Traveling Exhibition Service  Search this
Funder:
Lila Wallace-Reader's Digest Fund  Search this
Ella Fitzgerald Charitable Foundation  Search this
National Endowment for the Arts  Search this
Lila Wallace-Reader's Digest Fund  Search this
National Endowment for the Arts  Search this
Creator:
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Interviewee:
Adams, Joe, 1922-  Search this
Aguabella, Francisco, 1925-  Search this
Akiyoshi, Toshiko, 1929-  Search this
Alvarado, Alfredo  Search this
Anderson, Chris, 1926-  Search this
Armenteros, Chocolate, 1928-  Search this
Armstrong, Howard, 1909-2003  Search this
Ashby, Harold  Search this
Atkins, Clarence, 1921-  Search this
Avakian, George, 1919-  Search this
Baker, David, 1931-  Search this
Bank, Danny, 1922-  Search this
Barker, Danny, 1909-  Search this
Barker, Louise, 1913-  Search this
Barron, Kenny  Search this
Bass, Fontella  Search this
Bates, Peg Leg, 1907-  Search this
Bauza, Mario, 1911-  Search this
Belli, Remo  Search this
Bellson, Louis  Search this
Benson, George, 1943-  Search this
Berger, Ed  Search this
Bert, Eddie, 1922-  Search this
Betts, Keter, 1928-  Search this
Bey, Chief (James), 1913-  Search this
Bishop, Walter, 1927-  Search this
Brooks, Cecil  Search this
Brown, Oscar, Jr., 1926-  Search this
Brown, Velzoe, 1910-  Search this
Brubeck, Dave  Search this
Bryant, Ardie, 1929-  Search this
Bryant, Clora  Search this
Bryant, Ray, 1931-  Search this
Bufalino, Brenda, 1937-  Search this
Bunnett, Jane  Search this
Burns, Ralph, 1922-2001  Search this
Burrell, Kenny  Search this
Butts, Jimmy, 1917-  Search this
Byrd, Charlie, 1925-  Search this
Calloway, Cab, 1907-  Search this
Camero, Candido, 1921-  Search this
Carbonell, Luis  Search this
Carrington, Terri Lyne  Search this
Carter, Benny, 1907-2003  Search this
Carter, Ron, 1937-  Search this
Casey, Al, 1915-  Search this
Cheatham, Doc, 1905-1997  Search this
Cheatham, Jeannie, 1917-  Search this
Cheatham, Jimmy, 1924-  Search this
Claxton, William  Search this
Cobb, Jimmy, 1929-  Search this
Cohen, Martin, 1939-  Search this
Collins, John, 1913-  Search this
Columbus, Chris, 1902-  Search this
Conover, Willis, 1920-  Search this
Costello, Diosa  Search this
Cruz, Alfredo  Search this
Cruz, Celia, 1920-  Search this
Cugat, Xavier, 1900-  Search this
D'Rivera, Paquito, 1948-  Search this
De Franco, Buddy, 1923-  Search this
DeJohnette, Jack  Search this
Dejan, Harold, 1909-  Search this
Del Puerto, Carlos, 1951-  Search this
Di Novi, Gene, 1928-  Search this
Diaz Ayala, Cristobal  Search this
Donegan, Dorothy, 1922-  Search this
Driggs, Frank, 1930-  Search this
Dudley, Bessie, 1902-  Search this
Edison, Harry, 1915-  Search this
Egũes, Richard, 1923-2006  Search this
Farmer, Art, 1928-  Search this
Favors, Malachi  Search this
Fernandez, Rosita, 1918-2006  Search this
Fernandez, Ruth  Search this
Finegan, Bill, 1917-  Search this
Flynn, Frank (Marimba player)  Search this
Foster, Frank, 1928-  Search this
Fournier, Vernel, 1928-  Search this
Freeman, Von, 1922-  Search this
Fuller, Curtis, 1934-  Search this
Fuller, Gil, 1920-  Search this
Gensel, John  Search this
Gilbert, Peggy  Search this
Golson, Benny  Search this
Gonzalez, Celina  Search this
Goodson, Sadie, 1904-  Search this
Green, Urbie  Search this
Guerrero, Felix, 1916-2001  Search this
Guines, Tata  Search this
Hamilton, Chico, 1921-  Search this
Hampton, Slide  Search this
Harris, Joe  Search this
Harrison, Nelson  Search this
Haynes, Roy, 1926-  Search this
Heath, Jimmy, 1926-  Search this
Heath, Percy, 1923-2005  Search this
Hemphill, Julius, 1938-  Search this
Henderson, Bill, 1930-  Search this
Henderson, Luther  Search this
Hendricks, Jon, 1921-  Search this
Hentoff, Nat  Search this
Hill, Roger, 1928-  Search this
Hinton, Milt, 1910-  Search this
Holman, Bill, 1927-  Search this
Horn, Shirley, 1934-  Search this
Humphries, Roger  Search this
Hutcherson, Bobby  Search this
Jarvis, Jane, 1915-  Search this
Jimenez, Flaco  Search this
Johnson, J.J., 1924-  Search this
Jones, Elvin  Search this
Jones, Hank, 1918-2010  Search this
Jones, Jonah  Search this
Jones, Quincy, 1933-  Search this
Jordan, Kidd, 1935-  Search this
Jordan, Sheila, 1928-  Search this
Keepnews, Orrin, 1923-  Search this
Kimball, Narvin, 1909-  Search this
Klein, Manny, 1908-  Search this
Konitz, Lee  Search this
Lateef, Yusef, 1920-  Search this
Laws, Hubert  Search this
LeGon, Jeni, 1916-  Search this
LeRoy Neiman  Search this
Leonard, Herman, 1923-2010  Search this
Levy, John, 1912-2012  Search this
Lewis, Edna, 1907-  Search this
Lewis, Ramsey  Search this
Liebman, Dave  Search this
Lincoln, Abbey, 1930 -  Search this
Liston, Melba  Search this
Livelli, VIncent  Search this
Longoria, Valerio, 1924-200  Search this
Lopez, Israel, 1918-  Search this
Lucie, Lawrence, 1907-  Search this
Lutcher, Nellie, 1912-  Search this
Lynton, Charles, 1904-  Search this
Mandel, Johnny  Search this
Manning, Frank, 1914-  Search this
Marsalis, Delfeayo  Search this
Marsalis, Ellis  Search this
Marsalis, Jason  Search this
McGettigan, Betty  Search this
McIntosh, Tom, 1927-  Search this
McKibbon, Al, 1919-  Search this
McKusick, Hal, 1924-  Search this
McPartland, Marian  Search this
Mendoza, Lydia  Search this
Miller, Eric  Search this
Miller, Norma, 1919-  Search this
Mondello, Toots, 1911-  Search this
Moody, James, 1925-  Search this
Morgenstern, Dan  Search this
Murray, Albert, 1916-  Search this
Myers, Amina  Search this
Nicholas, Fayard, 1918-  Search this
Nicholas, Harold, 1924-  Search this
Norvo, Red, 1908-1999  Search this
O'Brien, Peter F.  Search this
O'Farrill, Chico, 1921-2001  Search this
Owens, Jimmy, 1943-  Search this
Palmier, Remo, 1923-  Search this
Peraza, Armando, 1924-  Search this
Perez, Graciela  Search this
Peterson, Oscar, 1925-  Search this
Puente, Tito  Search this
Pullen, Don, 1941-  Search this
Rachell, Yank  Search this
Ray, Carline, 1925-  Search this
Reed, Leonard, 1907-  Search this
Richards, Red, 1912-  Search this
Rivers, Sam  Search this
Robinson, Charles  Search this
Robinson, Les, 1912-  Search this
Rogers, Shorty, 1924-  Search this
Rollins, Sonny  Search this
Ross, Annie, 1930-  Search this
Royal, Marshall, 1912-  Search this
Rugolo, Pete, 1915-  Search this
Russell, George, 1923-2009  Search this
Rutherford, Rudy  Search this
Sager, Jane, 1914-  Search this
Santamaria, Mongo, 1917-  Search this
Scott, Jimmy  Search this
Settle, Cucell, 1914-  Search this
Shaw, Artie, 1910-2004  Search this
Slyde, Jimmy, 1927-  Search this
Smith, Hale G.  Search this
Smith, Johnny  Search this
Stoll, Jerry, 1923-  Search this
Taylor, Arthur, 1929-  Search this
Taylor, Billy  Search this
Teagarden, Norma, 1911-  Search this
Terry, Clark  Search this
Thielemans, Toots  Search this
Tinney, Al, 1921-  Search this
Toro, Yomo  Search this
Tucker, Bobby, 1923-2008  Search this
Tyner, McCoy  Search this
Valdes, Bebo, 1918-  Search this
Valdez, Carlos, 1926-  Search this
Valdez, Chucho, 1941-  Search this
Valentin, Val, 1920-  Search this
Valeria, Chuy  Search this
Van Gelder, Rudy  Search this
Van Lake, Turk, 1918-  Search this
Viola, Al, 1919-  Search this
Walton, Cedar, 1934-  Search this
Wein, George  Search this
Wess, Frank, 1922-  Search this
Weston, Randy, 1926-  Search this
White, Andrew, 1942-  Search this
Wilder, Joe, 1922-  Search this
Willcox, Spiegle, 1902-  Search this
Williams, Claude, 1908-2004  Search this
Williams, John, 1905-  Search this
Wilson, Gerald, 1918-  Search this
Wilson, Nancy, 1937-  Search this
Wofford, Mike  Search this
Woods, Phil  Search this
Ybarra, Eva  Search this
Yoshida, George, 1922-  Search this
Young, Al (Saxophinist)  Search this
Young, Lee, 1917-  Search this
Young, Webster, 1932-  Search this
Interviewer:
Baker, Lida  Search this
Bluiett, Hamiett  Search this
Brower, William  Search this
Brown, Anthony  Search this
Burstein, Julie  Search this
Carner, Gary  Search this
Cole, Tom  Search this
Coleman, Steve  Search this
Corporan, Hector  Search this
Crease, Bob  Search this
Dantzler, Russ  Search this
Elie, Lolis  Search this
Fernandez, Raul  Search this
Fochios, Steve  Search this
Frank, Rusty  Search this
Geremia, Paul, 1944-  Search this
Haddix, Chuck  Search this
Harris, Barry  Search this
Holley, Eugene  Search this
Jackson, Reuben  Search this
Jenkins, Willard  Search this
Kimery, Kennith  Search this
Kirchner, Bill  Search this
Levin, Floyd, 1922-2007  Search this
Lopez, Rene  Search this
McDaniel, Ted  Search this
McDonough, John  Search this
Murphy, Molly  Search this
Newton, James  Search this
O'Meally, Bob  Search this
Ouelette, Dan  Search this
Pelote, Vincent  Search this
Placksin, Sally  Search this
Porter, Lewis  Search this
Pullman, Peter  Search this
Ritz, David  Search this
Rodrique, Jessie  Search this
Schoenberg, Loren  Search this
Schwartz, Scott  Search this
Smith, Ernie  Search this
Sneed, Ann  Search this
Stitt, Katea  Search this
Talbot, Bruce  Search this
Tucker, Sherrie  Search this
Watson, Matt  Search this
White, Michael  Search this
Whitfield, Weslia  Search this
Willard, Patricia  Search this
Williams, James  Search this
Wong, Herb  Search this
Yamazaki, Paul  Search this
Zimmerman, James  Search this
Extent:
39 Cubic feet (54 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Compact discs
Sound recordings
Oral history
Audiotapes
Interviews
Date:
1992-2012
Scope and Contents:
Audiotapes, CDs and digital files: an ongoing project to interview and preserve the memories of people important in the jazz world, including jazz musicians, singers, dancers, producers, arrangers, and others. A list of interviewees and interviewers follows.

