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James T. Demetrion Lecture: Jordan Casteel

Creator:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden  Search this
Type:
Lectures
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2020-10-02T13:47:17.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, modern  Search this
See more by:
hirshhornmuseum
Data Source:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
YouTube Channel:
hirshhornmuseum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_XXZZ1S7P9sA

Fostering Critical Thinking in Schools and Museums

Creator:
Smithsonian Education  Search this
Type:
Conversations and talks
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2009-03-17T16:51:25.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Education  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianEducation
Data Source:
Smithsonian Education
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianEducation
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_pvCpgM_pUcI

Leo Baekeland Diary Volume 6

Author:
Baekeland, L. H. (Leo Hendrik), 1863-1944  Search this
Collection Creator:
Baekeland, L. H. (Leo Hendrik), 1863-1944  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (6.9" x 4.5".)
Container:
Box 18, Folder 5
Type:
Archival materials
Biographies
Diaries
Place:
Yonkers (N.Y.) -- 1900-1910
Date:
1910 February 1-1910 May 31
Scope and Contents:
Inscription on flyleaf: "Journal from February 1, 1910 to May 31, 1910."
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Laboratories  Search this
Automobiles -- 1900-1910  Search this
Tourism  Search this
Family -- 20th century  Search this
Genre/Form:
Biographies
Diaries -- 20th century
Collection Citation:
Leo Baekeland Papers, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Leo H. Baekeland Papers
Leo H. Baekeland Papers / Series 4: Diaries
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0005-ref295
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"Girls and Women in Science and Math Initiative," 1995

Collection Creator:
Ride, Sally, 1951-2012  Search this
Container:
Box 39, Folder 3
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Collection Citation:
Sally K. Ride Papers, Acc. 2014-0025, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Sally K. Ride Papers
Sally K. Ride Papers / Series 6: Space and Stem Education Advocacy / 6.2: STEM Advocacy, Committees and Conferences
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-2014-0025-ref538
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Graduation

Collection Creator:
Davis, Benjamin O., Jr., 1912-  Search this
Container:
Box 5, Folder 3
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Collection Citation:
Benjamin O. Davis, Jr. Collection, Acc. 1992.0023, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Benjamin O. Davis Jr. Collection
Benjamin O. Davis Jr. Collection / Series 2: Military Career / 2.3: Materials Arranged by Posting / 2.3.1: United States Military Academy (West Point, NY), Cadet
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-1992-0023-ref1800
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Matthew Baigell papers, [ca. 1965-1985]

Creator:
Baigell, Matthew, 1933-  Search this
Baigell, Matthew, 1933-  Search this
Subject:
Cézanne, Paul  Search this
Weichsel, John  Search this
Davis, Stuart  Search this
Macdonald-Wright, Stanton  Search this
Marsh, Reginald  Search this
Lichtenstein, Roy  Search this
Sherman, Hoyt Leon  Search this
Gottlieb, Harry  Search this
Gropper, William  Search this
Benton, Thomas Hart  Search this
Lozowick, Louis  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Cubism  Search this
Regionalism  Search this
Social realism  Search this
Muralists  Search this
Theme:
Diaries  Search this
Art Theory and Historiography  Search this
Art Movements and Schools  Search this
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)5835
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)208675
AAA_collcode_baigmatt
Theme:
Diaries
Art Theory and Historiography
Art Movements and Schools
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_208675

Selman Waksman

Artist:
Philippe Halsman, 02 May 1906 - 25 Jun 1979  Search this
Sitter:
Selman Abraham Waksman, 22 Jul 1888 - 16 Aug 1973  Search this
Medium:
Gelatin silver print on paper
Dimensions:
Image/Sheet: 34.7 x 27.4cm (13 11/16 x 10 13/16")
Mat: 71.1 x 55.9cm (28 x 22")
Type:
Photograph
Date:
1954
Topic:
Costume\Dress Accessory\Eyeglasses  Search this
Personal Attribute\Facial Hair\Mustache  Search this
Architecture\Door  Search this
Interior\Laboratory  Search this
Equipment\Laboratory Equipment  Search this
Equipment\Laboratory Equipment\Beaker  Search this
Equipment\Laboratory Equipment\Test tube  Search this
Equipment\Laboratory Equipment\Microscope  Search this
Equipment\Laboratory Equipment\Flask  Search this
Selman Abraham Waksman: Male  Search this
Selman Abraham Waksman: Literature\Writer\Scientific  Search this
Selman Abraham Waksman: Education\Educator\Professor\University  Search this
Selman Abraham Waksman: Science and Technology\Scientist\Biologist\Microbiologist  Search this
Selman Abraham Waksman: Nobel Prize  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Steve Bello in memory of Jane Halsman Bello
Object number:
NPG.2004.45
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Copyright:
© Philippe Halsman Archive
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm4e3c19d62-5f09-41b4-bbb5-412bbe7bbd6a
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.2004.45

Microscope

Maker:
Queen and Company  Search this
Physical Description:
brass (microscope material)
wood (microscope material)
iron (microscope material)
brown (overall color)
green (overall color)
black (overall color)
wood (case material)
Measurements:
microscope: 26.6 cm x 10.5 cm x 30 cm; 10 1/2 in x 4 1/8 in x 11 13/16 in
case: 29.2 cm x 18.3 cm x 33.1 cm; 11 1/2 in x 7 3/16 in x 13 1/16 in
Object Name:
microscope
Date made:
1875-1890
Subject:
Science & Scientific Instruments  Search this
Credit Line:
Rutgers University, Department of Physics
ID Number:
MG.327631
Accession number:
268279
Catalog number:
327631
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Medicine
Science & Mathematics
Microscopes
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a9-14c8-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1060257
Online Media:

Microscope

Maker:
Baker, Charles  Search this
Physical Description:
glass (overall material)
brass (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 40.4 cm x 17.3 cm x 16.6 cm; 15 7/8 in x 6 13/16 in x 6 9/16 in
Object Name:
microscope
Place made:
United Kingdom: England, London
Date made:
ca 1850-1900
Subject:
Science & Scientific Instruments  Search this
Credit Line:
Rutgers University, Department of Physics
ID Number:
MG.327632
Accession number:
268279
Catalog number:
327632
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Medicine
Microscopes
Science & Mathematics
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a9-5ced-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1349414
Online Media:

