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Nudist Colony Opening at the Smithsonian's National Zoo

Creator:
National Zoo  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
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2018-08-27T15:46:36.000Z
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Pets & Animals  Search this
Topic:
Zoology;Animals;Veterinary medicine;Animal health  Search this
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Data Source:
National Zoo
YouTube Channel:
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EDAN-URL:
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Exploring Dr. Frederick Douglass Patterson's papers with Anacostia Community Museum

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Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Type:
Lectures
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2017-02-17T21:30:50.000Z
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Education  Search this
Topic:
Transcription  Search this
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Data Source:
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John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash (part 1)

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Laird, Carobeth, 1895-1983  Search this
Names:
Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa (San Luis Obispo, Calif.)  Search this
San Buenaventura Mission  Search this
Santa Barbara Mission  Search this
Santa Inés Mission (Solvang, Calif.)  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
169 Boxes
Culture:
Chumash  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
Narratives
Manuscripts
Place:
California -- Languages
California -- History
San Luis Obispo (Calif.)
Santa Barbara (Calif.)
Ventura County (Calif.)
San Nicolas Island (Calif.)
Date:
1912-1961
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southern California/Basin series contains John P. Harrington's research on Chumash. His voluminous records on the group--totaling several hundred thousand pages--contain data on each of the six distinct dialect groups which constitute Chumash.

Material on the Obispeno, classified as Northern Chumash, consists primarily of vocabulary and contains a mixture of linguistic, ethnographic, and personal data. These elicitations from the last known native speaker, Rosario Cooper, represent the fullest and phonetically most reliable attestation of the language.

The Purisimeno notes consist mainly of words and "corrected vocabularies." Unlike the materials for the other Central Chumash dialects--Ineseno, Barbareno, and Ventureno--these records contain little grammatical information. Occasional Purisimeno forms are to be found in the Obispeno notes. In addition, much of the Purisimeno data is intermixed with that for Ineseno, as Harrington's informants were generally speakers of both.

Records relating to Ineseno are extensive and varied. They include raw field notes, texts, semantic and grammatical slipfiles, and a dictionary. The bulk of the data are from Maria Solares.

The Barbareno dialect of Central Chumash provided a constant source of interest for Harrington. He became fluent enough that he omitted glosses and translations from his later notes and was able to exchange letters with native speakers. During the course of his fieldwork, he had the unique opportunity to work with three generations of women in one family: Luisa Ignacio (around 1914); her daughter, Lucrecia Garcia (1926-1928); and her granddaughter, Mary Yee (from the 1920s to the early 1960s). Harrington also worked with Juan de Jesus Justo, a speaker of a different subdialect. While the notes Harrington recorded on Barbareno are among his most extensive, they are not as clearly organized as those for other groups. Thousands of pages of linguistic notes are totally without organization. Harrington rarely obtained paradigms. Instead, he obtained information by rechecking other sources, such as his own Ineseno dictionary, or by eliciting sentences in a random fashion. While textual material is plentiful, complete interlinear and free translations are often lacking.

Harrington's ethnographic notes on the Ventureno are among the most complete for any California Indian tribe he studied. Detailed accounts of Chumash life were obtained from the elderly Fernando Librado. Their interviews touched upon religion, perceptions of astronomy, such technologies as boat building and basket making, social structure, medical practices, and natural resources. A number of subdialects are represented in the Ventureno notes. Harrington recorded the "commonized" Ventura Mission dialect (samala) from Librado, Simplicio Pico, and Cecilio Tumamait. Interior Chumash (Cayetano and Castequeno) was obtained from Jose Juan Olivas. Other dialects mentioned include Mugu, Malibu, Ojai, and Matilija. There are also notes on the lone woman of San Nicolas Island.

In comparison with the records for the other Chumash dialects, documentation for Island Chumash (Ysleno) is extremely limited. Scattered throughout the material are references to the two dialects of Santa Cruz (Cruzeno), swaxil and kaxas. The speech of Santa Rosa and San Miguel is also mentioned.