The following is a list of the individuals who conducted the interviews.

1. Brown, Anthony

2. Baker, Lida

3. Burstein, Julie

Interviewer

2. Bluiett, Hamiet
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged into six series.

Series 1, DAT and CD Original Interview Recordings, 1992-2012

Series 2, Cassette Reference and Master Interview Tapes, 1992-2012

Series 3, Audio CD Reference Copies, 2000-2012

Series 4, Video/CD, 1994-2012

Series 5, Transcripts and Abstracts, 1992-2014

Series 6, Supplemental Documentation, 1992-2012
Biographical / Historical:
The Smithsonian Jazz Oral History Program, a project of "America's Jazz Heritage, A Partnership of the Lila Wallace-Reader's Digest Fund and the Smithsonian Institution" initiative was created in 1992. More than 150 in-depth oral history interviews were conducted from 1992 through 2002. The collection was transferred to the Archives Center of the National Museum of American History in 2000. Now part of the National Museum of American History's American Music History Initiatives, the Smithsonian Jazz Oral History Program continues to conduct interviews as funding is available.

The Smithsonian Jazz Oral History Program was established to document significant jazz musicians, performers, producers, and business associates in their own words and voices. Program staff contacted and worked with potential interviewees to arrange for interviews. Each interview was conducted by a jazz authority and was recorded on digital audiotape by a professional audio engineer. The interviews averaged 6 hours in length and covered a wide range of topics including early years, initial involvement in music, generally, and jazz specifically, as well as experiences in the jazz music world, including relationships to musicians. The original DAT interview tapes were then dubbed to audiocassettes and CD to create protection and access copies. More recent interviews have been recorded using fully digital technology and the interviews are preserved and made availbel as digital files.

A number of the interviews were conducted as part of the Ella Fitzgerald Oral History Project of the Jazz Oral History Program. Funded by the Ella Fitzgerald Charitable Foundation, these interviews focus on the life and work of Ella Fitzgerald. The National Endowments for the Arts Jazz Masters Oral Histories Program continues to support new interviews with NEA Jazz Masters.

For more information about jazz concerts, education, collections, Jazz Appreciation Month, and the Jazz Master orchestra, visit Smithsonian Jazz.
Provenance:
The interviews were made for the Smithsonian Institution under the auspices of the Smithsonian Jazz Oral History Program supported by America's Jazz Heritage, funded by the Lila Wallace-Reader's Digest Fund, the Smithsonian Institution, and the National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Masters Oral Histories Program. Additional interviews were conducted with support from the Ella Fitzgerald Charitable Foundation.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Researchers must use reference copies.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions. Release forms exist for most interviews.
Topic:
Dancers  Search this
Music -- 20th century  Search this
Jazz  Search this
Musicians -- United States  Search this
Jazz musicians -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Compact discs
Sound recordings
Oral history -- 1990-2000
Audiotapes -- 1990-2000
Interviews -- 2000-2010
Interviews -- 1990-2000
Citation:
[Interviewee name] Interview, Smithsonian Jazz Oral History Program Collection, 1992-2014, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0808
See more items in:
Smithsonian Jazz Oral History Program Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0808
Online Media:

Duke Ellington Collection

Collector:
Musical History, Division of (NMAH, SI)  Search this
Musical History, Division of (NMAH, SI)  Search this
Creator:
Ellington, Duke, 1899-1974  Search this
Names:
Duke Ellington Orchestra  Search this
Washingtonians, The.  Search this
Ellington, Mercer Kennedy, 1919-1996 (musician)  Search this
Strayhorn, Billy (William Thomas), 1915-1967  Search this
Extent:
400 Cubic feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Phonograph records
Papers
Photographic prints
Posters
Sound recordings
Scrapbooks
Music
Clippings
Awards
Audiotapes
Place:
New York (N.Y.) -- 20th century
Harlem (New York, N.Y.) -- 20th century
Washington (D.C.) -- 20th century
Date:
1903 - 1989
Summary:
The collection documents Duke Ellington's career primarily through orchestrations (scores and parts), music manuscripts, lead sheets, transcriptions, and sheet music. It also includes concert posters, concert programs, television, radio, motion picture and musical theater scripts, business records, correspondence, awards, as well as audiotapes, audiodiscs, photographs, tour itineraries, newspaper clippings, magazines, caricatures, paintings, and scrapbooks.
Scope and Contents:
Dating approximately from the time Duke Ellington permanently moved to New York City in 1923 to the time the material was transferred to the Smithsonian Institution in 1988, the bulk of the material in the Duke Ellington Collection is dated from 1934-1974 and comprises sound recordings, original music manuscripts and published sheet music, hand-written notes, correspondence, business records, photographs, scrapbooks, news clippings, concert programs, posters, pamphlets, books and other ephemera. These materials document Ellington's contributions as composer, musician, orchestra leader, and an ambassador of American music and culture abroad. In addition, the materials paint a picture of the life of a big band maintained for fifty years and open a unique window through which to view an evolving American society.

