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Bay Head -- Beach Bound

Provenance:
Rumson Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Beach Bound (Bay Head, New Jersey)
United States of America -- New Jersey -- Ocean County -- Bay Head
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes a work sheet.
General:
This is a small, private side garden. The fountain is not attached to water, but used as a piece of sculpture. This piece was made for and situated on the Day estate in Short Hills, New Jersey. Mr. Renwick, the sculptor, was a neighbor and friend of the Day family. The garden also contains a Victorian iron bench and jardinieres, which possibly came from the same estate.
Person(s) associated with the garden property include(s): William W. Renwick (sculptor).
Related Materials:
Beach Bound related holdings consist of 1 folder (1 35 mm. slide)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- New Jersey -- Bay Head  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NJ469
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New Jersey
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb68cce96f9-65fa-43ce-bc31-0c87717153e6
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref20059

Far Hills -- Teviot Farm

Former owner:
Turnbull, Arthur, Jr.  Search this
Turnbull, Arthur  Search this
Turnbull, Alice  Search this
Post, George B.  Search this
Garden designer:
Turnbull, Alice  Search this
Landscape architect:
Hutcheson, Martha Brookes  Search this
Sculptor:
Borglum, Gutzon, 1867-1941  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Teviot Farm (Far Hills, New Jersey)
United States of America -- New Jersey -- Somerset County -- Far Hills
Scope and Contents:
The folders include work sheets, a written description, and a garden plan.
General:
The Teviot Farm house, part of which is an old quarry man's stone house, is situated on a west-facing hillside that slopes down to the North Branch of the Raritan River. The river view is the focal point of the house and gardens. The original landscape plan with walls, pergolas, and terraces, as well as much of the foundation planting, still existed unchanged in 1994. On a lower level, an English-type informal curving path with perennial borders leads from the pergola past a tool shed to the top of an old quarry and on into the woods. On the west, the large porch opens on a narrow grass terrace with two old maple trees edged by a low box hedge. A grass path below goes from the rose garden around to the south side of the house overlooking a pasture field which runs along the river.
Related Materials:
Teviot Farm related holdings consist of 2 folders (22 35 mm. slides; 15 negatives)
See others in:
Maida Babson Adams American Garden Collection, ca. 1960-1994.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- New Jersey -- Far Hills  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NJ105
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New Jersey
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb67afff6ab-3f64-4d6e-afc4-2a5c8e8ba1a7
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref20081

Millburn -- Henry P. and Susan I. Johnson Garden

Former owner:
Halbach, Ernest K.  Search this
Wodell, Helen Page  Search this
Landscape designer:
Wodell, Helen Page  Search this
Provenance:
Short Hills Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Halbach Garden No. 1 (Short Hills, New Jersey)
United States of America -- New Jersey -- Essex County -- Millburn -- Short Hills
Scope and Contents:
The folders include worksheets and additional information.
General:
The restoration of the circa 1905 house recovered its original design but the gardens of this 2.6- acre property have a modern design, implemented over ten years. The owners consulted with experts at the New York Botanical Garden on plants and trees most appropriate for their location and least appealing to the local deer population. They sought out a landscape architect who would take a modern approach yet also reference the past of this location. The owners were involved in every step: drainage modification, construction, choosing hardscape materials, lighting, and finally the selection of trees, shrubs, bulbs and all the other plants. The straight driveway to the house was reconfigured into a meandering approach lined with green giant arborvitae, daffodils, and French iris surrounded by alliums and chives to deter deer. A deer deterring metal fence encloses the side and back yards to enable more varied plantings.

A short allée of lindens were planted to be pleached after they had grown at least three years. There is a garden for the relocated swimming pool and small utility building. Another garden within the enclosed space is for cutting. Outside the screened porch the garden emphasizes scent with white lilac and hydrangea, and variegated foliage for visual effect at night. Plantings throughout the property include more than thirty varieties of daffodils for an extended display, five magnolia and seven dogwood varieties, and seven varieties of boxwood in addition to the older extant trees.

The modern gardens were conceived and designed by the previous owners Henry and Susan Johnson along with landscape architect Ben Young and installation and maintenance crews. Previous owners Ernest K. Halbach and landscape designer Helen Page Wodell were responsible for a redesign in the 1940's that incorporated flagstone terraces, brick walls and an ornamental iron gate with a lily pond and wall fountain.
Persons associated with the garden include: Ernest K. Halbach (former owner); and Helen Page Wodell [Halbach] (former owner and landscape designer); Ben Young, BYLA Landscape Architects (landscape architect, 2008-2019); Michael Todd, The Todd Group (landscape installation, 2008-2019); John Rivell, Tewksbury Construction (general contractor, 2008-2019); Alexander Antonelli, Antonelli Architects (architect, 2008-2019; George Rickey (sculptor).
Varying Form:
Formerly known as Halbach Garden No. 1.
Related Materials:
Holdings consist of 2 folders including 3 glass lantern slides (001-003), 7 35 mm. slides (004-010), and 40 digital images (001-040).
See others in:
Lois Poinier slide collection, circa 1920-1999.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- New Jersey -- Short Hills  Search this
Gardening in the shade  Search this
Moon garden  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NJ025
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New Jersey
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb67d671127-bcd0-4d22-9818-c25f0749ca1f
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref20116