Delegate

Published by:
MelPat Associates, American, 1965 - 1986  Search this
Created by:
C. Melvin Patrick, American, died 1985  Search this
Medium:
ink on paper
Dimensions:
H x W x D: 10 13/16 × 8 7/16 × 9/16 in. (27.5 × 21.4 × 1.5 cm)
Type:
magazines (periodicals)
Place made:
Harlem, New York City, New York, United States, North and Central America
Place depicted:
Houston, Harris County, Texas, United States, North and Central America
San Francisco, California, United States, North and Central America
Oakland, Alameda County, California, United States, North and Central America
Martha's Vineyard, Oak Bluffs, Dukes County, Massachusetts, United States, North and Central America
Date:
1984
Topic:
African American  Search this
Advertising  Search this
Associations and institutions  Search this
Business  Search this
Communities  Search this
Dance  Search this
Fraternal organizations  Search this
Fraternities  Search this
Government  Search this
Hollywood (Film)  Search this
Journalism  Search this
Labor  Search this
Mass media  Search this
Men  Search this
Olympics  Search this
Political organizations  Search this
Politics  Search this
Professional organizations  Search this
Religious groups  Search this
Social life and customs  Search this
Sororities  Search this
U.S. History, 1969-2001  Search this
Urban life  Search this
Women  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Anne B. Patrick and the family of Hilda E. Stokely
Object number:
2012.167.18
Restrictions & Rights:
Public domain
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Documents and Published Materials-Published Works
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5a99826b2-563a-492a-9d22-e03c2c02f99c
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2012.167.18
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Playbill for 'Master Harold' …and the boys

Published by:
Playbill, American, founded 1884  Search this
Used by:
Lyceum Theatre, American, founded 1903  Search this
Subject of:
Danny Glover, American, born 1946  Search this
Zakes Mokae, South African, 1934 - 2009  Search this
Lonny Price, American, born 1959  Search this
Medium:
ink on paper
Dimensions:
H x W: 8 1/2 x 5 5/8 in. (21.6 x 14.3 cm)
Type:
theater programs
Place used:
New York City, New York, United States, North and Central America
Date:
1982
Topic:
African American  Search this
Broadway Theatre  Search this
Drama (Theatre)  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Kayla Deigh Owens
Object number:
2011.45.63
Restrictions & Rights:
Playbill used by permission. All rights reserved, Playbill Inc.
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Memorabilia and Ephemera
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd587833493-3e52-477d-947d-5b52493e7f97
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2011.45.63
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Online Media:

Woman's Building records

Creator:
Woman's Building (Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
Names:
Feminist Studio Workshop  Search this
Women's Graphic Center (Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
Chicago, Judy, 1939-  Search this
De Bretteville, Sheila Levrant  Search this
Raven, Arlene  Search this
Extent:
33.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Slides
Artists' books
Date:
1970-1992
Summary:
The records of the Woman's Building feminist arts organization in Los Angeles measure 33.5 linear feet and date from 1970-1992. Originally founded by artist Judy Chicago, graphic designer Sheila Levant de Bretteville, and art historian Arlene Raven in 1973, the Woman's Building served as an education center and public gallery space for women artists in southern California. The records document both the educational and exhibition activities and consist of administrative records, financial and legal records, publications, curriculum files, exhibition files, grant funding records and artist's works of arts and prints. A significant portion of the collection documents the Women's Graphic Center, a typesetting, design, and printing service operated by The Woman's Building.
Scope and Content Note:
The records of the Woman's Building measure 33.5 linear feet and date from 1970 to 1992. The organization played a key role as an alternative space for women artists energized by the feminist movement in the 1970s. The records document the ways in which feminist theory shaped the Building's founding core mission and goals. During its eighteen year history, the Building served as an education center and a public gallery space for women artists in Los Angeles and southern California; the records reflect both functions of the Building's activities.

The Administrative Files series documents the daily operations of the Building, with particular emphasis on management policies, budget planning, history, cooperative relationships with outside art organizations and galleries, special building-wide programs, and relocation planning. Included in this series are the complete minutes from most Building committees from 1974 through closing, including the Board of Directors and the Advisory Council. The General Publicity and Outreach series is particularly complete, containing publicity notices from most events, exhibits, and programs held at the Woman's Building, including brochures, announcements, programs, invitations, press releases, newspaper clippings, and magazine articles.

The Woman's Building's educational programs centered on courses offered by the Feminist Studio Workshop and the Extension Program. While the Workshop provided a two-year program for women interested in fully developing their artistic talent, the Extension Program offered a broad range of classes, specifically oriented to working women interested in art and art vocations. The records fully document both programs, focusing on the course development and descriptions, teacher contracts, class evaluations, budget planning, and scholarship programs. Although the Archives does not have the entire slide library, there are files concerning the establishment and administration of the library, as well as a few folders of slides.

The Gallery Programs series houses the records of the visual, performing, literary and video arts events held at the Woman's Building. Administrative files detail the daily operation of the gallery spaces. The files in the remaining subseries are primarily arranged by event and contain proposals, announcements, publicity, and artist biographies.

The Women's Graphic Center became a profit-making arm of the Woman's Building in 1981 but the typesetting and design equipment had been used by staff and students since 1975. The records in this series focus on the work produced at the Center, including general projects and artist designs and art prints. Many of the design and printing examples were produced for Woman's Building events and programs.

The Artist's Works of Art series includes artist books, resumes, correspondence, postcards, and samples of art in the form of sketches, drawings, and prints. There is also material related to Woman's Building projects. Especially noteworthy is the "What is Feminist Art?" project where artists gave their responses in various formats and mediums from text to pieces of artwork.

The Printed Materials series contains feminist and art publications not produced by or for the Woman's Building.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 7 series.

