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Polycube Puzzle, SOMA Cube

Maker:
Parker Brothers  Search this
Physical Description:
plastic (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 8.6 cm x 8.6 cm x 8.6 cm; 3 3/8 in x 3 3/8 in x 3 3/8 in
overall: 8.6 cm x 8.6 cm x 8.6 cm; 3 3/8 in x 3 3/8 in x 3 3/8 in
Object Name:
puzzle
Date made:
ca 1970
Subject:
Mathematics  Search this
Education  Search this
Mathematical Recreations  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Dr. Judy Green
ID Number:
2012.0091.04
Accession number:
2012.0091
Catalog number:
2012.0091.04
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Mathematics
Science & Mathematics
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746ad-a6d4-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1425322
Online Media:

Virginia Drew Watson papers

Creator:
Watson, Virginia  Search this
Watson, James B. (James Bennett), 1918-2009  Search this
Cole, J. David, 1941-  Search this
Extent:
8.13 Linear feet (20 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Brazil
Papua New Guinea
Mato Grosso (Brazil : State)
Papua New Guinea -- Social life and customs
Papua New Guinea -- Antiquities
Date:
1930-2001
Summary:
Virginia Drew Watson was a cultural anthropologist best known for her work in the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea. Her papers attest to a variety of interests related to culture and culture change, drawing on resources both archaeological and ethnographic. This collection contains catalogs, correspondence, drawings, field notes, grant proposals, manuscripts, maps, photographs, publications, reports, and slides. The majority of the field work relates to her work in Papua New Guinea, both with her husband (James B. Watson) and with J. David Cole, but there are also materials related to her work in Brazil.
Scope and Contents:
The Virginia Drew Watson papers attest to a variety of interests related to culture and culture change, drawing on resources both archaeological and ethnographic. Her work could be conveniently separated into four areas: Brazil, Plains and Caddo Indians, Papua New Guinea ethnographic, and Papua New Guinea archaeology with Cole. This collection contains catalogs, correspondence, drawings, field notes, grant proposals, manuscripts, maps, photographs, publications, reports, and slides. Most of the correspondence is with colleagues doing related work in other museums or universities in the United States or Australia. A small part of the correspondence is with friends, including missionaries, who report relevant information of interest. The collection includes original field notes from Brazil, including notes from a lecture by Radcliffe-Brown in 1943. There are also original field notes from the Tairora, Agarabi, and Gadsup groups in Highland New Guinea. In addition, this collection includes a list of Watson's publications, a copy of most of them, and some reviews.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 5 series: (1) Correspondence, 1930s-2000; (2) Brazil, 1943-1955, 1966; (3) New Guinea, 1949-2000; (4) Manuscripts, 1939-2001; (5) Books/Monographs, 1942-1977, 1997; (6) Slides of PEHNG Archeological Sites, 1965-1973, undated
Biographical Note:
Virginia Drew Watson was born on June 17, 1918, in Tomah, Wisconsin. Her undergraduate work was completed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she received a PhB in Sociology (1940). She conducted graduate work for both AM (1943) and PhD (1965) degrees at the University of Chicago. She was a Fellow of both the American Anthropological Association and the Royal Anthropological Institute.

Virginia Watson's early work was in archaeology, but later she pursued both archaeology and socio-cultural anthropology. She married James B. Watson, a cultural anthropologist, in 1943. During that year they went to Brazil, where Virginia Watson's work was primarily ethnographic among the Cayua Indians of Mato Grosso. On the trip returning from the field to Sao Paulo the Watsons stopped at the archaeological site of Ciudad Real del Guayra. From 1944 to 1945 Watson worked in the Cultural Relations Department of the American Consulate General in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

The Watsons made two trips to the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea. The first, 1954-1955, was funded by the Ford Foundation. Watson focused on socio-cultural aspects of the Tairora and Agarabi groups, and her work resulted in the 1965 publication of her dissertation, "Agarabi Female Roles and Family Structure, a study of socio-cultural change." The Watsons' second Papua New Guinea trip was in 1963-1964. It was sponsored by the National Science Foundation and focused on the Tairora and Gadsup groups. For Virginia Watson, the second trip was partly connected to archaeological work previously carried out by J. David Cole. Due to illness, he was unable to analyze the mass of material (25,000 objects) that he had collected. Watson analyzed the material and produced publications, one of which was in collaboration with Cole.

Virginia Watson often held one or more part-time positions. As a graduate student in 1942, she was a part-time Lecturer in the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago. On returning from Brazil, the Watsons moved to Oklahoma University in Norman for one year. There, Watson supervised archeology students in sorting and putting in order the university collection of artifacts as well as directing them in the field. From 1948 to 1953 Watson was a Lecturer at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, and she also directed students in field work. During the St. Louis years the Watsons spent two summers studying the Anglo-Spanish community in Colorado. From 1957 to 1963 she was a Lecturer at Seattle University and from 1961 to 1971 she was also an Occasional Lecturer at the University of Washington, Seattle. From 1969 to 1989 Watson held the position of Affiliate Curator at the Burke Museum, University of Washington. After she retired, Virginia Watson spent her winters in Florida and her summers in Boulder, Colorado.

Virginia Watson died in 2007.

Sources Consulted

Watson, Virgina Drew. "Curriculum vitae, 2001, For National Anthropological Archives." Virginia Drew Watson papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

"James Watson III." Bangor Daily News, December 10, 2009.

Chronology

1918 -- Born on June 17 in Tomah, Wisconsin

1940 -- Earned PhB in Sociology from University of Wisconsin-Madison

1942 -- Lecturer in archaeology at the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago

1943 -- Earned AM from University of Chicago Married James B. Watson Field research of the Cayua Indians, Mato Grosso, Brazil

1944-1945 -- Worked in the Cultural Relations Department of the American Consulate General in Sao Paulo, Brazil

1947 -- Special Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Oklahoma, Norman

1948-1953 -- Lecturer in anthropology and archaeology at Washington University in St. Louis

1949-1950 -- Field research of the Anglo-Spanish community, Del Norte, Colorado

1953-1955 -- First field research trip to the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea

1957-1963 -- Lecturer in anthropology at Seattle University

1961-1971 -- Lecturer in anthropology at the University of Washington, Seattle

1963-1964 -- Second field research trip to the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea

1965 -- Earned PhD from the University of Chicago Published dissertation: "Agarabi Female Roles and Family Structure, a study of socio-cultural change"

1969-1989 -- Affiliate Curator of Melanesian Archaeology at the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture, University of Washington

2007 -- Died
Related Materials:
The National Anthropological Archives also has the papers of Virginia D. Watson's husband, James Bennett Watson.
Provenance:
Virginia Drew Watson donated her papers to the National Anthropological Archives in 2002.
Restrictions:
The Virginia Drew Watson papers are open for research.

