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Alabama Mining Institute Photographs

Source:
National Museum of American History (U.S.). Division of Work and Industry  Search this
Creator:
Alabama Mining Institute  Search this
Names:
Alabama Fuel and Iron Company, Overton, Alabama  Search this
Central Iron and Coal Company, Kellerman, Albama  Search this
DeBardeleben Coal Company (Sipsey, Alabama)  Search this
Gulf States Steel Company (Sayre, Alabama)  Search this
Imperial Coal and Coke Company (Bradford, Alabama)  Search this
New Castle Coal and Coke Company (New Castle, Alabama)  Search this
Railway Fuel Company (Parrish, Alabama)  Search this
Republic Iron and Steel Company (Republic, Alabama)  Search this
Republic Iron and Steel Company (Sayreton, Albama)  Search this
Roden Coal Co. (Marvel, Alabama)  Search this
Southern Coal and Coke Company (Boothton, Alabama)  Search this
Woodward Iron Company (Woodward, Alabama)  Search this
Former owner:
National Museum of American History (U.S.). Division of Work and Industry  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (3 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Date:
undated.
Scope and Contents note:
Two volumes of photographs, plus negatives, of mining villages in Alabama, featuring company commissaries, hospitals, dining halls, boarding houses, schools, and recreational facilities. The photographs are captioned as to which facilities were for white employees and which for "colored" employees. Companies documented include the Woodward Iron Company, the Central Iron and Coal Company, DeBardeleben Coal Company, Railway Fuel Company, Southern Coal and Coke Company, Roden Coal Company, Alabama Fuel and Iron Company, Imperial Coal and Coke Company, New Castle Coal and Coke Company, Republic Iron and Steel Company, and Gulf States Steel Company.
Arrangement:
1 series.
Biographical/Historical note:
The Alabama Mining Institute is a consortium of underground and surface mining operators, dating back to the 1920s.
Provenance:
Immediate source of acquisition unknown.
Restrictions:
Collection open for research on site by appointment. Unprotected photographs must be handled with gloves.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Mining and minerals industry  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Segregation in education  Search this
Mining corporations  Search this
Dwellings -- Alabama  Search this
Company towns  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film -- 1900-1950
Citation:
Alabama Mining Institute Photographs, undated, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1004
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1004

We'll Help Protect Him, Mrs. Smith ... Fabricators Must Segregate Ally Steel Scrap - Or Schedules May Collapse! ... Republic Steel.

Creator:
U.S. Government Salvage Campaign  Search this
Republic Steel (Cleveland; New York)  Search this
Collection Creator:
Princeton University  Search this
Extent:
1 Poster (Full size; Monochrome, 64 x 94 cm)
Container:
Map-folder 449
Type:
Archival materials
Posters
Place:
United States
Image:
Main Image: Photograph of a Woman writing a letter with a picture of a U.S. soldier next to her
Local numbers:
Princeton Poster# 3543
General:
Issued by: Republic Steel Corp.

Issued for: U.S. Government Salvage Campaign

Artist(s): Anon
Locale:
Cleveland, Ohio
Printing Info:
Property of Princeton [...] Received MAY 3 1943
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but is stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Collection Rights:
Copyright status of items varies. Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Conservation/Food production  Search this
War production  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Conservation of natural resources  Search this
Metals -- Conservation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Posters
Posters -- World War, 1939-1945 -- United States
Collection Citation:
Princeton University Posters Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Princeton University Poster Collection
Princeton University Poster Collection / Series 4: World War Two / United States
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0433-ref14951

Will You Let Him Die? Because of the Little Things You Don't Do? ... What About Alloy Steel Scrap Segregation? ... Republic Steel.

Creator:
U.S. Government Salvage Campaign  Search this
Sponsor:
Republic Steel (Cleveland; New York)  Search this
Collection Creator:
Princeton University  Search this
Extent:
1 Poster (Full size; Monochrome, 64.5 x 94 cm)
Container:
Map-folder 456
Type:
Archival materials
Posters
Place:
United States
Image:
Main Image: Photograph of U.S. soldier
Local numbers:
Princeton Poster# 3542
General:
Issued by: Republic Steel Corporation

Issued for: U.S. Government Salvage Campaign

Artist(s): Anon
Locale:
Cleveland, Ohio
Printing Info:
Property of Princeton [...] Received MAY 3 1943
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but is stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Collection Rights:
Copyright status of items varies. Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Conservation/Food production  Search this
War production  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Soldiers -- 1940-1950  Search this
Conservation of natural resources  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Posters -- United States  Search this
Metals -- Conservation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Posters
Posters -- World War, 1939-1945 -- United States
Collection Citation:
Princeton University Posters Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Princeton University Poster Collection
Princeton University Poster Collection / Series 4: World War Two / United States
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0433-ref14955