Princeton -- New Jersey Woodland Property

Former owner:
Stanley, Thomas Mr.  Search this
Stanley, Thomas Mrs.  Search this
Heins, Katharine P.  Search this
Heins, John J.  Search this
Architect:
Bauhan, Rolf William, 1892-1966  Search this
Bennett, Robert S.  Search this
Landscape architect:
Lenker, David M.  Search this
Bencze, S. Lawrence  Search this
Olejnik, Barbara J. CLA  Search this
Doerler Landscapes  Search this
Sculptor:
Mallory, Ann  Search this
Ditarando, Roger  Search this
Stokes, Charlotte C.  Search this
Provenance:
Stony Brook Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
New Jersey Woodland Property (Princeton, New Jersey)
United States of America -- New Jersey -- Mercer County -- Princeton
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets and write-ups of the property's planting scheme.
Varying Form:
Frog Pond
General:
The New Jersey Woodland Property comprises 3.5 acres, a Colonial Revival house designed by architect Rolf W. Bauhan (1892-1966) in 1959, and ten distinct garden areas that the owner has been developing since 1981. Among the first area encountered is wooded lot bordered by preserved open space, a spring-fed pond, a swimming pool, and a graceful curving entry with bluestone steps and mature rhododendron and mountain laurel. Problems to overcome included a huge native deer population, undeveloped areas where invasive plants thrived, heavy clay soil, a cinder block retaining wall near the swimming pool, and the competing roots and canopies of mature trees that had to be accommodated in the landscape designs. The owner undertook a three-year course of study at the Barnes Arboretum, installed a six-foot tall deer fence around the property, and found the right plant for the right place, taking into account light, soil conditions and terrain. The style of the gardens is naturalized, with different species intermingling, rather than formally planted garden beds.
The entry courtyard was improved by replacing black asphalt with stone pavers, installing a brick retaining wall and piers, and planting bulb, perennial and shrub gardens under existing trees. The front path to the main entrance of the house is a bluestone walkway bordered by rhododendron and mountain laurel under planted with hosta, tiarella, euonymous and other ground covers. The pool terrace is in full sun, and features a 50-year-old wisteria that wraps around the house, Chippendale style gates lead to the pool, and vistas of the other gardens, pond and woodlands due to its higher elevation. Dwarf conifers are planted under the overhanging roof.
A perennial garden that replaced grass on the south side of the house was the owner's first project, with stone retaining walls defining the space. The eastern border of the property features unusual rhododendron. `The cryptomeria garden is a small woodland screen that features naturalized plantings. The woodland garden was designed with a meandering stone path and beds of naturalized perennials and shrubs but the soil was poor and needed yearly additions of leaf compost. A tennis court and outdoor room were installed in 1987 near Stony Brook and the designated open space. The banks of the pond created from a spring by the previous owners are accessible for bass fishing, with the outer perimeter planted in trees and shrubs that screen the property from the street.
Persons associated with the garden include Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Stanley (former owners, 1959-1981); Rolf W. Bauhan (architect, 1959); Robert S. Bennett (architect, 1997, 2008); David M. Lenker (landscape architect, 1959); Doerler Landscapes (landscape architect, 1973, 1975); S. Lawrence Bencze (landscape architect, 1988, 1990, 1992, 1995); Barbara J. Olejnik, CLA (landscape architect, 2000-2002); Ann Mallory (sculptor of "Forest Pool"); Roger Ditarando (sculptor of "Bird's Nest"); Charlotte Calwell Stokes (sculptor of "Francis of Assisi")
Related Materials:
New Jersey Woodland Property related holdings consist of 1 folder (25 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- New Jersey -- Princeton  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NJ519
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New Jersey
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb65ffbef9f-36a6-4108-8360-c9cade0cea38
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref20203

Scotch Plains -- Boxwoods

Architect:
Detwiller, Charles  Search this
Landscape architect:
Dixon, Roberta Freeman  Search this
Sculptor:
Edstrom, David  Search this
Garden designer:
Poinier, Lois W.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Boxwoods (Scotch Plains, New Jersey)
United States of America -- New Jersey -- Union County -- Scotch Plains
Scope and Contents:
Boxwoods holdings consist of 1 folder including a worksheet and garden description and (9) 35 mm. slides.
General:
This two-acre garden site, established in 1954, surrounds a house dating to 1845 (with subsequent renovations). Landscape architect Roberta Freeman Dixon laid out the three-part plan in 1956, which has been closely followed by the owners since that time. Windbreaks were important to cut weather and frame the house in the field. Evergreen bedding plants surround the house and edge the meandering landscape. The vegetable beds and cutting garden are behind hurdle fencing allowing them to be kept in less than pristine condition without detracting from the rest of the garden, Boxwood was brought in from Virginia and is used solely as foundation planting, accented with Ilex crenata, including 'Bulatta'. Native rhododendron, Leucothoe, hollies, cherry laurel (Prunus laurocerasus), hemlock, and dogwoods are used repeatedly in the landscape, giving a peaceful background of lush greenery with occasional bloom interest. A wonderful old barn and a pump house on the property add charm and are enhanced with a choice Chinese white wisteria on the barn's car entrance and a climbing boxwood espaliered on the pump house. An original sculpture, "Inspiration," by David Edstrom, is used with water in a little side garden entrance off the library. It is surrounded with a holly hedge and Buxus microphylla at the base of the planting, making it handsome in all seasons. This is a charming garden with many unique features that complement the historic farmhouse setting.
Persons associated with the property include: Charles Detwiller (architect, 1954); Roberta Freeman Dixon (landscape architect, 1956); David Edstrom (sculptor, 1927); and Lois Poinier (garden designer, 1968).
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- New Jersey -- Scotch Plains  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NJ135
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New Jersey
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6446600d6-7752-4a94-b94d-783d4376f494
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref20227

Rohallion

Creator:
Adams, Edward Dean, Mrs.  Search this
White, Robert, M/M  Search this
Pisani, Anthony J., Dr./mrs  Search this
Sourlis, Theodore, M/M  Search this
Rumson Garden Club  Search this
Landscape architect:
Barrett, Nathan Franklin  Search this
Shipman, Ellen, 1869-1950  Search this
Architect:
White, Stanford, 1853-1906  Search this
Provenance:
Banta, Blake  Search this
Sculptor:
MacMonnies, Frederick William, 1863-1937  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Place:
New Jersey -- Rumson
United States of America -- New Jersey -- Monmouth County -- Rumson
Date:
1930
General:
Date - 1910 -1920. Sculpture - Pan of Rohallion. Water tower designed by Stanford White. 35 mm - Photographs from Family Album.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Summer  Search this
Gazebos  Search this
Water towers  Search this
Flower beds  Search this
Ponds  Search this
Sculpture  Search this
Fountains  Search this
Pine  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, Item NJ009021
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New Jersey / NJ009: Rumson -- Rohallion
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb62ea284de-e721-4621-a910-908e4d0e0171
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref21015

Rohallion

Creator:
Adams, Edward Dean, Mrs.  Search this
White, Robert, M/M  Search this
Pisani, Anthony J., Dr./mrs  Search this
Sourlis, Theodore, M/M  Search this
Rumson Garden Club  Search this
Landscape architect:
Barrett, Nathan Franklin  Search this
Shipman, Ellen, 1869-1950  Search this
Architect:
White, Stanford, 1853-1906  Search this
Provenance:
Banta, Blake  Search this
Sculptor:
MacMonnies, Frederick William, 1863-1937  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Place:
New Jersey -- Rumson
United States of America -- New Jersey -- Monmouth County -- Rumson
Date:
1930
General:
Sculpture - Pan of Rohallion.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Lily ponds  Search this
Sculpture  Search this
People  Search this
Carriages and carts  Search this
Horses  Search this
Women  Search this
Men  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, Item NJ009047
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New Jersey / NJ009: Rumson -- Rohallion
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb62361b873-d9c3-4761-b985-b1d6686e0ceb
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref21021

