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James T. Demetrion Lecture: Jordan Casteel

Creator:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden  Search this
Type:
Lectures
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2020-10-02T13:47:17.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, modern  Search this
See more by:
hirshhornmuseum
Data Source:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
YouTube Channel:
hirshhornmuseum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_XXZZ1S7P9sA

Fostering Critical Thinking in Schools and Museums

Creator:
Smithsonian Education  Search this
Type:
Conversations and talks
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2009-03-17T16:51:25.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Education  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianEducation
Data Source:
Smithsonian Education
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianEducation
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_pvCpgM_pUcI

7. Lester Brown - Perspectives on Limits to Growth: World on the Edge

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2012-03-15T18:58:08.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianVideos
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianVideos
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_KPfUqEj5mok

Paul Robeson

Artist:
Doris Ulmann, 29 May 1882 - 28 Aug 1934  Search this
Sitter:
Paul Robeson, 9 Apr 1898 - 23 Jan 1976  Search this
Medium:
Platinum print
Dimensions:
Other (Accurate): 20.2 x 15.3 cm (7 15/16 x 6")
Mat: 45.7 x 35.6 cm (18 x 14")
Type:
Photograph
Date:
c. 1924
Topic:
Interior  Search this
Home Furnishings\Furniture\Seating\Chair  Search this
Costume\Jewelry\Ring  Search this
Costume\Dress Accessory\Tie\Necktie  Search this
Paul Robeson: Male  Search this
Paul Robeson: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Theater  Search this
Paul Robeson: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Singer  Search this
Paul Robeson: Society and Social Change\Reformer\Activist\Civil rights activist  Search this
Paul Robeson: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Movie  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
Object number:
NPG.78.2
Restrictions & Rights:
CC0
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm4e073450e-3e9c-4efc-aa50-9398a9f5fe69
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.78.2

Joe Glazer at Rutgers University -- Songs and Stories of Labor

Collection Musician:
Penn, Larry  Search this
McGee, Bobbie  Search this
Magpie  Search this
Killen, Louis  Search this
Collection Creator:
Collector Records  Search this
Glazer, Joe, 1918-2006  Search this
Extent:
1 Videocassettes (U-matic)
Container:
Box 16
Type:
Archival materials
Videocassettes (u-matic)
Date:
undated
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at rinzlerarchives@si.edu or (202) 633-7322 for additional information.

Restrictions may apply concerning the use, duplication, or publication of items in the Collector Records business records. Please consult the archivists for additional information about the materials and their use.
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions apply. Contact archives staff for information.
Collection Citation:
Collector Records business records, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.COLL, File JG-1345
See more items in:
Collector Records business records
Collector Records business records / Series 5: Video Recordings
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-coll-ref4035

Ira Condict

Artist:
Henry F. Derby, 1780 - 1880?  Search this
Other attribution:
Henry F. Darby, 1829 - 1897  Search this
Sitter:
Ira Condict, 1764 - 1811  Search this
Medium:
Oil on canvas
Dimensions:
71.1cm x 54.6cm (28" x 21 1/2"), Accurate
Type:
Painting
Date:
c. 1800-1867
Topic:
Ira Condict: Male  Search this
Ira Condict: Religion and Spirituality\Clergy\Clergyman  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
Owner: Rutgers University
Object number:
12 RU
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
Catalog of American Portraits
Data Source:
Catalog of American Portraits
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm4d62957d3-9cbd-4ab0-8079-2f7ede66a91f
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_12_RU

"A Right To The City" Symposium | "From Urban Renewal to Gentrification"

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2018-11-28T15:39:41.000Z
YouTube Category:
Nonprofits & Activism  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianAnacostia
Data Source:
Anacostia Community Museum
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianAnacostia
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_ZfjBZ8fl9us

