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Nathaniel Saltonstall Arts Fund records

Creator:
Nathaniel Saltonstall Arts Fund  Search this
Names:
Saltonstall, Nathaniel, 1903-1968  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1968-1975
Scope and Contents:
Minutes of a meeting of the trustees of the Saltonstall Arts Fund; letters and memorandums relating to the sale of works from the Saltonstall collection; lists of works in the collection and appraisals; a "Memorial Exhibition" catalog; an estate auction catalog; and photocopies of clippings about Saltonstall.
Biographical / Historical:
Nathaniel Saltonstall, an architect and art collector, was one of the founders of the Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) in Boston, Massachusetts. He was President from 1936-1948, and 1960-1961; and Honorary President from 1961-1968. He was also a long-time trustee of both the ICA and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. In 1959, he established the "Nathaniel Saltonstall Arts Fund" in memory of his parents. Through auctions and sales of works in his collection, numerous schools, colleges, museums and galleries have received gifts from the fund and/or had the opportunity to show work not otherwise available.
Provenance:
Donated in 1992 by Eloise W. Hodges, a grand niece of Nathaniel Saltonstall. She received the material from her father, Philip Weld, an executor of Saltonstall's estate.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Art patrons -- Massachusetts  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Private collections  Search this
Art patronage  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- Massachusetts  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.nathsalt
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-nathsalt

Oral history interview with Elizabeth Saltonstall

Interviewee:
Saltonstall, Elizabeth, 1900-1990  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Names:
Boston Society of Independent Artists  Search this
Institute of Contemporary Art (Boston, Mass.)  Search this
Institute of Modern Art (Boston, Mass.)  Search this
Milton Academy (Milton, Mass.) -- Faculty  Search this
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. School  Search this
Windsor School (Boston, Mass.) -- Faculty  Search this
Windsor School (Boston, Mass.) -- Students  Search this
Benson, Frank Weston, 1862-1951  Search this
Bosley, Frederick A., 1881-1942  Search this
Chase, Frank Swift, 1886-1958  Search this
Clark, Henry Hunt  Search this
Cross, Anson K., 1862-1944  Search this
Hale, Philip Leslie, 1865-1931  Search this
James, Alexander, 1890-1946  Search this
Miller, George Charles, b. 1894  Search this
Presser, Josef, 1909-1967  Search this
Saltonstall, Nathaniel, 1903-1968  Search this
Thompson, Leslie P.  Search this
Wengenroth, Stow, 1906-1978  Search this
Extent:
34 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
1981 November 18
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Elizabeth Saltonstall conducted 1981 November 18, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art.
Saltonstall discusses her experiences with art as a child in Boston (mentioning Frank Weston Benson as an influence) and her subsequent art education at the Winsor School, the art school of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and independent study in Paris. She remembers the various teaching styles of the Museum School faculty (Frederick A. Bosley, Henry Hunt Clark, Anson K. Cross, Philip Leslie Hale, Alexander James, and Leslie P. Thompson), especially as they contrasted with French teaching methods. She also speaks of her teachers in France and on Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket (including Frank Swift Chase), and recalls some of her co-students (including Josef Presser). Particular mention is made of a lithography workshop taught by Stow Wengenroth, and of George C. Miller, who printed her lithography stones. Her cousin, Nathaniel Saltonstall, is discussed as a patron of the arts, especially his contributions to the establishment of the Institute of Modern Art [Institute of Contemporary Art] in Boston. She touches also on her own teaching career at Winsor School and Milton Academy, and her involvement with the Boston Society of Independent Artists and the Grace Horn Gallery.
Biographical / Historical:
Elizabeth Saltonstall (1900-1990) was a painter, printmaker, and instructor of Chestnut Hill, Mass.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound cassette. Reformatted in 2010 as 2 digital wav files. Duration is 1 hr., 25 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Art patrons -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching -- France -- Paris  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- Massachusetts  Search this
Art teachers -- Massachusetts -- Interviews  Search this
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Interviews  Search this
Printmakers -- Massachusetts -- Interviews  Search this
Women artists -- Massachusetts -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.salton81
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-salton81