The approximate four hundred cubic feet of archival materials have been processed and organized into sixteen series arranged by type of material. Several of the series have been divided into subseries allowing additional organization to describe the content of the material. For example, Series 6, Sound Recordings, is divided into four subseries: Radio and Television Interviews, Concert Performances, Studio Dates and Non-Ellington Recordings. Each series has its own scope and content note describing the material and arrangement (for example; Series 10, Magazines and Newspaper Articles, is organized into two groups, foreign and domestic, and arranged chronologically within each group). A container list provides folder titles and box numbers.

The bulk of the material is located in Series 1, Music Manuscripts, and consists of compositions and arrangements by Duke Ellington, Billy Strayhorn and other composers. Series 6, Sound Recordings also provides a record of the performance of many of these compositions. The materials in Series 2, Performances and Programs, Series 3, Business Records, Series 8, Scrapbooks, Series 9, Newspaper Clippings, Series 11, Publicity and Series 12, Posters provide documentation of specific performances by Duke Ellington and His Orchestra. Ellington was a spontaneous and prolific composer as evidenced by music, lyrical thoughts, and themes for extended works and plays captured on letterhead stationery in Series 3, Business Records, in the margin notes of individual books and pamphlets in Series 14, Religious Materials and Series 15, Books, and in the hand-written notes in Series 5, Personal Correspondence and Notes.

During its fifty-year lifespan, Duke Ellington and His Orchestra were billed under various names including The Washingtonians, The Harlem Footwarmers and The Jungle Band. The soloists were informally called "the band", and Series 3 includes salary statements, IOU's, receipts and ephemera relating to individual band members. Series 1, Music Manuscripts contains the soloists' parts and includes "band books" of several soloists (for example; Harry Carney and Johnny Hodges) and numerous music manuscripts of Billy Strayhorn. The changing role of Strayhorn from arranger hired in 1938 to Ellington's main collaborator and composer of many well-known titles for Duke Ellington and His Orchestra including "Take The A' Train" and "Satin Doll" can be traced in these music manuscripts. Series 7, Photographs and Series 2, Performances and Programs contain many images of the band members and Strayhorn. This Collection also documents the business history of Duke Ellington and His Orchestra. Series 3, Business Records contains correspondence on letterhead stationery and Series 11, Publicity contains promotional material from the various booking agencies, professional companies, and public relations firms that managed the Orchestra.

The materials in the Duke Ellington Collection provide insight into public and institutional attitudes towards African Americans in mid-twentieth-century America. The business records in Series 3 beginning in 1938 and published sheet music in Series 1 depict Duke Ellington's progression from an African-American musician who needed "legitimization" by a white publisher, Irving Mills, to a businessmen who established his own companies including Tempo Music and Duke Ellington, Incorporated to control his copyright and financial affairs. Programs from the segregated Cotton Club in Series 2, Performances And Programs and contracts with no-segregation clauses in Series 3: Business Records further illustrate racial policies and practices in this time period. The public shift in perception of Duke Ellington from a leader of an exotic "Jungle Band" in the 1930s to a recipient of the Congressional Medal Of Freedom in 1970 is evidenced in Series 2, Performances And Programs, Series 12, Posters, Series 7, Photographs and Series 13, Awards. Reviews and articles reflecting Ellington's evolving status are also documented in Series 8, Newspaper Clippings, Series 9, Scrapbooks, Series 10, Newspaper and Magazine Articles.

The materials in the Duke Ellington Collection reflect rapid technological changes in American society from 1923-1982. Sound recordings in Series 6 range from 78 phonograph records of three minutes duration manufactured for play on Victrolas in monaural sound to long-playing (LP) phonograph records produced for stereo record players. Television scripts in Series 4, programs in Series 2 and music manuscripts (for example, Drum Is A Woman) in Series 1 demonstrate how the development of television as a means of mass communication spread the Orchestra's sound to a wider audience. The availability of commercial air travel enabled the Ellington Orchestra to extend their international performances from Europe to other continents including tours to Asia, Africa, South America and Australia and archival material from these tours is included in every series.

Series 4, Scripts and Transcripts and Series 6, Audio Recordings contain scripts and radio performances promoting the sale of United States War bonds during World War II, and Series 7, Photographs includes many images of Duke Ellington and His Orchestra's performances for military personnel revealing the impact of historic events on Duke Ellington and His Orchestra. Series 2: Programs and Performances, Series 9, Newspaper clippings and Series 8, Scrapbooks document the 1963 Far East tour aborted as a result of President John F. Kennedy's assassination.

The Duke Ellington Collection contains works by numerous twentieth-century music, literature, and art luminaries. Series 1, Music Manuscripts contains original music manuscripts of William Grant Still, Eubie Blake, Mary Lou Williams, and others. Series 4, Scripts and Transcripts contains a play by Langston Hughes, and Series 12, Posters contains many original artworks.
Arrangement:
Series 1: Music Manuscripts, circa 1930-1981, undated

Series 2: Performances and Programs, 1933-1973, undated

Series 3: Business Records, 1938-1988

Series 4: Scripts and Transcripts, 1937-1970

Series 5: Personal Correspondence and Notes, 1941-1974, undated

Series 6: Sound Recordings, 1927-1974

Series 7: Photographs, 1924-1972, undated

Series 8: Scrapbooks, 1931-1973

Series 9: Newspaper Clippings, 1939-1973, undated

Series 10: Magazine Articles and Newspaper Clippings, 1940-1974

Series 11: Publicity, 1935-1988

Series 12: Posters and Oversize Graphics, 1933-1989, undated

Series 13: Awards, 1939-1982

Series 14: Religious Material, 1928-1974

Series 15: Books, 1903-1980

Series 16: Miscellaneous, 1940-1974
Biographical / Historical:
A native of Washington, DC, Edward Kennedy Ellington was born on April 29, 1899. Edward was raised in a middle-class home in the Northwest section of Washington described by his sister Ruth--younger by sixteen years--as a "house full of love." Ellington himself wrote that his father J.E. (James Edward) raised his family "as though he were a millionaire" but Edward was especially devoted to his mother, Daisy Kennedy Ellington. In 1969, thirty-four years after his mother's death, Ellington accepted the Presidential Medal of Freedom with these words, "There is nowhere else I would rather be tonight but in my mother's arms." Both his parents played the piano and Ellington began piano lessons at the age of seven, but like many boys he was easily distracted by baseball.

In his early teens, Ellington sneaked into Washington clubs and performance halls where he was exposed to ragtime musicians, including James P. Johnson, and where he met people from all walks of life. He returned in earnest to his piano studies, and at age fourteen wrote his first composition, "Soda Fountain Rag" also known as "Poodle Dog Rag." Ellington was earning income from playing music at seventeen years of age, and around this time he earned the sobriquet "Duke" for his sartorial splendor and regal air. On July 2, 1918, he married a high school sweetheart, Edna Thompson; their only child, Mercer Kennedy Ellington, was born on March 11, 1919. Duke Ellington spent the first twenty-four years of his life in Washington's culturally thriving Negro community. In this vibrant atmosphere he was inspired to be a composer and learned to take pride in his African-American heritage.

Ellington moved to New York City in 1923 to join and eventually lead a small group of transplanted Washington musicians called "The Washingtonians," which included future Ellington band members, Sonny Greer, Otto Hardwicke and "Bubber" Miley. Between 1923 and 1927, the group played at the Club Kentucky on Broadway and the ensemble increased from a quintet to a ten-piece orchestra. With stride pianist Willie "The Lion" Smith as his unofficial guide, Ellington soon became part of New York's music scene; Smith proved to be a long-lasting influence on Duke's composing and arranging direction. At the Club Kentucky, Ellington came under the tutelage of another legendary stride pianist, "Fats" Waller. Waller, a protege of Johnson and Smith, played solos during the band's breaks and also tutored Ellington who began to show progress in his compositions. In November 1924, Duke made his publishing and recording debut with "Choo Choo (I Got To Hurry Home)" released on the Blu-Disc label. In 1925, he contributed two songs to Chocolate Kiddies, an all-black revue which introduced European audiences to black American styles and performers. By this time Ellington's family, Edna and Mercer, had joined him in New York City. The couple separated in the late 1920's, but they never divorced or reconciled.