Stony Brook

Landscape designer:
Doerler, Bill  Search this
Architect:
Ford, Jerry  Search this
Sculptor:
Holofcener, Larry  Search this
Former owner:
Golden  Search this
Barnes, James Col  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Place:
New Jersey -- Rumson
United States of America -- New Jersey -- Monmouth County -- Rumson
Date:
1995
General:
Stony Brook has something to offer for everyone, novice and garden conisseur alike. There is a wide variety of flowering trees and evergreens at the entrance. After getting to the house one enters the formal herb garden. This area at the back of the house serves as a kitchen garden and offers views for the living room and other parts of the house. Behind the house is a barn next to a slightly overgrown meadow that is home to several different types of fruit trees. There is also a vegetable garden and 90 foot grape arbor which provides a heavy harvest every year.
Stony Brook also has a cutting garden and rose garden which provides roses for the house almost 6 months of the year. All the vegetables and annuals are started in house in the Stony Brook greenhouse, then moved outside to harden off in coldframes. The property also has a rejuvenated lilac allee, several functional wells, a swimming pool, tennis court and adjoining hillside rockgarden. Stony Brook is a true masterpiece. Copy of property plan.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Planting plans  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, Item NJ118001
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New Jersey / NJ118: Rumson -- Stony Brook
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6474cea0d-a334-473b-9ec4-f6622fb90647
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref21047

Stony Brook

Creator:
Clarke, Diane B.  Search this
Landscape designer:
Doerler, Bill  Search this
Architect:
Ford, Jerry  Search this
Sculptor:
Holofcener, Larry  Search this
Former owner:
Golden  Search this
Barnes, James Col  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Place:
New Jersey -- Rumson
United States of America -- New Jersey -- Monmouth County -- Rumson
Date:
09/01/1995
General:
Stony Brook has something to offer for everyone, novice and garden conisseur alike. There is a wide variety of flowering trees and evergreens at the entrance. After getting to the house one enters the formal herb garden. This area at the back of the house serves as a kitchen garden and offers views for the living room and other parts of the house. Behind the house is a barn next to a slightly overgrown meadow that is home to several different types of fruit trees. There is also a vegetable garden and 90 foot grape arbor which provides a heavy harvest every year.
Stony Brook also has a cutting garden and rose garden which provides roses for the house almost 6 months of the year. All the vegetables and annuals are started in house in the Stony Brook greenhouse, then moved outside to harden off in coldframes. The property also has a rejuvenated lilac allee, several functional wells, a swimming pool, tennis court and adjoining hillside rockgarden. Stony Brook is a true masterpiece.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Summer  Search this
Driveways, gravel  Search this
Gates -- Iron  Search this
Evergreens  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, Item NJ118002
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New Jersey / NJ118: Rumson -- Stony Brook
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6034d47ba-de11-4a2c-954f-356639aa6c6b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref21048

Stony Brook

Creator:
Clarke, Diane B.  Search this
Landscape designer:
Doerler, Bill  Search this
Architect:
Ford, Jerry  Search this
Sculptor:
Holofcener, Larry  Search this
Former owner:
Golden  Search this
Barnes, James Col  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Place:
New Jersey -- Rumson
United States of America -- New Jersey -- Monmouth County -- Rumson
Date:
06/01/1995
General:
Stony Brook has something to offer for everyone, novice and garden conisseur alike. There is a wide variety of flowering trees and evergreens at the entrance. After getting to the house one enters the formal herb garden. This area at the back of the house serves as a kitchen garden and offers views for the living room and other parts of the house. Behind the house is a barn next to a slightly overgrown meadow that is home to several different types of fruit trees. There is also a vegetable garden and 90 foot grape arbor which provides a heavy harvest every year.
Stony Brook also has a cutting garden and rose garden which provides roses for the house almost 6 months of the year. All the vegetables and annuals are started in house in the Stony Brook greenhouse, then moved outside to harden off in coldframes. The property also has a rejuvenated lilac allee, several functional wells, a swimming pool, tennis court and adjoining hillside rockgarden. Stony Brook is a true masterpiece. Arbor at exit of herb garden by house.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Summer  Search this
Arbors  Search this
Latticework  Search this
Hosta  Search this
Walkways, gravel  Search this
Perennials  Search this
Flower beds  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, Item NJ118003
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New Jersey / NJ118: Rumson -- Stony Brook
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6daf07463-5074-4340-978b-9e8fd3105fb0
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref21049

Stony Brook

Creator:
Clarke, Diane B.  Search this
Landscape designer:
Doerler, Bill  Search this
Architect:
Ford, Jerry  Search this
Sculptor:
Holofcener, Larry  Search this
Former owner:
Golden  Search this
Barnes, James Col  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Place:
New Jersey -- Rumson
United States of America -- New Jersey -- Monmouth County -- Rumson
Date:
06/01/1995
General:
Stony Brook has something to offer for everyone, novice and garden conisseur alike. There is a wide variety of flowering trees and evergreens at the entrance. After getting to the house one enters the formal herb garden. This area at the back of the house serves as a kitchen garden and offers views for the living room and other parts of the house. Behind the house is a barn next to a slightly overgrown meadow that is home to several different types of fruit trees. There is also a vegetable garden and 90 foot grape arbor which provides a heavy harvest every year.
Stony Brook also has a cutting garden and rose garden which provides roses for the house almost 6 months of the year. All the vegetables and annuals are started in house in the Stony Brook greenhouse, then moved outside to harden off in coldframes. The property also has a rejuvenated lilac allee, several functional wells, a swimming pool, tennis court and adjoining hillside rock garden. Stony Brook is a true masterpiece. Entrance to guest house.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Spring  Search this
Alcea  Search this
Sculpture  Search this
Entrances  Search this
Benches  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, Item NJ118004
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New Jersey / NJ118: Rumson -- Stony Brook
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6a343b981-24ee-4df1-bd40-dbee9a0fa17b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref21050

Stony Brook

Creator:
Clarke, Diane B.  Search this
Landscape designer:
Doerler, Bill  Search this
Architect:
Ford, Jerry  Search this
Sculptor:
Holofcener, Larry  Search this
Former owner:
Golden  Search this
Barnes, James Col  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Place:
New Jersey -- Rumson
United States of America -- New Jersey -- Monmouth County -- Rumson
Date:
06/01/1995
General:
Stony Brook has something to offer for everyone, novice and garden conisseur alike. There is a wide variety of flowering trees and evergreens at the entrance. After getting to the house one enters the formal herb garden. This area at the back of the house serves as a kitchen garden and offers views for the living room and other parts of the house. Behind the house is a barn next to a slightly overgrown meadow that is home to several different types of fruit trees. There is also a vegetable garden and 90 foot grape arbor which provides a heavy harvest every year.
Stony Brook also has a cutting garden and rose garden which provides roses for the house almost 6 months of the year. All the vegetables and annuals are started in house in the Stony Brook greenhouse, then moved outside to harden off in coldframes. The property also has a rejuvenated lilac allee, several functional wells, a swimming pool, tennis court and adjoining hillside rock garden. Stony Brook is a true masterpiece. Vegetable garden with guest houses and garage in background.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Spring  Search this
Vegetable gardening  Search this
Fences -- wooden  Search this
Guesthouses  Search this
Raised bed gardening  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, Item NJ118005
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New Jersey / NJ118: Rumson -- Stony Brook
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb63a2cce86-f9c1-47b6-97af-4cba0c64d89c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref21051