Series 1: Administrative Files, circa 1970-1991 (Box 1-9, 32; 9 linear feet)

Series 2: Educational Programs, 1971-1991 (Box 10-14; 4.9 linear feet)

Series 3: Gallery Programs, 1973-1991 (Box 14-20, OV 54; 5.7 linear feet)

Series 4: Women's Graphic Center, circa 1976-1989 (Box 20-23, 32, OV 33-50; 5.6 linear feet)

Series 5: Artists' Works of Art, circa 1972-1990 (Box 24-25, OV 51-53; 1.7 linear feet)

Series 6: Grants, 1974-1992 (Box 25-30; 5.3 linear feet)

Series 7: Printed Material (Not Woman's Building), 1970-1983 (Box 30-31; 1.3 linear feet)
Historical Note:
In 1973, artist Judy Chicago, graphic designer Sheila Levant de Bretteville, and art historian Arlene Raven founded the Feminist Studio Workshop (FSW), one of the first independent schools for women artists. The founders established the workshop as a non-profit alternative education center committed to developing art based on women's experiences. The FSW focused not only on the development of art skills, but also on the development of women's experiences and the incorporation of those experiences into their artwork. Central to this vision was the idea that art should not be separated from other activities related to the developing women's movement. In November of 1973 the founders rented workshop space in a vacated building in downtown Los Angeles and called it The Woman's Building, taking the name from the structure created for the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago. The FSW shared space with other organizations and enterprises including several performance groups, Womanspace Gallery, Sisterhood Bookstore, the National Organization of Women, and the Women's Liberation Union.

When the building they were renting was sold in 1975, the FSW and a few other tenants moved to a three-story brick structure, originally designed to be the administrative offices of the Standard Oil Company in the 1920s. In the 1940s, it had been converted into a warehouse and consisted of three floors of open space, conducive to publically available extension classes and exhibitions offered by the Woman's Building staff and students. By 1977, the majority of the outside tenants had left the Woman's Building, primarily because they were unable to sustain business in the new location. The new building was more expensive to maintain and the FSW staff decided to hire an administrator and to create a board structure to assume the financial, legal, and administrative responsibility for the Building. The funds to operate came from FSW tuition, memberships, fund-raising events, and grant monies.

In 1981, the Feminist Studio Workshop closed, as the demand for alternative education diminished. The education programs of the Building were restructured to better accommodate the needs of working women. The Woman's Building also began to generate its own artistic programming with outside artists, including visual arts exhibits, performance art, readings, and video productions. That same year, the Woman's Building founded the Women's Graphic Center Typesetting and Design, a profit-making enterprises designed to strengthen its financial base. Income generated from the phototypesetting, design, production, and printing services was used to support the educational and art making activities of the Building.

When the graphics business closed in 1988, the Woman's Building suffered a financial crisis from which it never fully recovered. The Building closed its gallery and performance space in 1991.
Related Material:
Among the other resources relating to the Woman's Building in the Archives of American Art is an oral history with Suzanne Lacy on March 16, 1990, March 24, 1990, and September 24, 1990. While not credited as a founding member, Lacy was among the first group of staff of the Woman's Building which she discusses in her interview.

The Getty Research Institute also holds a large collection on the Woman's Building which includes a wide range of material relating to its exhibitions, activities, and projects.
Separated Material:
The Archives of American Art donated 5 boxes of video tape from the collection to the Long Beach Museum of Art, Video Annex in 1994. According to documentation, this was the desire of Sandra Golvin and the Board of Directors of the Woman's Building.
Provenance:
The Woman's Building records were donated to the Archives of American Art in 1991 by Sandra Golvin, President of the Board of Directors. An small addition of a set of "Cross Pollination" posters was donated in 2019 by by ONE Archives at University of Southern California Libraries via Loni Shibuyama, Archives Librarian.
Topic:
Works of art  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Women artists -- California  Search this
Feminism and art  Search this
Function:
Nonprofit organizations -- California
Arts organizations -- California
Genre/Form:
Slides
Artists' books
Citation:
Woman's Building records, 1970-1992. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.womabuil
See more items in:
Woman's Building records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-womabuil
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Passages to Freedom: The Underground Railroad in American History and Legend

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 26, Folder 6
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
2003 February 27-March 1
Scope and Contents:
Conference held Thursday, February 27, through Saturday, March 1, 2003, National Museum of American History, Behring Center, Smithsonian Institution. Program celebrated the twenty-second annual national observance of African American History Month. Program created as a conference, community tribute, and cultural fair, in collaboration with the National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom Program of the United States National Park Service. It included performances, films, presentations hands-on activities, lectures, and panel discussions.

Participants included:

Allison Blakely, Ph.D., professor of European and Comparative History, Boston University

David W. Blight, Ph.D., scholarly advisor to the Passages to Freedom conference; professor of history, Yale University

Charles L. Blockson, curator and historian

Spencer R. Crew, Ph.D., executive director and chief executive officer, National Underground Railroad Freedom Center

Mary A. Edmond, chairperson of the Michigan Freedom Trail Commission; founder and president, Michigan Black History Network

Jerry Gore, historian, scholar and one of the founders of the National Underground Railroad Museum, Incorporated

Allen Grundy, founder, International Freedom Institute of the Southwest (IFIS); cofounder of Talking Back Living History Theatre (TBLH)

James Oliver Horton, Ph.D., scholarly advisor to the Passages to Freedom conference; Benjamin Banneker Professor of African Studies and History, George Washington University

Lois E. Horton, Ph.D., professor of history, George Mason University

Wilma King, Ph.D., Strickland Professor of American History and Culture, University of Missouri

Jane Landers, Ph.D., associate dean of the College of Arts and Science; associate professor of history and director, Center of Latin American and Iberian Studies, Vanderbilt University

Emma J. Lapsansky, Ph.D., curator, Quaker Collection and professor of history, Haverford College

Diane Miller, planning committee member, Passages to Freedom conference; and national coordinator, National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom Program, National Park Service (NPS)

Orloff Miller, Ph.D., planning committee member, Passages to Freedom conference; director, Freedom Station Program; and interim director, Research Programs, National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, Cincinnati, Ohio

Kevin Mulroy, Ph.D., director of research collections and chair, Research Services, University of Southern California libraries

Cathy D. Nelson, founder and president emeritus, Friends of Freedom Society; and state coordinator, Ohio Underground Association

Freddie L. Parker, Ph.D., chair, Department of History, North Carolina Central University, Durham, North Carolina