Ellington's achievements as a composer and bandleader began to attract national attention while he worked at the Cotton Club in Harlem, New York City, from 1927 to 1932. The orchestra developed a distinctive sound that displayed the non-traditional voicings of Ellington's arrangements and featured the unique talents of the individual soloists. Ellington integrated his soloists' exotic-sounding trombone growls and wah-wahs, their high-squealed trumpets, their sultry saxophone blues licks and Harlem's street rhythms into his arrangements. In the promotional material of the Cotton Club, the band was often billed as "Duke Ellington and His Jungle Band." With the success of compositions like "Mood Indigo," and an increasing number of recordings and national radio broadcasts from the Cotton Club, the band's reputation soared.

The ten years from 1932 to 1942 are considered by some major critics to represent the "golden age" for the Ellington Orchestra, but it represents just one of their creative peaks. These years did bring an influx of extraordinary new talent to the band including Jimmy Blanton on double bass, Ben Webster on tenor saxophone, and Ray Nance on trumpet, violin and vocals. During this ten year span Ellington composed several of his best known short works, including "Concerto For Cootie," "Ko-Ko," "Cotton Tail," "In A Sentimental Mood," and Jump For Joy, his first full-length musical stage revue.

Most notably, 1938 marked the arrival of Billy Strayhorn. While a teenager in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Strayhorn had already written "Lush Life," "Something To Live For" and a musical, Fantastic Rhythm. Ellington was initially impressed with Strayhorn's lyrics but realized long before Billy's composition "Take the A' Train" became the band's theme song in 1942 that Strayhorn's talents were not limited to penning clever lyrics. By 1942, "Swee' Pea" had become arranger, composer, second pianist, collaborator, and as Duke described him, "my right arm, my left arm, all the eyes in the back of my head, my brain waves in his head, and his in mine." Many Ellington/Strayhorn songs have entered the jazz canon, and their extended works are still being discovered and studied today. Strayhorn remained with the Ellington Organization until his death on May 30, 1967.

Ellington had often hinted of a work in progress depicting the struggle of blacks in America. The original script, Boola, debuted in Carnegie Hall in November of 1943, retitled Black, Brown and Beige. The performance met with mixed reviews, and although Ellington often returned to Carnegie Hall the piece was never recorded in a studio, and after 1944 was never performed in entirety again by the Ellington Orchestra. Nonetheless, it is now considered a milestone in jazz composition.

After World War II the mood and musical tastes of the country shifted and hard times befell big bands, but Ellington kept his band together. The band was not always financially self-sufficient and during the lean times Ellington used his songwriting royalties to meet the soloists' salaries. One could assign to Ellington the altruistic motive of loyalty to his sidemen, but another motivation may have been his compositional style which was rooted in hearing his music in the formative stage come alive in rehearsal. "The band was his instrument," Billy Strayhorn said, and no Ellington composition was complete until he heard the orchestra play it. Then he could fine tune his compositions, omit and augment passages, or weave a soloist's contribution into the structure of the tune.

In 1956, the American public rediscovered Duke and the band at the Newport Jazz Festival in Rhode Island. The searing performances of tenor saxophonist Paul Gonsalves on "Diminuendo and Crescendo In Blue," his premiere soloist, alto saxophonist Johnny Hodges on "Jeep's Blues", and the crowd's ecstatic reaction have become jazz legend. Later that year Duke landed on the cover of Time magazine. Although Ellington had previously written music for film and television (including the short film, Black and Tan Fantasy in 1929) it wasn't until 1959 that Otto Preminger asked him to score music for his mainstream film, Anatomy of a Murder, starring Jimmy Stewart. Paris Blues in 1961, featuring box-office stars Paul Newman and Sidney Poitier in roles as American jazz musicians in Paris, followed.

Ellington's first performance overseas was in England in 1933, but the 1960s brought extensive overseas tours including diplomatic tours sponsored by the State Department. Ellington and Strayhorn composed exquisite extended works reflecting the sights and sounds of their travels, including the Far East Suite, 1966. They wrote homages to their classical influences; in 1963, they adapted Tchaikovsky's Nutcracker Suite and celebrated Shakespeare's works with the suite Such Sweet Thunder in 1957. With Ella Fitzgerald, they continued the Norman Granz Songbook Series. Ellington also began to flex his considerable pianist skills and recorded albums with John Coltrane (1963), Coleman Hawkins (1963), Frank Sinatra, and Money Jungle (1963) with Charles Mingus and Max Roach. The First Sacred Concert debuted in San Francisco's Grace Cathedral in 1965. In his final years, Ellington's thoughts turned to spiritual themes and he added a Second (1968) and Third (1973) Concert of Sacred Music to his compositions.

In his lifetime, Duke received numerous awards and honors including the highest honor bestowed on an American civilian, the Congressional Medal Of Freedom. In 1965, Ellington was recommended for a Pulitzer Prize to honor his forty years of contribution to music but the recommendation was rejected by the board. Most likely he was disappointed, but his response at the age of sixty-six was, "Fate is being kind to me. Fate doesn't want me to be famous too young."

Ellington never rested on his laurels or stopped composing. Whenever he was asked to name his favorite compositions his characteristic reply was "the next five coming up," but to please his loyal fans Ellington always featured some of his standards in every performance. Even on his deathbed, he was composing the opera buffo called Queenie Pie.

Duke Ellington died on May 24, 1974 at seventy-five years of age. His funeral was held in New York's Cathedral of St. John The Divine; he was buried in Woodlawn Cemetery. His long-time companion Beatrice "Evie" Ellis was buried beside him after her death in 1976. He was survived by his only child, Mercer Kennedy Ellington, who not only took up the baton to lead the Duke Ellington Orchestra but assumed the task of caring for his father's papers and his legacy to the nation. Mercer Ellington died in Copenhagan, Denmark on February 8, 1996, at the age of seventy-six. Ruth Ellington Boatwright died in New York on March 6, 2004, at the age of eighty-eight. Both Mercer and Ruth were responsible for shepherding the documents and artifacts that celebrate Duke Ellington's genius and creative life to their current home in the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History.
Related Materials:
Materials in the Archives Center

William H. Quealy Collection of Duke Ellington Recordings (AC0296)

Rutgers University Collection of Radio Interviews about Duke Ellington (AC0328)

Duke Ellington Oral History Project (AC0368)

Duke Ellington Collection of Ephemera and realated Audiovisual Materials (AC0386)

Annual International Conference of the Duke Ellington Study Group Proceedings (AC0385)

Robert Udkoff Collection of Duke Ellington Ephemera (AC0388)

Frank Driggs Collection of Duke Ellington Photographic Prints (AC0389)

New York Chapter of the Duke Ellington Society Collection (AC390)

Earl Okin Collection of Duke Ellington Ephemera (AC0391)

William Russo Transcription and Arrangement of Duke Ellington's First Concert of Sacred Music (AC0406)

Ruth Ellington Collection of Duke Ellington Materials (AC0415)

Music manuscripts in the Ruth Ellington Collection complement the music manuscripts found in the Duke Ellington Collection.

Carter Harman Collection of Interviews with Duke Ellington (AC0422)

Betty McGettigan Collection of Duke Ellington Memorabilia (AC0494)

Dr. Theodore Shell Collection of Duke Ellington Ephemera (AC0502)

Edward and Gaye Ellington Collection of Duke Ellington Materials (AC0704)

Andrew Homzy Collection of Duke Ellington Stock Music Arrangements (AC0740)

John Gensel Collection of Duke Ellington Materials (AC0763)

Al Celley Collection of Duke Ellington Materials (AC1240)

Materials at Other Organizations

Institute of Jazz Studies
Separated Materials:
Artifacts related to this collection are in the Division of Culture and the Arts and include trophies, plaques, and medals. See accessions: 1989.0369; 1991.0808; 1993.0032; and 1999.0148.
Provenance:
The collection was purchased through an appropriation of Congress in 1988.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.

Copyright restrictions. Consult the Archives Center at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.

