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The Garden Club of America collection

Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Names:
New York Flower Show  Search this
Extent:
37,000 Slides (35mm slides)
33 Linear feet ((garden files))
3,000 Lantern slides
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Slides
Lantern slides
Plans (drawings)
Brochures
Articles
Correspondence
Clippings
Slides (photographs)
Date:
circa 1920-present
Summary:
This collection contains over 37,000 35mm slides, 3,000 glass lantern slides and garden files that may include descriptive information, photocopied articles (from journals, newspapers, or books), planting lists, correspondence, brochures, landscape plans and drawings. Garden files were compiled by Garden Club of America (GCA) members for most of the gardens included in the collection. Some gardens have been photographed over the course of several decades; others only have images from a single point in time. In addition to images of American gardens, there are glass lantern slides of the New York Flower Show (1941-1951) and trips that GCA members took to other countries, including Mexico (1937), Italy, Spain, Japan (1935), France (1936), England (1929), and Scotland.

A number of the slides are copies of historic images from outside repositories including horticultural and historical societies or from horticultural books and publications. The GCA made a concerted effort in the mid-1980s to acquire these images in order to increase its documentation of American garden history. Because of copyright considerations, use of these particular images may be restricted.
Biographical/Historical note:
The Garden Club of America was established in 1913 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, when the Garden Club of Philadelphia and eleven other garden clubs met to create a national garden club. Its purpose is to foster the knowledge and love of gardening and to restore and protect the quality of the environment through educational programs and gardening and conservation efforts. The GCA was incorporated in Delaware in 1923, with its headquarters established in New York City. Today, local clubs are organized under twelve regional zones. The GCA continues its tradition of hosting flower shows and publishing material related to gardening in the United States.

The GCA's glass lantern slides were used by The GCA for presentations and lectures about notable gardens throughout the United States dating back to colonial times. An effort was made in the late 1980s, in preparation of the 75th anniversary of the Garden Club of America's founding, to collect the disbursed slides. These slides were to eventually form the Slide Library of Notable American Parks and Gardens. The informational value of this collection is extensive since a number of images of the more than 4,500 gardens represented show garden designs that have changed over time or no longer exist. While the majority of images document a range of designed upper and upper-middle class gardens throughout the U.S., the scope of the collection is expanding as volunteers photograph and document contemporary gardens including community and vernacular gardens.

The gardens illustrate the design work of dozens of landscape architects including Marian Coffin, Beatrix Farrand, Lawrence Halprin, Hare & Hare, Umberto Innocenti, Gertrude Jekyll, Jens Jensen, Warren Manning, the Olmsted Brothers, Charles Platt, Ellen Biddle Shipman, and Fletcher Steele. Because of their proximity to the gardens, works of notable architects and sculptors may also be featured in the images.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- France  Search this
Gardens -- Italy  Search this
Gardens -- Japan  Search this
Gardens -- Mexico  Search this
Flower shows  Search this
Gardening -- United States -- societies, etc  Search this
Gardens -- England  Search this
Landscape architecture  Search this
Gardens -- United States  Search this
Gardens -- Spain  Search this
Gardens -- Scotland  Search this
Genre/Form:
Plans (drawings)
Brochures
Articles
Correspondence
Clippings
Lantern slides
Slides (photographs)
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aag-gca
Online Media:

Swing Low

Created by:
Richard Hunt, American, born 1935  Search this
Commissioned by:
National Museum of African American History and Culture, American, founded 2003  Search this
Medium:
bronze
Dimensions:
Overall with Weight: 1500 lb. (680.4 kg)
Type:
installations (sculpture)
Date:
2016
Topic:
African American  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Art  Search this
Museums  Search this
Spirituals (Music)  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Richard Hunt
Object number:
2017.63
Restrictions & Rights:
© Richard Hunt
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Visual Arts
On View:
NMAAHC (1400 Constitution Ave NW), National Mall Location, First Floor, 1 050
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd597c0cbc4-07f2-4c96-948c-fce8bccf83af
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2017.63
Online Media:

Cambridge -- Brown Street Green Garden

Provenance:
Cambridge Plant and Garden Club  Search this
Former owner:
Howard, Emily  Search this
Nichols, Abbie  Search this
Sculptor:
Seamans, Beverly Benson  Search this
Donor:
Child, Julia, 1912-2004  Search this
Nurseryman:
Haskell, Allen C.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital images
Place:
Brown Street Green Garden (Cambridge, Massachusetts)
United States of America -- Massachusetts -- Middlesex -- Cambridge
Scope and Contents:
1 folder and 20 digital images.
General:
The owner's first project after obtaining the one-third acre garden in 1951 was to create a private space with tall wooden fences in back and trees: hemlock, spruce, pine, kousa dogwood, holly and amur cork. The front yard lawn has a granite boulder set in one side of a wide brick walk with hawthorn and cork on the other side, spreading yew mixed with pink and white azaleas in the foundation bed of the gray stucco Cape Cod house, and antique lead containers with seasonal planting. Alongside and behind the house there are three areas: the entry borders, the terrace and lawn, and the wildflower garden. A decorative gate painted yellow-green opens to the entry garden with mixed borders: yew and holly foundation plants, witch hazel, crabapple and Cornelian cherry dogwood for late winter and early spring bloom, mixed spring bulbs and a white Japanese tree peony, and hosta and colorful annuals in summer. A low mound of Japanese maple marks off the corner granite terrace added in 1960 that is surrounded by beds of flowering shrubs, spring bulbs, black-eyed Susan and verbena in summer, shaded by kousa dogwood and hemlock. Climbing hydrangea and akebia have grown up the cedar stockade fence. There is a bench copying one seen in Denmark made from a thick teak plank set between two granite cubes and other decorative features.