The subseries also contains drafts of different lengths and in various stages of completion. Two documents pertain to Barbareno linguistics while the remaining papers reflect Harrington's cultural study of the Chumash.
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington studied the Chumash Indians of southern California more thoroughly than any other group, both linguistically and culturally. He first expressed interest in the Chumash culture as early as 1902 during summer school studies with A. L. Kroeber and P. E. Goddard. His linguistic study of the Chumash family began during his association with the School of American Archaeology and the Panama-California Exposition and continued periodically up until his death in 1961.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Local Note:
This subseries was broken up into six catalog records to facilitate viewing of digital surrogates. See the other catalog records for John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash to view surrogates for the rest of Harrington's Chumash files.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Chumash language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Grammar, Comparative and general  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Ynezeno  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
Narratives
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John P. Harrington Papers
John P. Harrington Papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies / 8.3: Supplemental Material on Southern California/Basin / Chumash
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref17251
Online Media:

John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash (part 2)

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Laird, Carobeth, 1895-1983  Search this
Names:
Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa (San Luis Obispo, Calif.)  Search this
San Buenaventura Mission  Search this
Santa Barbara Mission  Search this
Santa Inés Mission (Solvang, Calif.)  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
169 Boxes
Culture:
Chumash  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
Narratives
Manuscripts
Place:
California -- Languages
California -- History
San Luis Obispo (Calif.)
Santa Barbara (Calif.)
Ventura County (Calif.)
San Nicolas Island (Calif.)
Date:
1912-1961
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southern California/Basin series contains John P. Harrington's research on Chumash. His voluminous records on the group--totaling several hundred thousand pages--contain data on each of the six distinct dialect groups which constitute Chumash.

Material on the Obispeno, classified as Northern Chumash, consists primarily of vocabulary and contains a mixture of linguistic, ethnographic, and personal data. These elicitations from the last known native speaker, Rosario Cooper, represent the fullest and phonetically most reliable attestation of the language.

The Purisimeno notes consist mainly of words and "corrected vocabularies." Unlike the materials for the other Central Chumash dialects--Ineseno, Barbareno, and Ventureno--these records contain little grammatical information. Occasional Purisimeno forms are to be found in the Obispeno notes. In addition, much of the Purisimeno data is intermixed with that for Ineseno, as Harrington's informants were generally speakers of both.

Records relating to Ineseno are extensive and varied. They include raw field notes, texts, semantic and grammatical slipfiles, and a dictionary. The bulk of the data are from Maria Solares.

The Barbareno dialect of Central Chumash provided a constant source of interest for Harrington. He became fluent enough that he omitted glosses and translations from his later notes and was able to exchange letters with native speakers. During the course of his fieldwork, he had the unique opportunity to work with three generations of women in one family: Luisa Ignacio (around 1914); her daughter, Lucrecia Garcia (1926-1928); and her granddaughter, Mary Yee (from the 1920s to the early 1960s). Harrington also worked with Juan de Jesus Justo, a speaker of a different subdialect. While the notes Harrington recorded on Barbareno are among his most extensive, they are not as clearly organized as those for other groups. Thousands of pages of linguistic notes are totally without organization. Harrington rarely obtained paradigms. Instead, he obtained information by rechecking other sources, such as his own Ineseno dictionary, or by eliciting sentences in a random fashion. While textual material is plentiful, complete interlinear and free translations are often lacking.

Harrington's ethnographic notes on the Ventureno are among the most complete for any California Indian tribe he studied. Detailed accounts of Chumash life were obtained from the elderly Fernando Librado. Their interviews touched upon religion, perceptions of astronomy, such technologies as boat building and basket making, social structure, medical practices, and natural resources. A number of subdialects are represented in the Ventureno notes. Harrington recorded the "commonized" Ventura Mission dialect (samala) from Librado, Simplicio Pico, and Cecilio Tumamait. Interior Chumash (Cayetano and Castequeno) was obtained from Jose Juan Olivas. Other dialects mentioned include Mugu, Malibu, Ojai, and Matilija. There are also notes on the lone woman of San Nicolas Island.

In comparison with the records for the other Chumash dialects, documentation for Island Chumash (Ysleno) is extremely limited. Scattered throughout the material are references to the two dialects of Santa Cruz (Cruzeno), swaxil and kaxas. The speech of Santa Rosa and San Miguel is also mentioned.