Paul Ellington, executor, is represented by:

Richard J.J. Scarola, Scarola Ellis LLP, 888 Seventh Avenue, 45th Floor, New York, New York 10106. Telephone (212) 757-0007 x 235; Fax (212) 757-0469; email: rjjs@selaw.com; www.selaw.com; www.ourlawfirm.com.
Occupation:
Composers -- 20th century  Search this
Topic:
Big bands  Search this
Pianists  Search this
Bandsmen -- 20th century  Search this
Jazz -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Musicians -- 20th century  Search this
Music -- Performance  Search this
African American entertainers -- 20th century  Search this
African Americans -- History  Search this
Popular music -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Music -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
Genre/Form:
Phonograph records
Papers
Photographic prints
Posters
Sound recordings
Scrapbooks -- 20th century
Music -- Manuscripts
Clippings
Awards
Audiotapes
Citation:
Duke Ellington Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0301
See more items in:
Duke Ellington Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0301
Online Media:

Margie; Oh! Peter (You're So Nice)

Recording artist:
Billy Banks' Rhythmakers  Search this
Manufacturer:
United Hot Clubs of America  Search this
Physical Description:
shellac (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 10 in; 25.4 cm
Object Name:
sound recording
Place made:
United States: New York, New York
Recording date:
1932
Related Publication:
Rust, Brian. Jazz Records 1897-1942, Vol. 1
Credit Line:
Gift of Howard A. Guernsey (through Richard L. Guernsey)
ID Number:
1988.0698.0464
Catalog number:
1988.0698.0464
Accession number:
1988.0698
Collector/donor number:
B19
Maker number:
110
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Entertainment
Music & Musical Instruments
Popular Entertainment
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a8-f3e3-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1055564

Oral history interview with Herbert Palmer, 2004 Dec. 6-22

Interviewee:
Palmer, Herbert Bearl, 1915-2006  Search this
Interviewer:
Ehrlich, Susan, 1942-  Search this
Subject:
Offner, Richard  Search this
Reiss, Winold  Search this
Feigen, Richard L.  Search this
Cézanne, Paul  Search this
Shapiro, Meyer  Search this
Garabedian, Charles  Search this
Ankrum, Joan  Search this
Tudor, David  Search this
Stevenson, Harold  Search this
Onslow-Ford, Gordon  Search this
Paalen, Wolfgang  Search this
Mullican, Lee  Search this
Callahan, Harry M.  Search this
Bluhm, Norman  Search this
Grooms, Red  Search this
Maillol, Aristide  Search this
Gustavus Vasa  Search this
Bloch, Lucienne  Search this
Wölfflin, Heinrich  Search this
Reiss, Henrietta  Search this
Riley, Bridget  Search this
New York University  Search this
David Stuart Galleries  Search this
Ankrum Gallery  Search this
Felix Landau Gallery  Search this
Feigen Palmer Gallery  Search this
Irving Blum Gallery (Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Art dealers -- California -- Interviews  Search this
Art thefts  Search this
Gallery owners -- California -- Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)11749
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)250508
AAA_collcode_palmer04
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_250508
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Jun Kaneko, 2005 May 23- 24

Interviewee:
Kaneko, Jun, 1942-  Search this
Interviewer:
McInnes, Mary  Search this
Subject:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Ceramicists -- Nebraska -- Interviews  Search this
Art -- Economic aspects  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American sculptors  Search this
Japanese American sculptors  Search this
Asian American ceramicists  Search this
Japanese American ceramicists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12628
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)252375
AAA_collcode_kaneko05
Theme:
Asian American
Craft
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_252375
Online Media:

Donald J. Ortner Papers

Creator:
Ortner, Donald J.  Search this
Names:
Paleopathology Association  Search this
Smithsonian Institution Department of Anthroplogy  Search this
University of Bradford  Search this
Frohlich, Bruno, 1945-  Search this
Putschar, Walter G. J., 1904-1987  Search this
Extent:
44.37 Linear feet (96 boxes, 3 map-folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Maps
Photographs
Slides (photographs)
Negatives (photographic)
Manuscripts
Sound recordings
Correspondence
Place:
Virginia
England
Jordan
Peru
Date:
1963-2013
Summary:
The Donald J. Ortner Papers, dated 1963 to 2013, document his research and professional activities while working in the Division of Physical Anthropology in the Department of Anthropology at the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History. They primarily deal with his contributions to the field of paleopathology and his work with specimens from Bab edh-Dhra, Jordan and Chichester, England. The bulk of this collection consists of correspondence, files related to Ortner's publications, specimen observations and analysis, and photographs.
Scope and Contents:
The Donald J. Ortner Papers primarily document his projects, research, and correspondence working as a biological anthropologist in the Division of Physical Anthropology of the Department of Anthropology from 1963 until his death in 2012. The bulk of the projects represented relate to his work in paleopathology, such as the Near Eastern skeletal biology program in Jordan and the medieval skeletal disease project in England. The collection consists of notes, research materials, correspondence, data and data analysis, transcripts of specimen observations, maps, blueprints, artwork, negatives, slides, photographs, CD-Roms, floppy discs, and sound cassettes.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 8 series: Series 1. Correspondence, 1966-2012; Series 2. Subject files, 1965-2013, undated; Series 3. Near Eastern Skeletal Biology Program, 1977-2010, undated; Series 4. Medieval Skeletal Disease Project, 1988-2006, undated; Series 5. Other publications, projects, and research, 1963-2011, undated; Series 6. Professional activities, 1971-2007, undated; Series 7. Biographical and office files, 1963-2011, undated; Series 8. Artwork, 1978, undated
Biographical Note:
Donald J. Ortner was a biological anthropologist in the Department of Anthropology at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History (NMNH). By the time of his death, Ortner had served in many positions at the Museum, including Acting Director (1994-1996). His areas of expertise included human paleopathology, human health in medieval England, bioarcheology of the ancient Near East, and the history and evoluton of human infectious diseases. Ortner was a founding member of the Paleopathology Association.

Ortner was born in 1938 in Stoneham, Massachusetts and arrived at the NMNH in 1963, working primarily with J. Lawrence Angel who had recently started as Curator in the Division of Physical Anthropology. While working at the Museum, Ortner completed his Master's in Anthropology in 1967 and received his Ph.D. from the University of Kansas in 1970. His doctoral dissertation was on The Effects of Aging and Disease on the Micromorphology of Human Compact Bone.

Ortner worked with Walter G. J. Putschar, a pathologist based at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, on a series of short-courses (1971-1974) on paleopathology at the Smithsonian. During the summer of 1974, Putschar and Ortner traveled to Europe (London, Edinburgh, Zurich, Strasbourg, Vienna, Prague) studying and photographing examples of skeletal pathology in museums and other repositories. The result of this research was the book Identification of Pathological Conditions in Human Skeletal Remains published in 1981, with later editions in 1985 and 2003.

In 1977, Ortner joined the Expedition to the Dead Sea Plain directed by archaeologists Walter E. Rast and R. Thomas Schaub, focusing on the site of Bab edh-Dhra. Ortner studied the tombs and skeletons for data indicating cultural and biological changes, especially urbanization and connection to the development of other "Western civilizations." Ortner participated in two more field seasons in Bab edh-Dhra in 1979 and 1981. From his research at Bab-edh-Dhra, Ortner published many scholarly articles and recreated two tombs for the Hall of Western Civilization at NMNH.

In 1988, Ortner began his collaboration with the University of Bradford in Bradford, England, teaching short-courses on paleopathology. While a Visiting Professor at the University, he also participated in a project on human health and disease in Medieval England. The project focused on leprosy and syphilis in skeletons from St. James Hospital's leprosarium cemetery in Chichester, Wharram Perry, and Magistrates' Court in Kingston-upon-Hull. He received an Honorary Doctorate of Science from the University in 1995.

Donald J. Ortner died on April 29th, 2012 in Maryland.

Sources consulted:

Ubelaker, D. H. "Obituary: Donald J. Ortner (1938–2012)." American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 149 (2012): 155–156.

Arnoldi, Mary Jo and Ann Kaupp. "Donald J. Ortner, Sr. (1939-2012)." Anthropolog: Newsletter of the Department of Anthropology, Spring 2012: 1-3.

Chronology

1938 -- Born on August 23 in Stoneham, Massachusetts.

1960 -- Received B.A. in Zoology from Columbia Union College in Takoma Park, Maryland.

1963 -- Began working at the Smithsonian Institution.

1967 -- Received M.A. in Anthropology from Syracuse University.

1969 -- Promoted to Assistant Curator.

1970 -- Received Ph.D. from the University of Kansas.

1971 -- Promoted to Associate Curator.

1971-1975 -- Taught part-time at the University of Maryland.

1974 -- Spent summer with Dr. Walter G. J. Putschar studying pathological specimens in Europe.

1976 -- Promoted to Curator in the Anthropology Department, National Museum of Natural History.

1977 -- First field season at Bab edh-Dhra cemetery site in Jordan.

1979 -- Second field season at Bab edh-Dhra cemetery site in Jordan.