A stretch of lawn leads to a shady wildflower garden planted with ferns, Solomon's seal, European ginger, many bulbs including scilla, fritillary, trout lily, trillium and narcissus; spring flowering shrubs and white oak-leaf hydrangea, and yew, hemlock, holly and a very tall ash for shade. There are two beehives behind the house that provide honey for the owner. Additions to the house include a deck and bluestone patio where there are two sculptures by Beverly Seamans: Walter the Poodle and Roger the Red, a Rhode Island red rooster. Trees and shrubs are the mainstays of this garden and provide changing colors each season, from flowering white and yellow in spring and summer to red and yellow leaves in autumn. The owner has employed knowledge about gardening gleaned from guided walks through the Arnold Arboretum with Dr. Donald Wyman and her certification from Radcliffe in landscape design in her plant selection, color coordination, placement and maintenance for a garden that is naturalistic yet elegant. She has been a professional landscape consultant for private and larger civic and commercial gardens and has instigated beautification projects in Cambridge.

Persons associated with the garden include: Emily Howard (former owner, 1914-c.1928); Abbie Nichols (former owner, c.1928-1951); Beverly Benson Seamans (1928-2012) (sculptor, no dates available); Julia Child (donor of garden decorations, 2001); Allen Haskell (nurseryman, no dates available).
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Massachusetts -- Cambridge  Search this
Genre/Form:
Digital images
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File MA640
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Massachusetts
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref32891

Lowell Nesbitt papers

Creator:
Nesbitt, Lowell, 1933-1993  Search this
Names:
Indiana, Robert, 1928-  Search this
Johns, Jasper, 1930-  Search this
Mitchell, Jack, 1925-  Search this
Warhol, Andy, 1928- -- Photographs  Search this
Extent:
50.2 Linear feet
0.001 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Sketchbooks
Drawings
Scrapbooks
Video recordings
Paintings
Sound recordings
Photographs
Designs
Collages
Prints
Date:
circa 1903-1993
bulk 1950-1993
Summary:
The papers of painter, photographer and sculptor Lowell Nesbitt measure 50.2 linear feet and 0.001 GB and date from circa 1903-1993 (bulk 1950-1993). The collection documents Nesbitt's career through biographical material, correspondence, subject files, business and financial records, source material, artwork, photographs and audiovisual records, printed material and scrapbooks.
Scope and Contents note:
The papers of painter, photographer and sculptor Lowell Nesbitt measure 50.2 linear feet and 0.001 GB and date from circa 1903-1993 (bulk 1950-1993). The collection documents Nesbitt's career through biographical material, correspondence, subject files, business and financial records, source material, artwork, printed and digital matter, photographs and audiovisual records and scrapbooks.

Biographical Material includes documentation of Nesbitt's education and other personal documents. Plans and designs for Nesbitt's properties on West Twelfth Street, New York City and Kent, New York are arranged in the series for architectural records for homes and studios

Correspondence and Subject Files are voluminous and record Nesbitt's interaction with individuals, businesses and organizations and includes personal and family correspondence in addition to correspondence relating to galleries, exhibitions, commissions he undertook and committees on which he served.

Artwork by Nesbitt includes a small collection of collages, drawings, paintings, prints and sketchbooks. Source material comprises approximately 11 linear feet of material, primarily newspaper and magazine clippings and photographs, relating to a large variety of subjects that inspired Nesbitt, such as flowers, fruits and vegetables, dogs and other animals and the studios of other artists including Robert Indiana, Jasper Johns and Andy Warhol.

Photographs are of Nesbitt, his friends, family, colleagues and his pets, as well as subjects of interest to him in his work. Also of note are twenty-seven folders of photographs taken by photographer Jack Mitchell of Nesbitt and others.

Printed Material contains publicity material and documents exhibitions of Nesbitt's work. Additional photographs and printed material are found in the Scrapbooks.
Arrangement note:
The collection is arranged as 11 series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1932-1988 (Boxes 1, 40, OV 58; 1.0 linear ft.)

Series 2: Architectural Records for Homes and Studios, 1977-1992 (Boxes 1-2, 40; 1.0 linear ft.)

Series 3: Notes and Writings, 1981-1990 (Boxes 2-3; 1.0 linear ft.)

Series 4: Calendars and Addressess, 1973-1993 (Boxes 3-5; 1.25 linear ft.)

Series 5: Correspondence and Subject Files, 1940-circa 1990s (Boxes 5-12, 40, OV 51; 8.0 linear feet, ER01; 0.001 GB)

Series 6: Business and Financial Records, circa 1910-1993 (Boxes 12-14; 2.0 linear ft.)

Series 7: Artwork, circa 1948-1989 (Boxes 15-16, 41-42, OVs 52, 55; 2.0 linear ft.)

Series 8: Source Material, 1965-circa 1990s (Boxes 16-26, 43-45, OV 53; 12.0 linear ft.)

Series 9: Photographs and Audiovisual Records, 1965-circa 1990s (Boxes 16-26, 43-46, OV 53, FC 76-78; 12.3 linear ft.)

Series 10: Printed Material, circa 1960s-circa 1990s (Boxes 37-39, 45, OVs 48-50, 54, 56, 60; 3.05 linear feet

Series 11: Scrapbooks, 1964-1992 (Boxes 61-75; 6.6 linear feet)
Biographical/Historical note:
Painter, photographer, and sculptor Lowell Nesbitt worked primarily in New York City.

Lowell Nesbitt was born in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1933. In college he studied stained glass and printmaking, graduating from the Tyler School of Art at Temple University in Philadelphia in 1955 and attending the Royal College of Art in London from 1955 to 1956.