Historical Records of Jones-Hall-Sims House

Creator:
McDaniel, George W.  Search this
Extent:
0.5 Cubic feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Oral histories (document genres)
Place:
United States of America -- Maryland -- Montgomery County -- Potomac
Poolesville (Md.)
Date:
1978-1979
Summary:
The Jones-Hall-Sims House also known as "Freedom House" is featured prominently in the NMAAHC Defending Freedom, Defining Freedom: The Era of Segregation exhibition. This collection reflects the research completed by historian Dr. George McDaniel documenting the history of the Jones-Hall-Sims House, the communties of Jonesville and Jerusalem.
Scope and Contents:
The Historical Records of Jones-Hall-Sims House consists of the research that historian Dr. George McDaniel and his team completed in order to document African American communities in western Montgomery County, Maryland. The collection consists of photographs and oral history transcripts collected about the families and community members that occupied the historic home and the surrounding Jonesville community. The bulk of the materials were created and collected during 1978-1979.
Arrangement:
The materials in this collection have been kept at the folder level and separated into three series. The materials have been ordered and organized based on the content. Within each series and subseries, the folders are organized as close to the collection's original order as when it was acquired.
Biographical / Historical:
The Jones-Hall-Sims House, also referred to as the "Freedom House," is featured prominently within the permanent exhibition, Defending Freedom, Defining Freedom: The Era of Segregation of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC). NMAAHC acquired the House in 2009. After disassembling the house at its original site in Maryland, it was reconstructed in the museum and became a focal aspect of the main History gallery. The House was named for three of the families that owned and occupied it for several generations starting in 1874. The home was originally located in Jonesville, Maryland, near what is now classified as Poolesville, Maryland. The Jones-Hall-Sims House was located at 6 Jonesville Terrace.

The city of Jonesville was named after brothers Richard (1810-1880) and Erasmus (1823-1880) Jones. Jonesville was one of the earliest free African American communities in Montgomery County, Maryland. Most of the inhabitants of Jonesville were descendants of the town's founders. With ratification of 13th amendment effectively banning the practice of American slavery, many former plantation owners were forced to sell their land to the formerly enslaved people who wanted to create and sustain their own communities. Research indicates that Richard and Erasmus were likely enslaved by the Bruner family on their Aix la Chapelle plantation. It is believed that the Bruner family enslaved up to 5,400 African American men, women, and children before the Civil War. This included Henrietta Jones, (1778-1870) that research suggests was the mother of Richard and Erasmus. In 1874, Richard Jones purchased 9 acres of land on the former Aix la Chapelle plantation from the Bruner family for $135.00. The sale was not formalized until the death of the landowner and head of the Bruner family, Joseph in 1874.

It is believed that the Jones-Hall-Sims House was built in approximately 1875. Research suggests that Richard Jones likely built the home with the help of his sons and neighbors. The original house was a wooden structure with two stories, three bays, and a side gabled roof covered in tin. Although Richard owned the house, it is unclear if he ever lived there. He transferred ownership of the house and land to his sons, John Henry (1853-1920) and Dennis (b. 1855) in 1876. John Henry and his wife Maria Jones are the first recorded occupants of the Jones-Hall-Sims House. Maria was the daughter of John Peters (b. 1825) a free-born blacksmith and an unidentified enslaved woman. John Peters also hailed from a longtime Jonesville family. Marrying John Henry in 1878, Maria was the first of her family who lived with her husband and children in the same home. In 1896, John Henry Jones sold the land the Jones-Hall-Sims House was located on to his brother Frank Jones and a friend, Levin Hall. The house was on Hall's property; therefore, the ownership was transferred to him.

In 1915, Elmer Jones, Richard's grandson, built a house nearby Jones-Hall-Sims House and made a home with his wife, Elnora Hall, Levin Hall's daughter. Elmer, a carpenter, known during that time as a "house wright," was responsible for rebuilding Elijah Methodist Church after it was damaged in a fire. Elmer's grandfather Richard was responsible for building the church, an integral part of the Jonesville community. After Elnora's death, Elmer married Hannah Jones; she would subsequently remain in that home until after Elmer's death in 1969.

In 1946, Annie E. Hall, Elnora's sister and Levin's daughter, transferred the land surrounding the Jones-Hall-Sims House to her daughter, Marion Hall. Marion married John Sims and they raised their son, Paul, in the historic home. In 1964, returning home from his service in Air Force, Paul married Barbara (b. 1944) and returned home where they lived with his father, John. In 1989, John passed away and transferred the property to his son. Like his father, Paul raised his children and grandchildren in the home. The families in the home were always self-sufficient, hunting and farming for their food, growing orchards and gardens, and making their own wine. Featured frequently in the collection are images of hog butchering, a main source of income throughout the home's history. Hog butchering was a joyous occasion, celebrated with food and drink by the whole community.