The subseries also contains drafts of different lengths and in various stages of completion. Two documents pertain to Barbareno linguistics while the remaining papers reflect Harrington's cultural study of the Chumash.
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington studied the Chumash Indians of southern California more thoroughly than any other group, both linguistically and culturally. He first expressed interest in the Chumash culture as early as 1902 during summer school studies with A. L. Kroeber and P. E. Goddard. His linguistic study of the Chumash family began during his association with the School of American Archaeology and the Panama-California Exposition and continued periodically up until his death in 1961.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Local Note:
This subseries was broken up into seven catalog records to facilitate viewing of digital surrogates. See the other catalog records for John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash to view surrogates for the rest of Harrington's Costanoan files.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Chumash language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Ynezeno  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
Narratives
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John P. Harrington Papers
John P. Harrington Papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies / 8.3: Supplemental Material on Southern California/Basin / Chumash
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref17252
Online Media:

John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash (part 3)

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Laird, Carobeth, 1895-1983  Search this
Names:
Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa (San Luis Obispo, Calif.)  Search this
San Buenaventura Mission  Search this
Santa Barbara Mission  Search this
Santa Inés Mission (Solvang, Calif.)  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
169 Boxes
Culture:
Chumash  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
Narratives
Manuscripts
Place:
California -- Languages
California -- History
San Luis Obispo (Calif.)
Santa Barbara (Calif.)
Ventura County (Calif.)
San Nicolas Island (Calif.)
Date:
1912-1961
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southern California/Basin series contains John P. Harrington's research on Chumash. His voluminous records on the group--totaling several hundred thousand pages--contain data on each of the six distinct dialect groups which constitute Chumash.

Material on the Obispeno, classified as Northern Chumash, consists primarily of vocabulary and contains a mixture of linguistic, ethnographic, and personal data. These elicitations from the last known native speaker, Rosario Cooper, represent the fullest and phonetically most reliable attestation of the language.

The Purisimeno notes consist mainly of words and "corrected vocabularies." Unlike the materials for the other Central Chumash dialects--Ineseno, Barbareno, and Ventureno--these records contain little grammatical information. Occasional Purisimeno forms are to be found in the Obispeno notes. In addition, much of the Purisimeno data is intermixed with that for Ineseno, as Harrington's informants were generally speakers of both.

Records relating to Ineseno are extensive and varied. They include raw field notes, texts, semantic and grammatical slipfiles, and a dictionary. The bulk of the data are from Maria Solares.

The Barbareno dialect of Central Chumash provided a constant source of interest for Harrington. He became fluent enough that he omitted glosses and translations from his later notes and was able to exchange letters with native speakers. During the course of his fieldwork, he had the unique opportunity to work with three generations of women in one family: Luisa Ignacio (around 1914); her daughter, Lucrecia Garcia (1926-1928); and her granddaughter, Mary Yee (from the 1920s to the early 1960s). Harrington also worked with Juan de Jesus Justo, a speaker of a different subdialect. While the notes Harrington recorded on Barbareno are among his most extensive, they are not as clearly organized as those for other groups. Thousands of pages of linguistic notes are totally without organization. Harrington rarely obtained paradigms. Instead, he obtained information by rechecking other sources, such as his own Ineseno dictionary, or by eliciting sentences in a random fashion. While textual material is plentiful, complete interlinear and free translations are often lacking.

Harrington's ethnographic notes on the Ventureno are among the most complete for any California Indian tribe he studied. Detailed accounts of Chumash life were obtained from the elderly Fernando Librado. Their interviews touched upon religion, perceptions of astronomy, such technologies as boat building and basket making, social structure, medical practices, and natural resources. A number of subdialects are represented in the Ventureno notes. Harrington recorded the "commonized" Ventura Mission dialect (samala) from Librado, Simplicio Pico, and Cecilio Tumamait. Interior Chumash (Cayetano and Castequeno) was obtained from Jose Juan Olivas. Other dialects mentioned include Mugu, Malibu, Ojai, and Matilija. There are also notes on the lone woman of San Nicolas Island.

In comparison with the records for the other Chumash dialects, documentation for Island Chumash (Ysleno) is extremely limited. Scattered throughout the material are references to the two dialects of Santa Cruz (Cruzeno), swaxil and kaxas. The speech of Santa Rosa and San Miguel is also mentioned.

The subseries also contains drafts of different lengths and in various stages of completion. Two documents pertain to Barbareno linguistics while the remaining papers reflect Harrington's cultural study of the Chumash.
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington studied the Chumash Indians of southern California more thoroughly than any other group, both linguistically and culturally. He first expressed interest in the Chumash culture as early as 1902 during summer school studies with A. L. Kroeber and P. E. Goddard. His linguistic study of the Chumash family began during his association with the School of American Archaeology and the Panama-California Exposition and continued periodically up until his death in 1961.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Local Note:
This subseries was broken up into six catalog records to facilitate viewing of digital surrogates. See the other catalog records for John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash to view surrogates for the rest of Harrington's Costanoan files.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Chumash language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Ynezeno  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
Narratives
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John P. Harrington Papers
John P. Harrington Papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies / 8.3: Supplemental Material on Southern California/Basin / Chumash
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref17253
Online Media:

John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash (part 4)

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Laird, Carobeth, 1895-1983  Search this
Names:
Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa (San Luis Obispo, Calif.)  Search this
San Buenaventura Mission  Search this
Santa Barbara Mission  Search this
Santa Inés Mission (Solvang, Calif.)  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
169 Boxes
Culture:
Chumash  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
Narratives
Manuscripts
Place:
California -- Languages
California -- History
San Luis Obispo (Calif.)
Santa Barbara (Calif.)
Ventura County (Calif.)
San Nicolas Island (Calif.)
Date:
1912-1961
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southern California/Basin series contains John P. Harrington's research on Chumash. His voluminous records on the group--totaling several hundred thousand pages--contain data on each of the six distinct dialect groups which constitute Chumash.

Material on the Obispeno, classified as Northern Chumash, consists primarily of vocabulary and contains a mixture of linguistic, ethnographic, and personal data. These elicitations from the last known native speaker, Rosario Cooper, represent the fullest and phonetically most reliable attestation of the language.

The Purisimeno notes consist mainly of words and "corrected vocabularies." Unlike the materials for the other Central Chumash dialects--Ineseno, Barbareno, and Ventureno--these records contain little grammatical information. Occasional Purisimeno forms are to be found in the Obispeno notes. In addition, much of the Purisimeno data is intermixed with that for Ineseno, as Harrington's informants were generally speakers of both.

Records relating to Ineseno are extensive and varied. They include raw field notes, texts, semantic and grammatical slipfiles, and a dictionary. The bulk of the data are from Maria Solares.

The Barbareno dialect of Central Chumash provided a constant source of interest for Harrington. He became fluent enough that he omitted glosses and translations from his later notes and was able to exchange letters with native speakers. During the course of his fieldwork, he had the unique opportunity to work with three generations of women in one family: Luisa Ignacio (around 1914); her daughter, Lucrecia Garcia (1926-1928); and her granddaughter, Mary Yee (from the 1920s to the early 1960s). Harrington also worked with Juan de Jesus Justo, a speaker of a different subdialect. While the notes Harrington recorded on Barbareno are among his most extensive, they are not as clearly organized as those for other groups. Thousands of pages of linguistic notes are totally without organization. Harrington rarely obtained paradigms. Instead, he obtained information by rechecking other sources, such as his own Ineseno dictionary, or by eliciting sentences in a random fashion. While textual material is plentiful, complete interlinear and free translations are often lacking.

Harrington's ethnographic notes on the Ventureno are among the most complete for any California Indian tribe he studied. Detailed accounts of Chumash life were obtained from the elderly Fernando Librado. Their interviews touched upon religion, perceptions of astronomy, such technologies as boat building and basket making, social structure, medical practices, and natural resources. A number of subdialects are represented in the Ventureno notes. Harrington recorded the "commonized" Ventura Mission dialect (samala) from Librado, Simplicio Pico, and Cecilio Tumamait. Interior Chumash (Cayetano and Castequeno) was obtained from Jose Juan Olivas. Other dialects mentioned include Mugu, Malibu, Ojai, and Matilija. There are also notes on the lone woman of San Nicolas Island.

In comparison with the records for the other Chumash dialects, documentation for Island Chumash (Ysleno) is extremely limited. Scattered throughout the material are references to the two dialects of Santa Cruz (Cruzeno), swaxil and kaxas. The speech of Santa Rosa and San Miguel is also mentioned.

The subseries also contains drafts of different lengths and in various stages of completion. Two documents pertain to Barbareno linguistics while the remaining papers reflect Harrington's cultural study of the Chumash.
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington studied the Chumash Indians of southern California more thoroughly than any other group, both linguistically and culturally. He first expressed interest in the Chumash culture as early as 1902 during summer school studies with A. L. Kroeber and P. E. Goddard. His linguistic study of the Chumash family began during his association with the School of American Archaeology and the Panama-California Exposition and continued periodically up until his death in 1961.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Local Note:
This subseries was broken up into six catalog records to facilitate viewing of digital surrogates. See the other catalog records for John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash to view surrogates for the rest of Harrington's Costanoan files.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Chumash language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Ynezeno  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
Narratives
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John P. Harrington Papers
John P. Harrington Papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies / 8.3: Supplemental Material on Southern California/Basin / Chumash
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref17254
Online Media:

John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash (part 5)

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Laird, Carobeth, 1895-1983  Search this
Names:
Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa (San Luis Obispo, Calif.)  Search this
San Buenaventura Mission  Search this
Santa Barbara Mission  Search this
Santa Inés Mission (Solvang, Calif.)  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
169 Boxes
Culture:
Chumash  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
Narratives
Manuscripts
Place:
California -- Languages
California -- History
San Luis Obispo (Calif.)
Santa Barbara (Calif.)
Ventura County (Calif.)
San Nicolas Island (Calif.)
Date:
1912-1961
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southern California/Basin series contains John P. Harrington's research on Chumash. His voluminous records on the group--totaling several hundred thousand pages--contain data on each of the six distinct dialect groups which constitute Chumash.

Material on the Obispeno, classified as Northern Chumash, consists primarily of vocabulary and contains a mixture of linguistic, ethnographic, and personal data. These elicitations from the last known native speaker, Rosario Cooper, represent the fullest and phonetically most reliable attestation of the language.

The Purisimeno notes consist mainly of words and "corrected vocabularies." Unlike the materials for the other Central Chumash dialects--Ineseno, Barbareno, and Ventureno--these records contain little grammatical information. Occasional Purisimeno forms are to be found in the Obispeno notes. In addition, much of the Purisimeno data is intermixed with that for Ineseno, as Harrington's informants were generally speakers of both.

Records relating to Ineseno are extensive and varied. They include raw field notes, texts, semantic and grammatical slipfiles, and a dictionary. The bulk of the data are from Maria Solares.

The Barbareno dialect of Central Chumash provided a constant source of interest for Harrington. He became fluent enough that he omitted glosses and translations from his later notes and was able to exchange letters with native speakers. During the course of his fieldwork, he had the unique opportunity to work with three generations of women in one family: Luisa Ignacio (around 1914); her daughter, Lucrecia Garcia (1926-1928); and her granddaughter, Mary Yee (from the 1920s to the early 1960s). Harrington also worked with Juan de Jesus Justo, a speaker of a different subdialect. While the notes Harrington recorded on Barbareno are among his most extensive, they are not as clearly organized as those for other groups. Thousands of pages of linguistic notes are totally without organization. Harrington rarely obtained paradigms. Instead, he obtained information by rechecking other sources, such as his own Ineseno dictionary, or by eliciting sentences in a random fashion. While textual material is plentiful, complete interlinear and free translations are often lacking.

Harrington's ethnographic notes on the Ventureno are among the most complete for any California Indian tribe he studied. Detailed accounts of Chumash life were obtained from the elderly Fernando Librado. Their interviews touched upon religion, perceptions of astronomy, such technologies as boat building and basket making, social structure, medical practices, and natural resources. A number of subdialects are represented in the Ventureno notes. Harrington recorded the "commonized" Ventura Mission dialect (samala) from Librado, Simplicio Pico, and Cecilio Tumamait. Interior Chumash (Cayetano and Castequeno) was obtained from Jose Juan Olivas. Other dialects mentioned include Mugu, Malibu, Ojai, and Matilija. There are also notes on the lone woman of San Nicolas Island.

In comparison with the records for the other Chumash dialects, documentation for Island Chumash (Ysleno) is extremely limited. Scattered throughout the material are references to the two dialects of Santa Cruz (Cruzeno), swaxil and kaxas. The speech of Santa Rosa and San Miguel is also mentioned.

The subseries also contains drafts of different lengths and in various stages of completion. Two documents pertain to Barbareno linguistics while the remaining papers reflect Harrington's cultural study of the Chumash.
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington studied the Chumash Indians of southern California more thoroughly than any other group, both linguistically and culturally. He first expressed interest in the Chumash culture as early as 1902 during summer school studies with A. L. Kroeber and P. E. Goddard. His linguistic study of the Chumash family began during his association with the School of American Archaeology and the Panama-California Exposition and continued periodically up until his death in 1961.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Local Note:
This subseries was broken up into six catalog records to facilitate viewing of digital surrogates. See the other catalog records for John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash to view surrogates for the rest of Harrington's Costanoan files.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Chumash language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Ynezeno  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
Narratives
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John P. Harrington Papers
John P. Harrington Papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies / 8.3: Supplemental Material on Southern California/Basin / Chumash
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref17255
Online Media:

John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash (part 6)

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Laird, Carobeth, 1895-1983  Search this
Names:
Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa (San Luis Obispo, Calif.)  Search this
San Buenaventura Mission  Search this
Santa Barbara Mission  Search this
Santa Inés Mission (Solvang, Calif.)  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
169 Boxes
Culture:
Chumash  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
Narratives
Manuscripts
Place:
California -- Languages
California -- History
San Luis Obispo (Calif.)
Santa Barbara (Calif.)
Ventura County (Calif.)
San Nicolas Island (Calif.)
Date:
1912-1961
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southern California/Basin series contains John P. Harrington's research on Chumash. His voluminous records on the group--totaling several hundred thousand pages--contain data on each of the six distinct dialect groups which constitute Chumash.