Bryan Prince, Buxton National Historic Site and Museum, Ontario, Canada

Vivian Abdur-Rahim, founder and director, Harriet Tubman Historical Society; and founding member, Underground Railroad Coalition, Delaware

Bernice Johnson Reagon, Ph.D., scholar, composer, singer, and activist, Cosby Chair Professor of Fine Arts, Spelman College, Atlanta, Georgia

Jane Rhodes, Ph.D., associate professor, ethnic studies, University of California, San Diego

Hilary Russell, independent scholar and researcher

Milton C. Sernett, Ph.D., professor of African American Studies and history and adjunct professor of religion, Syracuse University

Barbara A. Tagger, historian and regional coordinator, National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom Program

Ron Tyler, Ph.D., is director of the Texas State Historical Society and professor of history at the University of Texas at Austin

John Michael Vlach, Ph.D., professor of American studies and anthropology and director of the Folklife Program, George Washington University

Judith Wellman, Ph.D., professor emerita, History Department, State University of New York, Oswego

Deborah Gray White, Ph.D., professor and chair, history department, Rutgers University

Carol Wilson, Ph.D., associate professor of history, Washington College, Chestertown, Maryland

Church Historians

Ambassador Horace G. Dawson Jr., Ph.D., historian, Metropolitan AME Church, Washington, DC

Janet Lee Ricks, member and vice chair, history committee, Mt. Zion United Methodist Church, Georgetown, Washington, DC

Lonise Fisher Robinson, church historian, Asbury United Methodist, Washington, DC Performers and Artists included:

Nasar Abadey Trio

Drums - Nasar Abadey, drummer and composer, founder and leader of SUPERNOVA

Piano - Allyn Johnson, Washington, DC native, attended the University of the District of Columbia

Bass - James King, bassist, composer, and arranger

Michael E. Baytop, founder and president, Archie Edwards Blues Heritage Foundation, Washington, DC

Gwendolyn Briley – Strand

The Chancel Choir of Sargent Memorial Presbyterian Church The Daughters of Dorcas and Sons

The Duke Ellington School of the Arts Show Choir

Samuel L. E. Bonds, director and voice teacher, Duke Ellington School of the Arts, Washington, DC

Irma Gardner-Hammond, professional storyteller who tells stories from the African oral tradition known as the Griot tradition

Bus Howard, actor and artist in residence, Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Washington, DC

In Process…, African American women's a cappella ensemble

Jo Ann James, avid collector of recipes, a student of African American history, and a craftsperson

Kimberly Kelly, member of planning committee for the Passages of Freedom conference

Magpie - Terry Leonino and Greg Artzner, musicians

Alice McGill, well known for her portrayal of Sojourner Truth

Gretchen McKinney, term member, Speech Choir and Drama Team, Asbury United Methodist Church

Dietra Montague, independent artist who has lived and studied the arts and crafts of North and West Africa, Central and South America, Mexico, and Europe

Fred Morsell, actor

Ayo Ngozi, collage, multimedia, and book artist based in Mt. Rainier, Maryland

Reverb, a cappella group of African American gospel, quartet, and doo-wop singing

Mary Kay Ricks, freelance writer, researcher, and history tour guide who specializes in the Underground Railroad, Washington, DC

Kath Robinson, Washington, DC resident interested in the study of Ethnobotany and the study of misaims

Charlie Sayles, blues harmonica player

Program number AC408.120.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Use of reference audio and video cassette copies only.
Collection Rights:
Reproduction fees for commercial use. Copyright restrictions. Contact staff for information.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1328

Oral history interview with Douglas Crimp

Interviewee:
Crimp, Douglas  Search this
Interviewer:
Fialho, Alex, 1989-  Search this
Names:
ACT UP (Organization)  Search this
Century 21 Exposition (1962 : Seattle, Wash.)  Search this
Gay Activists Alliance  Search this
Rutgers University -- Faculty  Search this
Tulane University -- Students  Search this
University of Rochester -- Faculty  Search this
Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project  Search this
Baker, Elizabeth C., 1934-  Search this
Belaygue, Christian  Search this
Bordowitz, Gregg  Search this
Cooke, Lynne  Search this
Copjec, Joan  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel, 1887-1968  Search this
Elovich, Richard  Search this
Jonas, Joan, 1936-  Search this
Kohlmeyer, Ida, 1912-1997  Search this
Krauss, Rosalind E.  Search this
Lemann, Bernard, 1905-  Search this
Leonard, Zoe  Search this
Michelson, Annette  Search this
Olander, William  Search this
Owens, Craig  Search this
Robinson, Marilynne  Search this
Santos, René, 1954-1986  Search this
Torm, Fernando  Search this
Waldman, Diane  Search this
Warhol, Andy, 1928-1987  Search this
Wodiczko, Krzysztof  Search this
Wolfe, Daniel, 1960-  Search this
Extent:
5 Items (Sound recording: 5 sound files (6 hr., 2 min.), digital, wav)
69 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Place:
Germany -- description and travel
New York (N.Y.) -- Description and Travel
Date:
2017 January 3-4
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Douglas Crimp, conducted 2017 January 3-4, by Alex Fialho, for the Archives of American Art's Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project, at Crimp's home in New York, New York.
Crimp speaks of growing up in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho; his athleticism in water skiing and ice skating; sibling rivalry as a child; seeing art for the first time at the Seattle World Fair; being closeted and conflicted as a young gay man in 1950s Idaho; attending Tulane University in New Orleans and the culture shock he experienced there; his first year in Tulane's rigorous architecture program and ultimately changing his major to art history; the pageantry of Mardi Gras parades and the gay society he explored; writing an undergraduate paper analyzing Marcel Duchamp's "The Large Glass"; deciding to go to New York City; finding his voice as an art critic while beginning his career at Art News and Art International; his extensive analysis of Joan Jonas; attending Firehouse dances sponsored by Gay Activist Alliance and coming into his sexuality; being a patient of esteemed doctor Dr. Dan William; first learning of the AIDS crisis and epidemic through a New York Times article in 1981 describing a gay cancer; receiving an NEA art critic grant and spending a year in Germany from 1985-86; returning to find friends and acquaintances sick with HIV/AIDS or having died from it; the Dia Conversations; his role as editor of October and bringing queerness and AIDS to the forefront; joining ACT UP; the genesis of October's AIDS double issue in 1987-1988 and its success; how the journal issue changed the course of his career and steered him to teach gay studies and further his work with AIDS activism; the inner workings of ACT UP meetings; the sense of community ACT UP provided and the empowerment everyone felt; noting a sense of personal and professional urgency during the crisis; the timeline of his AIDS writings; his reaction to seeing the AIDS quilt for the first time at the March on Washington; writing to a wide, non-academic audience; his 1988 course at Rutgers University on AIDS video; his complex relationships with Rosalind Krauss and Annette Michelson; the poor coverage of the AIDS epidemic in the media and how it informed his writing; the understanding of the need for safe sex practices and writing "How to Have Promiscuity in an Epidemic;" teaching courses on AIDS at the University of Rochester and how his teaching interest evolved into queer theory and studies; evaluating Warhol's work with a queer lens; writing about his experience with queer life in New York City in the 1970s to counter the condescending conservative narrative; his current writing projects and interests; experience in demonstrations held by ACT UP; and the tremendous communal support he felt during his seroconversion. Crimp also recalls Marilynne Summers (Robinson), Bernard Lemann, Marimar Benetiz, Ida Kohlmeyer, Lynn Emory, Diane Waldman, Betsy Baker, Lucinda Hawkins, Christian Belaygue, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Rosalind Krauss, Joan Copjec, Gregg Bordowitz, Terri Cafaro, Rene Santos, Craig Owens, Fernando Torm, Bill Olander, Richard Elovich, Daniel Wolfe, Hector Caicedo, Lynne Cooke, and Zoe Leonard.
Biographical / Historical:
Douglas Crimp (1944- 2019) was a professor and art critic in New York, New York. Alex Fialho (1989- ) is a curator and arts writer who is the Programs Director for Visual AIDS in New York, New York.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
AIDS activists  Search this
AIDS (Disease) and the arts  Search this
Art -- History -- Study and teaching  Search this
Gay activists  Search this
Gay and lesbian studies  Search this
AIDS (Disease)  Search this
Mardi Gras  Search this
NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt  Search this
Queer theory  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.crimp17
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-crimp17