From 1978-9, Dr. George McDaniel conducted a historical survey of African American communities in upper western Montgomery County, Maryland. McDaniel worked with the preservation organization, Sugarloaf Regional Trails and the Maryland Historical Trust to conduct the survey. The purpose was to document important African American historical communities and homes in the area as they were rapidly disappearing. The survey was also used to obtain historical designation from the Maryland Historical Trust for the home in applications date for 1979 and 1985. Unfortunately, the house did not successfully receive the designation. At the time of the survey, McDaniel was a Ph.D. student at Duke University studying traditional African American home and customs. The study included research on the homes, churches, and schools through artifacts, photographs, and oral histories. At the time of the survey, Paul Sims owned and lived in the home. From his findings, McDaniel published Black Historical Resources in Upper Western Montgomery County and A Living Black Heritage focused on 11 African American communities including Jonesville and Sugarland.

In 2000, the family lost ownership of the home and it was purchased by Maryland resident, Brad Rhoderick with the intent to demolish the property to build a new home for his family. The Montgomery County Historic Preservation Commission was not able to designate the Jones-Hall-Sims House for historical preservation because of the many changes done by later generations who lived in the home, so they turned to NMAAHC for help. They worked together to acquire the house as quickly as possible to ensure the rich history presented by the home was preserved.

Historical Timeline

1778 -- Henrietta Jones was born. Research suggests she was the mother of Richard and Erasmus Jones.

c. 1810 -- Richard Jones was born.

c. 1820s -- Richard Jones married Evelyn (b. 1820).

1825 -- John Peters was born.

1850 -- Levin Hall was born. Frank Jones is born to Richard and Evelyn Jones (b. 1820).

1853 -- John Henry Jones was born to Richard and Evelyn Jones.

1855 -- Dennis Jones was born to Richard and Evelyn Jones.

1858 -- Maria E. Peters was born to John Peters and unidentified enslaved woman.

1864 -- Maryland ratified the Emancipation Proclamation.

1870 -- Henrietta Jones passed away.

1874 -- Richard Jones purchased 9 acres of land from the Aix la Chapelle plantation. Richard purchased the land that became Jonesville, named after founders Richard and Erasmus Jones.

1875 -- Jones-Hall-Sims House was built.

1878 -- John Henry married Maria E. Peters.

1876 -- Richard Jones bequeathed the House and land to his sons, John Henry (m. Marie E.) and Dennis Jones (m. Mary V.)

1879 -- Frank Jones, son of Richard and Rachael Jones, married Ruth (1858-1931).

1880 -- Dennis Jones married Mary (b. 1862). Richard Jones passed away.

1888 -- Elmer Jones was born to John Henry Jones and an unknown woman.

1891 -- Elnora Hall was born to Levin and Ruth Hall.

1896 -- John Henry Jones sold the House to his brother Frank Jones and friend Levin Hall splitting the property in half. The Jones-Hall-Sims House was located on Hall's land.

1898 -- John Sims was born.

1902 -- Marian Hall was born to Annie E. Hall and unknown man.

1915 -- Elmer Jones built his own home in Jonesville near the Jones-Hall-Sims House and lived with his wife Elnora Hall Jones (daughter of Levin Hall).

1920 -- Marian Hall married John Sims. Elnora Hall Jones and John Henry Jones passed away.

1924 -- Annie E. Hall inherits the land from her father, Levin Hall.

1936 -- Paul Sims was born and raised by Elmer Jones, husband to Elnora Hall.

1946 -- Marion Hall Sims (daughter of Annie E. Hall) inherited the land and passed it on to her husband John Sims.

1969 -- Elmer Jones passed away, leaving his own house to his widow Hannah Jones (1902-1984).

1978-1979 -- Dr. George McDaniel conducted a historical survey of the black communities in Montgomery County, Maryland.

1989 -- John Sims passed away. Paul Sims inherits the home from his father, John Sims.

1984-c. 1995 -- Paul and Barbara Sims lived with their children and grandchildren. John Sims lived with his family until he passed away in 1989.

2000 -- The family sold the land.

2008 -- Jones-Hall-Sims House was purchased by Brad Rhoderick with the intention to demolish the house and rebuild a new one.

2009 -- Jones-Hall-Sims House was acquired by the National Museum of African American History and Culture.
Provenance:
Acquired as a gift of Dr. George W. McDaniel.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access to collection materials requires an appointment.
Rights:
The NMAAHC Archives can provide reproductions of some materials for research and educational use. Copyright and right to publicity restrictions apply and limit reproduction for other purposes.
Topic:
Photographs  Search this
American South  Search this
Communities  Search this
Domestic life  Search this
Families  Search this
Religions  Search this
Local and Regional  Search this
Free communities of color  Search this
Emancipation  Search this
Housing  Search this
Genre/Form:
Oral histories (document genres)
Citation:
Historical Records of the Jones-Hall-Sims House, National Museum of African American History and Culture, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAAHC.A2013.110
See more items in:
Historical Records of Jones-Hall-Sims House
Archival Repository:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmaahc-a2013-110