Rutgers University Collection of Radio Interviews about Duke Ellington

Collector:
Rutgers University. Institute of Jazz Studies  Search this
Names:
Ellington, Duke, 1899-1974  Search this
Extent:
1.5 Cubic feet (4 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Oral history
Audiotapes
Date:
1971-1986.
Scope and Contents:
Collection consists of twenty-five (25) 7-inch reel-to-reel audiotapes of nine (9) radio interviews documenting the career of Duke Ellington as composer and musician.
Arrangement:
Collection arranged into one series.
Provenance:
Collection donated by Dan Morgenstern, Institute of Jazz Studies, Rutgers University, November 7, 1992.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Occupation:
Composers -- 20th century  Search this
Topic:
Music -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Musicians -- 1970-1990 -- United States  Search this
Jazz musicians -- 1970-1990 -- United States  Search this
Jazz -- 1970-2000  Search this
African American composers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews -- 1970-1990
Oral history -- 1970-1990
Audiotapes -- 1970-1990
Citation:
Rutgers University Collection of Radio Interviews about Duke Ellington, 1971-1986, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0328
See more items in:
Rutgers University Collection of Radio Interviews about Duke Ellington
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0328

Oral history interview with Barkley L. Hendricks, 2009 June 18

Interviewee:
Hendricks, Barkley L., 1945-  Search this
Interviewer:
Goncharov, Kathy, 1952-  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
African American artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)16034
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)307096
AAA_collcode_hendrb09
Theme:
African American
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_307096

Leon Golub papers, 1930s-2009

Creator:
Golub, Leon, 1922-2004  Search this
Subject:
Spero, Nancy  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Sound recordings
Interviews
Transcripts
Video recordings
Topic:
Art dealers  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Political activists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art historians  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)8979
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)211166
AAA_collcode_goluleon
Theme:
Lives of American Artists
Chicago's Art-Related Archival Materials: A Terra Foundation Resource
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_211166
Online Media:

Leon Golub papers

Creator:
Golub, Leon, 1922-2004  Search this
Names:
Spero, Nancy, 1926-2009  Search this
Extent:
16.5 Linear feet
4.13 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Photographs
Sound recordings
Interviews
Transcripts
Video recordings
Date:
1930s-2009
Summary:
The papers of painter, political activist, and educator Leon Golub are dated 1930s-2009 and measure 16.5 linear feet and 4.13 GB. His career as a painter and educator – and, to a far lesser extent, his personal interests and activities – are documented by correspondence, interviews, writings by Golub and other authors, subject files, printed and digital material, and audiovisual recordings. Also included are biographical materials, personal business records, and photographs of Leon Golub and wife Nancy Spero. Posthumously dated items are mostly condolence letters, obituaries, printed material, and inventories of his work.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of painter, political activist, and educator Leon Golub are dated 1930s-2009 and measure 16.5 linear feet and 4.13 GB. His career as a painter and educator – and, to a far lesser extent, his personal interests and activities – are documented by correspondence, interviews, writings, subject files, printed and digital material, and audiovisual recordings. Also included are biographical materials, personal business records, and photographs of Leon Golub and his art work. Posthumously dated items are mostly condolence letters, obituaries, printed material, and inventories of his work.

Biographical materials consist largely of video documentaries about Leon Golub and his work, obituaries, and information about his 2004 memorial service and a larger memorial tribute held later. Also found are educational records, passports, curricula vitae.

Correspondence is mostly of a professional nature, focusing on exhibitions, projects, collectors, articles submitted for publication, Golub's work, speaking engagements, awards, gifts of artwork, studio visits, and travel arrangements. Correspondents include dealers, curators, art historians, critics, collectors, writers, and editors. Scattered throughout are a small number of letters concerning personal business and politics.

Interviews with Leon Golub and joint interviews with Leon Golub and Nancy Spero were conducted for a variety of purposes. They are preserved as transcripts, video, and sound recordings. Writings by Golub include manuscripts and notes for articles, catalog essays, and miscellaneous writings. Notes and texts for talks, lectures, and panel discussions, include some transcripts and recordings. Among the writings by other authors are a dissertation, a thesis, academic papers, notes, texts of speeches, and a recording of a lecture by an unidentified speaker.

Subject files reflect Golub's professional and personal activities, interests and relationships. Of note are many files of "Images (source material)" used for a variety of artwork and projects. Personal business records documenting Golub's artistic output include many inventories and lists, and a comprehensive register of work, information about consignments, loans, photo permissions, and gifts or donations. Also found are extensive mailing lists.

Printed material includes clippings, exhibition catalogs and announcements, and a variety of miscellaneous printed items. Most material is about/mentions Golub, and/or includes reproductions of his work. Scattered throughout are items concerning topics of interest to Golub, and articles written by him.