Access to the Virginia Drew Watson papers requires and appointment.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Citation:
Virginia Drew Watson papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2002-12
See more items in:
Virginia Drew Watson papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3eed77aa4-4bb2-477b-abec-20cc03efe498
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2002-12

William C. Sturtevant papers

Topic:
Handbook of North American Indians
Creator:
Sturtevant, William C.  Search this
Names:
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.)  Search this
Six Nations  Search this
Extent:
220 Linear feet (The total extent of the collection is 191.41 linear feet (consisting of 473 document boxes and 2 record boxes) plus 254 sound recordings, 94 computer disks, 42 card file boxes, 85 oversize folders, 9 rolled items, 18 binder boxes, and 3 oversize boxes. Of the total extent, 4.79 linear feet (14 boxes) are restricted.)
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Southeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Realia
Research
Notes
Office files
Theses
Slides (photographs)
Sound recordings
Exhibition catalogs
Field notes
Clippings
Correspondence
Photographs
Microfilms
Newsletters
Manuscripts
Memorandums
Articles
Card files
Books
Artifacts
Negatives
Date:
1952-2007
Summary:
This collection contains the professional papers of William Curtis Sturtevant and documents his activities as Curator of North American Ethnology at the National Museum of Natural History, his work as the editor-in-chief of the Handbook of North American Indians, his research among the Seminole and Iroquois people, and other professional activities. The collection is comprised of books, sound recordings, research and field notes, realia, artifacts, clippings, microfilm, negatives, slides, photographs, manuscripts, correspondence, memorandums, card files, exhibition catalogs, articles, and bibliographies.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains the professional papers of William Curtis Sturtevant and documents his activities as Curator of North American Ethnology at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History, his work as the editor-in-chief of the Handbook of North American Indians, his research among the Seminole and Iroquois people, and his involvement in various professional activities. The collection is comprised of research and field notes, sound recordings, realia, clippings, negatives, slides, prints, published and unpublished writings, correspondence, memorandums, conference papers and meeting notes, card files, exhibition catalogs, articles, bibliographies, student files such as class notes and papers from Sturtevant's years as an anthropology student, teaching materials including lecture notes and exams, daily planners, passports, military records, artwork including prints and lithographs, maps, and computer files.

The materials in this collection document Sturtevant's career as a preeminent North American ethnologist, museum curator, university professor, his role as General Editor of the Handbook of North American Indians, and his contributions to the field of Anthropology. From his early work with the Seminole Indians of Florida to his forays into Burma, and his decades-long study of how Native Americans have been depicted in artistic and popular culture, Sturtevant's diverse intellectual interests are represented in his research files. A copious note taker, Sturtevant captured his observations and opinions of everything from meetings with colleagues to museum exhibits. Sturtevant's commitment to the anthropological profession can be found in the notes and programs of the many conferences, symposiums, and lecture series he attended and at which he presented. He also held numerous leadership positions in various professional associations and sat on the board of directors/trustees for several cultural organizations including Survival International and the Museum of the American Indian-Heye Foundation. Sturtevant was respected for his vast knowledge of indigenous peoples and he received a voluminous amount of correspondence from colleagues who often included copies of their papers and grant proposals. He kept many of these works, which, it appears he used as reference material. Sturtevant's own work is reflected in his writings; he published over 200 scholarly papers, articles, and books.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
This collection is organized in 14 series: 1. Correspondence, 1951-2008; 2. Research Files, 1851, 1860s, 1880s, 1890, 1939-2006; 3. Writings, 1952-2006; 4. Professional Activities, 1952-2006; 5. Smithsonian, 1954-2008; 6. Handbook of North American Indians, 1971-2007; 7. Biographical Files, 1933-2007; 8. Student Files, 1944-1985; 9. Subject Files, 1902-2002; 10. Photographs, 1927-2004; 11. Artwork, 1699-1998; 12. Maps, 1949-1975; 13. Sound Recordings, 1950-2000; 14. Computer Files, 1987-2006.
Biographical/Historical note:
William C. Sturtevant (1926-2007), preeminent North American ethnologist, museum curator, and university professor, was best known for his contributions to Seminole ethnology, as curator of North American Ethnology in the Department of Anthropology at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History, and for his work as the general editor of the Handbook of North American Indians.

Sturtevant's passion for studying Native peoples began at a young age. In third grade "after a class on American Indians, he asked his father what kind of people study Indians, and his father replied, 'Anthropologists.' Sturtevant decided then that he would make anthropology his career" (Merrill 11). After graduating with honors from the University of California at Berkeley in 1949, Sturtevant went on to Yale University to complete his graduate work in anthropology. When it came time to decide on what area of North America he should focus his research, one of his faculty members at Yale, Irving Rouse, "suggested he consider the Seminoles of south Florida. By the end of his first fieldwork season, Sturtevant was convinced that the dearth of ethnographic information about these Seminoles and their status as one of the least acculturated of all North American Indian societies justified ethnographic research among them and offered the possibility of making an important contribution to North American ethnology" (Merrill 13). Sturtevant spent the summers of 1950 and 1951 conducting preliminary fieldwork among the Mikasuki-speaking Seminole and in 1952 he took up temporary residence at Big Cypress Reservation to undertake research for his dissertation, "The Mikasuki Seminole: Medical Beliefs and Practices." This work focused on Seminole medicine, but also included Sturtevant's analysis of Seminole worldview, religion, history, inter-ethnic relations, material culture, economy, kinship, language, and social organization.

In 1954, while he was finishing his dissertation, Sturtevant made the transition from student of anthropology to professional anthropologist. He was hired as an instructor in Yale's Anthropology Department and began his career in museum work as an assistant curator of anthropology at the Yale Peabody Museum. After receiving his PhD from Yale in 1955, Sturtevant moved on to the Smithsonian Institution, where he accepted a position as a research anthropologist at the Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE). This position afforded Sturtevant the chance to continue to explore his many research interests in ways that a full time professorship or museum curatorship could not. Over the next ten years he studied the Catawba in South Carolina; the Seneca and Cayuga nations of the Iroquois League in New York, Oklahoma, and Ontario; continued his work with the Seminole; visited European museums to examine early ethnographic examples and possible European prototypes of eastern North American Indian material culture; and spent a year in Burma. In 1963, Sturtevant and his wife, Theda Maw, the daughter of a prominent Burmese family, took their three young children to Burma so that they could visit with Maw's family. Sturtevant took this as an opportunity to branch out from his Native American research and spent the year visiting neighborhoods in Rangoon and villages in the surrounding countryside, examining archival materials, studying the Burmese language, learning about Burmese clothing and other aspects of the culture, and taking photographs. He also collected 386 items of clothing and other objects for the Smithsonian.

When Sturtevant returned from Burma, he found the BAE had been dissolved. In 1965, he was transferred from the now-defunct BAE to the Department of Anthropology at the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), where he became curator of North American Ethnology, a position he held for the next forty-two years. During his tenure at NMNH Sturtevant oversaw all the North American ethnology collections, planned exhibitions, served on committees, and sponsored interns and fellows. One of Sturtevant's primary duties at NMNH was serving as the General Editor of the Handbook of North American Indians, "a major multi-volume reference work summarizing anthropological, linguistic, and historical knowledge about native peoples north of Mexico" (Jackson). Each volume was designed to represent a geographic or topical area of Americanist study. As General Editor, Sturtevant selected volume editors, chapter authors, oversaw office staff, and proofread manuscripts over the course of production.

Besides focusing on the Handbook, much of Sturtevant's time was taken up by responsibilities he held outside the Institution. Sturtevant was extremely involved in professional anthropological associations and held many leadership positions. Fresh out of graduate school, he began a three-year term on the Board of Governors of the Anthropological Society of Washington in 1957. He later became a member of the executive committee of the Florida Anthropological Society, served as book-review editor and associate editor of the American Anthropologist from 1962-1968, was a member of the American Anthropological Association's Committee on Anthropological Research in Museums and was both vice president and president of the committee once it became the Council for Museum Anthropology, was on the American Anthropological Association's Committee on Archives, served three terms on the Board of Trustees of the Museum of the American Indian-Heye Foundation from 1976-1982 and was appointed to a fourth term between 1984 and 1986, and sat on the Board of Directors of Survival International from 1982-1988. He was President of the American Society for Ethnohistory, the American Ethnological Society, the American Anthropological Association, and the Anthropological Society of Washington. Sturtevant also taught classes at Johns Hopkins University as an adjunct professor in the Department of Anthropology, served as a consultant on exhibits at other museums, and reviewed manuscripts for scholarly publications.