The Historical Records of the Barnett-Aden Gallery

Creator:
Barnett-Aden Gallery  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Corcoran Gallery of Art  Search this
Howard University  Search this
Howard University. Gallery of Art  Search this
Aden, Alonzo J., 1906-1963  Search this
Asher, Lila Oliver  Search this
Driskell, David C.  Search this
Ealey, Adolphus  Search this
Greene, Carroll  Search this
Herring, James V. (James Vernon)  Search this
Johnson, Robert L., 1946 April 8-  Search this
Lazzari, Pietro, 1898-1979  Search this
Long, Richard, 1945-  Search this
Porter, James A. (James Amos), 1905-1970  Search this
Roosevelt, Eleanor, 1884-1962  Search this
Spellman, Gladys Noon  Search this
Thomas, Alma  Search this
Wells, James Lesesne, 1902-1993  Search this
Extent:
0.5 Cubic feet
Culture:
African American artists  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Ephemera
Catalogues
Business records
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
South Carolina
Date:
1954-1989
bulk 1961-1977
Summary:
The Historical Records of the Barnett-Aden Gallery showcases one of the first galleries owned and operated by African Americans. The work of the Gallery was invaluable as they opened the exhibition space to established and unknown artists regardless of race or gender.
Scope and Contents:
The Historical Records of Barnett-Aden Gallery collection includes historical background materials on the gallery, its founders James V. Herring and Alonzo Aden as well as Adolphus Ealey, its steward after its closure in 1969. The materials include correspondence, business records, photographs, exhibition catalogues, and clippings.
Arrangement:
The materials in this collection have been kept at the folder level and separated into four series. The materials have been ordered and organized based on the content. Within each series and subseries, the folders are organized as close to the collection's original order as when it was acquired.
Historical Sketch:
The Barnett-Aden Gallery, suggested to be the first African American privately-owned gallery in the U.S, open its doors on October 16, 1943. The gallery was founded by artist and scholar James V. Herring alongside his protegee, curator Alonzo Aden. The gallery was housed in a private home that they shared, located on 127 Randolph Street NW in Washington, DC. These men aimed to create an art gallery that provided a venue for underrepresented artists of all races and genres. It was this partnership that laid the foundation for the shift in African American representation in modern art. Aden stated that the gallery's aims were to help foster new talent while also bringing "art of superior quality" to the community. Throughout its history, the gallery held almost 200 exhibitions and showcased the work of over 400 artists.

James Vernon Herring was born on January 7, 1887 in Clio, South Carolina to an African American mother, Alice Herring (1860-1942), and white father, William Culbreth. As a young man, he moved to Washington, DC for better educational opportunities. Herring was educated at the Howard Academy, a preparatory high school located at nearby Howard University campus. Herring received his undergraduate degree from Syracuse University and completed graduate studies at Columbia and Harvard Universities. Trained in art and classical studies with a focus on French impressionism, Herring was initially brought on Howard University's faculty as architecture instructor in 1920. This experience inspired Herring to create the Department of Art at the university where he convinced former home economics student and future prominent visual artist, Alma Thomas to be the art school's first graduate in 1924. Herring continued to mentor and discover young artists as was the case with Alonzo Aden.

Alonzo Aden was born on May 6, 1906 in Spartanburg, South Carolina to Naomi Barnett (1883-1956) and Ephraim Aden (1859-1917). His working-class parents wanting more for their eldest son, decided to send him to live with relatives in Washington, DC for greater educational opportunities. Aden did well academically and completed some studies at Hampton Institute (now Hampton University) before finally entering Howard University in 1927. The following year, Herring opened the Howard University Gallery of Art and installed Aden as its first curator. Aden initially pursued a career as an educator but became more interested in art history and after his graduation from Howard in 1933, he pursued studies in museum and curatorial work.

Recent scholarship has suggested that Herring and Aden were in a romantic as well as working relationship. Working together in the Howard Gallery of Art, they sought to provide a space for art students, local artists and other relatively unknown artists from around the world. Living together since 1929, Herring supported Aden's post-graduate pursuits including his studies of African arts and crafts in galleries across Europe as well as his curatorial work at the American Negro Exposition in Chicago in 1940. Aden returned to Washington to great acclaim and continued his work with Herring at the Howard Gallery of Art.

The Gallery was housed in a Victorian townhouse located in the then middle-class African American neighborhoods of LeDroit Park and Logan Circle (present-day Bloomingdale). Research notes that the house was purchased during the late 1920s by Herring with some assistance of artist Alma Thomas (or vice versa). Both were listed as owners of the property until 1933 when Aden was listed as the co-owner. In 1943, Aden resigned as head of the Howard Gallery for unknown reasons which led Herring and Aden to open a gallery in their home. The gallery was named after Aden's mother Naomi, who also served as an early benefactor of the gallery giving $1,000 in support. It was the support of various benefactors alongside Herring's salary as a Howard professor and Aden's several "government jobs" that kept the gallery afloat during its time in the home. The first floor of the gallery consisted entirely of exhibition space with the second-floor space interchanged between exhibition, study, and living spaces over the years. Herring's library, also located on the upper floors, was used for research by students and local scholars. Herring and Aden never saw the gallery as a truly profitable venture but instead wanted to offer avenues for the artists to showcase their work. As policy, each artist retained all money earned from sales but were required to donate at least one work of art to the Barnett-Aden collection.