African American Contributions to the Smithsonian Oral History Interviews

Creator::
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Transcripts
Compact discs
Electronic images
Digital images
Electronic records
Sound recordings
Date:
2015-2016
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives (SIA) began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also reminiscences and interviews recorded by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

To celebrate the opening of the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) in September of 2016, the Institutional History program of Smithsonian Institution Archives conducted a series of oral history interviews with African Americans who made significant contributions to the Smithsonian over their careers.
Descriptive Entry:
These interviews discuss their contributions to the Smithsonian as African American volunteers, employees, and regents, their relationships to the rest of the Smithsonian, notable programs they developed, significant challenges, reminiscences of colleagues, and interaction with the public and staff.

The Smithsonian African American Contributions Oral History Interviews collection is comprised of 6 interview sessions, totaling approximately 7 hours of recordings and c. 340 pages of transcripts. The interviews were conducted in 2015-2017 by intern Olivia Sayah and historian Pamela M. Henson.

Jeannine Smith Clark (1928-2018) was born on October 5, 1928 in Washington, D.C. She received her BA and MA in African Studies from Howard University. She began her work with the Smithsonian in 1968 as a volunteer docent. She chaired the volunteer program of the Smithsonian Women's Committee in the late 1970s and early 1980s. In 1983 she was appointed to the Board of Regents, where she became the first chairwomen of the Cultural Education Committee in 1986. She was now a Emeritus Regent.

Shireen Dodson (1951- ) was born July 2, 1951 in New Jersey and moved to Washington, D.C. in the 1970s. She received her BS from Morgan State University and her juris doctorate from Seton Hall Law School. At the Smithsonian, she worked as the Assistant Director of the Accounting and Financial Services Office, SI Comptroller and with the African American Museum Project from 1980 to 2000. She is now at the United Nations.

Michael R. Barnes (1956- ) was born March 4th, 1956 in Washington, D.C. He began his career in 1977 at the Smithsonian in the Duplicating Branch of the Office of Printing and Printing Services. He has been working as a photographer for the Smithsonian since 2000. He is best known for his photography of the building of the National Museum of African American History and Culture, as well as of the Million Man March and the presidential inaugurations of George W. Bush and Barak Obama.

Shirley Ann Jackson (1946- ) grew up in Washington, D.C., before attending Massachusetts Institute of Technology for her B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. in theoretical physics and particle physics. After a career at Bell Labs, Rutgers University and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, she was named president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1999. She served on the Smithsonian Board of Regents from 2005 to 2017.
Historical Note:
The Smithsonian African American Contributions interviewees include Jeannine Smith Clark, Shireen Dodson, Michael R. Barnes, and Shirley Ann Jackson.
Rights:
Restricted. Contact SIHistory@si.edu to request permission.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Museums -- Employees  Search this
Photographers  Search this
Women  Search this
African Americans -- History  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Obama, Barack  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Presidents -- United States -- Inauguration  Search this
Volunteer workers in museums  Search this
Genre/Form:
Transcripts
Compact discs
Electronic images
Digital images
Electronic records
Sound recordings
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9636, African American Contributions to the Smithsonian Oral History Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9636
See more items in:
African American Contributions to the Smithsonian Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9636

History of Smithsonian Folklife Oral History Interviews

Extent:
0.5 cu. ft. (2 half document boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Date:
2005-2009
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives (SIA) began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also reminiscences and interviews recorded by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Smithsonian Institution predoctoral fellow, William S. Walker, of Brandeis University, conducted a series of oral history interviews on the history of folklife presentation at the Smithsonian, as part of his dissertation research.
Descriptive Entry:
The History of Folklife at the Smithsonian Oral History Interviews consist of 13.2 hours of analog and digital audio interviews and 369 pages of transcript.
Historical Note:
Folklife studies are carried on in several organizational units of the Smithsonian Institution: the Department of Anthropology at the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), the Festival of American Folklife (FAF), and the National Museum of American History (NMAH), and the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI). Dr. Walker began his project on the study and exhibition of folklife at the Smithsonian, focusing on the Folklife Festival and then expanded his interview scope to include other Smithsonian cultural scholars and solicit their views on the FAF and cultural studies, exhibition and public programming at the Smithsonian.