The majority of the photographic materials are color digital prints of Golub's artwork. There are photographs of Leon Golub and Nancy Spero, family members, and friends and colleagues at exhibition events. Also found are a few photographs of Golub's plexibox sculptures.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged in 8 series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1930s-2006 (Boxes 1-2; 1.4 linear feet, ER01-ER02; 3.82 GB)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1955-2004 (Boxes 2-3; 0.9 linear foot)

Series 3: Interviews, 1967-2004 (Boxes 3-4; 0.8 linear foot)

Series 4: Writings, 1948-2003 (Boxes 4-5, 21; 1.1 linear foot, ER03; 0.098 GB)

Series 5: Subject Files, 1959-2005 (Boxes 5-11, OV 18; 6.2 linear feet, ER04-ER06, 0.213 GB)

Series 6: Personal Business Records, 1965-2009 (Boxes 11-12; 1.4 linear feet)

Series 7: Printed Material, circa 1950s-2009 (Boxes 12-16, 21, OV 19; 3.9 linear feet)

Series 8: Photographs, 1940s-2004 (Boxes 16-17, OV 20; 0.6 linear foot)
Biographical / Historical:
Leon Golub (1922-2004) was a painter in New York City known for figurative work with political content, an anti-war activist, and professor of art at Rutgers University.

Chicago native Leon Golub studied art history at the University of Chicago (BA 1942) before serving as a cartographer with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Europe during World War II. Upon returning home, Golub became identified with Monster Roster, a group of Chicago artists who believed art must be grounded in real events in order to be relevant to the viewer and society, an idea he held throughout his life. At the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Golub pursued his interest in painting (BFA 1949, MFA 1950) and met fellow student Nancy Spero whom he married in 1951. After graduation he began teaching at local colleges, exhibited in Chicago and New York, and served as chair of "Exhibition Momentum" (1950). The couple and their two sons lived in Italy from 1956-1957. In 1959 they moved to Paris and, while there, a third son was born. Upon returning to New York City in 1964, Golub became actively involved with the Artists and Writers Protest Against the War in Vietnam, other anti-war groups, and civil liberties organizations. While his painting style changed with time, Golub continued to explore power, violence and conflict, often working in series with titles such as Combats, Napalm, Mercenaries, Interrogation, and Riot.

He first participated in a group show with other veterans at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1947, and soon was included in group and solo exhibitions throughout the United States and in Europe, including the Guggenheim Museum's influential national traveling exhibition "Younger American Painters" (1954-1956). Golub and Spero exhibited their work in tandem and collaborated on installations. He continued to participate in group shows including "Documenta IX" (2002). Golub's work is included in the permanent collections of museums throughout the world.

Golub began his teaching career soon after graduation, first at a junior college in Chicago. In the later 1950s he served briefly on the faculties of Illinois Institute of Technology School of Design and Indiana University; in the 1960s at the Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia, and Fairleigh Dickinson University in New Jersey. He began a long tenure at Rutgers University, School of Visual Arts in 1970 and retired in 1991. In the early 1990s, both Golub and Spero were affiliated with Sommerakademie in Salzburg. Golub wrote and spoke on art, politics, and social issues; he also published many articles, statements, and book reviews, as well as contributing introductions and essays for exhibition catalogs.

Awards and honors included the Skowhegan Medal for Painting (1988), Chicago Committee to Defend the Bill of Rights Award (1989), Dickinson College Arts Award (1992), National Foundation of Jewish Culture Visual Arts Award (1995), and Hiroshima Art Prize shared with Nancy Spero (1996). Golub was awarded honorary doctorates of Fine Arts by the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (1982), Swarthmore College (1985), College of St. Rose (1995), Trinity College (1999), and Pratt Institute (2000). He was elected a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters (2002).

Leon Golub died in New York City August 8, 2004 from complications following surgery.
Related Materials:
Also among the holdings of the Archives of American Art are oral history interviews with Leon Golub conducted for the Archives of American Art by Bruce Hooten 1965 and Irving Sandler 1968 October 28-November 18. The Nancy Spero papers, 1940s-2009, bulk 1970-2009, include documentation of many of the couple's collaborative projects, joint exhibitions, their family, and shared interests.
Provenance:
The Leon Golub papers were donated by Leon Golub in 1978; the majority of the papers were given in 2013 by The Nancy Spero and Leon Golub Foundation for the Arts via their sons Stephen, Philip and Paul Golub. Material loaned for microfilming in 1969 is included with the 2013 donation.
Restrictions:
Use of original materials requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Leon Golub papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Art museum curators  Search this
Art critics  Search this
Topic:
Art dealers  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Political activists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art historians  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Sound recordings
Interviews
Transcripts
Video recordings
Citation:
Leon Golub papers, 1930s-2009. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.goluleon
See more items in:
Leon Golub papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-goluleon
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Barkley L. Hendricks