Stony Brook

Creator:
Clarke, Diane B.  Search this
Landscape designer:
Doerler, Bill  Search this
Architect:
Ford, Jerry  Search this
Sculptor:
Holofcener, Larry  Search this
Former owner:
Golden  Search this
Barnes, James Col  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Place:
New Jersey -- Rumson
United States of America -- New Jersey -- Monmouth County -- Rumson
Date:
06/01/1995
General:
Stony Brook has something to offer for everyone, novice and garden conisseur alike. There is a wide variety of flowering trees and evergreens at the entrance. After getting to the house one enters the formal herb garden. This area at the back of the house serves as a kitchen garden and offers views for the living room and other parts of the house. Behind the house is a barn next to a slightly overgrown meadow that is home to several different types of fruit trees. There is also a vegetable garden and 90 foot grape arbor which provides a heavy harvest every year.
Stony Brook also has a cutting garden and rose garden which provides roses for the house almost 6 months of the year. All the vegetables and annuals are started in house in the Stony Brook greenhouse, then moved outside to harden off in coldframes. The property also has a rejuvenated lilac allee, several functional wells, a swimming pool, tennis court and adjoining hillside rock garden. Stony Brook is a true masterpiece. Vista across lawn toward tennis court.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Spring  Search this
Hosta  Search this
Lawns  Search this
Petunias  Search this
Flower beds  Search this
Benches, wooden  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, Item NJ118006
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New Jersey / NJ118: Rumson -- Stony Brook
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb659b2c87f-a13d-4323-8c8f-399cc11252c6
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref21052

Stony Brook

Creator:
Clarke, Diane B.  Search this
Landscape designer:
Doerler, Bill  Search this
Architect:
Ford, Jerry  Search this
Sculptor:
Holofcener, Larry  Search this
Former owner:
Golden  Search this
Barnes, James Col  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Place:
New Jersey -- Rumson
United States of America -- New Jersey -- Monmouth County -- Rumson
Date:
06/01/1995
General:
Stony Brook has something to offer for everyone, novice and garden conisseur alike. There is a wide variety of flowering trees and evergreens at the entrance. After getting to the house one enters the formal herb garden. This area at the back of the house serves as a kitchen garden and offers views for the living room and other parts of the house. Behind the house is a barn next to a slightly overgrown meadow that is home to several different types of fruit trees. There is also a vegetable garden and 90 foot grape arbor which provides a heavy harvest every year.
Stony Brook also has a cutting garden and rose garden which provides roses for the house almost 6 months of the year. All the vegetables and annuals are started in house in the Stony Brook greenhouse, then moved outside to harden off in coldframes. The property also has a rejuvenated lilac allee, several functional wells, a swimming pool, tennis court and adjoining hillside rock garden. Stony Brook is a true masterpiece. From the swimming pool looking back to the house.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Spring  Search this
Daylilies  Search this
Flower beds  Search this
Chaises longues  Search this
Houses  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, Item NJ118007
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New Jersey / NJ118: Rumson -- Stony Brook
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb616392d39-a32d-4622-8396-1d2e0be7af9b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref21053

Stony Brook

Creator:
Clarke, Diane B.  Search this
Landscape designer:
Doerler, Bill  Search this
Architect:
Ford, Jerry  Search this
Sculptor:
Holofcener, Larry  Search this
Former owner:
Golden  Search this
Barnes, James Col  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Place:
New Jersey -- Rumson
United States of America -- New Jersey -- Monmouth County -- Rumson
Date:
06/01/1995
General:
Stony Brook has something to offer for everyone, novice and garden conisseur alike. There is a wide variety of flowering trees and evergreens at the entrance. After getting to the house one enters the formal herb garden. This area at the back of the house serves as a kitchen garden and offers views for the living room and other parts of the house. Behind the house is a barn next to a slightly overgrown meadow that is home to several different types of fruit trees. There is also a vegetable garden and 90 foot grape arbor which provides a heavy harvest every year.
Stony Brook also has a cutting garden and rose garden which provides roses for the house almost 6 months of the year. All the vegetables and annuals are started in house in the Stony Brook greenhouse, then moved outside to harden off in coldframes. The property also has a rejuvenated lilac allee, several functional wells, a swimming pool, tennis court and adjoining hillside rock garden. Stony Brook is a true masterpiece. Woodland gardens with perennial borders.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Spring  Search this
Sedum  Search this
Irises (Plants)  Search this
Flower beds  Search this
Birdhouses  Search this
Gazebos  Search this
Perennials  Search this
Rail fences  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, Item NJ118008
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New Jersey / NJ118: Rumson -- Stony Brook
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb684d0d455-ec4c-4e44-8057-78a858233ba9
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref21054

Stony Brook

Creator:
Clarke, Diane B.  Search this
Landscape designer:
Doerler, Bill  Search this
Architect:
Ford, Jerry  Search this
Sculptor:
Holofcener, Larry  Search this
Former owner:
Golden  Search this
Barnes, James Col  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Place:
New Jersey -- Rumson
United States of America -- New Jersey -- Monmouth County -- Rumson
Date:
06/01/1995
General:
Stony Brook has something to offer for everyone, novice and garden conisseur alike. There is a wide variety of flowering trees and evergreens at the entrance. After getting to the house one enters the formal herb garden. This area at the back of the house serves as a kitchen garden and offers views for the living room and other parts of the house. Behind the house is a barn next to a slightly overgrown meadow that is home to several different types of fruit trees. There is also a vegetable garden and 90 foot grape arbor which provides a heavy harvest every year.
Stony Brook also has a cutting garden and rose garden which provides roses for the house almost 6 months of the year. All the vegetables and annuals are started in house in the Stony Brook greenhouse, then moved outside to harden off in coldframes. The property also has a rejuvenated lilac allee, several functional wells, a swimming pool, tennis court and adjoining hillside rock garden. Stony Brook is a true masterpiece. Woodland gardens with perennial borders.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Irises (Plants)  Search this
Fences -- wooden  Search this
Perennials  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, Item NJ118009
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New Jersey / NJ118: Rumson -- Stony Brook
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6229a77c4-9805-446d-9f3c-6f8fc33e222a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref21055

Violet Oakley

Artist:
Robert Tait McKenzie, 1867 - 1938  Search this
Sitter:
Violet Oakley, 10 Jun 1874 - 1961  Search this
Medium:
Bronze bas-relief
Dimensions:
Other: 37.4 x 26.9cm (14 3/4 x 10 9/16")
Frame: 58.4 x 41.9 x 2.5cm (23 x 16 1/2 x 1")
Type:
Sculpture
Date:
1925
Topic:
Sculpture\Relief\Bas-relief  Search this
Violet Oakley: Female  Search this
Violet Oakley: Visual Arts\Artist\Portraitist  Search this
Violet Oakley: Visual Arts\Artist\Illustrator  Search this
Violet Oakley: Visual Arts\Art instructor  Search this
Violet Oakley: Visual Arts\Artist\Painter\Muralist  Search this
Violet Oakley: Visual Arts\Artist\Glass artist\Stained glass artist  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of the Violet Oakley Memorial Foundation
Object number:
NPG.83.12
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Copyright:
© Robert Tait McKenzie
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Exhibition:
2022 Rehang of Out of Many: Portraits from 1600 to 1900
On View:
NPG, East Gallery 135
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm42b9bc8c5-4190-485e-b8e4-8be28c502c5a
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.83.12