JoAllyn Archambault (1942- ), Director of the American Indian Program at the National Museum of Natural History, is an enrolled member of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe. She earned her doctorate at the University of California in Berkeley in 1984. She was a faculty member of the Department of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukie, Wisconsin (1983-86), and the Director of Ethnic Studies, California College of Arts and Crafts, Oakland, California (1978-83). As curator of Anthropology at the NMNH since 1986, she organized various exhibitions, including Plains Indian Arts: Change and Continuity, 100 Years of Plains Indian Painting, Indian Baskets and Their Makers, and Seminole Interpretations.

Spencer Crew (1949- ) received the A.B. in history from Brown University in 1972 and holds a master's degree (1973) and a doctorate from Rutgers University (1979). He was assistant professor of African-American and American History at the University of Maryland-Baltimore County, 1978-1981; historian, 1981-1987, curator 1987-1989, Department of Social and Cultural History, chair, 1989-1991, deputy director, 1991-1992, acting director, 1992-1994, director, 1994-2001 of NMAH. He then served as historical consultant to the National Civil Rights Museum, in Memphis, Tennessee, from 1987-1991; consultant to the Civil Rights Institute, in Birmingham, Alabama, 1991-1994; and executive director and chief executive officer for the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center from 2001-2008; and was appointed Clarence Robinson Professor at George Mason University in 2008. At the Smithsonian, Crew curated several exhibitions, most notably Field to Factory: Afro-American Migration, 1915-1940

William W. Fitzhugh (1943- ), an anthropologist, specialized in circumpolar archaeology, ethnology and environmental studies. He received his B.A. from Dartmouth College in 1964. After two years in the U.S. Navy, he attended Harvard University where he received his PhD in anthropology in 1970. He joined the Anthropology Department at NMNH in 1970. As director of the Arctic Studies Center and Curator in the Department of Anthropology, NMNH, he has spent more than thirty years studying and publishing on arctic peoples and cultures in northern Canada, Alaska, Siberia and Scandinavia. His archaeological and environmental research has focused upon the prehistory and paleoecology of northeastern North America, and broader aspects of his research feature the evolution of northern maritime adaptations, circumpolar culture contacts, cross-cultural studies and acculturation processes in the North, especially concerning Native-European contacts. He curated four international exhibitions, Inua: Spirit World of the Bering Sea Eskimos; Crossroads of Continents: Native Cultures of Siberia and Alaska; Ainu: Spirit of a Northern People; and Vikings: The North Atlantic Saga.

Rayna D. Green (1942- ) curator and Director of the American Indian Program at the NMAH, received the B.A. in 1963 and M.A. in 1966 from Southern Methodist University, served in the Peace Corps as a history instructor and library director for the Teacher Training School in Harar, Ethiopia, and the Ph. D. in Folklore and American Studies from Indiana University in 1973. A member of the Cherokee tribe, she administered National Native American Science Resource Center, Dartmouth College, before joining the staff of the Smithsonian in 1984. She has written extensively of Native American culture and foodways. Her research and exhibit projects include a documentary narrative with Julia Child, In the Kitchen with Julia, following on her co-curation of the long-running popular exhibition Bon App tit: Julia Child's Kitchen at the Smithsonian.

Thomas W. Kavanagh (1949- ), an anthropologist, received the B.A. from the University of New Mexico in 1971, the M.A. from The George Washington University in 1980, and the Ph.D. from University of New Mexico in 1986. He began his career at Indiana University and then joined the staff of the Smithsonian Institution. A scholar of Comanche Indians of Oklahoma, he has published extensively on the Comanches and was appointed Consulting Anthropologist for the Comanche Nation. In the 2000s, he served as director of the Seton Hall University Museum. His publications include Comanche Ethnography (2008), Comanche Political History (1996), North American Indian Portraits: Photographs from the Wanamaker Expeditions (1996), and "Comanche" in the Handbook of North American Indians, Volume 13 (Plains), Smithsonian Institution (2001).

Roger G. Kennedy (1926-2011) graduated from Yale University in 1949 and the University of Minnesota Law School in 1952, and pursued a diverse career in banking, television production, historical writing, foundation management, and museum administration. He was appointed Director of the National Museum of History and Technology (NMHT) in 1979, renamed it the National Museum of American History, and left in 1992 to become Director of the National Park Service. He focused on social and cultural history, and oversaw controversial exhibits including A More Perfect Union: Japanese Americans &amp; the American Constitution and Field to Factory: Afro-American Migration, 1915-1940.

Keith E. Melder (1932- ) studied American history at Williams College (B.A. 1954) and Yale University (M.A. 1957; PhD, 1964). He was an intern at the NMHT in 1958 and returned in 1961 as Curator of Political History until his retirement in 1996. His research focused on America political movements, especially the Women's Movement and the Civil Rights era. Melder was also interviewed for two other Smithsonian Institution Archives projects, Record Unit 9603, African American Exhibits at the Smithsonian, and Record Unit 9620, the American Association of Museums Centennial Honorees Oral History Project, as well as for the Ruth Ann Overbeck Capitol Hill History Project of the Capitol Hill Historical Society.

Clydia Dotson Nahwooksy (1933-2009), a Cherokee, and her husband Reaves, a Comanche Nation member, worked most of their lives to preserve American Indian tribal culture. Originally from Oklahoma, they spent 20 years in Washington, D.C., as cultural activists. In the 1970s, Clydia was director of the Indian Awareness Program for the Smithsonian Institution's Festival of American Folklife. In 1986 both Nahwooskys entered the seminary, and the Rev. Clydia Nahwooksy was an active pastor and a member of the Board of National Ministries and the American Baptist Churches USA General Board.