1981 -- Third field season at Bab edh-Dhra cemetery site in Jordan.

1988 -- Began association with the University of Bradford in Bradford, England.

1988-1992 -- Chairman of the Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History.

1994-1996 -- Acting Director of the National Museum of Natural History.

1995 -- Awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Science degree from the University of Bradford.

1999-2001 -- President of the Paleopathology Association.

2005 -- Received Eve Cockburn Award from the Paleopathology Association in recognition of his contributions in the field of paleopathology.

2012 -- Died on April 29 in Maryland.
Related Materials:
The following photo lots depicting Donald J. Ortner can be found at the NAA:

Photo Lot 7D: Photograph of attendees after American Anthropological Association annual meeting, 1965

Photo Lot 7A: Portraits made at the annual meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists, 1970

Photo Lot 77-45: Photograph of Smithsonian Institution physical anthropologists, circa 1977

Photo Lot 4822: Division of Physical Anthropology collection of photographs of physical anthropologists, undated

Sound recordings of Donald J. Ortner at the NAA:

John Lawrence Angel Papers, Sound Recordings, "How Humans Adapt: A Biocultural Odyssey," November 9, 1981

Other collections at the NAA in which Donald J. Ortner is a correspondent or creator of material:

Records of the Department of Anthropology, 1877-1980

Department of Anthropology Annual Reports, 1920-1983

John Lawrence Angel Papers, 1930s-1980s

Three films that document Ortner's work in Bab edh-Dhra are located in the Human Studies Film Archives (HSFA):

Film number 2000.9.1, The Bones of Bab edh-Dhra, ca. 1970s

Film number 2000.9.3, Bab edh-Dhra Film Project, 1970-1980

Film number 2014.3, City of the Dead, 1978

The Smithsonian Institution Archives holds the original City of the Dead in Accession 05-282, Office of Telecommunications, Productions.
Provenance:
These papers were transferred to the NAA from the Department of Anthropology in 2014.
Restrictions:
The Donald J. Ortner Papers are open for research.

Access to the Donald J. Ortner Papers requires an appointment.

Requests to view forensic files are subject to review by the NAA. Forensic files can only be viewed in the National Anthropological Archives reading room. No copies are permitted unless permission is granted by the agency the report was written for.

Electronic records are unavailable for research. Please contact the reference archivist for additional information.

Use of audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Anthropologists -- United States  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Human remains (Archaeology)  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology) -- Middle East  Search this
Scurvy  Search this
Leprosy -- Research  Search this
Physical anthropology  Search this
Bāb edh-Dhrā Site (Jordan)  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology) -- England  Search this
Forensic anthropology  Search this
Paleopathology  Search this
Bronze age  Search this
Chichester (England)  Search this
Diseases  Search this
Genre/Form:
Maps
Photographs
Slides (photographs)
Negatives (photographic)
Manuscripts
Sound recordings
Correspondence
Citation:
Donald J. Ortner Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.2014-07
See more items in:
Donald J. Ortner Papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2014-07

Oral history interview with Volkmar Kurt Wentzel

Interviewee:
Wentzel, Volkmar Kurt, 1915-2006  Search this
Interviewer:
Berman, Anne Louise, 1975-2016  Search this
Names:
Constantinople, Lely  Search this
Extent:
6 Items (sound discs (5 hr., 36 min.), digital, 2 5/8 in.)
114 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2002 October 18-2003 January 24
Scope and Contents:
Interview with Volkmar Kurt Wentzel by Anne Louise Bayly Berman for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, at Wentzel's home in Washington, DC on October 18 and 24, 2002; November 12, 2002; and January 24, 2003.
Wentzel discusses his childhood in Dresden, Germany, and the devastation during bombing of the city in World War II. He recalls a few stories about his fascination with dirigibles, beginning in childhood through his experience taking his first news photograph capturing President Franklin Delano Roosevelt meeting with Germans who traveled in the Hindenburg to unsuccessfully negotiate for helium in the 1930s. Wentzel discusses how his family endured the devastation of Germany toward the end of the World War I, and he recalls his father, Fritz Wentzel, working as a photochemist in Germany, and setting up photo paper factories in the former Czechoslovakia and Spain. Wentzel talks about how his father travelled to the Balkans to take photographs for his hobby before family life, and how he was a contemporary of Alfred Stieglitz, as they both studied under Hermann Vogel in Berlin. Wentzel speaks about how his family immigrated to Binghamton, NY in 1926 for his father's work with the Ansco Company (which later became Agfa-Ansco). Wentzel recalls how his father's home darkroom was his first influence on his photographic career. He talks about his mother passing away of pneumonia at an early age and the effects it had on his family. Wentzel recalls his ambition to travel to South America after graduating Binghamton High School with a friend, but once he arrived in Washington, DC, he ended his journey there. He talks about meeting architects Arved Kundzin and Eric Menke, who lead him to an artist retreat in Aurora, West Virginia. Wentzel discusses how he started making photographs in West Virginia, and a few of the pictures he made into photographs were purchased by First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt on a road trip through the area. Wentzel talks about returning to Washington, DC and working in the darkroom for the portrait studio, Underwood & Underwood. He speaks about documenting Washington at night with his hand-me-down Speed Graphic camera. Wentzel explains that a colleague suggested that he send the photographs to the Royal Photographic Society, and walking into the offices of National Geographic to see their darkroom. He discusses applying for and landing a job in the darkroom of the offices of National Geographic. Wentzel talks about founder Gilbert Grosvenor as a pioneer of printing color photography. He describes National Geographic assignments in Kentucky and West Virginia, and talks about the impact of digital photography on the medium. Wentzel describes his air force service in World War II with the First Photo Squadron, where he helped take photographs to create aerial maps, and talks about ending his service in Okinawa and seeing the destruction of Nagasaki. Wentzel discusses returning to National Geographic after from his military service, and then getting assigned to document India. He speaks vividly of his travels in India, about building a traveling darkroom from a junkyard ambulance. He describes meeting Pandit Nehru, and his travels through Bombay, Jammu, Srinagar, Kashmir, Ladakh, Zoji La pass, Delhi, and Jaipur. He also speaks about his time documenting Africa, including the Weeks Expedition to Central Africa in 1952. He talks of his travels in Namibia, the Etosha Pan, Angola, the Congo, and the Cameroons. Lely Constantinople, Wentzel's studio assistant, also participates in the interview.
Biographical / Historical:
Volkmar Wentzel (1915-2006) was a writer and photographer from Washington, D.C.
General:
Originally recorded on 6 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 12 digital wav files. Duration is 5 hr., 36 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
This transcript is open for research. Access to the entire audio recording is restricted. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Topic:
Photographers -- Washington (D.C.) -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.wentze02
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-wentze02