After serving for several years in the United States Army in the mid 1950s, Nesbitt received his first exhibition at the Baltimore Museum of Art in 1958. By 1963 he had moved to New York City and by the 1970s had emerged as one of the most well known artists in the United States. Nesbitt was frequently grouped with the photo realists and was best known for more than four hundred works he created with the flower as his central theme. In addition to flowers, Nesbitt's subjects included studio interiors, dogs, fruits and vegetables, bridges and buildings in New York, and male nudes. He began experimenting with printmaking in the 1960s and produced more than a hundred original prints in the course of his lifetime, primarily in the medium of dry point engraving. In 1963 he began a series of x-ray inspired paintings and was credited with being the first artist to produce a body of work of this kind. During the same period he began a long-standing relationship with the Howard Wise Gallery in New York, a space known for it's devotion to art and new technology.

In 1969 and 1970 the National Aeronautics and Space Administration named Nesbitt the official artist of the Apollo 9 and Apollo 13 missions. In 1980 the United States Postal Service released a series of four postage stamps based on his floral paintings.

Following a major one-man show at the Corcoran Gallery in Washington, DC in 1964, Nesbitt's work was exhibitied widely in Europe and the United States. In New York City he was represented by the Stable Gallery, the Robert Stefanotti Gallery and the Andrew Crispo Gallery. In the late 1960s and early 1970s Nesbitt taught at Towson State and Morgan State Colleges in Maryland, and the School of Visual Arts in New York.

Nesbitt was active in the National Multiple Sclerosis Society from the early 1980s until his death, serving as co-chairman on the Society's annual juried Project Rembrandt exhibition for artists with multiple sclerosis. He was also actively involved in fundraising for artists with HIV/AIDS.

Nesbitt's work is represented in many major museum collections including the Art Institute of Chicago, Baltimore Museum of Art, Bibliotheque Nationale (Paris), Corcoran Gallery, Detroit Institute of Art, Hirshhorn Museum, Museum of Modern Art, and the National Gallery.

Lowell Nesbitt died in 1993 at the age of 59.
Provenance:
A portion of the papers were donated by Lowell Nesbitt in 1984 and the bulk of the papers were a bequest from Nesbitt's estate in 1994.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Photographers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Artists' studios -- Photographs  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Drawings
Scrapbooks
Video recordings
Paintings
Sound recordings
Photographs
Designs
Collages
Prints
Citation:
Lowell Nesbitt papers, circa 1903-1993 (bulk 1950-1993). Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.nesblowe
See more items in:
Lowell Nesbitt papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-nesblowe

"Sculptors of United States Coins," Chase Manhattan Money Museum

Collection Creator:
Beach, Chester, 1881-1956  Search this
Container:
Box 3, Folder 16
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1968
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information. Glass plate negatives are housed separately and closed to researchers.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Chester Beach papers, 1846-1999, bulk circa 1900-1999. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Chester Beach papers
Chester Beach papers / Series 5: Correspondence / 5.2: Estate Correspondence and Related Documents / Exhibitions
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-beacches-ref246

Tomás Oliva papers

Creator:
Oliva, Tomás, 1930-1996  Search this
Names:
Díaz Peláez, José Antonio  Search this
Levy-Angulo, Cyndee  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Sketches
Date:
circa 1969-1996
Summary:
This small collection of papers of Cuban born sculptor and painter Tomás Oliva measure 0.2 linear feet and date from circa 1969-1996. Found among the papers are a chronology; life documents; exhibition catalogs, including one from the 1993 exhibition of three of the original Los Once Cuban artist's group forty years after their first exhibition in Havana; one letter from Cyndee Levy-Angulo; notes and poetry; a photograph of Oliva with José Antonio Díaz Peláez; photographs of sculpture, two sketchbooks; and loose sketches and doodles.
Scope and Contents:
This small collection of papers of Cuban born sculptor and painter Tomás Oliva measure 0.2 linear feet and date from circa 1969-1996. Found among the papers are a chronology; life documents; exhibition catalogs, including one from the 1993 exhibition of three of the original Los Once Cuban artist's group forty years after their first exhibition in Havana; one letter from Cyndee Levy-Angulo; notes and poetry; a photograph of Oliva with José Antonio Díaz Peláez; photographs of sculpture, two sketchbooks; and loose sketches and doodles.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 1 series.

Series 1: Tomás Oliva Papers, circa 1969-1996 (Box 1; 0.2 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Tomás Oliva (1930-1996) was a Cuban born sculptor, painter, and printmaker who worked in Havana up to the mid or late 1970s before relocating to Miami, Florida.

Born in 1930 in Havana, Cuba, Oliva graduated from the San Alejandro Academy in Havana in 1952 with a dual degree in painting and sculpture. He also attended the Royal School of Ceramic La Moncloa in Spain and Ecole du Mosaic de Ravene et Ceramique de Faienze in Paris France. He also studied art and film animation with Ivan Zeiler and stage design with Ladislav Vihodil while living in Havana.

Oliva was one of the founding members of the Cuban artists' group Los Once (The Eleven), active in Havana between 1953 and 1955. Los Once consisted of 11 painters and sculptors-Pancho Antigua, René Avila, José Ignacio Bermudez, Agustin Cárdenas, Hugo Consuegra, Viredo Espinosa, Guido Llinás, Fayad Jamís, Tomás Oliva, José Antonio Díaz Peláez, and Antonio Vidal.