The gallery, the first of its kind in Washington at the time, exhibited works of artists regardless of race; African American artists displayed alongside their more notable white peers. Notable artists featured in the gallery include Henri Matisse, Paul Cezanne, Pablo Picasso, Marc Chagall, and M.C. Escher were exhibited alongside notable African American artists Richmond Barthé, Romare Bearden, Elizabeth Catlett, Charles White, Selma Burke as well as many others. Several Howard professors who went on to have notable art careers also exhibited their work at the gallery including James Porter, Lois Mailou Jones, and James Lesesne Wells. Many of the artists featured in the gallery were also greatly involved in the operations. Alma Thomas served gallery's vice president before she began exhibiting her work there in 1950s. Artist and scholar, David Driskell served as the associate director of the gallery after Aden's death.

The gallery held five to eight exhibitions every year including a special annual anniversary exhibition. In 1944, the gallery opened a show featuring Brazilian modern artist, Candido Portinari, who had previously completed a mural at the Library of Congress, that sparked great interest at the gallery. The exhibition opening brought in visitors from all over Washington including members of the president's cabinet, foreign ambassadors and First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt. This renewed interest created a somewhat hectic pace in keeping up with the work of the gallery. This pace coupled with the full-time jobs and other ventures including a gift shop enabled the gallery to act as a luminary of the African American and local arts community in Washington.

In 1961, while preparing for the annual anniversary exhibition, Alonzo Aden died suddenly. Herring with aid of his friends and students took on the management of the gallery after his partner's death but was unable to keep the pace of Aden's work and the attendance declined. In 1969, Herring died in the home leaving behind a formidable legacy. The home and its contents including the gallery's art collection was sold in order to settle the debts of Herring's estate. The collection was divided amongst three individuals. Artist and former Herring student, Adolphus Ealey inherited the bulk of the collection that featured 250 significant works. Herring's books, graphic drawings, and prints were given to Herring associate and friend, Dr. Felton J. Earls, while the sculptures went to art collectors and friends Dr. and Mrs. Cecil Marquez.

The portion of the collection owned by Ealey was described as the preeminent selection from the gallery's collection. The size and ongoing upkeep of the collection was significant which caused the collection to be moved several times over the years. The collection which out of necessity was originally stored in Ealey's Southwest Washington apartment then moved a to a house in LeDroit Park and then to another space in the Washington neighborhood of Fort Lincoln. Ealey collaborated with colleagues and institutions to have it exhibited in various locations but also bid to find the collection a permanent home. During the 1970s, the collection was featured at the Museum of Afro-American Culture and History in Philadelphia, the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum (now the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum) and the Corcoran Gallery of Art.

Unable to find an institutional home for the collection, Ealey was forced to sell the collection in 1989 to the Florida Endowment Fund for Higher Education. Ealey stipulated that collection must remain intact but also that the new owners had to develop educational and outreach programs focused on African Americans in the arts. Failing to find consistent opportunities to exhibit the collection, the owners were forced to sell the collection. In 1998, Robert L. Johnson, then chairman and founder of the television channel, Black Entertainment Television (BET), purchased the collection. The collection went on a national tour then was displayed for some time at the BET headquarters in Washington. In 2015, Johnson donated selections from the gallery collection to the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in an effort to preserve the legacy of the Barnett-Aden Gallery and the tireless work of James V. Herring and Alonzo Aden for generations to come.

Historical Timeline

1897 -- James Vernon Herring was born January 7 in Clio, South Carolina.

1906 -- Alonzo James Aden was born May 6 in Spartanburg, South Carolina.

1914-1916 -- While attending Syracuse University, Herring taught summer classes at Wilberforce University in Ohio for two summers.

1917 -- Herring graduated from Syracuse University with a Bachelors of Pedagogy in Art degree.

1917-1920 -- Herring served as YMCA secretary for the YMCA in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, and then Camp Lee, Virginia. Herring also held teaching positions at Straight College in New Orleans and Bennett College in North Carolina

1920 -- Alonzo was sent to Washington, D.C. to live with his uncle, James Aden, and his wife Laura.

1921 -- Herring was initially hired as architectural drawing instructor at Howard University and after negotiations established Department of Art later that same year.

1927 -- Herring organized an exhibition of Howard U. students' artwork that toured the Deep South U.S. Aden enrolled in Howard University in pursuit of an education degree.

1930 -- The Howard University Gallery of Art formally opened on April 7. Aden was hired as gallery assistant.

1933 -- Aden received his Bachelor of Arts in Education; Herring added Aden's name as co-owner of the 127 Randolph Place home.

1934-1939 -- Aden engaged in post-graduate study and museum curatorial work around the U.S. and Europe.