Interviewee:
Hendricks, Barkley L., 1945-  Search this
Interviewer:
Goncharov, Kathy  Search this
Extent:
3 Items (Sound recording, master: 3 sound files (1 hr., 42 min.), digital, wav)
24 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2009 June 18
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Barkley L. Hendricks conducted 2009 June 18, by Kathy Goncharov, for the Archives of American Art, at Hendricks's home and studio, in New London, Conn.
Biographical / Historical:
Barkley L. Hendricks (1945- ) is an artist in New London, Conn. Kathy Goncharov (1952- ) is Director of the Brodsky Center at Rutgers University, N.J.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Painters -- Connecticut  Search this
Topic:
African American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.hendrb09
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-hendrb09

Benny Carter Collection

Creator:
Carter, Benny, 1907-2003  Search this
Extent:
67.5 Cubic feet (182 boxes, 3 oversize folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Awards
Clippings
Scrapbooks
Scores
Posters
Photographs
Music
Manuscripts
Date:
1928-2000
Scope and Contents:
The majority of the material in the Benny Carter Collection is dated from the late 1920s through the later half of the 1990s. Donated to the Smithsonian Institution in December, 2000, the bulk of the collection is comprised of original music manuscripts (full scores and parts), band books, and published sheet music from Benny Carter's prolific career as a jazz composer and musician. The collection also contains newspaper clippings, correspondence, photographs, scrapbooks, awards, posters, commercial sound recordings, a few jazz related journals and some personal ephemera documenting Benny Carter's personal life and career as a composer, arranger, bandleader, trumpeter and alto saxophonist.
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into six series

Series 1: Music Manuscripts, 1928-1990s

Series 2: Newspaper Clippings and Magazine Clippings, 1928-2000

Series 3: Photographs, 1928-1998

Series 4: Awards and Proclamations, 1961-1999

Series 5: Sound Recordings, 1958-1989

Series 6: Ephemera, 1952-2000

Series 7: 2004 Photographs Addenda

Series 8: 2004 Ephemera Addenda

Series 9: 2004 Magazine and Newsclippings Addenda

Series 10: 2004 Awards and Proclamations Addenda
Biography:
Bennett Lester Carter, better known as "Benny," was born on August 8, 1907 in New York City. The Carter's were quite a musical family - - Benny's father played guitar, his mother played piano, and a cousin, Theodore ("Cuban") Bennett, played the trumpet professionally - - so it was no surprise that Benny also became a musician, beginning his musical training at the age of ten. He first played the trumpet and then C-melody saxophone before changing to alto saxophone, which became his chief instrument.

Benny Carter began his professional career around the young age of seventeen, when he joined a local group as an alto saxophonist. He subsequently played with various other groups, including Billy Paige and Louis Deppe, until attending Wilberforce College in Ohio to study seminary in 1925. Finding music more enticing than theology, Carter left college and instead toured with Horace Henderson's Wilberforce Collegians intermittently between 1925 and 1928.

Carter's musical talents began attracting widespread attention in 1930 during a year-long stint with Fletcher Henderson's orchestra, to which he contributed many important arrangements. As word of his talent continued to spread, Carter played with such notables as William "Chick" Webb (1931) and served as musical director of William McKinney's Cotton Pickers (1931-1932) in Detroit. Upon returning to New York in 1932, Carter formed his own highly-respected orchestra. In its two years of existence, the Benny Carter Orchestra included several major pioneers in early swing style, such as Bill Coleman, Dicky Wells, Ben Webster, Chu Berry, Teddy Wilson, and Sid Catlett. Months after playing the inaugural show in New York City at Harlem's Apollo Theater in 1934, Carter disbanded the orchestra and, one year later, sailed to Europe to spread jazz across the globe.