Oral history interview with William Morris

Interviewee:
Morris, William, 1957-  Search this
Interviewer:
Riedel, Mija, 1958-  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
California State University, Chico -- Students  Search this
Central Washington University -- Students  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Pilchuck Glass Center (Stanwood, Wash.)  Search this
San Carlos Borromeo Basilica (Carmel, Calif.)  Search this
Benaroya, Jack, 1921-2012  Search this
Benaroya, Rebecca  Search this
Campbell, Joseph, 1904-1987  Search this
Carpenter, James, 1949-  Search this
Chihuly, Dale, 1941-  Search this
Demarco, Ricky  Search this
Graves, Nancy Stevenson, 1940-1995  Search this
Hauberg, John H. (John Henry), 1916-  Search this
Hydman-Vallien, Ulrica, 1938-2018  Search this
Jung, C. G. (Carl Gustav), 1875-1961  Search this
Karan, Donna, 1948-  Search this
Kirkpatrick, Joey  Search this
Libenský, Stanislav, 1921-2002  Search this
Lipofsky, Marvin, 1938-2016  Search this
Lipski, Donald, 1947-  Search this
Mace, Flora, 1949-  Search this
Marioni, Dante, 1964-  Search this
Moore, Benjamin P.  Search this
Oppenheim, Dennis, 1938-2011  Search this
Pfaff, Judy, 1946-  Search this
Saxe, Dorothy  Search this
Saxe, George  Search this
Scanga, Italo, 1932-2001  Search this
Seguso, Livio, 1930-  Search this
Signoretto, Pino, 1944-  Search this
Smith, Kiki, 1954-  Search this
Stroemple, George R.  Search this
Tagliapietra, Lino  Search this
Vallien, Bertil, 1938-  Search this
Extent:
7 Items (Sound recording: 7 wav files (5 hr., 5min.), digital)
105 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Place:
British Isles -- Description and Travel
Date:
2009 July 13-14
Scope and Contents:
An interview of William Morris conducted 2009 July 13-14, by Mija Riedel, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Morris' home, in Stanwood, Washington.
William Morris speaks of his decision to stop working in glass in 2005; his deep connection to the natural world; working now with stone; the longstanding theme of man and nature in his work; his influence on the studio glass movement; use of installations; relationship to the greater art world; Cache [1993]; the importance of working in a team, particularly with Jon Ormbrek; studio practice and philosophy of working in the studio; series Man Adorned and first use of the human form; how his work evolves artistically; the influence of his travels on his work and his particular affinity for Mesoamerican culture; the process of choosing his subjects; growing up in Carmel, California, and frequenting the museum at the Carmel Mission Basilica; his early fascination with Native American artifacts and history in the museum; childhood spent hiking in the hills around Carmel and youth spent camping and rock-climbing; art instruction during childhood; ceramics work in high school; introduction to ideas of Carl Jung and Joseph Campbell by his high school teacher, Lloyd Baskerville; undergraduate work at California State University, Chico, working with Vernon Patrick; first experience with glass in high school, through the Fort Ord military base crafts department; brief studies at Central Washington University in Ellensburg, Washington; arriving at Pilchuck Glass School, Stanwood, Washington, in 1977 as a shop assistant/maintenance person; his first encounter with Dale Chihuly; 10 years as Chihuly's main assistant and de facto apprenticeship; his greater overall technical education at Pilchuck; the development of his own team as he continued to work with Chihuly; working with Chihuly and Italo Scanga; the synergy of working in a group and artistic cross-pollination at Pilchuck; the influence and mentorship of Judy Pfaff; working with Italian glass masters at Pilchuck; the influence of Pino Signoretto; his trip with Chihuly to the British Isles, which inspired his series Stone Vessels and series Standing Stones in the mid-1980s; his practice of working in series; series Petroglyph Vessels, and the beginning of narrative in his work; the importance of naiveté, experimentation, and a "confidence in innocence"; series Artifacts; the influence of Donald Lipski on Morris' installations; series Burial Urns and series Burial Rafts; series Canopic Jars; commissions for George Stroemple; the genesis of the series Rhyton; the transcendental/mythic qualities in his work; series Crow and Raven; more discussion of series Man Adorned; series Rattles; collaboration with fashion designer Donna Karan; the importance of glass as a material, and the importance of "play"; the value of an apprentice-type program; his work in bronze and with Nancy Graves; series Cinerary Urns and coming to terms with the deaths of close friends; series Mazorca; series Idolo and Idolito; series Native Species (2006); series Fish Traps; more discussion of his decision to leave glassworking; documentary film Creative Nature, 2008; "Myth, Object, and the Animal" exhibition; the adventurous spirit of the American studio glass movement, particularly in the early years; his preference for short workshops rather than longer teaching sessions; the aesthetic continuity of his work throughout his career; his appreciation of the community of collectors of glass art. He also recalls Ken Wiese, Robert and Terrie Kvenild, Bertil and Ulrica Vallien, Gary Galbraith, Stan Price, Dennis Oppenheim, Kiki Smith, Dante Marioni, Livio Seguso, Marvin Lipofsky, Benjamin Moore, Jamie Carpenter, Checco Ongaro, Lino Tagliapietra, Ricky DeMarco, Flora Mace, Joey Kirkpatrick, Trumaine Mason, Karen Willenbrink, Ross Richmond, Randy Walker, John Hauberg, Stanislav Libenský, Graham Graham, Charlie Cowles, George and Dorothy Saxe, and Jack and Rebecca Benaroya.
Biographical / Historical:
William Morris (1957- ) is a glass artist in Stanwood, Washington.
General:
Originally recorded on 3 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 7 digital wav files. Duration is 5 hr., 5 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Ceramics -- Study and teaching  Search this
Glass artists -- Washington (State) -- Interviews  Search this
Sculptors -- Washington (State) -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.morris09
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-morris09

Robert S. Hartmann Phonograph Disc Collection

Creator:
Decca (recording company).  Search this
Duchin, Eddie (musician)  Search this
Cugat, Xavier (bandleader)  Search this
Columbia (recording company).  Search this
Goodman, Benny (Benjamin David), 1909-1986  Search this
Community Life, Div. of, NMAH, SI  Search this
Victor (recording company).  Search this
Silvertone (recording company).  Search this
King, Wayne (musician)  Search this
Iona, Andy (musician)  Search this
Lombardo, Guy, 1902-1977  Search this
Kinney, Ray (musician)  Search this
Edison, Thomas A. (Thomas Alva), 1847-1931  Search this
Hemple, Frieda (singer)  Search this
Hartmann, Robert S.  Search this
Extent:
2.5 Cubic feet (8 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
78 rpm records
45 rpm records
Sound recordings
Phonograph records
Date:
1916-1930s.
Scope and Contents note:
Popular music recorded approximately 1916-1930s: 78 and 45 RPM phonograph discs produced by Edison recordings, Victor, Decca, Columbia, and Silvertone.

Boxes 1-4: 53 10" Edison recordings of popular songs by such artists as Freda Hemple, George Hamilton Green, the Metropolitan Quartet, and Frederick Kinsley; also hymns, World War I songs, and some operatic selections.

Box 5: 32 45-r.p.m. records, primarily by Victor, some Decca, others, by Eddie Duchin, Xavier Cugat, Guy Lombardo.

Box 6: 41 45-r.p.m. records, including 16 by Victor, 4 by Columbia, 4 by Silvertone, 8 unlabelled, 3 family recordings, 4 in Greek. Artists include Eddie Duchin, Guy Lombardo, Wayne King.

Box 7: Several volumes of Victor library, all 78 r.p.m. Artists include Ray Kinney, Tommy Dorsey, Benny Goodman, Dick McIntire, Andy Iona.

Box 8: Popular recordings; Christmas carols sung by Frieda Hempel, recorded by Edison; and family recordings.
Biographical / Historical:
This collection consists of popular music recorded between approximately 1916 and the 1930's collected by Robert S. Hartmann.
Provenance:
Colection donated by Robert S. Hartmann, March 1988.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Music -- Performance -- 1910-1940  Search this
Popular music  Search this
Genre/Form:
78 rpm records
45 rpm records
Sound recordings
Phonograph records
Citation:
Robert S. Hartmann Phonograph Disc Collection, ca. 1916-1930s, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0297
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0297

Flexi Discs

Collection Artist:
Cornell, Joseph  Search this
Extent:
73 Sound recordings (flexi discs)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
1960-1962
Scope and Contents:
Flexi discs are found in 13 music publications of "Echo" and "Sonorama."
Series Restrictions:
Record albums are unavailable for playback. Contact repository for a complete list of record albums.
Collection Rights:
Unpublished materials are protected by copyright. Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository and the copyright holder.
Collection Citation:
Joseph Cornell Study Center collection, 1750-1980, bulk 1930-1972. Joseph Cornell Study Center, Smithsonian American Art Museum.
See more items in:
Joseph Cornell Study Center Collection
Joseph Cornell Study Center Collection / Series 14: Record Album Collection
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Research and Scholars Center
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-saam-jcsc-1-ref4178

Oral history interview with Jun Kaneko

Interviewee:
Kaneko, Jun, 1942-  Search this
Interviewer:
McInnes, Mary, 1956-  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Extent:
43 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2005 May 23- 24
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Jun Kaneko conducted 2005 May 23-24, by Mary Drach McInnes, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at the artist's studio, in Omaha, Nebraska.
Kaneko speaks of his parents and grandparents; growing up in Japan; taking art lessons as a child; moving to Los Angeles; living with ceramic collectors Fred and Mary Marer; attending Chouinard Art Institute; making and exhibiting his first ceramic pieces; working as a studio assistant to Peter Voulkos; being artist in residence at the Archie Bray Foundation; building his first studio; getting a graduate degree at Scripps College; returning to Japan and building a studio; being hired to teach at Cranbrook Academy of Art; working with art dealers; how the ceramics market has changed during his career; working in the international craft market; his current studio and living space; the inspiration for his work; his interest in patternmaking; making large-scale pieces; why he likes clay; selection of color; moving to Omaha; traveling and working on various projects; working at industrial sites; making ceramic tile walls; influential artists; how critics view his work; the future of ceramic art; and working in different media. Kaneko also recalls Jerry Rothman, Paul Soldner, Jim Melchert, Ralph Bacerra, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Jun Kaneko (1942- ) is a ceramicist and sculptor from Omaha, Nebraska. Mary Drach McInnes is an art history professor from Alfred Station, N.Y.
General:
Originally recorded on 3 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 6 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hr., 43 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
Ceramicists -- Nebraska -- Interviews  Search this
Art -- Economic aspects  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American sculptors  Search this
Japanese American sculptors  Search this
Asian American ceramicists  Search this
Japanese American ceramicists  Search this
Function:
Artists' studios
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.kaneko05
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-kaneko05