In the mid to late 1970s, Oliva relocated to Miami, Florida and regularly exhibited there and across the United States, Canada, Brazil, Mexico, Spain, Europe, and Japan.
Provenance:
The Tomás Oliva papers were donated to the Archives of American Art by Xiomara Almaguer-Levy in 1998.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- Cuba -- Havana  Search this
Painters -- Florida -- Miami  Search this
Topic:
Latino and Latin American artists  Search this
Sculptors -- Cuba -- Havana  Search this
Sculptors -- Florida -- Miami  Search this
Cuban American art  Search this
Artists -- Cuba  Search this
Expatriate artists -- Florida -- Miami  Search this
Cuban American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Sketches
Citation:
Tomás Oliva papers, circa 1969-1996. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.olivtoma
See more items in:
Tomás Oliva papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-olivtoma

Oliver Pollock Fountain and Monument, (sculpture)

Sculptor:
Hayden, Frank 1934-1988  Search this
Subject:
Pollock, Oliver  Search this
Medium:
Sculpture: bronze; Base: concrete
Type:
Sculptures-Outdoor Sculpture
Sculptures-Fountain
Sculptures-Relief
Sculptures
Owner/Location:
Administered by City of Baton Rouge Public Works 444 St. Louis Street Baton Rouge Louisiana 70802
Located Galvez Plaza Baton Rouge Louisiana
Date:
1979
Topic:
History--United States--Louisiana  Search this
Portrait male--Head  Search this
Occupation--Military--Soldier  Search this
Figure group  Search this
Object--Weapon--Cannon  Search this
Control number:
IAS LA000321
Data Source:
Art Inventories Catalog, Smithsonian American Art Museums
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_ari_327988

Armistead Peter, Jr. papers relating to Paul W. Bartlett

Creator:
Peter, Armistead, 1870-1960  Search this
Names:
Bartlett, Paul Wayland, 1865-1925  Search this
Extent:
1 Microfilm reel (12 items on partial microfilm reel)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Microfilm reels
Date:
1920-1925
Scope and Contents:
The microfilmed Armistead Peter, Jr. Papers relating to Paul W. Bartlett contain scattered correspondence between Armistead Peter, Jr. And Paul Wayland Bartlett regarding family matters and a gift of a bronze eagle (1920-1925); and printed materials, cincluding news clippings and a program about Bartlett's statue of Benjamin Franklin (1921), as well as two published articles about Bartlett (1923 and 1925).
Biographical / Historical:
Armistead Peter, Jr. (1870-1960) was father-in-law to Caroline Ogden-Jones Peter(1894-1965), who was the daughter of Suzanne Bartlett and stepdaughter of sculptor Paul Wayland Bartlett (1865-1925).
Related Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds the microfilmed Paul Wayland Bartlett papers, 1887-1925; the microfilmed Suzanne Bartlett papers relating to Paul W. Bartlett, circa 1883-1950s; and the microfilmed Caroline Ogden-Jones Peter papers relating to Paul W. Bartlett, 1955-1965. The Library of Congress Manuscript Division holds the Paul Wayland Bartlett papers, 1875-1959.
Provenance:
Lent for microfilming by The Tudor Place Foundation, Inc. in 1994 along with the Paul Wayland Bartlett papers, and papers of Suzanne Bartlett and Caroline Ogden-Jones relating to Paul W. Bartlett (each group has been cataloged separately). The Tudor Place Foundation, Inc. inherited these papers in 1984 with the estate of Armistead Peter III of Tudor Place.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Sculptors -- United States  Search this
Topic:
Sculpture, American  Search this
Sculpture, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.petearmi
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-petearmi

Caroline Ogden-Jones Peter papers relating to Paul W. Bartlett

Creator:
Peter, Caroline Ogden-Jones, 1894-1965  Search this
Names:
Bartlett, Paul Wayland, 1865-1925  Search this
Extent:
2 Microfilm reels (1.5 linear feet on 2 microfilm reels)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Microfilm reels
Date:
1955-1965
Scope and Contents:
The microfilmed Caroline Ogden-Jones Peter papers relating to Paul W. Bartlett contain correspondence, lists, inventories, photographs and printed materials (1955-1965) regarding Caroline Peter's distribution of Paul Wayland Bartlett's sculpture and manuscripts to museums, galleries, universities, and other institutions across the United States.
Biographical / Historical:
Caroline Ogden-Jones Peter (1894-1965) was the daughter of Suzanne Bartlett (1861-1954) and her first husband Mahlon Ogden-Jones. Suzanne Bartlett later married sculptor Paul Wayland Bartlett (1865-1925). Caroline Peter inherited the work of Paul W. Bartlett upon her mother's death in 1954 and later distributed his work to various museums and institutions across the country.
Related Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds the microfilmed Paul Wayland Bartlett papers, 1887-1925; the microfilmed Suzanne Bartlett papers relating to Paul W. Bartlett, circa 1883-1950s; and the microfilmed Armistead Peter, Jr. papers relating to Paul W. Bartlett, 1920-1925. The Library of Congress Manuscript Division holds the Paul Wayland Bartlett papers, 1875-1959.
Provenance:
Lent for microfilming 1994 by The Tudor Place Foundation, Inc. along with the Paul Wayland Bartlett Papers, and papers of Suzanne Bartlett and Armistead Peter, Jr. relating to Paul W. Bartlett (each group has been cataloged separately). The Tudor Place Foundation, Inc. inherited the papers in 1984 with the estate of Armistead Peter III, husband of Caroline Odgen-Jones, daughter of Suzanne Bartlett and stepdaughter of Paul W. Bartlett.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Sculptors -- United States  Search this
Topic:
Sculpture, American  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.petecaro
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-petecaro