Sturtevant remained active in the profession throughout his later years. After divorcing Theda Maw in 1986, he married Sally McLendon, a fellow anthropologist, in 1990 and they undertook several research projects together. Sturtevant was recognized for his dedication and contributions to the field of anthropology in 1996 when he was awarded an honorary doctorate in humane letters by Brown University, and in 2002 when his colleagues published a festschrift in his honor, Anthropology, History, and American Indians: Essays in Honor of William Curtis Sturtevant.

Sturtevant died on March 2, 2007 at the Collingswood Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Rockville, MD after suffering from emphysema.

Sources Consulted

Estrada, Louie. 2007. William C. Sturtevant; Expert on Indians. Washington Post, March 17. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/03/16/AR2007031602273.html, accessed August 31, 2012.

Jackson, Jason Baird. 2007. William C. Sturtevant (1926-2007). http://museumanthropology.blogspot.com/2007/03/william-c-sturtevant-1926-2007.html, accessed August 31, 2012.

Merrill, William L. 2002. William Curtis Sturtevant, Anthropologist. In Anthropology, History, and American Indians: Essays in Honor of William Curtis Sturtevant. William L. Merrill and Ives Goddard, eds. Pp. 11-36. Washington D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press.

1926 -- Born July 26 in Morristown, NJ

1944 -- Entered the University of California at Berkeley as a second-semester freshman

1944 -- Attended summer school at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico in Mexico City where he took courses on Mexican archaeology and South American ethnology

1945 -- Drafted into the United States Navy

1946 -- Received an honorable discharge from the Navy with the rank of pharmacist's mate third class and returned to UC Berkeley

1947 -- Attended the University of New Mexico's summer field school in Chaco Canyon, New Mexico

1949 -- January: Received his Bachelor's degree with honors in anthropology from UC Berkeley

1949 -- Began graduate studies at Yale University

1950-1951 -- Spent the summers of 1950 and 1951 in Florida conducting fieldwork among the Mikasuki-speaking Seminole

1951 -- Conducted his first research study of the Iroquois, a classification of Seneca musical instruments, their construction and use, with Harold Conklin

1952 -- May: Moved to Big Cypress Reservation in Florida to conduct research for his dissertation. He focused on Seminole medicine, but also collected physical anthropological data such as blood-type frequencies, handedness, and color blindness

1952 -- July 26: Married Theda Maw

1954 -- Hired by Yale University as an instructor in the Department of Anthropology and as an assistant curator of anthropology in the Yale Peabody Museum

1955 -- Received PhD in anthropology from Yale University

1956 -- Joined the staff of the Smithsonian Institution's Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE) as a research anthropologist

1957 -- Began a three-year term on the Board of Governors of the Anthropological Society of Washington

1957 -- Traveled to Rock Hill, South Carolina to collect linguistic data from Sam Blue, the last member of the Catawba tribe to have maintained some proficiency in the Catawba language. While there, he made a small collection of Catawba pottery for the United States National Museum

1957-1958 -- Spent seven weeks continuing his research among the New York Seneca

1959 -- Returned to Florida to study Seminole ethnobotany. He also collected ethnographic materials, especially objects made for the tourist market, which he deposited in the United States National Museum

1959-1960 -- Member of the executive committee of the Florida Anthropological Society

1960 -- July and August: Visited 17 European museums to examine early ethnographic examples and possible European prototypes of eastern North American Indian material culture

1961-1962 -- Spent the summers of these years conducting ethnographic fieldwork among the Seneca-Cayuga in Oklahoma

1962 -- October: Visited the Six Nations Reserve in Ontario, Canada to conduct fieldwork among the Seneca and Cayuga there

1962-1968 -- Book-review editor and associate editor of the American Anthropologist

1963 -- October: Spent the year in Burma; visited neighborhoods in Rangoon and villages in the surrounding countryside, examined photographs in several archives, studied the Burmese language, and read extensively about the country's history and culture. Assembled notes on Burmese clothing and other aspects of the culture, took hundreds of photographs, and made a collection of 386 items of clothing and other objects for the Smithsonian

1964 -- Visited Inle Lake in the Southern Shan States southeast of Mandalay, where he examined local approaches to artificial island agriculture

1964-1981 -- Became a member of the American Anthropological Association's Committee on Anthropological Research in Museums, which became the Council for Museum Anthropology in 1974. Sturtevant was the Council's first vice president, serving two terms between 1974 and 1978, and was its president from 1978 to 1981

1965 -- Became curator of North American Ethnology in the Department of Anthropology at the National Museum of Natural History after the dissolution of the BAE

1965-1966 -- President of the American Society for Ethnohistory

1966 -- Named the editor of the Handbook of North American Indians

1967-1968 -- Fulbright scholar and lecturer at Oxford University's Institute of Social Anthropology

1969 -- Began serving on the American Anthropological Association's Committee on Archives

1974-1989 -- Adjunct Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Johns Hopkins University

1976-1982 -- Served three terms on the Board of Trustees of the Museum of the American Indian-Heye Foundation and was appointed to a fourth term between 1984 and 1986

1977 -- President of the American Ethnological Society

1980-1981 -- President of the American Anthropological Association

1981 -- Spent part of the spring semester at the University of California Berkeley as a Regents Lecturer

1982-1988 -- Board of Directors of Survival International

1986 -- Divorced Theda Maw

1986-1987 -- Smithsonian Fellow at Oxford University's Worcester College

1990 -- Married Sally McLendon

1992 -- President of the Anthropological Society of Washington

1996 -- Awarded an honorary doctorate in humane letters at Brown University

2007 -- Died March 2 in Rockville, MD
Related Materials:
Other materials relating to William C. Sturtevant at the National Anthropological Archives are included in the following collections:

Manuscript 4504

Manuscript 4595

Manuscript 4806

Manuscript 4821

Manuscript 4972

Manuscript 7045

Photo Lot 59

Photo Lot 79-51

Photo Lot 80-3

Photo Lot 81R

Photo Lot 86-68 (6)

Photo Lot 86-68 (7)

American Society for Ethnohistory records

Committee on Anthropological Research in Museum Records

Handbook of North American Indians records

Records of the Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History

Gordon Davis Gibson Papers, Sound Recordings

SPC Se Powhatan Confederacy Mattapony BAE No # 01790700

DOE Oceania:Amer Poly:Hi:Hawaiian Helmet:Sturtevant 04913800

DOE Oceania:Amer Poly:Hi:Hawaiian Helmet:Sturtevant 04913900

DOE Oceania:Amer Poly:Hi:Hawaiian Helmet:Sturtevant 04914000

Negative MNH 1530

Negative MNH 1530 B

Sturtevant is listed as a correspondent in the following NAA collections:

Administrative file, 1949-1965, Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology

John Lawrence Angel Papers

James Henri Howard Papers

Donald Jayne Lehmer Papers

John Victor Murra Papers

Records of the Society for American Archaeology

Albert Clanton Spaulding Papers

Waldo Rudolph Wedel and Mildred Mott Wedel Papers

Copies of sound recordings made by William C. Sturtevant can be found at The California Language Archive at UC Berkeley in two collections, The William Sturtevant collection of Creek/Seminole sound recordings, which includes 31 minutes of Northern Muskogean linguistic field recordings from 1951, and The William Sturtevant collection of Mikasuki sound recordings, which includes 33 minutes of Mikasuki linguistic field recordings from 1951. Two sound tape reels of Seminole music Sturtevant recorded in Florida in 1951 can be found at Wesleyan University's World Music Archives. Folk songs on these recordings include "Scalping Sickness," "Bear Sickness with blowing," "Bear sickness without blowing," "Lullaby," "Feather Dance," "Snake Dance," and "Crazy Dance." Performers include Josie Billie, Lee Cypress, Harvey Jumper, Boy Jim, Charlie (Johnny?) Cypress, Little Tiger Tail, Billy Ossiola, and Charlie Billy Boy.
Separated Materials:
One video tape, "Seminole History and Tradition", was transferred to the Human Studies Film Archives. Series 2.2, Tukabahchee Plate: Glass negative of spectrogram from FBI (Box 135), removed for storage with other glass plate negatives.
Provenance:
These papers were transferred to the National Anthropological Archives by the Department of Anthropology at the National Museum of Natural History.
Restrictions:
Files containing Sturtevant's students' grades have been restricted, as have his students' and colleagues' grant and fellowships applications. Restricted files were separated and placed at the end of their respective series in boxes 87, 264, 322, 389-394, 435-436, 448, 468, and 483. For preservation reasons, his computer files are also restricted. Seminole sound recordings are restricted. Access to the William C. Sturtevant Papers requires an apointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
Botany  Search this
Anthropology  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
History  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Realia
Research
Notes
Office files
Theses
Slides (photographs)
Sound recordings
Exhibition catalogs
Field notes
Clippings
Correspondence
Photographs
Microfilms
Newsletters
Manuscripts
Memorandums
Articles
Card files
Books
Artifacts
Negatives
Citation:
William C. Sturtevant papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2008-24
See more items in:
William C. Sturtevant papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3b2223e72-e872-41c5-ae7b-abd0b27eaf6a
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2008-24
Online Media:

H. Arlo Nimmo papers

Creator:
Nimmo, Harry  Search this
Extent:
5 Linear feet (6 document boxes, 5 card file boxes, 1 binder box, 1 flip-top box plus 16 sound reels; and 12 maps (6 of which are duplicates))
5 Linear feet (6 document boxes, 5 card file boxes, 1 binder box, 1 flip-top box plus 16 sound reels; and 12 maps (6 of which are duplicates))
Culture:
Filipinos  Search this
Tausug (Philippine people)  Search this
Bajau (Southeast Asian people)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Chants
Stories
Songs
Correspondence
Maps
Sound recordings
Slides (photographs)
Place:
Tawitawi (Philippines)
Date:
1965-1967
1963
1965-1967
1963
Summary:
The papers of H. Arlo Nimmo document his field research among the Bajau (also known as Sama Dilaut) in Tawi-Tawi Province in the southern Philippines in 1963, 1965-1967, 1977, 1982, and 1997. The collection consists of correspondence, field journals, censuses, genealogies, kinship charts, transcripts of songs, unpublished manuscripts, card files, photographs, sound recordings, and maps. Nimmo's initial research focused on social change, but he collected data about other aspects of Bajau culture, including social organization, kinship, religion, fishing, boats, boat-building, art, and music.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of H. Arlo Nimmo document his field research among the Bajau (also known as Sama Dilaut) in Tawi-Tawi Province in the southern Philippines in 1963, 1965-1967, 1977, 1982, and 1997. The collection consists of correspondence, field journals, censuses, genealogies, kinship charts, transcripts of songs, unpublished manuscripts, card files, photographs, sound recordings, and maps. Nimmo's initial research focused on social change, but he collected data about other aspects of Bajau culture, including social organization, kinship, religion, fishing, boats, boat-building, art, and music.

Also in the collection are recordings of his 2001 interviews with Gerard Rixhon, an Oblates of Mary Immaculate priest, stationed in Tawi-Tawi and Jolo from 1953 to 1974. In addition, the collection contains materials regarding the Bajau from Don Hart and Rony Bautista.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged into 6 series: (1) Correspondence; (2) Research Data; (3) Unpublished Manuscripts; (4) Maps; (5) Photographs; (6) Sound Recordings.
Biographical Note:
Harry Arlo Nimmo is a Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at California State University East Bay at Hayward. He earned his Ph.D. in anthropology from University of Hawaii in 1969. As a graduate student, he conducted six months of field research among the Bajau (also known as Sama Dilaut) of Tawi-Tawi, Philippines in 1963 and another eighteen months in 1965-67. He returned to conduct more field research in Tawi-Tawi in 1977, 1982, and 1997. As a result of civil strife, massive immigration, and economic changes following his field research in the 1960s, the Bajau culture (as studied and documented by Nimmo) no longer exists in Tawi-Tawi. In addition to his master's thesis, Social Organization of the Tawi-Tawi Badjaw (1965), and his dissertation, The Structure of Bajau Society (1969), Nimmo has published extensively on his Bajau research.

Selected Bibliography

1965 -- Social Organization of the Tawi-Tawi Badjaw. Ethnology IV (4): 421- 439.

1966 -- Themes in Badjaw Dreams. Philippine Sociological Review XIV (1): 49-56.

1968 -- The Bajau of Sulu Fiction and Fact. Philippine Studies XVI (4): 771-775. Songs of the Sulu Sea. ETC. XXV (4): 489-494. Reflections on Bajau History. Philippine Studies XVI (1): 32-59.

1970 -- Bajau Sex and Reproduction. Ethnology IX (3): 251-262. Posong, Trickster of Sulu. Western Folklore XXIX (3): 185-191.

1971 -- Bajau: Gentle Boat-Dwellers of the Philippines. Nomads of the World. Washington, D. C.: National Geographic Society.

1972 -- The Bajau of the Philippines. Ethnocentrism Series. HRAFlex Book OA8-001. New Haven: Human Relations Area Files. The Sea People of Sulu. San Francisco: The Chandler Press. You will remember us because we have sung for you. Philippine Studies XX (2): 299-322.

1973 -- A Tribe of Ancient Mariners Comes Ashore. Natural History 82 (10): 334-45.

1975 -- The Shamans of Sulu. Asian and Pacific Quarterly VII (1): 1-9.

1976 -- A Functional Interpretation of Bajau Songs. Directions in Pacific Traditional Literature, edited by Adrienne L. Kaeppler and H. Arlo Nimmo. Honolulu: Bishop Museum Press.

1977 -- The Bajau of Sulu. Filipino Heritage I: 261-265.

1978 -- The Relativity of Sexual Deviance: A Sulu Example. Papers in Anthropology XIX (1): 91-98.

1984 -- Bajau. Muslim Peoples I: 75-80. Edited by Richard V. Weekes. Westport: Greenwood Press.

1986 -- Recent Population Movements in the Sulu Archipelago: Implications to Sama Culture History. Archipel 32: 25-38.

1990 -- The Boats of the Tawi-Tawi Bajau, Sulu Archipelago, Philippines. Asian Perspectives 29 (1): 51-88. Religious Beliefs of the Tawi-Tawi Bajau. Philippine Studies 38(1): 3-17. Religious Rituals of the Tawi-Tawi Bajau. Philippine Studies 38 (2): 166-198.