Ethel Raim (1936- ), Artistic Director of New York's Center for Traditional Music and Dance (CTMD), researched ethnic music and worked closely with community-based traditional for almost five decades. Raim also had a distinguished career as a performer, recording artist, music editor, and singing teacher. In 1963 she co-founded and was musical director of the Pennywhistlers, who were among the first to bring traditional Balkan and Russian Jewish singing traditions to the folk music world. Raim served as music editor of Sing Out! magazine from 1965 to 1975. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, she developed ethnic programs for the Newport Folklife Festival and the Smithsonian's Festival of American Folklife. In 1975 Raim joined Martin Koenig as Co-Director of the Balkan Folk Arts Center, which developed into the CTMD in New York City.

Joanna Cohan Scherer (1942- ) received the B.A. from Syracuse University in 1963 and the M.A. from Hunter College, City University of New York in 1968. A specialist in visual anthropology especially of Native Americans, historical photography, women and photography, North American Indian photography, and cultural anthropology. She joined the staff of the Anthropology Archives of the National Museum of Natural History in 1966 and in 1975 advanced to served as anthropologist and illustrations editor for the Smithsonian's multivolume series Handbook of North American Indians.

Robert D. Sullivan (1949- ) was educated at St. John Fisher College with a B.S. in anthropology in 1970, the M.A. in education management from the University of Rochester in 1979, and pursued the Ph.D. in human studies (ABD) at The George Washington University until 2006. He served as Chief of Museum Education at Rochester Museum and Science Center from 1970 to 1980, Director at the New York State Museum from 1980 to 1990, and Associate Director for exhibitions at National Museum of Natural History from 1990 to 2007.

Peter Corbett Welsh (1926-2010) was a curator and historian at the Museum of History and Technology, now known as the National Museum of American History. He was born on August 28, 1926, in Washington, D.C. He received his B.A. from Mount Union College in Alliance, Ohio, in 1950 and completed a post-graduate year of study at the University of Virginia. He received his M.A. from the University of Delaware where he was the first recipient of the Hagley Fellowship in 1956. Welsh served in the United States Army, 1951-1954. Prior to coming to the Smithsonian Institution, he was Research Assistant and Fellowship Coordinator at the Eleutherian-Mills Hagley Foundation, 1956-1959. Welsh was Associate Curator in the Smithsonian's Department of Civil History, 1959-1969, and served as editor of the Smithsonian's Journal of History in 1968. As Curator he played a major role in the development of the Growth of the United States hall for the opening of the Museum of History and Technology which depicted American civilization from the time of discovery through the mid-twentieth century. Welsh was Assistant Director General of Museums, 1969-1970, and assisted with the implementation of the National Museum Act through seminars on improving exhibit effectiveness. He also served as Director of the Office of Museum Programs, 1970-1971. After Welsh's tenure at the Smithsonian, he became the Director of both the New York State Historical Association and the Cooperstown Graduate Program, 1971-1974. He then served as Director of Special Projects at the New York State Museum in Albany, 1975-1976; Director of the Bureau of Museums for the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission; President of The Welsh Group, 1984-1986; and Curator (1986-1988) and Senior Historian (1988-1989) of the Adirondack Museum in Blue Mountain Lake, New York. In 1989, he became a full-time, independent museum consultant and lecturer, and was a visiting professor of the State University of New York (SUNY) in 1992. Welsh was a contributor to numerous scholarly journals. He authored Tanning in the United States to 1850 (1964), American Folk Art: The Art of the People (1967), Track and Road: The American Trotting Horse, 1820-1900 (1968), The Art of the Enterprise: A Pennsylvania Tradition (1983), and Jacks, Jobbers and Kings: Logging the Adirondacks (1994).
Rights:
Restricted. Contact SIHistory@si.edu to request permission.
Topic:
Interviews  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Folklife studies  Search this
Museum curators  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9619, History of Smithsonian Folklife Oral History Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9619
See more items in:
History of Smithsonian Folklife Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9619

History of Tropical Biology Oral History Interviews

Extent:
2 audiotapes (Reference copies).
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Place:
Panama
Date:
1997
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also reminiscences and interviews recorded by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

The History of Tropical Biology Oral History Interviews were compiled by Smithsonian fellow Catherine A. Christen as part of her research on the history of tropical biology at the Smithsonian.
Descriptive Entry:
These interviews of Robert L. Dressler and William Louis Stern, conducted by Catherine A. Christen, cover their involvement with the Association for Tropical Biology and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute during the 1960s.

The collection consists of two interview sessions, totaling approximately 1.5 hours of recordings and 57 pages of transcript.
Historical Note:
As part of her research for her Smithsonian postdoctoral fellowship project, in 1997 Catherine A. Christen conducted oral history interviews with two orchid specialists who had conducted research in the neotropics. On July 1, 1997, she interviewed Robert L. Dressler (1927- ), curator and co-ordinator for the Orchidaceae Section of the Flora MesoAmericana at the Missouri Botanical Garden. Dressler received the B.A. from the University of Southern California in 1951 and the Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1957. He was on the staff of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute from 1963 to 1987, when he was named a research associate. On July 2, 1997, Christen interviewed William Louis Stern (1926- ), professor of botany, University of Florida. Stern received the B.S. from Rutgers University in 1950, the M.S. in 1951 and the Ph.D. in 1954 from the University of Illinois. He was curator and then chair of the Department of Botany, National Museum of Natural History, from 1960 to 1967. In 1967, he was appointed professor at the University of Maryland. From 1978 to 1979, he was program chairman for systematic biology at the National Science Foundation. In 1979, he was named chairman of the Department of Botany at the University of Florida. In 1985 he returned to teaching there as professor of botany. In Florida, he changed his research focus to studies on the vegetative anatomy and systematics of the orchid family.
Restrictions:
Restricted (Transcripts). Contact SIHistory@si.edu to request permission.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Botany  Search this
Tropical biology  Search this
Professional associations  Search this
Science -- History  Search this
Museum curators -- United States -- Interviews  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9606, History of Tropical Biology Oral History Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9606
See more items in:
History of Tropical Biology Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9606

Photograph of Richard E. F. Leakey meeting with Susan Cachel and Rutgers University students