1940 -- Aden served as art curator for the American Negro Exposition (the "Negro's World Fair") in Chicago

1943 -- Aden resigned his position at the Howard University Gallery of Art for undisclosed reasons. The Barnett-Aden Gallery was founded by James V. Herring and Alonzo Aden. The first exhibition, "American Paintings for the Home" featured Elizabeth Catlett, Lois Mailou Jones, Malvin Gray Johnson, James Lesesne Wells, Jacob Lawrence, and many others.

1944 -- First anniversary exhibition featuring artist Candido Portinari, Brazilian artist who was already known in Washington from his mural for the Library of Congress. It was attended by the First Lady, Eleanor Roosevelt. Exhibition, "The Negro in Art" and "American Paintings for the Home" featuring Catlett, James A. Porter, Wells, Jones, Richmond Barthé, Hale Woodruff, Betsy Graves Reyneau and others.

1946 -- Exhibition, "Paintings by Lois Mailou Jones" and featured paintings of Jacob Lawrence for Third Anniversary exhibition.

1947 -- Fourth Anniversary Exhibition, "Recent Paintings by Charles White". Exhibition of Elizabeth Catlett, "Paintings, Sculpture, and Prints of The Negro Woman".

1948 -- Exhibition, "Paintings and Drawings by James A. Porter".

1949 -- Exhibition, "Sylvia Carewe".

1950 -- "Exhibition of Six Washington Artists" featuring Romare Bearden, Samuel Bookatz, Bernice Cross, Robert Gates, Norma Mazo, and James A. Porter. "Exhibition "Paintings and Prints by James Lesesne Wells."

1951 -- Exhibition, "Three Washington Artists" featuring Richard Dempsey, Sam Herman, and Jack Perlmutter Exhibition, "Herman Maril: Paintings in Retrospect, 1931-1951"

1953 -- Tenth Anniversary Exhibition, "Eighteen Washington Artists" featuring Sarah Baker, Samuel Bookatz, William Calfee, Bernice Cross, Robert Franklin Gates, Jacob Kainen, Marjorie Phillips, James Porter, and James Lesesne Wells.

1954 -- Exhibition "Six Washington Painters" featuring Theresa Abbott, Gabriel Cherin, Gloria Besser Green, Alma W. Thomas, and Anita Wertheim.

1955 -- Twelfth anniversary exhibition focused on "Jack Perlmutter".

1957 -- Exhibition, "David C. Driskell: Exhibition of Paintings"

1958 -- Exhibition "Norman Lewis: Paintings"

1959 -- Sixteenth Anniversary Exhibition of "Paintings by Pietro Lazzari, Helen Rennie, Alma Thomas, Andrea De Zerega". Exhibition of "Religious Paintings and Prints by James L. Wells and Sculpture by Selma Burke"

1962 -- Alonzo Aden died suddenly at the age of 56 on October 13 in Washington D.C. Herring solely inherits the Gallery collection.

1969 -- Herring dies at age 84 in Washington, DC. on May 29. Artist Adolphus Ealey inherits the bulk of the gallery collection along with Dr. Felton J. Earls and Dr. and Mrs. Cecil Marquez.

1974 -- Two exhibitions of the collection at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and the Corcoran Gallery of Art.

1989 -- Collection sold to Florida Endowment Fund for Higher Education.

1998 -- Robert Johnson, founder and former CEO of Black Entertainment Television (BET) purchased the entire collection and serves as administrators over the collection.
Provenance:
Acquired through a purchase by the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access to collection materials requires an appointment.
Rights:
The NMAAHC Archives can provide reproductions of some materials for research and educational use. Copyright and right to publicity restrictions apply and limit reproduction for other purposes.
Topic:
Photographs  Search this
Art  Search this
Business  Search this
LGBTQ  Search this
Museums  Search this
Painting, American  Search this
Galleries  Search this
Education  Search this
finance  Search this
Local and Regional  Search this
HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges and Universities)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Ephemera
Catalogues
Business records
Citation:
Historical Records of the Barnett-Aden Gallery, Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.
Identifier:
NMAAHC.A2014.63.32
See more items in:
The Historical Records of the Barnett-Aden Gallery
Archival Repository:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmaahc-a2014-63-32

Eastern Wind: The Asian-American Community Newsletter of Washington, D.C. Vol. 3, No. 11

Collection Designer:
Eng, Miu, 1955-  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 2
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1975 March-April
Scope and Contents:
This issue of Eastern Wind includes cover art designed by Miu Eng, organizational news, a history of Filipinos in Washington, D.C., and an essay published by the Committee to Save Angel Island Detention Center.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at ACMarchives@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Miu Eng Eastern Wind collection, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Miu Eng.
See more items in:
Miu Eng Eastern Wind Collection
Miu Eng Eastern Wind Collection / Series 2: Newsletters
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-102-ref4
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Eastern Wind: The Asian-American Community Newsletter of Washington, D.C. Vol. 3, No. 11 digital asset number 1