1994 -- The Songs of Salanda. Seattle: University of Washington Press.

2001 -- Magosaha: An Ethnography of the Tawi-Tawi Sama Dilaut. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press.

2005 -- Silungan Baltapa. The Voyage to Heaven of a Sama Hero. (Co-authored with Nicole Revel, Alain Martenot, Gèrard Rixhon, Talib Lim Sangogot, and Olivier Tourny.) Paris: Geuthner.

2010 -- The H. Arlo Nimmo and Tarabasa Idji Collection. Voices from Sulu. Edited by Gerard Rixhon. Quezon City: The Ateneo de Manila University Press.

2012 -- A very far place: tales of Tawi-tawi. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press.
Separated Materials:
8 mm color film (and DVD copy) of Tungkalong shot by Nimmo in 1963 was transferred to the Human Studies Film Archives. See HSFA.2011.02
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by H. Arlo Nimmo.
Restrictions:
According to the wishes of H. Arlo Nimmo, his correspondence and field notes are restricted until his death.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Standard copyright restrictions apply.
Topic:
Sama languages  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Ethnology -- Philippines  Search this
Music  Search this
Kinship  Search this
Fishing  Search this
Rites and ceremonies  Search this
Genre/Form:
Chants
Stories
Songs
Correspondence
Maps
Sound recordings
Slides (photographs)
Citation:
H. Arlo Nimmo papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2009-17
See more items in:
H. Arlo Nimmo papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw33c3a0819-cfcf-4423-bcbd-2549e31289ee
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2009-17
Online Media:

Ruth Law Scrapbook

Collection Creator:
Law, Ruth  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 1
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1916-1918
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Collection Citation:
Ruth Law Collection, Acc. NASM.XXXX.0387, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Ruth Law Collection
Ruth Law Collection / Series 1: Ruth Law Scrapbook
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg23c516b67-e52c-4a50-88d4-a1b5e84eba83
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-xxxx-0387-ref517
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Carol Zane Jolles papers

Former owner:
Jolles, Carol Zane  Search this
Extent:
7 Linear feet
Culture:
Yupik Eskimos  Search this
Eskimos -- Alaska  Search this
Yup'ik (Yupik Eskimo)  Search this
Inupiaq (Alaskan Inupiat Eskimo)  Search this
Inupiaq (Alaskan Inupiat Eskimo) [Kinugumiut/Kingegan/Cape Prince of Wales]  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Sound recordings
Place:
Saint Lawrence Island (Alaska)
Diomede Islands (Alaska and Russia)
Bering Strait
Prince of Wales, Cape (Alaska)
Date:
1910, 1930-2013 (bulk 1988-2004)
Summary:
The Carol Zane Jolles papers document her research conducted among the Inupiaq and Yup'ik communities of Wales, St. Lawrence Island, and Big and Little Diomede Islands from approximately 1982-2004. Jolles interviewed villagers (with a focus on village elders) in English and Yup'ik about their lives, traditions, and village histories. The collection contains: audiovisual material, correspondence; maps, charts, diagrams, and drawings, population records, questionnaires, reports, research project notes and papers, school records, transcripts, and various Yup'ik-related publications.
Scope and Contents:
The bulk of the collection consists of recorded interviews and transcripts of the Inupiaq residents of Wales, the villages Gambell and Savoonga of St. Lawrence Island, and Big and Little Diomede Islands (primarily Little Diomede Island), Alaska gathered during various research projects conducted by Jolles from approximately 1982-2004 regarding community life and history.

The records include: audiovisual recordings (cassettes, VHS tapes, and film); correspondence between Jolles and various community members; maps, charts, diagrams, and drawings (many created by community members); population records; questionnaires; reports; research project notes and papers; school records (administrative records, correspondence, meeting minutes, notes, photographs, and reports); photographs; transcripts; and various Inupiaq-related publications.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged into four (4) series: (1) Wales, 1996-2013; (2) St. Lawrence Island, 1910, 1946, 1954-1955, 1968-2000; (3) Diomede, 1930-1974, 1980-2006; (4) Restricted, 1991, 2001-2011.
Biographical / Historical:
Carol Zane Jolles is a leading figure in Arctic ethnology who worked among the Yup'ik and Inupiaq communities in Alaska along the northern Bering Sea-Bering Strait region from 1982-2013.

Jolles was born on November 12, 1940 in Washington, D.C. and grew up in Falls Church, Virginia. She studied Literature at Earlham College (1958-1961) and received her Bachelor's degree and a teaching certificate from Roosevelt University (1964). From the 1964 to 1980 Jolles taught in Chicago, Minneapolis, and Philadelphia public schools, until deciding to continue her education.

Jolles attended the University of Washington from 1982-1990, where she received her Master's degree (1985) and Ph.D. (1990) in Cultural Anthropology. Her doctoral research involved documenting family histories, gender roles, family relations, and history and impact of acculturation and people's conversion to Christianity due to the activities of Presbyterian missionaries since the late 1800s, including changes in schooling and decreased knowledge of the Yup'ik languages. After becoming a faculty member at the University of Washington in the 1990s, Jolles' anthropological research expanded to include the documentation of the Inupiaq hunting communities of Wales and the Diomede Islands. Here, she focused on indigenous knowledge, perception of place and space, people's relation to their home territory as reflected in place names, oral histories, original art (drawings), and other cultural means. Other research interests included climate change and its impact on Alaska Native communities. This research culminated in a seminal book, Faith, Food, and Family in a Yupik Whaling Community, which Jolles published with her research partner, Elinor Mikaghak Oozeva, in 2002.

Jolles retired from the University of Washington in 2013. As Emerita Research Professor for the Department of Anthropology, she continues to maintain correspondence with various Inupiaq community members.

Chronology

1940 November 12 -- Born in Washington, D.C.

1958-1961 -- Attends Earlham College

1964 -- Receives Bachelor's Degree in English & Language Arts from Roosevelt University Receives Teaching Certificate from Roosevelt University

1964-1980 -- Teaches in Chicago, Minneapolis, and Philadelphia public schools

1982-1990 -- Studies as a Graduate Student in Cultural Anthropology at the University of Washington Conducts doctoral research in Alaska

1982-2013 -- Conducts research in St. Lawrence Island, Wales, and the Diomede Islands of Alaska

1985 -- Receives Master's Degree in Cultural Anthropology from the University of Washington

1990 -- Receives PhD in Cultural Anthropology from the University of Washington

1990s -- Works as Research Assistant Professor for the Anthropology Department at the University of Washington

1992-1995 -- Works as Principal Investigator on the "Sivuqaghhmiit Traditions and Culture: Values for Survival in a Changing World" project

1995-1997 -- Works as Principal Investigator on the "Yupik Women: Narratives of Eskimo Women's Lives" project

1997-2000 -- Works as Principal Investigator on the "Yupik Women, Yupik Families: A Comparative Study of Siberian Yupik and St. Lawrence Island Yupik Eskimo Family Life"

1997-2001 -- Works as Research Associate, Visiting Assistant Professor for the Anthropology Department at Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis

2001-2002 -- Volunteers as mentor for the National Science Foundation's Teachers Experiencing Antarctica and the Arctic (TEA)