Material on the Obispeno, classified as Northern Chumash, consists primarily of vocabulary and contains a mixture of linguistic, ethnographic, and personal data. These elicitations from the last known native speaker, Rosario Cooper, represent the fullest and phonetically most reliable attestation of the language.

The Purisimeno notes consist mainly of words and "corrected vocabularies." Unlike the materials for the other Central Chumash dialects--Ineseno, Barbareno, and Ventureno--these records contain little grammatical information. Occasional Purisimeno forms are to be found in the Obispeno notes. In addition, much of the Purisimeno data is intermixed with that for Ineseno, as Harrington's informants were generally speakers of both.

Records relating to Ineseno are extensive and varied. They include raw field notes, texts, semantic and grammatical slipfiles, and a dictionary. The bulk of the data are from Maria Solares.

The Barbareno dialect of Central Chumash provided a constant source of interest for Harrington. He became fluent enough that he omitted glosses and translations from his later notes and was able to exchange letters with native speakers. During the course of his fieldwork, he had the unique opportunity to work with three generations of women in one family: Luisa Ignacio (around 1914); her daughter, Lucrecia Garcia (1926-1928); and her granddaughter, Mary Yee (from the 1920s to the early 1960s). Harrington also worked with Juan de Jesus Justo, a speaker of a different subdialect. While the notes Harrington recorded on Barbareno are among his most extensive, they are not as clearly organized as those for other groups. Thousands of pages of linguistic notes are totally without organization. Harrington rarely obtained paradigms. Instead, he obtained information by rechecking other sources, such as his own Ineseno dictionary, or by eliciting sentences in a random fashion. While textual material is plentiful, complete interlinear and free translations are often lacking.

Harrington's ethnographic notes on the Ventureno are among the most complete for any California Indian tribe he studied. Detailed accounts of Chumash life were obtained from the elderly Fernando Librado. Their interviews touched upon religion, perceptions of astronomy, such technologies as boat building and basket making, social structure, medical practices, and natural resources. A number of subdialects are represented in the Ventureno notes. Harrington recorded the "commonized" Ventura Mission dialect (samala) from Librado, Simplicio Pico, and Cecilio Tumamait. Interior Chumash (Cayetano and Castequeno) was obtained from Jose Juan Olivas. Other dialects mentioned include Mugu, Malibu, Ojai, and Matilija. There are also notes on the lone woman of San Nicolas Island.

In comparison with the records for the other Chumash dialects, documentation for Island Chumash (Ysleno) is extremely limited. Scattered throughout the material are references to the two dialects of Santa Cruz (Cruzeno), swaxil and kaxas. The speech of Santa Rosa and San Miguel is also mentioned.

The subseries also contains drafts of different lengths and in various stages of completion. Two documents pertain to Barbareno linguistics while the remaining papers reflect Harrington's cultural study of the Chumash.
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington studied the Chumash Indians of southern California more thoroughly than any other group, both linguistically and culturally. He first expressed interest in the Chumash culture as early as 1902 during summer school studies with A. L. Kroeber and P. E. Goddard. His linguistic study of the Chumash family began during his association with the School of American Archaeology and the Panama-California Exposition and continued periodically up until his death in 1961.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Local Note:
This subseries was broken up into six catalog records to facilitate viewing of digital surrogates. See the other catalog records for John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash to view surrogates for the rest of Harrington's Costanoan files.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Chumash language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Ynezeno  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
Narratives
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John P. Harrington Papers
John P. Harrington Papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies / 8.3: Supplemental Material on Southern California/Basin / Chumash
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref17256
Online Media:

Structures sociales en pays baga (Guinée française)

Author:
Paulme, Denise  Search this
Smithsonian Libraries African Art Index Project DSI  Search this
Type:
Articles
Date:
1956
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies  Search this
Baga social structure  Search this
Call number:
QH3 .B936b
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_753958