Jane Teller papers

Creator:
Teller, Jane  Search this
Names:
Albright-Knox Art Gallery  Search this
Montclair Art Museum  Search this
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
National Council on the Aging  Search this
Newark Museum  Search this
Noyes Museum  Search this
Parma Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Princeton Gallery of Fine Art  Search this
Squibb Gallery (Princeton, N.J.)  Search this
Whitney Museum of American Art  Search this
Brodsky, Judith K.  Search this
Caparn, Rhys, 1909-1997  Search this
Dehner, Dorothy, 1901-1994  Search this
Fuller, Sue, 1914-  Search this
Gatch, Lee, 1902-1968  Search this
Johnson, Margaret K. (Margaret Kennard)  Search this
Kadish, Reuben, 1913-1992  Search this
Lamis, Leroy, 1925-  Search this
Lassaw, Ibram, 1913-2003  Search this
Siskind, Aaron  Search this
Extent:
8.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Prints
Sketchbooks
Slides (photographs)
Motion pictures (visual works)
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Sound recordings
Date:
1911-1991
Summary:
The papers of printmaker and sculptor Jane Teller measure 8.6 linear feet and date from 1911 to 1991. The papers include biographical materials, correspondence, business records, notes, writings, three sketchbooks, sketches and prints, five scrapbooks, printed material, subject files, photographs, sound and video recordings, and motion picture film.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of printmaker and sculptor Jane Teller measure 8.6 linear feet and date from 1911 to 1991. The papers include biographical materials, correspondence, business records, notes, writings, three sketchbooks, sketches and prints, five scrapbooks, printed material, subject files, photographs, sound and video recordings, and motion picture film.

Biographical material includes a birth certificate, school work, and passports. General correspondence includes letters from several artists including Rhys Caparn, Sue Fuller and Lee Gatch, and from art galleries, including the Museum of Modern Art, Albright-Knox Art Gallery and the Whitney Museum of American Art. Additional correspondence is found in the Subject Files.

Business records include an account book, lists of expenses and prices of art works, and sales records. Notes and writings include Teller's notes about art and travel, artists' statements, autobiographical writings, and a compilation of many artists' statements regarding "The Nine Bean Question."

Artwork includes three sketchbooks, 30 sketches and three prints primarily depicting nature and sculpture designs.

Five scrapbooks contain clippings, exbition announcements and catalogs. Additional printed material includes magazines, exhibition announcements and catalogs, a booklet by Teller entitled Art, Age and the River, published posthumously by her husband, and a manuscript of Poems or Poetic Expressions of Sculptors, collected by L. Lamis.

Subject files are arranged by name or subject and may contain letters, photographs, and printed material. Many of the files focus on galleries and museums, including the Montclair Art Museum, the Newark Museum, Noyes Museum, Parma Gallery, the Princeton Gallery of Fine Art and the Squibb Gallery. There are also subject files for associations, travel, projects, and colleagues including Margaret K. Johnson, Reuben Kadish, Ibram Lassaw, Aaron Siskind and Dorothy Dehner.

Photographs and slides depict Teller, her friends, works, gallery installations, and travels. Also included are photographs of trees, bark, and other natural formations used by Teller in her work.

The audio-visual materials include several sound recordings, videocassettes and 16 mm motion picture films. The videocassettes include television programs in which Teller, printmaker Judith Brodsky and actor Harry Hamlin are interviewed, a retrospective at Skidmore College and a film featuring Teller speaking for the National Council on Aging. Sound recordings include two interviews and a "Talk on Malta" by Teller and Joan Needham. The 16 mm films are black and white footage of Teller's first Parma Gallery show.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 11 series. Records are generally arranged by material type and chronologically thereafter.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1911-1985 (Box 1; 4 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1956-1991 (Box 1; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 3: Business Records, 1961-1990 (Box 1; 5 folders)

Series 4: Notes, 1960-1987 (Box 1; 13 folders)

Series 5: Writings, 1960-1989 (Boxes 1 and 9; 5 folders)

Series 6: Artwork, circa 1950s (Boxes 1 and 9; 6 folders)

Series 7: Scrapbooks, 1948-1990 (Boxes 1-2; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 8: Printed Material, 1957-1991 (Boxes 2-3 and 9; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 9: Subject Files, 1951-1990 (Boxes 3-5; 2.5 linear feet)

Series 10: Photographs, 1934-1985 (Boxes 5-9; 2.5 linear feet)

Series 11: Audio-Visual Materials, 1961-1989 (Box 8, FC 10-12; 0.6 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Jane Teller (1911-1990) worked as a printmaker and sculptor primarily in New Jersey. She specialized in working with wood and studied at the Rochester Institute of Technology, Skidmore College, and Barnard College. She also attended Federal Works Progress Administration (W.P.A.) classes in New York City, studying sculpture with Aaron J. Goodelman and wood carving with Karl Nielson. She later studied welding in the studio of Ibram Lassaw. She was also a lifelong friend of photographer Aaron Siskind. In 1960, she was awarded the Mary and Gustave Kellner Prize at the National Association of Women Artists Annual Exhibition at the National Academy of Design in New York, and in 1966 the Sculpture Prize at the Fiftieth Anniversary Exhibition, Philadelphia Art Alliance in Philadelphia. She exhibited mainly in New York and New Jersey and was married to author and editor Walter Teller.
Provenance:
The Jane Teller papers were donated by Jane Teller in 1990 and in 1991 by Walter Teller, widower of Jane Teller.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Printmakers -- New Jersey  Search this
Sculptors -- New Jersey  Search this
Topic:
Printmakers -- New Jersey  Search this
Sculpture, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women sculptors  Search this
Women printmakers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Prints
Sketchbooks
Slides (photographs)
Motion pictures (visual works)
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Sound recordings
Citation:
Jane Teller papers, 1911-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.telljane
See more items in:
Jane Teller papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw95c6d3902-ef80-4ea1-ba58-b2abe402072c
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-telljane