2001-2006 -- Works as Principal Investigator on the "Collaborative Research-Change and Its Impact on Culture, Economy and Identity in Three North Bering Strait Alaskan Inupiat Societies: Diomede, King Island, Wales" project

2002 -- Publishes Faith, food, and family in a Yupik whaling community with research partner Elinor Mikaghaq Oozeva

2006-2007 -- Works as Principal Investigator on the "Assessing Alaskan Yup'ik Community Interest in a Dental Health Initiative" project

2006-2009 -- Works as Principal Investigator on the "Ethnographic Approaches to Alaska Native Health Disparities Research" project

2008 -- Volunteers as Internal reviewer and copy editor for the Kinikmi Sigum Qanuq Ilitaavut, Wales-IInupiaq Sea-Ice Dictionary, compiled by Winton Weyapuk, Jr. and Igor Krupnik for the Smithsonian Institution's Arctic Studies Center

2008-2013 -- Works as Principal Investigator on the "Inupiaq Landscapes and Architecture: Preserving Alaska Native Community Histories" project

2010-2012 -- Serves as Co-Chair of Organization and Planning Committee for the Alaska Anthropology Association annual meetings

2013 -- Retires

2013-2018 -- Works as Research Associate Professor for the Anthropology Department at the University of Washington

2019 -- Works as Research Associate Professor, faculty emerita for the Anthropology Department at the University of Washington
Provenance:
The papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Carol Jolles between 2014 and 2019.
Restrictions:
Material containing personally identifiable information (PII) is restricted.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Whaling  Search this
Villages -- Alaska  Search this
Yupik  Search this
Hunting -- Eskimo  Search this
Alaska Natives  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Sound recordings
Citation:
Carol Zane Jolles papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2014-14
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3c27cdc62-a8c1-48a4-b23e-275c1e1700f9
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2014-14

Oral history interview with Val Laigo

Interviewee:
Laigo, Val M., 1930-1992  Search this
Interviewer:
Nakane, Kazuko  Search this
Lau, Alan Chong  Search this
Names:
Charles and Emma Frye Art Museum  Search this
Foster/White Gallery  Search this
Mexico City College -- Students  Search this
Northwest Asian American Project  Search this
Seattle University -- Students  Search this
University of Washington -- Students  Search this
Bennett, Doug  Search this
Callahan, Kenneth, 1905-1986  Search this
Chong, Fay  Search this
Dusanne, Zoe, 1884-1977  Search this
Horiuchi, Paul, 1906-  Search this
Jones, Quincy, 1933-  Search this
Katayama, Mits  Search this
Nordness, Lee  Search this
Okada, Frank S. (Frank Sumio), 1931-2000  Search this
Orozco, José Clemente, 1883-1949  Search this
Picasso, Pablo, 1881-1973  Search this
Ritchie, Bill  Search this
Rivera, Diego, 1886-1957  Search this
Siqueiros, David Alfaro  Search this
Tamayo, Rufino, 1899-  Search this
Voorhees, Clark G. (Clark Greenwood), 1871-1933  Search this
Washington, James W., 1911-2000  Search this
Extent:
42 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1989 July 12
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Val Laigo conducted 1989 July 12, by Alan Lau and Kazuko Nakane, for the Archives of American Art Northwest Asian American Project, in Laigo's home, Seattle, Wash.
Laigo speaks of learning how to paint at age eleven with watercolors; growing up with a heart condition known as Eisenmenger's Complex; teaching at Highline High School and creating a wolverine as the school's mascot; the inclusion of his life story in a Filipino oral history project; singing for an orchestra called the Gentlemen of Rhythm, at the Filipino Catholic Youth Activities events and other venues; Doug Bennett as an influence in composition and design; being a student at Seattle University and joining Art Equity in approximately 1951; remembering his painting, "Madonna" being shown at the Seattle Art Museum; his first show at the People's Furniture Store and later with Fay Chong at the Hathaway House; Zoe Dusanne became his agent; his introduction to the MacPaint software program and his first piece of computer art; his desire to study Mexican muralists, Diego Rivera, Jose Orozco, David Siqueiros, and Rufino Tamayo and becoming at student at Mexico City College; his life in Mexico with the woman who would become his wife; the strong influence of Nick Damascus on his painting; how his palette changed to brighter colors after living in Mexico; his health crisis there that lead him to abandon his work towards a master's degree and return to Seattle in 1959; having to start over from the beginning at the University of Washington; Tommy Kwazume hiring him at Boing as an artist in 1960; Lee Nordness and the RCA Victor album cover; his negative experience with Margaret Reed while showing at the Panaca Gallery; his exhibit at the Frye Art Museum in 1969 and criticism by Clark Voorhees; his Mexican experience having influenced his vigor and scale; the Lost Generation series; his comment about Picasso not being able to paint; encouragement from his family to pursue art training; the murder of his father in 1936; his mother's success as a new painter; and his work, "Dilemma of the Atom" featured on the cover of an RCA Victor record album. Laigo also recalls Perry Acker, Foster White Gallery, David Mendoza, Fred Mendoza, Tom Tooley, Ray Sadirius, Quincy Jones, Oscar Holden's Orchestra, Fred Cordova, Mits Katayama, Rudy Bundis, Kal Chin, Paul Horiuchi, James Washington, Dick Kirsten, Frank Okada, John Matsudaira, Walter Froelich, Bill Ritchie, John Counts, Don Fenton, Kenneth Callahan, Fred Run, Barry Ferrell, Ken Harms, Andrew Chin, Ben Dar, Ruth Mora, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Val Laigo (1930-1992) was a Filipino American painter based in Seattle, Washington. Val Laigo was born in Naguilian, La Union, in the Phillipines. His family moved to the United States in 1931 and to Seattle in 1941. Laigo's full name Valeriano Emerenciano Montante Laigo.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 3 digital wav files. Duration is 1 hr., 48 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Painters -- Washington (State) -- Seattle  Search this
Topic:
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Computer Art  Search this
Filipino American art  Search this
Filipino American artists  Search this
Asian American painters  Search this
Asian American muralists  Search this
Muralists -- Mexico  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.laigo89
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw90a8fb211-d3b2-4e6d-9727-b2bc260466e6
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-laigo89
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Val Laigo, 1989 July 12

Interviewee:
Laigo, Val M., 1930-1992  Search this
Laigo, Val M., 1930-1992  Search this
Interviewer:
Nakane, Kazuko  Search this
Subject:
Lau, Alan Chong  Search this
Bennett, Doug  Search this
Callahan, Kenneth  Search this
Chong, Fay  Search this
Dusanne, Zoe  Search this
Horiuchi, Paul  Search this
Jones, Quincy  Search this
Katayama, Mits  Search this
Nordness, Lee  Search this
Okada, Frank S. (Frank Sumio)  Search this
Orozco, José Clemente  Search this
Picasso, Pablo  Search this
Ritchie, Bill  Search this
Rivera, Diego  Search this
Siqueiros, David Alfaro  Search this
Tamayo, Rufino  Search this
Voorhees, Clark G. (Clark Greenwood)  Search this
Washington, James W.  Search this
Charles and Emma Frye Art Museum  Search this
Foster/White Gallery  Search this
Mexico City College  Search this
Seattle University  Search this
University of Washington  Search this
Northwest Asian American Project  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Computer Art  Search this
Filipino American art  Search this
Filipino American artists  Search this
Asian American painters  Search this
Asian American muralists  Search this
Muralists -- Mexico  Search this
Theme:
Asian American  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12747
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)224926
AAA_collcode_laigo89
Theme:
Asian American
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_224926
Online Media:

Edward Melcarth papers, [ca. 1930-1974]

Creator:
Melcarth, Edward, 1914-1973  Search this
Melcarth, Edward, 1914-1973  Search this
Topic:
Literary miscellany  Search this
Sound recordings  Search this
Theme:
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)7865
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)210032
AAA_collcode_melcedwa
Theme:
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_210032

Dollars for Research: Science and its Patrons in Nineteenth-Century America

Author:
Miller, Howard Smith  Search this
Subject:
Agassiz, Louis 1807-1873  Search this
Henry, Joseph 1797-1878  Search this
Tyndall, John 1820-1893  Search this
Date:
1970
Topic:
American science  Search this
Astronomy  Search this
Benefactors  Search this
Education  Search this
Science--History  Search this
Paleontology  Search this
Endowments  Search this
Scientific Lazzaroni  Search this
SI, Early History  Search this
Publisher:
Seattle: University of Washington Press
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sic_3347

Edward Melcarth papers

Creator:
Melcarth, Edward, 1914-1973  Search this
Extent:
7.3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
[ca. 1930-1974]
Scope and Contents:
Biographical information, photographs, correspondence, writings, works of art, printed material, sound recordings and miscellany regarding Edward Melcarth. Photographs are of Melcarth, family, friends, and his work, as well as photographs taken by Melcarth, mostly in the 1940's and 1950's, of Coney Island, New York City, Venice, Germany, and subjects Peggy Guggenheim, Sam Wagstaff, Eugene Berman, John La Touche, Anabelle Gamson and Walter Steumpfig. Correspondence between Melcarth and his mother regard his acquaintences Peggy and Hazel Guggenheim, and Norman Parkinson. Other correspondents include Gore Vidal and Gael Greene, New York magazine food critic, and artist Richard Taddei. Also included are letters from artists Lief Anderson, Peter Carello, Pablo Pristeno, Ernst Teves, from playwright William Inge, from actors George Maharis, Ronald Staba and Joseph Newlin, Henry Allen Moe, R. Kirk Askew, agent John Schafner, and Charles B. Moses. Writings include 146 manuscripts of Melcarth's short stories, novels, poems, song lyrics, essays, books and travel articles for the New York Sun. Works of art include sketchbooks and loose sketches. Printed material consists of scrapbooks, clippings, exhibition catalogs and announcements. Sound recordings consist of interviews and speeches by Melcarth on 4 sound tape reels and 2 cassettes. Also included are a list of Melcarth's works sold by Durlacher Bros., 1948-1962, with price and purchaser, Melcarth's will, and a surrogate court statement on his personal property.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter, photographer, educator, writer; New York, N.Y. Born Edward Epstein, 1914, in Louisville, Kentucky. Studied in London, Paris and at Harvard. Taught at Parsons School of Design, Columbia University, University of Washington (Seattle), University of Louisville and the Educational Alliance Art School. Melcarth died in 1973.
Provenance:
Donated 1971 by Edward Melcarth, in 1977 and 1978 by a friend, Robert Morgan, in 2000 by Albert La Tucha, a friend of Melcarth's and in 2007 by Richard Taddei, Melcarth's fromer student.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Identifier:
AAA.melcedwa
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-melcedwa

James B. Watson papers

Creator:
Watson, Virginia  Search this
Watson, James B. (James Bennett), 1918-2009  Search this
Extent:
52.5 Linear feet (123 boxes)
47 sound recordings
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Correspondence
Books
Programs
Field notes
Maps
Punched cards
Journals (periodicals)
Grant proposals
Photographs
Articles
Lecture notes
Place:
Papua New Guinea
Brazil
Mato Grosso (Brazil : State)
Papua New Guinea -- Social life and customs
Date:
1904-1998
bulk 1933-1987
Summary:
This collection contains the professional papers of cultural anthropologist James B. Watson, and documents his fieldwork in Papua New Guinea, Brazil, and Del Norte, Co., as well as his teaching career at the University of Washington. Included are field notes, lecture notes, correspondence, maps, photographs, books, articles, journals, grant proposals, surveys, data punch cards, conference materials, and sound recordings.
Scope and Contents:
This collection is comprised of the professional papers of James B. Watson, the bulk of which relate to his research and academic work on the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea. The series are Research, Writings, Correspondence, Professional Activities, University Files, Biographical Files, Maps, Photographs, and Sound Recordings.

The Research series contains Watson's research on Hopi food classification systems in Arizona, Cayua acculturation in Brazil, social stratification between English-speaking and Spanish-speaking residents of Del Norte, Co., numerous research projects in Papua New Guinea, and gift exchange theories.

The Arizona, Hopi Food Classification Systems subseries consists of his research among the Hopi in Arizona, primarily on their food classication systems. Included are field notes and reports.

The Mato Grosso, Brazil and Cayua Acculturation subseries consists of research materials conducted while Watson was working as an assistant professor in Sao Paulo. Included are field notes, bibliographies, a journal, and a language notebook primarily regarding his research on culture change among the Cayua.

The Del Norte, Colorado Surveys subseries contains material related to research conducted in the summers of 1949 and 1950 as part of a study on social stratification between English-speaking and Spanish-speaking residents of Del Norte. Included are datasets from several community surveys on education, occupations, business, and cultural attitudes, along with research notes and background materials.

The Papua New Guinea subseries consists of research materials on the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea. Included are field notes, language materials, bibliographies, grant documents and research proposals, genealogy data, long reports and patrol reports, data punch cards, and TAT (thematic apperception test) protocols. There is material from several research projects including the Committee on New Guinea Studies (CONGS), the Kainantu Blood Group Study, and the New Guinea Religions Project. Watson's wife, Virginia Drew Watson, also has research material in this series. Language documentation include lexicons and notes about Agarabi, Auyana, Awa, Tairora, Gadsup, and Tok Pisin.

The subsubseries Micro-evolution Studies Project (MES) consists of related Papua New Guinea research as part of this multi-year project. Material included is correspondence, financial documents, memorandums and planning documents, grant proposals, language files, and work papers.

The Gift Exchange Theories subseries consists of Watson's research on gift exchange theories, primarily as they relate to small autonomous peoples. The material consists of research notes, paper ideas, bibliographies, and grant applications.

The Other Research subseries consists of papers and research that are not easily catagorized. Included are subject files on perception, notes and critiques of Marshal Sahlins's Stone Age Economics, and a research project by Watson studying innovation in high school social studies curriculum.

The Writings series primarily consists of journal articles produced over the duration of his career. Included are research notes, drafts, and some correspondence. A print copy is included where possible. There is significant material related to his book Tairora Culture, including chapter drafts, outlines, and reader comments. The writings by others are primarily annotated copies of articles, rare and small print-run items, or manuscripts by others sent to Watson for comment.

The Correspondence series contains professional and personal correspondence with Watson's colleagues and contemporaries in the field, including J. David Cole, Terence Hays, Paula Brown-Glick, Richard Lieban, Howard P. McKaughan, Harold Nelson, Kerry Pataki-Schweizer, Kenneth E. Read, Sterling Robbins, and Roy Wagner. Topics include his academic career, student dissertations, research grants and fellowships, and research related to Papua New Guinea, and in particular the Micro-evolution Studies project.