The living goddesses / Marija Gimbutas ; edited and supplemented by Miriam Robbins Dexter

Author:
Alseikaitė 1921-1994  Search this
Dexter, Miriam Robbins 1943-  Search this
Physical description:
xx, 286 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
Type:
Books
History
Place:
Europe
Europe, Western
Date:
1999
©1999
Topic:
Religion, Prehistoric  Search this
Goddesses, Prehistoric  Search this
Neolithic period  Search this
Folklore  Search this
15.40 prehistory  Search this
Antiquities  Search this
Religion  Search this
Prehistorie  Search this
Godsdienst  Search this
Goddesses  Search this
Gods and goddesses  Search this
Stone Age  Search this
Church history  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_682190

The winds of tomorrow : social change in a Maya town / Richard A. Thompson

Author:
Thompson, Richard A (Richard Allen)  Search this
Physical description:
x, 182 pages ; 23 cm
Type:
Case studies
Place:
Mexico
Ticul
Ticul (Mexico)
Ticul, Mexico
Ticul, Mexique
Mexiko
Maya
Date:
1974
Topic:
Mayas--Social conditions  Search this
Acculturation  Search this
Mayas--Conditions sociales  Search this
Acculturation--Cas, Études de  Search this
Social conditions  Search this
Sozialer Wandel  Search this
Social change  Search this
Conditions sociales  Search this
Acculturation--Mexico--Ticul--Case studies  Search this
Ticul (Mexico)--Social conditions  Search this
Call number:
F1391.T35 T48X
F1391.T35 T48
F1391.T35T48X
F1391.T35T48
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1146777

Puhua in Zhün ha County, Haidong Prefecture, Qinghai Province

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1.6 Terabytes (297 photographs and 1024 videos)
Type:
Archival materials
Terabytes
Date:
2016 May 3-June 3
Scope and Contents:
Videos and photographs in this series were shot by Puhua in Zhün ha County (also known as Xunhua Salar Autonomous County), Haidong Prefecture, Qinhai Province. Materials include documentation of nomadic life, horses, horse trading, and associated material culture, herding (sheep and yaks) and associated material culture, the physical and social structure of yak hair tents, courtship, gender roles, weaving, foodways, hunting, community history, community life, community conflict, wedding costumes and adornment, nomadic wedding practices, leatherworking, mattress making, traditional tools, child rearing, childhood, dirty jokes, riddles, traditional games, jewelry, folksongs, hair braiding, basket making, house construction, and household objects.
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is born digital; access for research and educational purposes is available by request . Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at (202) 633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions apply. Contact archives staff for additional information. Restrictions may apply concerning the use, duplication, or publication of items in these collections. Consult the archivists for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Tibetan Nomad Material Culture Documentation Collection, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.TNP, Series 2
See more items in:
Tibetan Nomad Material Culture Documentation Project Collection
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-tnp-ref2

Tenba and his wife Yangkos talking about social structure in their community

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
11 Video recordings (born digital)
Container:
Folder TNP_2016_08-18_LHA_0053-0063
Type:
Archival materials
Moving Images
Video recordings
Date:
2016 August 18
Scope and Contents:
Particularly Tshoba.

Filmed by Lhamo Drolma, Tsehua, and Puhua in Gartse, Tongren County, Huangnan Prefecture, Qinghai Province.
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is born digital; access for research and educational purposes is available by request . Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at (202) 633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions apply. Contact archives staff for additional information. Restrictions may apply concerning the use, duplication, or publication of items in these collections. Consult the archivists for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Tibetan Nomad Material Culture Documentation Collection, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Tibetan Nomad Material Culture Documentation Project Collection
Tibetan Nomad Material Culture Documentation Project Collection / Series 1: Llamo Drolma in Zeku and Tongren Counties, Huangnan Prefecture, Qinghai Province
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-tnp-ref78

Black Perspective Series: Hassan Jeru-Ahmed

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Jeru-Ahmed, Hassan  Search this
Martin-Felton, Zora  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (open reel, 1/2 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Lectures
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1972
Scope and Contents:
Hassan Jeru-Ahmed provides an overview of the political and social structures of the community and the United States. Jeru-Ahmed talks about black political activities, including fighting for full citizenship and voting rights in Washington, D.C. and the United States. He also talks about organizing the Blackman's Development Center and Blackman's Volunteer Army of Liberation; starting a drug program; and opening a sickle cell anemia center. He stresses the importance of organizing by black people of all ages. Zora Martin-Felton introduces Hassan Jeru-Ahmed.
Lecture. Part of ACM Museum Events, PR, and Ceremonies Recordings. Dated 19720229.
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Communities  Search this
Race  Search this
United States -- Politics and government  Search this
Drugs  Search this
Medical care  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Lectures
Citation:
Black Perspective Series: Hassan Jeru-Ahmed, Record Group AV09-023, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-023, Item ACMA AV003551
See more items in:
Museum Events, Programs, and Projects, 1967-1989
Museum Events, Programs, and Projects, 1967-1989 / Recordings of lectures
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-023-ref534