Patterns of Negro Segregation, Charles S. Johnson

Collection Creator:
Finlayson, Alice Bell  Search this
Container:
Box 3, Folder 11
Box 3, Folder 11
Type:
Archival materials
Books
Text
Date:
1943
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
The collection is open for unrestricted research. Use requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Alice Bell Finlayson papers are the physical property of the Anacostia Community Museum. Literary and copyright belong to the author/creator or their legal heirs and assigns. Rights to work produced during the normal course of Museum business resides with the Anacostia Community Museum. For further information, and to obtain permission to publish or reproduce, contact the Museum Archives.
Collection Citation:
Alice Bell Finlayson papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Alice Bell Finlayson papers
Alice Bell Finlayson papers / Series 5: Printed materials / 5.1: Books
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-003-ref86

Congressional debate on segregation in the armed forces, William L. Dawson, U.S. Representative

Collection Creator:
Finlayson, Alice Bell  Search this
Container:
Box 4, Folder 6
Type:
Archival materials
Books
Date:
undated
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
The collection is open for unrestricted research. Use requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Alice Bell Finlayson papers are the physical property of the Anacostia Community Museum. Literary and copyright belong to the author/creator or their legal heirs and assigns. Rights to work produced during the normal course of Museum business resides with the Anacostia Community Museum. For further information, and to obtain permission to publish or reproduce, contact the Museum Archives.
Collection Citation:
Alice Bell Finlayson papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Alice Bell Finlayson papers
Alice Bell Finlayson papers / Series 5: Printed materials / 5.2: Government publications
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-003-ref92

Frederick Douglass Home

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Frederick Douglass Memorial Home  Search this
United States.. Army. Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, 54th (1863-1865)  Search this
Brown, John, 1800-1859  Search this
Bruce, Blanche Kelso, 1841-1898  Search this
Cardozo, Francis Lewis, 1837-1903  Search this
Douglass, Anna Murray, -1882  Search this
Douglass, Frederick, 1817?-1895  Search this
Douglass, Helen, 1838-1903  Search this
Garrison, William Lloyd, 1805-1879  Search this
Langston, John Mercer, 1829-1897  Search this
Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865  Search this
Sewall, May Wright, 1844-1920  Search this
Twain, Mark, 1835-1910  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (cartridge, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Narration
Place:
United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865
Talbot County (Md.)
New Bedford (Mass.)
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
Rochester (N.Y.)
United States
England
Date:
1973
Scope and Contents:
Narrator provides an overview of abolitionist Frederick Douglass' life, work, and spirit from his birth as a slave in Talbot County, Maryland to his death in Washington, D.C. Douglass' experiences with racial prejudice and segregation as well as his involvement in the Underground Railroad and civil rights movements, including women's rights, are explored. Douglass lived in New Bedford (Mass.), Rochester (N.Y.), the neighborhood of Anacostia in Washington, D.C., and England, where he fled for two years after writing "The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass" in 1845. Douglass and his son Frederick Jr. recruited black men for the Civil War while his sons Lewis and Charles joined the 54th Massachusetts Regiment. While championing many reform causes, Douglass worked alongside William Lloyd Garrison, John Brown, Blanche Kelso Bruce, John Mercer Langston, Francis Cardozo, and May Wright Sewall.
Narration. Part of ACM Museum Events, PR, and Ceremonies Recordings. AV002692-1 and AV002692-2: same content. AV002692-1: sound beeps throughout recording. Dated 19731201.
Biographical / Historical:
Frederick Douglass Memorial Home was built between 1855 and 1859 for John Welsh Van Hook, an architect from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in Uniontown (also known as Anacostia). In 1877, Frederick Douglass purchased the home and 9 3/4 acres of land, which he named Cedar Hill. Over several years, Douglass purchased additional land and converted the home into a 21 room mansion. In 1900, Douglass' second wife, Helen Pitts Douglass, urged U.S. Congress to charter the Frederick Douglass Memorial and Historical Association, which received the property in 1903 upon Helen's death. On September 5, 1962, the Frederick Douglass estate became a part of the National Park Service. Groundbreaking ceremonies for a visitor center were held in September 1980. The visitor center opened to the public in February 1982. Douglass' home and estate became a National Historic Site in 1988 and underwent several restorations between 1922 and 2007.;Frederick Douglass (1818-1895) was born into slavery on Maryland's Eastern Shore but fled north in 1838 to settle in Massachussetts. He soon became an abolitionist in the antislavery movement, and by the mid-1840s his commanding eloquence in offering firsthand testimony to the oppressions of slavery had transformed him into one of the movement's most persuasive spokesmen. Douglass' reforming zeal remained strong all his life. After the Civil War put an end to slavery, he continued to be a leading defender of the rights of African Americans during Reconstruction.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV002692-2
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American abolitionists  Search this
Abolitionists  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Civil rights leaders  Search this
Antislavery movements  Search this
Civil rights movements  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Underground Railroad  Search this
Racism  Search this
Race discrimination  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Slaves -- Emancipation  Search this
Women's rights  Search this
Historic sites  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Narration
Collection Citation:
Anacostia Community Museum Programs and Projects, 1967-1989, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-023, Item ACMA AV002692-1
See more items in:
Museum Events, Programs, and Projects, 1967-1989
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-023-ref514