Suzanne Bartlett papers relating to Paul W. Bartlett

Creator:
Bartlett, Suzanne Earle Ogden-Jones Emmons, 1861-1954  Search this
Names:
Bartlett, Paul Wayland, 1865-1925  Search this
Extent:
1 Microfilm reel (0.4 linear feet on partial microfilm reel)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Microfilm reels
Date:
circa 1883-1950s
Scope and Contents:
The microfilmed Suzanne Bartlett papers relating to Paul W. Bartlett contain correspondence regarding Paul Wayland Bartlett's sculpture and his illness and death (1925-1931) and printed material. Printed material includes a biography of Bartlett; inventories and lists of his works; exhibition catalogs; newspaper clippings; and other printed matter.
Biographical / Historical:
Suzanne Bartlett (1861-1954) married sculptor Paul Wayland Bartlett in 1913. They lived mostly in France, but also in Washington, D.C. and New York. She helped him in his work, and after his death in 1925, went on to arrange exhibitions of his work, and had numerous pieces recast and sold to benefit a proposed memorial studio (never executed).
Related Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds the microfilmed Paul Wayland Bartlett papers, 1887-1925; the microfilmed Caroline Ogden-Jones Peter papers relating to Paul W. Bartlett, 1955-1965; and the microfilmed Armistead Peter, Jr. papers relating to Paul W. Bartlett, 1920-1925. The Library of Congress Manuscript Division holds the Paul Wayland Bartlett papers, 1875-1959.
Provenance:
Lent for microfilming 1994 by The Tudor Place Foundation, Inc. along with the papers of Paul Wayland Bartlett, and papers of Caroline Ogden-Jones Peter and Armistead Peter, Jr. relating to Paul W. Bartlett (each group has been cataloged separately). The Tudor Place Foundation, Inc. inherited the papers in 1984 with the estate of Armistead Peter III, husband of Caroline Odgen-Jones Peter, Suzanne Bartlett's daughter, and Paul Bartlett's stepdaughter.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Sculptors -- United States  Search this
Topic:
Sculpture, American  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.bartsuza
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-bartsuza

Oral history interview with Ruben Torres-Llorca, 1998 January 31

Interviewee:
Torres Llorca, Rubén, 1957-  Search this
Interviewer:
Martínez, Juan A  Search this
Subject:
Bedia, José  Search this
Rodríguez Brey, Ricardo  Search this
Instituto Superior de Arte (Cuba)  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Topic:
Artists -- Florida -- Miami -- Interviews  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Expatriate artists -- Florida -- Miami -- Interviews  Search this
Art, Cuban  Search this
Cuban American art  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- Florida -- Miami  Search this
Cuban American artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13547
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)216458
AAA_collcode_torres98
Theme:
Latino and Latin American
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_216458
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Enrique Guy Garcia, 1998 Mar. 18

Interviewee:
Garcia, Enrique Guy, 1928-  Search this
Interviewer:
Martínez, Juan A  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Artists -- Florida -- Miami -- Interviews  Search this
Painters -- Florida -- Miami -- Interviews  Search this
Sculptors -- Florida -- Miami -- Interviews  Search this
Expatriate artists -- Florida -- Miami -- Interviews  Search this
Artists -- Cuba -- Interviews  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- Florida -- Miami  Search this
Cuban American art  Search this
Cuban American artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13567
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)216454
AAA_collcode_garcia98
Theme:
Latino and Latin American
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_216454
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Ruben Torres-Llorca

Interviewee:
Torres Llorca, Rubén, 1957-  Search this
Interviewer:
Martínez, Juan A.  Search this
Names:
Instituto Superior de Arte (Cuba)  Search this
Bedia, José, 1959-  Search this
Rodríguez Brey, Ricardo, 1955-  Search this
Extent:
133 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
1998 January 31
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Ruben Torres-Llorca conducted 1998 January 31, by Juan A. Martínez, in Torres Llora's home/studio, Miami, Florida, for the Archives of American Art.
Torres Llora discusses his early interest in art; his father, whom he never met, who was a talented commercial artist; studying art at San Alejandro Academy of Art, Havana and fellow students Jose Bedia and Ricardo Rodriguez Brey; graduate studies at Havana's Instituto Superior del Arte; participating in the "Volumen I" exhibition in 1981; travels to Mexico, where he began sculpture and installations; returning to Cuba and curating exhibitions of younger artists; moving to Buenos Aires, Mexico City, and since 1993, Miami; artistic influences, including literature, anthropology, sociololgy, film, and other disciplines on him; his mixed media figurative objects of the 1990s which tell a narrative, are socially oriented, and at best, provide a shared experience for the viewer.
Biographical / Historical:
Ruben Torres-Llorca (1957-) is a painter and sculptor in Miami, Florida.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 3 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hr., 6 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics, and administrators. Funding for this interview provided by Smithsonian Institution's Latino Pool Fund.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Artists -- Cuba  Search this
Topic:
Artists -- Florida -- Miami -- Interviews  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Expatriate artists -- Florida -- Miami -- Interviews  Search this
Art, Cuban  Search this
Cuban American art  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- Florida -- Miami  Search this
Cuban American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.torres98
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-torres98