Names:
Cachel, Susan, 1949-  Search this
Leakey, Richard E.  Search this
Extent:
1 Print (silver gelatin)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Photographs
Date:
1986
Scope and Contents note:
Photograph of Richard E. F. Leakey with Rutgers University graduate students (Marie Selvaggio, Catherine Whiteman, and Sal Capaldo) and Susan Cachel, a faculty member in the Rutgers Department of Anthropology. They met at William Paterson College in New Jersey, November 1986.
Biographical/Historical note:
Susan Cachel is a physical anthropologist who works at Rutgers University and specializes in human and nonhuman primate evolution, evolutionary theory, and morphology. She was an instructor at the Koobi Fora Field School in northern Kenya, established by Richard Leakey in 1968.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 91-36
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 91-36, Photograph of Richard E. F. Leakey meeting with Susan Cachel and Rutgers University students, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.91-36
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-91-36

May Mandelbaum Edel papers

Creator:
Edel, May M. (May Mandelbaum), 1909-1964  Search this
Edel, Abraham, 1908-2007  Search this
Names:
Benedict, Ruth, 1887-1948  Search this
Boas, Franz, 1858-1942  Search this
Extent:
4.58 Linear feet (5 boxes)
Culture:
Jews  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Chiga (African people)  Search this
Okanagan  Search this
Kru (African people)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Lecture notes
Correspondence
Field notes
Place:
Uganda
Brownsville (New York, N.Y.)
Date:
1928-1996
bulk 1928-1964
Summary:
May Mandelbaum Edel (1909-1964) taught anthropology at Brooklyn College and the New School for Social Research, and founded the Anthropology Department at Rutgers University in 1960. She conducted fieldwork in Washington; Oregon; Uganda; and Brownsville, New York. The collection consists of field notes, lecture notes, language notes, manuscripts, books, correspondence, teaching materials, conference files, and personal papers. Included are lecture notes taken from courses with Franz Boas and Ruth Benedict, and extensive field notes for her work with the Okanagan Indians in Washington, the Bachiga (Bakiga) in Uganda, and Jewish families in Brownsville, New York.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of May Mandelbaum Edel document her student and professional career as an anthropologist. The collection consists of field notes, lecture notes, language notes, manuscripts, books, correspondence, teaching materials, conference files, and personal papers. Some of Edel's lecture notes reflect courses taken with Franz Boas and Ruth Benedict. The language notes include vocabulary lists, and are for Bullom, and possibly Salish and Tillamook. There are also extensive field notes for her work with the Okanagan in Washington, the Chiga in Uganda, and Jewish families in Brownsville, New York. Writings include annotated drafts of manuscripts on the Chiga of Uganda as well as an annotated draft of her book The Story of People. Correspondence includes letters from Franz Boas and Ernest B. Kalibala. Also included is correspondence for Abraham Edel regarding Edel's published works and the donation of her papers.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 7 series:

Series 1: Research, circa 1930s - circa 1960s; Series 2: Writings, 1933-1995; Series 3: Writings By Others circa 1920s-1966; Series 4: Personal Files, circa 1950s-1967; Series 5: Student Files, 1928-1935; Series 6: Correspondence, 1932-1996, undated; Series 7: Professional Files, 1929-1963;
Biographical/Historical note:
May Mandelbaum Edel was born on December 1, 1909 in New York. As a student at Barnard College, she took graduate anthropology classes at Columbia University under Franz Boas and Ruth Benedict. She continued her graduate studies at Columbia University and was awarded her Ph.D. in 1940. Her first fieldwork experience was with the Okanagan in 1930, and in the following year she conducted linguistic research among the Tillamook. As a fellow of the National Research Council, she traveled to Western Uganda in 1932 and stayed in the village of Bufuka (with the Bachiga people) where she did ethnographic work. In 1934 she married philosopher Abraham Edel, whom she would later collaborate with on the book Anthropology and Ethics. She taught anthropology at Brooklyn College and at the New School for Social Research, and in 1960, founded the Anthropology Department at Rutgers University. May Mandelbaum Edel passed away on May 23, 1964 at the age of 54.

Chronology

1909 -- Born on December 1 in New York

1929 -- B.A. from Barnard College

1930 -- Field research in Washington among the Okanagan

1931 -- Field research in Oregon among the Tillamook

1932 -- Field research among the Chiga in Uganda

1934 -- Married Abraham Edel

1940 -- Ph.D. in Anthropology from Columbia University

1947 -- Field research among Jewish families in Brownsville, New York

1956 -- Professor, New School for Social Research

1960 -- Founded the Anthropology Department at Rutgers University

1964 -- Died of illness on May 23
Related Materials:
The Bullom and Kru materials complement three tape recordings, apparently of these same individuals, and said to have been "collected by Franz Boas," that are deposited in the Archives of Traditional Music at Indiana University.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by May Mandelbaum Edel's daughter, Deborah Edel, in 2005.
Restrictions:
The May Mandelbaum Edel papers are open for research.
Rights:
Contact the naa@si.edu for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Northern Bullom language  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Lecture notes
Correspondence
Field notes
Citation:
May Mandelbaum Edel papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2005-27
See more items in:
May Mandelbaum Edel papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2005-27

[1965]

Container:
Box 1
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Scope and Contents:
Andujar, Manuel; Boynton, David P.; Crowe, C. Lawson (Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation); Du Bois, Hazel (includes "Working Mothers and Absent Fathers: Family Organization in the Caribbean"); Eddy, Elizabeth M.; Flayderman, Phillip C. (Washington Square Press); La Farge, Patricia (George Braziller, Inc; Review of Rene Millon's Built for Giants); Lauria, Anthony, Jr.; Lewis, Oscar; Lipit, Muriel (for Lita Fejos); Nahm, Helen (re: Mark Zborowski); Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Pandey, Triloki Nath; Perry, Bernard B. (Indiana University Press); Perry, Stewart E. (re: Mark Zborowski); Rohner, Ronald P.; General letter from Ruth Bunzel and others regarding May Edel Memorial Award at Rutgers University
Collection Restrictions:
Materials with student grades were separated and have been restricted. Most of the restricted materials are not open for access until 2030.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
See more items in:
Ruth Leah Bunzel Papers
Ruth Leah Bunzel Papers / Series 1: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2006-22-ref29

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