History of Anacostia by Thomas Cantwell

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Cantwell, Thomas J.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (open reel, 1/2 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Lectures
Place:
Barry Farms (Washington, D.C.)
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1973
Scope and Contents:
Thomas Cantwell speaks of the history of Anacostia and how the government has treated the neighborhood of Anacostia through efforts to isolate and divide the community. Lecture on history of Anacostia includes the meeting of John Smith and the Nacotchtank Indians; the establishment of Uniontown; development of Barry Farms by the Freedman's Bureau; the opening of St. Elizabeth's Hospital; refugee camps operated by the Freedman's Bureau; unmet housing needs of civil war refugees; formation of Hillsdale civic association; purchase of Cedar Hill by Frederick Douglass; establishment of Birney School, Garfield School, Anacostia High School, and Dunbar High School; movement against segregated schools; organization and role of the church; and public services in Anacostia and Hillsdale. Second part of lecture includes understanding the present - housing, education, unemployment, crime, and drug addiction in Anacostia. Focus on housing conditions; the interrelationship of housing conditions with education, unemployment, crime, and drug addiction; the influence of housing development, or lack of development, in the evolution of Anacostia; and the effects of the FHA 608 program on the community of Anacostia.
Presentation/Lecture. Part of ACM Museum Events, PR, and Ceremonies Recordings. Dated 19730116.
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Communities  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Neighborhoods  Search this
Housing  Search this
Social history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Lectures
Citation:
History of Anacostia by Thomas Cantwell, Record Group AV09-023, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-023, Item ACMA AV003562
See more items in:
Museum Events, Programs, and Projects, 1967-1989
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-023-ref561

Race Films

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
United States
Date:
1985
Scope and Contents:
Portions of soundtracks from race films which were shown in segregated theaters from 1920s-1940s. Dialogue and music from The Exile (1931), and music from the slient film, The Flying Ace (1926). Narrator provides introduction to The Flying Ace.
Film sound clips. Poor sound quality. Part of ACM Museum Events, PR, and Ceremonies Recordings. Dated 19850906.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African Americans in the performing arts  Search this
Race films  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Race Films, Record Group AV09-023, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-023, Item ACMA AV003503
See more items in:
Museum Events, Programs, and Projects, 1967-1989
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-023-ref600

WWII and Tuskegee Airmen - STEM in 30

Creator:
National Air and Space Museum  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2016-03-30T16:22:37.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Aeronautics;Flight;Space Sciences  Search this
See more by:
airandspace
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
YouTube Channel:
airandspace
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_NETJrO3B7qA

Capturing the Lives of Black Washington

Creator:
Smithsonian Channel  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2012-02-08T17:14:46.000Z
YouTube Category:
Entertainment  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianchannel
Data Source:
Smithsonian Channel
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianchannel
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_U3wIoYYOXPg

The Men That Helped Dismantle Racial Segregation

Creator:
Smithsonian Channel  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2013-08-21T18:04:11.000Z
YouTube Category:
Entertainment  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianchannel
Data Source:
Smithsonian Channel
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianchannel
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_pipbvq8SYlE

The Heinous 1961 KKK Attack on the Freedom Riders

Creator:
Smithsonian Channel  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2018-01-16T16:30:01.000Z
YouTube Category:
Entertainment  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianchannel
Data Source:
Smithsonian Channel
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianchannel
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_J8WnT6v_W3o

Meeting up with a Key Member of the Little Rock Nine

Creator:
Smithsonian Channel  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2020-02-13T16:30:00.000Z
YouTube Category:
Entertainment  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianchannel
Data Source:
Smithsonian Channel
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianchannel
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_Lia2Wp0WbS4

The Scary, Post-Segregation Reality for African Americans

Creator:
Smithsonian Channel  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2015-04-17T13:51:57.000Z
YouTube Category:
Entertainment  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianchannel
Data Source:
Smithsonian Channel
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianchannel
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_qs52fXkUQ-A

How the New Deal Left Out African-Americans

Creator:
Smithsonian Channel  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2017-12-26T16:30:02.000Z
YouTube Category:
Entertainment  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianchannel
Data Source:
Smithsonian Channel
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianchannel
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_r9hFVr-zmIg

How Lady Bird Johnson Became an Activist

Creator:
Smithsonian Channel  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2017-07-07T15:30:02.000Z
YouTube Category:
Entertainment  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianchannel
Data Source:
Smithsonian Channel
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianchannel
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_uVKg0EY1VsI

10 Colorized Videos That Bring American History to Life 🏛️ Smithsonian Channel

Creator:
Smithsonian Channel  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2021-01-01T16:30:00.000Z
YouTube Category:
Entertainment  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianchannel
Data Source:
Smithsonian Channel
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianchannel
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_aK7ij3dsOcU

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