Oral history interview with Enrique Guy Garcia

Interviewee:
Garcia, Enrique Guy, 1928-  Search this
Interviewer:
Martínez, Juan A.  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound cassette (Sound recording, analog)
73 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1998 Mar. 18
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Enrique Guy Garcia conducted 1998 Mar. 18, by Juan A. Martinez, in Garcia's studio, Miami, Fla., for the Archives of American Art.
Garcia discusses his early interest in drawing; enrolling in art school as a teenager in Santiago de Cuba; attending Havana's San Alejandro Art Academy and studying painting with Leopoldo Romanach and Domingo Ramos, and modeling for sculpture classes where his interest in sculpture developed; going to Mexico City upon graduation to study fresco painting; returning to Cuba and working in organizing craft workshops; becoming dissatisfied with the political situation in Cuba and accepting an UNESCO grant to study art in Italy; seeking political asylum on his return from Italy; living in New York and working in a foundry; moving to Miami in the mid-1970s; his sculpture, which is primarily bronzes; his abstract expressionist style; his series of works in the 1980s, "Head," and "Icarus"; his current work, "Columns"; and an upcoming exhibition in Venezuela.
Biographical / Historical:
Enrique Guy Garcia (1928-) is a sculptor and painter from Miami, Fla. Born in Havana, Cuba.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics, and administrators. Funding for this interview provided by the Smithsonian Institution's Latino Pool Fund.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Artists -- Florida -- Miami -- Interviews  Search this
Painters -- Florida -- Miami -- Interviews  Search this
Sculptors -- Florida -- Miami -- Interviews  Search this
Expatriate artists -- Florida -- Miami -- Interviews  Search this
Artists -- Cuba -- Interviews  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- Florida -- Miami  Search this
Cuban American art  Search this
Cuban American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.garcia98
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-garcia98

Macbeth Gallery records

Creator:
Macbeth Gallery  Search this
Names:
Hartley, Marsden, 1877-1943  Search this
Homer, Winslow, 1836-1910  Search this
Macbeth, Robert W. (Robert Walker), 1884-1940  Search this
Macbeth, William, 1851-1917  Search this
McIntyre, Robert G. (Robert George), b. 1885  Search this
Stuart, Gilbert, 1755-1828  Search this
Weir, Robert Walter, 1803-1889  Search this
Extent:
131.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Daguerreotypes
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Date:
1947-1948
1838-1968
bulk 1892-1953
Summary:
The Macbeth Gallery records provide almost complete coverage of the gallery's operations from its inception in 1892 to its closing in 1953. Through extensive correspondence files, financial and inventory records, printed material, scrapbooks, reference and research material, and photographs of artists and works of art, the records document all aspects of the gallery's activities, charting William Macbeth's initial intention to lease his store "for the permanent exhibition and sale of American pictures" through over sixty years of success as a major New York firm devoted to American art. The collection measures 131.6 linear feet and dates from 1838 to 1968 with the bulk of the material dating from 1892 to 1953.
Scope and Content Note:
The Macbeth Gallery records provide almost complete coverage of the gallery's operations from its inception in 1892 to its closing in 1953. The records document all aspects of the gallery's activities, charting William Macbeth's initial intention to lease his store "for the permanent exhibition and sale of American pictures" through over sixty years of success as a major New York firm devoted to American art. The collection measures 131.6 linear feet and dates from 1838 to 1968 with the bulk of the material dating from 1892 to 1953.

The gallery's correspondence files form the core of the collection and illuminate most aspects of American art history: the creation and sale of works of art, the development of reputations, the rise of museums and art societies, change and resistance to change in the art market, and the evolution of taste. Ninety-five feet of correspondence house substantial and informative letters from dozens of important American painters and sculptors, including older artists and younger contemporaries of the gallery in its later years. There are also letters from collectors, curators, other galleries, and critics.

The financial files found in the collection offer insight into the changing economic climate in which the gallery operated. They include information ranging from the details of individual sales and the market for individual artists, to consignment activities and artist commissions, to overviews of annual sales. This information is augmented by the firm's inventory records and the photographs of artwork with their accompanying records of paintings sold. The inventory records provide details of all works of art handled by the gallery, both sold and unsold, and the buyers who purchased them; the photographs of artwork include images of artwork sold with accompanying sales information.

The highlight of the gallery's printed material is the publication Art Notes. Although published only until 1930, Art Notes provides an excellent and detailed view of the gallery's exhibition schedule and the relationship of the gallery owners with many of the artists whose work they handled. It was a house organ that also provided a running commentary on events in the art world. The gallery's 19 fragile scrapbooks, maintained throughout the firm's history, provide further coverage of activities through exhibition catalogs and related news clippings. Printed material from other sources provides a frame of reference for activities in the art world from the mid-19th to the mid-20th-centuries and includes an almost complete run of the rare and important pre-Civil War art publication The Crayon.

Reference files record the interest which the gallery owners took in the work of early portrait painters and in later artists such as George Inness and Winslow Homer. Together with the immense volume of correspondence with buyers and sellers of paintings by the great portraitists and the Hudson River School found in the gallery's correspondence files, these records are still useful sources of information today and underscore the deep interest that the Macbeths and Robert McIntyre took in 18th and 19th-century American art.

The photographs of artists found here are a treasure trove of images of some of the major figures of the 19th and 20th-centuries. There are photographs of artists such as Chester Beach, Emil Carlsen, Charles Melville Dewey, Frederick Carl Frieseke, Childe Hassam, Winslow Homer, George Inness, Maurice Prendergast, and Julian Alden Weir, many of them original prints and the majority of them autographed.