The Professional Activities series primarily consists of conference notes, papers, presentations, and symposium documents. Included are materials for the American Anthropological Association, the Association for Social Anthropology in Oceania, the Pacific Sciences Conference, as well as symposiums held at the East-West Center in Honolulu, Hawaii. Some of the files are related to specific symposiums Watson attended or helped to organize, the bulk of which are related to Papua New Guinea. Also included are Watson's lecture notes, and materials related to the United Nations West Irian Development Plan

The University Files series contains material related to Watson's academic career. The bulk of the files are course materials from the classes he taught at the Univesity of Washington, which include lecture notes, syllabi, exams, and student papers. Other materials includes student dissertation files and some of Watson's course work from the University of Chicago.

The Biographical Files series includes numerous editions of his curriculum vitae and bibliographies.

The Maps series contains maps used in Watson's research, which includes Brazil; Del Norte, Co.; and Papua New Guinea. The bulk are maps of Papua New Guinea, and include published maps, annotated maps, hand-drawn maps, patrol reports, and linguistic maps.

The Photographs series contains photographs of Watson's fieldwork and professional career. The bulk of his fieldwork photographs are from Del Norte, Co. and Papua New Guinea. The Del Norte photographs include aerial images along with photographs of residents, houses, and cultural activities. The photographs from Papua New Guinea include images of a taro garden, a woman before and at her marriage ceremony, and images of tools found at an excavation site near the Wahgi Valley.

The sound recordings contain seven identified recordings made in the Papua New Guinea Eastern Highlands, Kainantu District during James and Virginia Watson's first trip, 1954-1955. Also included are 31 recordings of lectures and classes by James Watson and others, two recordings of popular music, and six reels recorded at the Pacific Science Congress in Tokyo in 1966. The remaining 23 uncataloged recordings are unidentified or partially identified.

Please see individual series descriptions in the finding aid for additional information.
Arrangement note:
This collection is arranged in 9 series:

Series1: Research, 1933-1993

Series 2: Writings, 1904-1995

Series 3: Correspondence, 1933-1994

Series 4: Professional Activities, 1944-1998

Series 5: University Files, 1939-1991

Series 6: Biographical Files, 1941-1991

Series 7: Maps, circa 1920s-1970

Series 8: Photographs, circa 1942-1977

Series 9: Sound Recordings, 1954-1984
Biographical/Historical note:
James B. Watson (1918-2009) was a cultural anthropologist and university professor. He is primarily known for his ethnographic studies of the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea, with a concentration on acculturation. He taught at the University of Washington, was the prinicipal investigator for the Micro-evolution Studies project (MES), and the author of numerous journal articles and books.

Watson was born in Chicago, Ill., and raised in Bangor, Maine. He studied anthropology at the University of Chicago, earning his B.A. in 1941; his M.A. in 1945; and his Ph.D. in 1948. Fred Eggan acted as his advisor while he was pursuing his doctorate. He began his teaching career as an assistant professor at the Escala Livre de Sociologia e Politica, Sao Paulo (1944-1945); Beloit College (1945-1946); University of Oklahoma (1946-1947); and as an associate professor at Washington University in St. Louis (1947-1955). He then became a full professor of anthropology at the University of Washington (1955-1987), where he spent the majority of his career.

His ethnographic research began with his fieldwork among the Hopi in Arizona in 1942. He researched Hopi food classification systems, which would become the subject of his master's thesis. Watson would next study the effects of acculturation among the Cayua people in Mato Grosso, Brazil in 1943-1945. This research would become the basis of his dissertation, later to be published as Cayua Culture Change: A Study in Acculturation and Methodology. His wife, anthropologist Virginia Drew Watson, accompanied him and conducted her own research. While at Washington University, he directed fieldwork in the summers of 1949 and 1950 in Del Norte, Co., conducting several community surveys on education, occupations, business, and cultural attitudes. These surveys were part of a larger study on social stratification between English-speaking and Spanish-speaking residents of Del Norte.

Watson is most noted for his work in the Papua New Guinea Highlands, where he was one of the first generation of Highland ethnographers. Along with Virginia Drew Watson, he studied the Kainantu peoples of the Eastern Highlands including the Tairora, the Gadsup, the Auyana, and the Awa. He was involved in several research projects, including the Committee on New Guinea Studies (CONGS), The Kainantu Blood Group Study, and the New Guinea Religions Project.

He was also the principal investigator for the Micro-evolution Studies project (1959-1968) where he directed a team of researchers examining the interconnections of the Kainantu peoples from the perspectives of ethnography, linguistics, archaeology, and physical anthropology. Other MES researchers include Kenneth E. Read, Robert A. Littlewood, Howard McKaughan, Kerry J. Pataki-Schweizer, and Sterling Robbins. This research on Papua New Guinea is best described in his book Tairora Culture: Contingency and Pragmatism (1983).

He was professionally active, attending and organizing sessions at annual meetings for the American Anthropological Association (AAA) and the Association for Social Anthropology in Oceania (ASAO). He also organized symposiums at the East-West Center in Honolulu, Hawaii. Additionally, he served as a consultant to the United Nations on their West Irian Development Plan in 1967. Watson retired from teaching in 1987, but continued to publish and remain involved in AAA and ASAO. He died in 2009.

Sources Consulted: 1999 Westermark, George. ASAO Honorary Fellow: James B. Watson. Association for Social Anthropology in Oceania Newsletter 104: 21

Chronology

1918 -- Born on August 10 in Chicago, Illinois

1941 -- B.A. in anthropology, University of Chicago Lecturer, University of Chicago

1941-1942 -- Fieldwork: Hopi

1943 -- Married Virgina Drew Fieldwork: Mato Grosso, Brazil

1943-1945 -- Fieldwork: Brazil

1944-1945 -- Assistant Professor, Escala Livre de Sociologia e Politica, Sao Paulo, Brazil

1945 -- M.A. in anthropology, University of Chicago

1945-1946 -- Assistant Professor, Beloit College

1946-1947 -- Assistant Professor, University of Oklahoma

1947-1955 -- Associate Professor, Washington University in St. Louis

1948 -- Ph.D. in anthropology, University of Chicago

1949-1950 -- Director, Washington University summer field project

1949-1950 -- Fieldwork: Del Norte, Colorado

1953-1955 -- Fieldwork: Eastern Highlands, Papua New Guinea

1955-1987 -- Professor of Anthropology, University of Washington

1959 -- Fieldwork: Papua New Guinea and Netherlands New Guinea

1959-1968 -- Principal Investigator, New Guinea Micro-evolution Studies Project

1963-1964 -- Fieldwork: Eastern Highlands, Papua New Guinea

1966-1967 -- Senior Specialist, Institute of Advanced Projects, East-West Center

1967 -- Consultant for United Nations Development Programme, West Irian

1967 -- Fieldwork: West Irian (Indonesia)

1987 -- Retired from teaching at University of Washington

2009 -- Died on November 12
Related Materials:
The National Anthropological Archives also holds the papers of Virginia D. Watson.

Mandeville Special Collections Library, UCSD holds the Micro-evolution Project Papers, MSS 436.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by James Watson's daughter, Anne Watson, in 2003.
Restrictions:
Some research proposals not authored by Watson are restricted until 2083.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Ethnology -- Brazil  Search this
Ethnology -- Papua New Guinea  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Correspondence
Books
Programs
Field notes
Maps
Punched cards
Journals (periodicals)
Grant Proposals
Photographs
Articles
Lecture notes
Citation:
James B. Watson papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.2003-15
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James B. Watson papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
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