Volta Labs Recording 2

Creator:
National Museum of American History  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2011-12-14T19:53:56.000Z
YouTube Category:
Science & Technology  Search this
Topic:
American History  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianAmHistory
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianAmHistory
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_MOsf7ffEP7c

Volta Labs Recording 3

Creator:
National Museum of American History  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2011-12-14T19:54:19.000Z
YouTube Category:
Science & Technology  Search this
Topic:
American History  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianAmHistory
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianAmHistory
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_Yv1emaQFg2w

Volta Labs Recording 1

Creator:
National Museum of American History  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2011-12-14T19:54:07.000Z
YouTube Category:
Science & Technology  Search this
Topic:
American History  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianAmHistory
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianAmHistory
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_x5BwTVblXk4

Volta Labs Recording 4

Creator:
National Museum of American History  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2011-12-14T20:01:41.000Z
YouTube Category:
Science & Technology  Search this
Topic:
American History  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianAmHistory
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianAmHistory
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_yo8N69__vFw

Oral history interview with Leroy Davis and Cecily Langdale, 2007 June 26-August 7

Interviewee:
Davis, Leroy, 1922-  Search this
Interviewer:
Langdale, Cecily  Search this
Subject:
Shikler, Aaron  Search this
Barnes, Albert C. (Albert Coombs)  Search this
Bly, Boris  Search this
De Mazia, Violette  Search this
Davis, Terry Ritter  Search this
Bouché, Louis  Search this
Levine, David  Search this
Penn, Arthur  Search this
Hirschl & Adler Galleries  Search this
Tyler School of Art  Search this
Barnes Foundation  Search this
Widgeon Point Charitable Foundation  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Art dealers -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Gallery owners -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Art dealers -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Gallery owners -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13624
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)271983
AAA_collcode_davis07
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_271983
Online Media:

Joseph Schillinger Phonograph Record Collection

Creator:
Schillinger, Joseph, 1895-1943  Search this
Collector:
Musical History, Division of (NMAH, SI)  Search this
Musical History, Division of (NMAH, SI)  Search this
Names:
Cowell, Henry, 1897-1965  Search this
Theremin, Leon  Search this
Extent:
0.6 Cubic feet (2 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Phonograph records
78 rpm records
Audiotapes
Date:
1940-1941, 1985
bulk 1940-1941
Summary:
Joseph Schillinger (1895-1943), composer and musical theorist, worked extensively with the Rhythmicon. The Rhythmicon, constructed in 1931, is the earliest electronic rhythm machine. The collection consists of recordings of the Rhythmicon.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of nine transcription recordings of the Rhythmicon on 78 rpm phonographic records made by Joseph Schillinger in 1940 and 1941; two 1/4 inch master reel to reel tapes of disc recordings created by Radio Smithsonian in fall, 1985; and one research cassette tape of disc recordings created by Radio Smithsonian in fall, 1985.

A digital reference copy is available in the Smithsonian Institutions Digital Asset Management System (DAMS).
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into two series.

Series 1: Original Discs, 1940-1941

Series 2: Miscellaneous, 1940-1941, 1985
Biographical / Historical:
Joseph Schillinger (1895-1943), composer and musical theorist, worked extensively with the Rhythmicon. The Rhythmicon, developed in 1931 by Leon Theremin at the request of composer Henry Cowell, is the earliest electronic rhythm machine.

Schillinger was born on August 31, 1895, in Kharkov, Ukraine. After beginning a successful musical career in the Soviet Union, he immigrated to the United States in 1928 and settled in New York City. He taught at New York University, the Teachers College of Columbia University and the New School for Social Research. A trained mathematician, Schillinger developed his own system of composition based on mathematics.
Related Materials:
Materials at Other Organizations

The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts New York, New York

Joseph Schillinger Papers, 1918-2000

The Joseph Schillinger Papers contain the composer/theorist's writings, composition lesson texts, student notebooks, scores, charts, personal papers, clippings and promotional material.

New York Public Library, Rodgers and Hammerstein Archives of Recorded Sound

Joseph Schillinger Collection of Sound Recordings, *L(Special) 89-16

Berkley School of Music Archives, Boston, Massachusetts
Provenance:
The collection was donated to the National Museum of American History by Mrs. Joseph Schillinger (Frances) and transferred to the Archives Center from the Division of Musical Instruments (Division of Culture and the Arts) in June 1985.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Digital reference copies available in the Smithsonian Institution Digital Asset Management System (DAMS). See RTC0162-RT0001.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Musical instruments  Search this
Rhythmicon  Search this
Genre/Form:
Phonograph records
78 rpm records
Audiotapes
Citation:
Joseph Schillinger Phonograph Record Collection, 1940-1941, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0162
See more items in:
Joseph Schillinger Phonograph Record Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0162

Oral history interview with Chunghi Choo, 2007 July 30-2008 July 26

Interviewee:
Choo, Chunghi, 1938-  Search this
Interviewer:
Milosch, Jane, 1964-  Search this
Subject:
Thomas, Richard C.  Search this
Bush, Cody  Search this
Chateauvert, Jocelyn  Search this
Kaufman, Glen  Search this
Fujio, Yuho  Search this
Grotell, Maija  Search this
McFadden, David Revere  Search this
Kao, Ruth  Search this
Lechtzin, Stanley  Search this
Lee, Sang-Bong  Search this
Larsen, Jack Lenor  Search this
Mayer-VanderMey, Sandra  Search this
Saarinen, Loja  Search this
Raab, Rosanne  Search this
Merkel-Hess, Mary  Search this
Park, No Soo  Search this
Smith, Paul J.  Search this
Yeun, Kee-ho  Search this
Cranbrook Academy of Art  Search this
University of Iowa  Search this
Haystack Mountain School of Crafts  Search this
Penland School of Handicrafts  Search this
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
University of Northern Iowa  Search this
Victoria and Albert Museum  Search this
Ihwa Yŏja Taehakkyo  Search this
Museum für Kunsthandwerk Frankfurt am Main  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Korea (South) -- History -- April Revolution, 1960
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Korean War, 1950-1953  Search this
Jewelers -- Interviews  Search this
Jewelry making -- Equipment and supplies  Search this
Jewelry making -- Technique  Search this
Jewelry making -- Study and teaching  Search this
Metal-work  Search this
Asian American women  Search this
Asian American women artists  Search this
Korean American art  Search this
Korean American women  Search this
Korean American artists  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Korean American women artists  Search this
Asian American jewelers  Search this
Asian American women jewelers  Search this
Korean American jewelers  Search this
Korean American women jewelers  Search this
Asian American metal-workers  Search this
Asian American women metal-workers  Search this
Korean American metal-workers  Search this
Korean American women metal-workers  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13621
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)271722
AAA_collcode_choo07
Theme:
Asian American
Women
Craft
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_271722
Online Media:

Am I Blue; How Come You Do Me Like You Do?

Recording artist:
Spanier, Muggsy  Search this
Russell, Pee Wee  Search this
Brown, Vernon  Search this
Caiazza, Nick  Search this
Schroeder, Gene  Search this
Haggart, Bob  Search this
Wettling, George  Search this
Manufacturer:
Disc  Search this
Physical Description:
shellac (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 10 in; 25.4 cm
Object Name:
sound recording
Place made:
United States: New York, New York
Recording date:
1946
Related Publication:
Jazz Records 1942-1962, Vol. 7: S - Te
Credit Line:
Gift of Howard A. Guernsey (through Richard L. Guernsey)
ID Number:
1988.0698.2149
Catalog number:
1988.0698.2149
Accession number:
1988.0698
Collector/donor number:
S112
Maker number:
6030
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Entertainment
Music & Musical Instruments
Popular Entertainment
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a9-2787-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1059933

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