With the exception of the "The Eight" and a few of their contemporaries, an important aspect of art history, the modernist movement, is generally represented in the Macbeth Gallery records only in a negative form as the three successive proprietors of the gallery showed very little interest in this area. Nevertheless, the collection is a highly significant source of information on many of the major and minor figures in American art in the period after 1890.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into eight series:

Series 1: Correspondence, 1838-1968 (Box 1-95, 163-164, OV 165; 96.2 linear feet)

Series 2: Financial and Shipping Records, 1892-1956 (Box 96-110; 11.8 linear feet)

Series 3: Inventory Records, 1892-circa 1957 (Box 111-113; 3.0 linear feet)

Series 4: Printed Material, 1838-1963 (Box 114-119, 162; 5.0 linear feet)

Series 5: Scrapbooks, 1892-1952 (Box 120-130; 3.3 linear feet)

Series 6: Reference Files, 1839-1959 (Box 131-132; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 7: Miscellaneous Files, 1912-1956 (Box 133-134; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 8: Photographs, circa 1880-circa 1968 (Box 135-161; 12.1 linear feet)
Historical Note:
The Macbeth Gallery was established in 1892 by William Macbeth, a Scotch-Irish immigrant who had spent ten years with the print dealer Frederick Keppel before he opened his doors to the art-buying public at 237 Fifth Avenue in New York. Despite the prevailing interest in foreign art at that time, particularly in that of the Barbizon and Dutch schools, Macbeth was determined to dedicate his gallery to "the permanent exhibition and sale of American pictures, both in oil and water colors."

Although some of the gallery's earliest exhibitions were of work by European artists, the business soon became the only gallery in continuous operation that kept American art permanently on display. In the January 1917 issue of Art Notes, Macbeth recounts those early days remembering that "The opening of my gallery......was a rash venture under the existing conditions, and disaster was freely predicted." Nevertheless, he struggled through the financial crisis of 1893 and persisted with his devotion to American art; slowly the market for his pictures grew more amenable.

Macbeth moved to more spacious quarters at 450 Fifth Avenue in 1906 and two years later undertook what was to become the major event in the gallery's early history: the 1908 exhibition of "The Eight," featuring work by Arthur B. Davies, Willam J. Glackens, Robert Henri, Ernest Lawson, George Luks, Maurice Prendergast, Everett Shinn, and John Sloan. "The Eight" were an unlikely combination of social realists, visionaries and impressionists eager to challenge the dominating influence of the National Academy. The exhibition received an immense amount of publicity and instantly entered into art history as a successful assault on tradition.

Despite the splash that the exhibition made and its implications for the future of American art, nothing that the gallery did subsequently indicated that Macbeth intended to capitalize on its significance. It is true that Macbeth supported many artists later considered leaders in American art when the public would pay no attention to them because of their modernist tendencies; Arthur B. Davies, Paul Dougherty, Maurice Prendergast, Theodore Robinson, and F. Ballard Williams all held their first exhibitions at his gallery. Nevertheless, neither Macbeth nor the gallery's two successive proprietors, Robert G. McIntyre (William's nephew) and Robert Macbeth (William's son), who joined the gallery in 1903 and 1906 respectively, ever developed a true interest in modern art. The November 1930 issue of Art Notes summarizes their collective disdain for modernism, stating: "We believe that, by and large, modern art is amusing. We are heretical enough to believe that much of it was started for the amusement of its creators and that no one was more surprised than they when it was taken seriously by a certain audience to whom the bizarre and the unintelligible always makes an appeal." So while the Macbeths and McIntyre cetainly championed American artists and insisted they deserved as much recognition as the Europeans, their deepest and most abiding interest was undoubtedly the established artists of the 18th and 19th-centuries and those of the early 20th-century who continued in a more conservative style. Artists such as Emil Carlsen, Charles Harold Davis, Frederick C. Frieseke, Robert Henri, Winslow Homer, Chauncey F. Ryder, Abbot Handerson Thayer, J. Francis Murphy, A. H. Wyant were the gallery's bread and butter.

When William Macbeth died in 1917 Robert Macbeth took up the reins with the assistance of Robert G. McIntyre . Although they incorporated the business as William Macbeth, Inc., in 1918 the gallery continued to be known, as it always would be, simply as Macbeth Gallery. Macbeth and McIntyre continued to show work in the same vein as the elder Macbeth. They concentrated primarily on oil paintings at this time, having found by the 1920s that "oils are all that our gallery owners will buy," though they also exhibited an occasional group of watercolors and pastels in addition to bronzes and other sculpture by contemporary American artists such as Chester Beach and Janet Scudder.

Of the early American painters the Macbeths and McIntyre were particularly interested in colonial portraits and miniatures, especially those painted by prominent artists in the latter part of the eighteenth century such as John Singleton Copley, Gilbert Stuart, Thomas Sully and John Trumbull. In its early years the gallery also handled the work of a few prominent American etchers including Frank W. Benson, Emil Fuchs, Daniel Garber, Childe Hassam and Chauncey F. Ryder. The print department was generally discontinued, however, in the late 1930s although the gallery continued to show prints by contemporaries such as Stow Wengenroth.

In 1924 relative prosperity allowed the gallery to move uptown to 15 East Fifty-seventh Street. When the 1930s brought new financial hardship for the gallery Macbeth and McIntyre took a variety of approaches to boosting sales. In 1930 they decided to hold only group exhibitions throughout the season to the exclusion of one-man shows, and also held some special exhibitions of paintings priced at a hundred dollars each in the hope that they could tempt those "willing to take advantage of a rare chance to secure representative examples of good art at a most attractive price." A move to smaller quarters at 15 East Fifty-seventh Street in 1935 was made with the intention of concentrating their efforts on the work of fewer contemporary artists, while continuing to handle the work of the older Americans they had long supported.

When Macbeth died suddenly and unexpectedly in August 1940 following an operation for appendicitis, McIntyre continued to run the gallery with the assistance of Hazel Lewis. During the 1940s McIntyre and Lewis showed primarily contemporary art in a wide range of media including oil, watercolor, pastel, drawing and sculpture, while continuing, as always, to show the occasional group of 19th-century Americans. The great success of the gallery's later years was undeniably Andrew Wyeth whose first exhibition, held at Macbeth Gallery in 1937, resulted in the sale of all twenty-two paintings cataloged.