Cleve Gray papers

Creator:
Gray, Cleve  Search this
Names:
Berry-Hill Galleries  Search this
Betty Parsons Gallery  Search this
Connecticut. Commission on Arts, Tourism, Culture, History and Film  Search this
Jacques Seligmann & Co  Search this
Neuberger Museum of Art  Search this
Pratt Institute  Search this
Princeton University  Search this
Rhode Island School of Design  Search this
Barzun, Jacques, 1907-  Search this
Calder, Alexander, 1898-1976  Search this
Davis, Jim, 1901-1974  Search this
Dillenberger, Jane  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel, 1887-1968  Search this
Ernst, Jimmy, 1920-1984  Search this
Gabo, Naum, 1890-1977  Search this
Grace, Louise N.  Search this
Gray, Francine du Plessix  Search this
Lipchitz, Jacques, 1891-1973  Search this
Marin, John, 1870-1953  Search this
Pollock, Jackson, 1912-1956  Search this
Richter, Hans, 1888-1976  Search this
Smith, David, 1906-1965  Search this
Villon, Jacques, 1875-1963  Search this
Weber, Nicholas Fox, 1947-  Search this
Extent:
9.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Poems
Articles
Photographs
Reviews (documents)
Notes
Illustrations
Notebooks
Sketches
Drafts (documents)
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Interviews
Manuscripts
Paintings
Prints
Watercolors
Drawings
Lectures
Date:
1933-2005
Summary:
The Cleve Gray papers, 1933-2005, measure 9.2 linear feet. Papers include biographical material, alphabetical files, writings, artwork, audio/visual records, artifacts, printed material, and photographs. Extensive alphabetical files contain personal and professional correspondence as well as subject files relating to projects and interests. Especially well-documented are: Gray's involvement with the Vietnam protest movement; and Threnody, his best-known work composed of fourteen large panels lamenting the dead of both sides sides in Vietnam, commissioned by the Neuberger Museum of Art.
Scope and Content Note:
The Cleve Gray papers, 1933-2005, measure 9.2 linear feet. Papers include biographical material, alphabetical files, writings, artwork, audio/visual records, artifacts, printed material, and photographs. Extensive alphabetical files contain personal and professional correspondence as well as subject files relating to projects and interests. Especially well-documented are: Gray's involvement with the Vietnam movement; and Threnody, his best-known work composed of fourteen large panels lamenting the dead of both sides sides in Vietnam, commissioned by the Neuberger Museum of Art.

Among the biographical material are award and membership certificates, biographical notes, and personal documentation.

The alphabetical files contain Cleve Gray's personal and professional correspondence, as well as subject files relating to projects and interests. Correspondence is with friends and family, colleagues, publishers, museum curators and directors, art dealers, collectors, and fans. Among the correspondents of note are: Jacques Barzun, James E. Davis, Naum Gabo, Louise N. Grace, Hans and Fridel Richter, and Jacques and Gaby Villon. Other substantial correspondence includes: Berry-Hill Galleries, Betty Parsons Gallery, Connecticut Commission on the Arts, Jacques Seligmann and Co., Neuberger Museum of Art, Pratt Institute, Princeton University, and Rhode Island School of Design. Subject files mostly consist of correspondence, but include printed material and some photographs. Among the subject files are: Art Collection of Cleve and Francine Gray, Artist-Dealer Consignments and Visual Artists' Rights Act of 1989, Artists' Tax Equity Act of 1979, Promised Gifts to Museums, Threnody, Vestments, and Vietnam Protest. Of particular interest are files relating to the Estate of Hans Richter (Cleve Gray, executor), and Gray's research correspondence and illustrations for his Cosmopolitan article "Women-Leaders of Modern Art."

Writings are manuscripts and drafts, research materials, notes, and miscellaneous writings by Cleve Gray and other authors. Those by Gray include articles and catalog introductions on a wide range of art-related topics, as well as book and exhibition reviews. Also found are a book proposal, texts and notes for lectures and talks, miscellaneous notes, poems, political statements, and student papers. Of particular interest are autobiographical notes in the form of a chronology that his biographer, Nicholas Fox Weber, cited as an "autochronology."

Among the writings by other authors are pieces about Cleve Gray including Nicholas Fox Weber's manuscript Cleve Gray. A significant amount of material relates to three books edited by Gray: David Smith by David Smith: Sculpture and Writings, Hans Richter, and John Marin. Research material survives for an unpublished volume, Naum Gabo. Also included are notes relating to his translation of A l'Infinitif by Marcel Duchamp. Jane Daggett Dillenberger is represented by a lecture, "The Resurrection in Art." The remaining items by other authors are unsigned; of particular interest is a small notebook of reminiscences and notes about Jackson Pollock.

Artwork by Cleve Gray consists mostly drawings and sketches, and a small number of paintings, prints, and watercolors. Works by other artists consist are an unsigned mobile of paper cut-outs, possibly by Alexander Calder, and a pencil drawing signed Dick (probably Richard Avedon).

Audio recordings are a radio broadcast featuring Cleve Gray, several lectures by Gray on John Marin, and a lecture titled "Meaning in the Visual Arts." Other recordings are of Hans Richter and an interview with Jimmy Ernst conducted by Francine du Plessix Gray. Also found is a videocassette of "Glenville School Students at SUNY (Lincoln Center Activity)."

Artifacts are a Chinese scroll representative of those that hung in Cleve Gray's studio, two of his paintbrushes, Aberdeen-Angus Breeders' Association blue ribbon, and Neuberger Museum of Art Lifetime Achievement Award.

The vast majority of printed material - articles, clippings, exhibition catalogs and announcements, reproductions of art work, etc. - are about or by Cleve Gray. Miscellaneous items and publications mentioning Gray consist of annual reports, brochures, calendars, newsletters, programs, etc. Clippings about Vietnam and Vietnam protest memorabilia reflect his passionate involvement in the anti-war movement; a small number of these items mention Gray or were written by him.

Photographs are of artwork, events, people, places, and miscellaneous subjects. Most of the art work appearing in the photographs is by Cleve Gray and includes images of destroyed paintings. Also found is an original print of Photo Abstraction by Gray, circa 1934. Of particular note are photographs of Threnody, among them preparatory drawings and views of the work in progress. Photographs of artwork by other artists include Louise N. Grace, Jacques Lipchitz, John Marin, Hans Richter, and Jacques Villon.

Photographs of people are mainly portraits of Gray, and views of him with his wife and sons. Other individuals appearing in photographs are Hans Richter and some of Richter's descendants. Pictures of places consist of Gray's studio.

Events are an unidentified exhibition opening. Miscellaneous subjects are mostly exhibition installations. Illustrations consist of photographs published in David Smith by David Smith: Sculpture and Writings. Also found are small number of negatives and color transparencies.
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into 8 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1943-circa 2001 (Box 1; 0.1 linear ft.)

Series 2: Alphabetical Files, 1936-2005 (Boxes 1-5, 9; 4.3 linear ft.)

Series 3: Writings, 1935-2000 (Boxes 5-6; 0.85 linear ft.)

Series 4: Artwork, circa 1933-1987 (Boxes 6, 9, OV 12; 0.45 linear ft.)

Series 5: Audio/Visual Records, 1971-1989 (Box 6; 0.25 linear ft.)

Series 6: Artifacts, 1957-1999 (Box 6, RD 11; 0.45 linear ft.)

Series 7: Printed Material, 1933-2005 (Boxes 7-8; 1.25 linear ft.)