State and society / [edited by] J. Gledhill, B. Bender, and M.T. Larsen

Author:
Gledhill, John  Search this
Bender, Barbara  Search this
Larsen, Mogens Trolle  Search this
World Archaeological Congress (1986 : Southampton, England)  Search this
Physical description:
xvii, 347 p. : ill. ; 24 cm
Type:
Congresses
Date:
1988
Topic:
Political anthropology  Search this
Social structure  Search this
State, The--Origin  Search this
Social archaeology  Search this
Call number:
GN492.S73 1988X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_361967

Traditional Social Structure and Economic Change, 1960 [sound recording]

Creator:
Schneider, Harold Kenneth 1925-1987  Search this
Physical description:
1 reel; 3 inch
Type:
Lectures
Date:
1960
Topic:
Anthropology  Search this
Language and languages--Documentation  Search this
Local number:
Schneider Sound Recording 25
See more items in:
Harold Kenneth Schneider Sound Recordings 1960s-1971
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_272126

Asen Balikci, Describing plan for social organization, 1980-12, January 14, 1966 [sound recording]

Creator:
Asch, Timothy 1932-1994  Search this
Balikci, Asen 1929-  Search this
Physical description:
1 reel; 7 inch, 1 7/8 ips
Type:
Lectures
Date:
1966
January 14, 1966
Topic:
Social structure  Search this
Language and languages--Documentation  Search this
Local number:
Asch Sound Recording 106
See more items in:
Timothy Asch Sound Recordings 1964-1986
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_272518

Netsilik Social Structure lecture by Terry Turner, November 3, 1966 [sound recording]

Creator:
Asch, Timothy 1932-1994  Search this
Turner, Terry  Search this
Physical description:
1 reel; 7 inch
Culture:
Netsilik Eskimos  Search this
Type:
Lectures
Date:
1966
November 3, 1966
Topic:
Netsilik Eskimos--Social organization  Search this
Social structure  Search this
Language and languages--Documentation  Search this
Local number:
Asch Sound Recording 107
See more items in:
Timothy Asch Sound Recordings 1964-1986
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_272519

John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash (part 1), 1912-1961

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody 1884-1961  Search this
Laird, Carobeth 1895-1983  Search this
Subject:
Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa (San Luis Obispo, Calif.)  Search this
San Buenaventura Mission  Search this
Santa Inés Mission (Solvang, Calif.)  Search this
Santa Barbara Mission  Search this
Physical description:
169 boxes
Culture:
Chumash Indians  Search this
Indians of North America California  Search this
Type:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
Narratives
Manuscripts
Place:
California
San Luis Obispo (Calif.)
Santa Barbara (Calif.)
Ventura County (Calif.)
San Nicolas Island (Calif.)
Date:
1912
1912-1961
Topic:
Chumash language  Search this
Language and languages--Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Grammar, Comparative and general  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Languages  Search this
History  Search this
Local number:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions & Rights:
No restrictions on access
Contact the repository for terms of use
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers: Southern California/Basin, 1907-1961
John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_363789

John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash (part 2), 1912-1961

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody 1884-1961  Search this
Laird, Carobeth 1895-1983  Search this
Subject:
Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa (San Luis Obispo, Calif.)  Search this
San Buenaventura Mission  Search this
Santa Inés Mission (Solvang, Calif.)  Search this
Santa Barbara Mission  Search this
Physical description:
169 boxes
Culture:
Chumash Indians  Search this
Indians of North America California  Search this
Type:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
Narratives
Manuscripts
Place:
California
San Luis Obispo (Calif.)
Santa Barbara (Calif.)
Ventura County (Calif.)
San Nicolas Island (Calif.)
Date:
1912
1912-1961
Topic:
Chumash language  Search this
Language and languages--Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Languages  Search this
History  Search this
Local number:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions & Rights:
No restrictions on access
Contact the repository for terms of use
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers: Southern California/Basin, 1907-1961
John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_363792

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