Oral history interview with Polly Thayer

Interviewee:
Thayer, Polly, 1904-2006  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Names:
Cox, Gardner, 1906-1988  Search this
Hale, Philip Leslie, 1865-1931  Search this
Hawthorne, Charles Webster, 1872-1930  Search this
Hofmann, Hans, 1880-1966  Search this
Hopkinson, Charles, 1869-1962  Search this
Littlefield, William Horace, 1902-1969  Search this
Saltonstall, Nathaniel, 1903-1968  Search this
Sarton, May, 1912-  Search this
Van Ness, Beatrice Whitney, 1888-1981  Search this
Wickey, Harry  Search this
Extent:
89 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1995 May 12-1996 February 1
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Polly Thayer (Starr) conducted 1995 May 12-1996 February 1, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art.
Thayer talks about her childhood in an upper class Boston family, thriving on drawing in charcoal from casts at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, under tutelage of Beatrice Van Ness; her social debut, 1921-1922; a trip in the summer of 1922 to the Orient with her mother and brother where she was caught in the Tokyo earthquake; Philip Hale's method of teaching drawing at the Museum School in Boston, 1923-1924, and, later, privately; Eugene Speicher's urging her to free herself from Hale's teaching; the difficulty of making the transition to painting; and winning of the Hallgarten Prize of National Academy of Design, 1929.
Studying with Charles W. Hawthorne in Provincetown, Massachusetts in the summer of 1923-1924, which countered the rigidity of her training at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston School; travels in Spain and Morocco in early 1929, at the time her large painting of a nude, "Circles," won the Hallgarten Prize; the importance to her of a letter in 1929 from the critic, Royal Cortissoz, urging her to not fall into the trap of the Boston School and become formulaic in her work; her first one-person show at Doll and Richards, Boston, which resulted in 18 portrait commissions; her ease with which she did self-portraits early in her career, but not so later; and her difficulty in holding the attention of portrait sitters.
Studying with Harry Wickey at the Art Students League, who taught her by boldly re-working her drawings for "plastic" values, which Starr quickly achieved; sketching medical operations and back-stage at theatres, which gave her the dramatic subject matter she sought in the early 1930s; her portraits; getting married in 1933 and the affect on her work; and her work at the Painter's Workshop in Boston with Gardner Cox and William Littlefield. She recalls May Sarton whose portrait she painted in 1936, Charles Hopkinson, and Hans Hofmann.
The distractions from painting brought about by marriage, children, acting, an active social life and much travel; her increased involvement in social concerns through her conversion to Quakerism; the simplification of her paintings beginning in the late 1930s and her steady execution of portrait commissions, which took less time; her exhibitions in Boston and New York through the 1940s and the rarity of them after that; being a board member of the Institute of Modern Art, Boston, and its co-founder, Nathaniel Saltonstall; her approach to painting which amounts to seeking the invisible in the visual world; and the onset of glaucoma which has ended her painting career.
Biographical / Historical:
Polly E. Thayer (1904-2006) was a painter from Boston, Massachusetts.
General:
Originally recorded on 3 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 6 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hr., 44 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston -- Interviews  Search this
Women painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.thayer95
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-thayer95

Oral history interview with Ralph Coburn

Interviewee:
Coburn, Ralph, 1923-  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Names:
Boris Mirski Gallery (Boston, Mass.)  Search this
Institute of Contemporary Art (Boston, Mass.)  Search this
Massachusetts Institute of Technology -- Students  Search this
Kelly, Ellsworth, 1923-  Search this
Nelson, Carl Gustaf, 1898-1988  Search this
Netsch, Walter  Search this
Plaut, James S. (James Sachs), 1912-1996  Search this
Polonsky, Arthur  Search this
Saltonstall, Nathaniel, 1903-1968  Search this
Swetzoff, Hyman Wulf, 1920-1968  Search this
Wilson, John, 1922-2015  Search this
Zerbe, Karl, 1903-1972  Search this
Extent:
48 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
1995 May 25-June 23
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Ralph Coburn conducted 1995 May 25 and 1995 June 23, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art, in Coburn's home, Gloucester, Massachusetts.
Coburn talks about his parents and his childhood in Miami Beach, Florida; his early schooling; and entering Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in 1941, in its 5-year architecture program. He recalls Walter Netsch, a classmate at MIT, who later became a partner at Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, who introduced Coburn to modern design and to avant-garde music. He also recalls the painter and head of painting at the Museum of Fine Arts School, Karl Zerbe, his teacher in the course of his work for advanced MIT architecture students. He talks about his return to Florida as a draftsman for an aircraft equipment company in Miami, outfitting planes for the African campaign, and his foreman, a son of Al Capone; then returning to Massachusetts to work with an electrical company making secret military components.
Coburn discusses returning to and dropping out of MIT; working at the Institute of Modern Art in Boston through Hyman Swetzoff; following Swetzoff to the Boris Mirski Gallery; studying at Mirski's art school with Esther Geller and John Wilson and friends made at the school, including Ellsworth Kelly, Arthur Polonsky, and Reed Kaye. He recalls Carl Nelson, one of his teachers. He talks about the change in atmosphere at the Institute with the replacement of Thomas Metcalf by James Plaut and Nathaniel Saltonstall who changed the Institute's name to Institute of Contemporary Art and the protest surrounding the name change.
Biographical / Historical:
Ralph Coburn (1923- ) is an architect, painter, and designer currently living in Gloucester, Massahusetts.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound cassettes as 4 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hr., 36 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Architects -- Massachusetts  Search this
Topic:
Architecture -- Study and teaching  Search this
Designers -- Massachusetts -- Gloucester -- Interviews  Search this
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Gloucester -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.coburn95
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-coburn95

A memorial exhibition; selections from the Nathaniel Saltonstall Collection

Author:
Institute of Contemporary Art (Boston, Mass.)  Search this
Subject:
Saltonstall, Nathaniel 1903-1968 Art collections  Search this
Physical description:
[59] p. illus. (part col.) 23 cm
Type:
Exhibitions
Date:
1969
1969]
20th century
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Call number:
N6512 .B58
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_656902

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