Series 8: Photographs, circa 1934-2002 (Boxes 8-10; 1.15 linear ft.)
Biographical Note:
Abstract Expressionist painter, sculptor, and writer Cleve Gray (1918-2004) lived and worked in Connecticut where he was politically active in the Vietnam protest movement and other liberal causes.

Born Cleve Ginsberg in New York City (the family changed its name to Gray in 1936), he attended the Ethical Culture School and at a young age developed a fascination with color and paint. At the urging of friends, Cleve's parents allowed him to accompany a school friend for lessons with George Bellows' student Antonia Nell. She encouraged and inspired the young artist, and a still life he painted in her class was shown at the National Academy of Design's 1932 annual exhibition. Miss Nell also introduced him to Louise N. Grace, an artist who became a good friend and had a lasting influence on him. While a student at Phillips Academy, Cleve studied painting with Bartlett Hayes and aspired to paint in France. Upon his graduation in 1936, he was awarded the Samuel F. B. Morse Prize for most promising art student.

Gray's mother was always supportive of his career choice. His businessman father, who didn't understand his son's desire to be an artist, insisted on a college education. Cleve chose Princeton, where he majored in art and archaeology, and studied painting with James E. Davis. His senior thesis was on Chinese landscape painting; both Eastern philosophy and art were long-term influences on Gray's work and outlook. He graduated summa cum laude in 1940, and then spent several months painting while living at the farm of a family friend in Mendham, New Jersey.

When a doctor suggeted that a dry climate might relieve sinus and asthma problems, Gray moved to Tucson, Arizona. Once settled in the desert, he contacted Louise N. Grace, whom he had met as a young teenager through his art instructor. Miss Grace, an artist and daughter of the founder of W. R. Grace and Co., was a highly cultured and independent woman older than his parents. The summer before Gray entered Phillips Academy, she had hired him to brush ground color onto canvases for murals she was painting for "Eleven Arches," her home in Tuscon then under construction. Miss Grace invited Gray to visit "Eleven Arches" to see the completed murals, and despite the substantial age difference, their friendship deepened; Gray found in her intellectual and spiritual guidance that was lacking in his own family. He remained in Tucson until enlisting in the U. S. Army in 1942, and they corresponded frequently during the the war. When a stroke in 1948 prevented Miss Grace from participating in the extensive tour of Europe she was arranging for a small group of friends, including Gray, she provided sufficient funds and insisted he make the trip on his own. Another stroke, suffered while Gray was traveling, left her in a coma; he was not permitted to see her again. Upon her death in 1954, Gray inherited "Eleven Arches."

Between 1943 and 1946, Gray was stationed in England, France, and Germany, serving in Army Signal Intelligence. Most of his work was performed at night, and he spent his free time drawing. While in London, Gray produced many colored pencil drawings of buildings that had been bombed. In France, a Red Cross volunteered to introduce him to Jacques Villon; although unfamiliar with the artist, Gray knew of Villon's brother, Marcel Duchamp, and accepted the invitation. Jacques and Gaby Villon lived near Gray's billet and he became a frequent visitor. Their friendship was important to his development as an artist. After being discharged from the Army in 1946, Gray remained in France to work with Villon who introduced him to the study of color and the concept of intellectual quality in painting. Gray also studied informally with André Lhote, Villon's former teacher. "American Painters in Paris," an exhibition presented in 1946 at Galerie Durand-Ruel, included work by Cleve Gray.

He returned to New York City in 1946. In the tight post-war rental market Gray managed to find a small room upstairs from a grocery store on East 106th Street for use as a studio. He commenced painting the London Ruins series based on drawings he had made during the war, and began thinking about exhibiting in New York. Gray secured introductions to Pierre Matisse, Curt Valentin, and Dorothy Miller. They encouraged him, but no opportunities came his way until Germain Seligmann, whose gallery was expanding its scope to include contemporary art, followed the advice of Curt Valentin and looked at Gray's work. Gary's first solo exhibition, held at Jacques Seligmann and Co., included selections from the London Ruins series, paintings done in Maine and Arizona, and a few portraits. The New York Times called it "an auspicious first," and one of the London Ruins series was selected by Edward Alden Jewell for the "Critic's Exhibition" at Grand Central Gallery.

Gray found New York City too frenetic. In 1949 he bought a large, old house in Warren, Connecticut, and lived and worked at "Graystones" for the remainder of his life. Half of a 6-car garage was converted to a studio; many years later, his studio moved to a barn, its renovation and design planned by sculptor and architect Tony Smith.

He married Francine du Plessix in 1957. Always interested in literature and philosophy, in the 1960s Francine du Plessix Gray began contributing articles to The New Yorker and is still affiliated with the magazine. Her reviews and articles appeared in prominent publications, and she wrote several award-winning novels and biographies. Their sons, Thaddeus and Luke (now a painter), were born in 1959 and 1961. Francine's mother, Tatiana du Plessix (the hat designer Tatiana of Saks), and step-father, the sculptor Alexander Liberman (also former art director of Vogue and later editorial director of Condé Nast publications) became Cleve Gray's closest friends.

The paintings and drawings of Cleve Gray - first consisting of figures and portraits, and then abstract compositions - were often produced in series. The earliest series, London Ruins, grew from the colored pencil drawings made while stationed in London during World War II. Travels to France, Italy, Greece, Morocco, Hawaii, Spain, Egypt, Japan, and Czechoslovakia, inspired many series, among them: Etruscan, Augury, Ceres, Demeter Landscape, Hera, Morocco, Hawaii, Ramses, Perne, Hatshepsut, Roman Walls, Zen, and Prague. His hometown, the Holocaust, and musicians inspired other series: Warren, Sleepers Awake!, Bela Bartok, and Four Heads of Anton Bruckner. Some series were works on paper, others were collage canvases, and a few series later spawned prints. Gray began using acrylics in the 1940s. Although the medium offered many benefits, he did not always like its appearance and frequently returned to oils. Around 1966 Gray was painting almost exclusively with acrylic, and eventually developed a technique of thinning the paint and applying successive layers of color (sometimes by pouring or with a sponge) on cotton duck rather than traditional canvas.

Gray was attracted to sculpture, too, working in that medium at different points in his career. His first sculpture, in plaster, was completed in 1959. In the early 1960s he visited a commercial sand-casting foundry and became excited about learning to cast in bronze. He made about a dozen sculptures to cast in sand, but due to too much undercutting, their casting became too difficult a problem. Lava flows seen while in Hawaii during 1970 and 1971 inspired a return to sculpture. This time, he used wood, papier maché, and metal. Gray then decided these pieces should be cast in bronze, and he was determined to do it himself. Friends taught him the lost wax process and he began working at the Tallix Foundry in Peekskill, New York where, over the next year, he cast about forty bronzes.