Although subsequent Wyeth exhibitions were also successful, McIntyre struggled financially throughout the 1940s and periodically considered liquidating the company. Although "vitally interested" in contemporary art by people such as Robert Brackman, Jay Connaway, Carl Gaertner, James Lechay, Herbert Meyer and Ogden M. Pleissner he found that, for the most part, it did not pay. McIntyre continued operations until 1953 when he decided that doing so for profit was not only a financial burden but also ran contrary to his desire to spend more time devoted to his first love, early American art. When the lease expired on 11 East Fifty-seventh Street in April 1953 McIntyre did not renew it. After closing the gallery's doors he sold art from his New York apartment and from his home in Dorset, Vermont. He officially dissolved William Macbeth, Inc., in 1957.

The history of the Macbeth Gallery is a long and distinguished one with each successive proprietor making a significant contribution to art in America. William Macbeth helped establish an audience and a market for American art when few were willing to give it serious consideration. Robert Macbeth continued to cement the gallery's reputation as one of the leading firms in New York and was instrumental in organizing the American Art Dealers Association. Robert G. McIntyre claimed in a letter to Lloyd Goodrich, dated 22 June 1945, that the thing of which he was most proud was "the share I have had in the formation of the collection of the Addison Gallery of American Art, at Andover, Massacusetts." McIntyre was widely respected in the art community as a dealer, as an adviser to curators, and as a scholar whose research and book on Martin Johnson Heade helped "rediscover" an important American artist. One of his most significant and lasting contributions to the history of art in America, however, was undoubtedly his gift of the gallery's historical records to the Archives of American Art.
Related Material:
Among the holdings of the Archives of American are a small collection of scattered Robert McIntyre's papers and 9 items of William Macbeth's papers. Macbeth Gallery exhibition catalogs are also available in the American Art Exhibition Catalog collection and the Brooklyn Museum Records, both loaned and microfilmed collections.

An extensive collection of Macbeth Gallery exhibition catalogs are also held by the Frick Art Reference Library and the Watson Library of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Provenance:
The bulk of the Macbeth Gallery records were donated and microfilmed in several installments between 1955 and 1966 by Robert G. McIntyre and Estate. Additional Macbeth Gallery printed material was donated by Phoebe C. and William Macbeth II, grandchildren of William Macbeth, in 1974.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Fragile original scrapbooks are closed to researchers.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Curators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Eight (Group of American artists)  Search this
Art directors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Artists -- United States  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Art dealers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Daguerreotypes
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Macbeth Gallery records, 1838-1968, bulk 1892 to 1953. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.macbgall
See more items in:
Macbeth Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-macbgall
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Luis Jimenez, 1985 Dec. 15-17

Interviewee:
Jimenez, Luis A. (Alfonso), 1940-2006  Search this
Interviewer:
Bermingham, Peter  Search this
Subject:
Lipton, Seymour  Search this
Ossorio, Alfonso  Search this
University of Texas  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Pop art  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Sculptors -- New Mexico -- Hondo -- Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13554
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)213712
AAA_collcode_jimene85
Theme:
Latino and Latin American
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_213712
Online Media:

Oral history interview with James W. Washington Jr, 1965 October 13

Interviewee:
Washington, James W. (James Winston), 1911-2000  Search this
Interviewer:
Bestor, Dorothy K., 1913-  Search this
Subject:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Painting, American  Search this
Sculpture, American  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Painters -- Washington (State) -- Seattle -- Interviews  Search this
Sculptors -- Washington (State) -- Seattle -- Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)11483
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)213969
AAA_collcode_washin65
Theme:
African American
New Deal
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_213969

Oral history interview with Benito Huerta, 2004 Feb. 29-Mar. 2

Interviewee:
Huerta, Benito, 1952-  Search this
Interviewer:
Cordova, Cary  Search this
Subject:
Livingston, Jane  Search this
Yanez, Rene  Search this
Pitman, Bonnie  Search this
Hernandez, John  Search this
Zamudio-Taylor, Victor  Search this
Garza, Carmen Lomas  Search this
Vargas, Kathy  Search this
Beardsley, John  Search this
Chin, Mel  Search this
Caton, David  Search this
Lynn Goode Gallery  Search this
Galería de la Raza (San Francisco, Calif.)  Search this
Recuerdos Orales: Interviews of the Latino Art Community in Texas  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Curators -- Texas -- Interviews  Search this
Art criticism  Search this
Art commissions  Search this
Painting -- Technique  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12217
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)247972
AAA_collcode_huerta04
Theme:
Latino and Latin American
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_247972
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Franco Mondini-Ruiz, 2004 July 7-8

Interviewee:
Mondini-Ruiz, Franco, 1961-  Search this
Interviewer:
Cordova, Cary  Search this
Subject:
Briseño, Rolando  Search this
Amado, Jesse  Search this
Romo, Ito  Search this
Herzberg, Julia P.  Search this
Jaukkuri, Maaretta  Search this
Moffatt, Tracey  Search this
Tracy, Michael  Search this
Judd, Donald  Search this
Cisneros, Sandra  Search this
Diaz, Alejandro  Search this
Taylor, Frederieke  Search this
Lozano, Danny  Search this
Casey, Mike  Search this
Recuerdos Orales: Interviews of the Latino Art Community in Texas  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Gay artists -- Texas -- Interviews  Search this
Art -- Technique  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12062
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)249039
AAA_collcode_mondin04
Theme:
Latino and Latin American
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_249039
Online Media:

Jirayr Zorthian papers, circa 1937-2004

Creator:
Zorthian, Jirayr, 1912-2004  Search this
Type:
Video recordings
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)6517
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)215776
AAA_collcode_zortjira
Theme:
Sketches & Sketchbooks
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_215776

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