Gray's best known work is Threnody, a lament for the dead of both sides in Vietnam. In 1972, Gray received a commission to fill a very large gallery of the soon-to-open Neuberger Museum of Art (State University of New York, College at Purchase) designed by Philip Johnson. Friends of the Neuberger Museum paid his expenses and Gray, who was enormously excited about the project he considered a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, donated his time. Developing plans for the execution of Threnody consumed most of his time during 1972 and 1973. Composed of a series of fourteen panels, each approximately twenty feet square, the piece presented a number of technical challenges. It was constructed and painted in situ during the summer and early fall of 1973. Since then, Threnody has been reinstalled at the Neuberger Museum of Art on several occasions.

Gray was commissioned to design liturgical vestments for two Episcopal churches in Connecticut in the 1970s. A chasuble, stoles, and a mitre were commissioned by the Episcopal Diocese of Connecticut in 1984.

He won the "Outdoor Art at the Station Competition," for Union Station, Hartford, Connecticut. His very large porcelain enamel tile mural, Movement in Space, was installed on the façade of the transportation center in 1988.

Gray began writing occasional articles and exhibition reviews in the late 1940s. His concern with rational structure in art led him to question Abstract Expressionism and write "Narcissus in Chaos." This article, published in 1959 by The American Scholar, drew considerable attention. In 1960, Cosmopolitan published "Women - Leaders of Modern Art" that featured Nell Blaine, Joan Brown, Elaine de Kooning, Helen Frankenthaler, Sonia Gretchoff, Grace Hartigan, Ethel Magafan, Louise Nevelson, and Georgia O'Keeffe. Between 1960 and 1970, Gray was a contributing editor of Art In America, producing numerous articles (a few co-authored with Francine) and reviews for the periodical. He edited three books, David Smith by David Smith: Scupture and Writings, Hans Richter, and John Marin, all published by Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, and translated Marcel Duchamp's A l'Infinitif.

During the early 1960s, Gray became intensely focused on the situation in Vietnam. His first artistic response came in 1963 with Reverend Quan Duc, painted to commemorate a Buddhist monk who had immolated himself. Francine, too, felt strongly about the issue and over time the couple became increasingly active in the anti-war movement. They joined a number of organizations and helped to found a local chapter of Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam. The years 1968 and 1969 were an especially intense and active period for the Grays. They protested, wrote and spoke out against the war, raised funds to support anti-war political candidates, and on a few occasions were arrested and jailed. Writing for Art in America, editing the book series, and anti-war activities left little time for his art. In 1970 Gray refocused his attention on painting.

Beginning in 1947, Gray was always represented by a New York Gallery: Jacques Seligmann and Co. (1947-1959), Staempfli Gallery (1960-1965), Saidenberg Gallery (1965-1968), Betty Parsons Gallery (1968-1983), Armstrong Gallery (1984-1987), and Berry-Hill Galleries (1988-2003). He was represented by galleries in other cities, as well, but not as consistently or for such long periods.

He exhibited extensively in group and solo exhibitions throughout the United States and internationally. In addition to numerous solo exhibitions presented by the dealers who represented Gray, there were retrospective exhibitions at: Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Brooklyn Museum, Columbus Museum of Art, Krannert Art Museum (University of Illinois, Champaign), Princeton University Art Museum, Rhode Island School of Design, and Wadsworth Atheneum.

Many museums' permanent collections include the work of Cleve Gray, among them: Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Butler Institute of American Art, Columbus Museum of Art, Neuberger Museum of Art (SUNY, College at Purchase), the Museum of Modern Art (New York), Newark Museum, Oklahoma City Museum of Art, Phillips Collection, Sheldon Memorial Art Gallery (University of Nebraska, Lincoln), Smithsonian Institution, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Whitney Museum of American Art, and Yale University Art Gallery.

Cleve Gray served as artist-in-residence at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art in 1963 and at the Honolulu Academy of Arts in 1970, both sponsored by Ford Foundation programs. In 1980, he was appointed an artist-in-residence at the American Academy in Rome, where Francine concurrently served as a writer-in-residence; they returned for shorter periods during each of the subsequent seven years. Cleve Gray was presented the Connecticut Arts Award in 1987, and the Neuberger Museum of Art Lifetime Achievement Award in 1999. He was awarded an honorary degree by the University of Hartford in 1992, and was elected a member of The American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1998. In addition, he was a trustee of the Neuberger Museum of Art, New York Studio School, Rhode Island School of Design, and Wadsworth Atheneum.

Cleve Gray hit his head and suffered a massive subdural hematoma after falling on ice outside of his home. He died the following day, December 8, 2004.
Separated Material:
Exhibition catalogs and announcements and two scrapbooks donated to the Archives in 1967 and 1968 were microfilmed on reels D314-D315. Items on reel D315, transferred to the Smithsonian American Art Museum Library in 1975, are not described in this finding aid.
Provenance:
The Cleve Gray papers were donated to the Archives of American Art by Mr. Gray in 1967 and 1968. The bulk of the collection was given by his widow, Francine du Plessix Gray, in 2007 and 2008.
Restrictions:
Use of original material requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordigs with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Sculptors -- Connecticut  Search this
Painters -- Connecticut  Search this
Topic:
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Vietnam War, 1961-1975 -- Protest Movements -- United States  Search this
Designers  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women sculptors  Search this
Genre/Form:
Poems
Articles
Photographs
Reviews (documents)
Notes
Illustrations
Notebooks
Sketches
Drafts (documents)
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Interviews
Manuscripts
Paintings
Prints
Watercolors
Drawings
Lectures
Citation:
Cleve Gray papers, 1933-2005. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.grayclev
See more items in:
Cleve Gray papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw92d3d47d0-baa3-4085-80f2-9b5d1730c052
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-grayclev
Online Media:

Woodrow Wilson

Artist:
Jo Davidson, 30 Mar 1883 - 2 Jan 1952  Search this
Sitter:
Woodrow Wilson, 28 Dec 1856 - 3 Feb 1924  Search this
Medium:
Bronze
Dimensions:
39.8 x 19.3 x 23.3 cm (15 11/16 x 7 5/8 x 9 3/16" ), without base
Type:
Sculpture
Date:
1919
Topic:
Costume\Dress Accessory\Neckwear\Tie\Necktie  Search this
Woodrow Wilson: Male  Search this
Woodrow Wilson: Law and Law Enforcement\Lawyer  Search this
Woodrow Wilson: Literature\Writer  Search this
Woodrow Wilson: Education and Scholarship\Educator\Professor\University  Search this
Woodrow Wilson: Education and Scholarship\Administrator\University administrator\University president  Search this
Woodrow Wilson: Politics and Government\President of US  Search this
Woodrow Wilson: Politics and Government\Governor\New Jersey  Search this
Woodrow Wilson: Nobel Prize  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Dr. Maury Leibovitz
Object number:
NPG.77.323
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Exhibition:
America's Presidents (Reinstallation September 2017)
On View:
NPG, West Gallery 210
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm4cb14ff11-c997-41ca-a601-5cfd21d57a2a
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.77.323
Online Media:

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