After arriving in Europe, Carter first performed with Willie Lewis in Paris, France, and then, during 1936 -1938, served as staff arranger for the BBC Dance Orchestra in London, England. As he continued to tour throughout his stay in Europe (even leading his own interracial band in the Netherlands in 1937), he met with even greater success than in the United States. By this point, Carter was well-known for his arrangements and for his alto saxophone and clarinet playing. He was also recognized for his talented singing and tenor saxophone, trumpet, and piano playing.

In 1938, Carter sailed back to the United States and formed a new orchestra which regularly played at Harlem's Savoy Theater until 1940. He toured the United States during the next few years, both with small groups and with his big band, finally settling in Los Angeles in 1945. There he continued to lead his band (band members included modern jazz greats such as Miles Davis and J. J. Johnson), but turned increasingly to writing and arranging music for films and television productions. His film scores include Stormy Weather (1943), A Man Called Adam (1966), Red Sky at Morning(1970), and Buck and the Preacher (1972). "Ironside," "Bob Hope Presents," and the Alfred Hitchcock show were among the television programs for which he wrote music.

Carter had stopped performing with a regular orchestra by 1946, but he remained active up through the 1960s both by playing at Norman Granz's Jazz at the Philharmonic shows and with Duke Ellington, among others. He also continued to arrange music for various singers, including Sarah Vaughan, Ella Fitzgerald, Ray Charles, Peggy Lee, and Louis Armstrong. During the 1970s he began performing again, touring in Europe, Asia and Australia; in 1976 he toured the Middle East under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of State. Carter also became involved with academia, serving as visiting professor or workshop consultant at universities such as Yale, Cornell, Princeton, and Duke. He remained active in the music business well into the 1990s and still resides in California.

Benny Carter is regarded as "one of the most versatile musicians of his time." As a musician, he made major contributions to several areas of jazz and, as an arranger, he helped to construct the big-band swing style. He has received many awards throughout his career. The more prestigious honors included a Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences and a 1994 Grammy Award for the album "Elegy in Blue."

Footnotes

[1 ] Biographical note derived from Benny Carter: A Life in American Music, by Monroe and Edward Berger, and James Patrick (New York: Scarecrow Press and the Institute of Jazz Studies, Rutgers University, 1982).

[2] J. Bradford Robinson, "John Kirby," The New Grove Dictionary of Jazz, vol 1, 1986: 653-54.
Provenance:
The Benny Carter Collection was donated by Bennett Carter in December 2000.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Reproduction restricted due to copyright.
Topic:
African American musicians  Search this
Jazz -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Awards
Clippings -- 20th century
Scrapbooks -- 20th century
Scores
Posters -- 20th century
Photographs -- 20th century
Music -- Manuscripts
Manuscripts -- Music -- 20th century
Citation:
Benny Carter Collection, 1928-2000, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0757
See more items in:
Benny Carter Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0757
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Juan Sánchez, 2018 October 1-2

Interviewee:
Sánchez, Juan, 1954-  Search this
Interviewer:
Franco, Josh T., 1985-  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Topic:
Art teachers -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Hispanic American artists -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Mixed media (Art)  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Photographers -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)17606
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)396648
AAA_collcode_sanche18
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_396648

Joan Semmel papers, 1949-2013, bulk 1960-2013

Creator:
Semmel, Joan, 1923-  Search this
Subject:
Hardy, John  Search this
Markson, David  Search this
Grossman, Nancy  Search this
Hammond, Harmony  Search this
Edelson, Mary Beth  Search this
Golden, Eunice  Search this
Sleigh, Sylvia  Search this
Bernstein, Judy  Search this
Stevens, May  Search this
Schapiro, Miriam  Search this
Nieto, José Antonio  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Video recordings
Illustrations
Photographs
Topic:
Women and erotica  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Painting, Abstract  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Feminism and art  Search this
Feminism  Search this
Erotica  Search this
Art -- Political aspects  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)16175
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)366716
AAA_collcode_semmjoan
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_366716
Online Media:

May Mandelbaum Edel papers

Creator:
Edel, May M. (May Mandelbaum), 1909-1964  Search this
Edel, Abraham, 1908-2007  Search this
Names:
Benedict, Ruth, 1887-1948  Search this
Boas, Franz, 1858-1942  Search this
Extent:
4.58 Linear feet (5 boxes)
Culture:
Jews  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Chiga (African people)  Search this
Okanagan Indians  Search this
Kru (African people)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Lecture notes
Correspondence
Field notes
Place:
Uganda
Brownsville (New York, N.Y.)
Date:
1928-1996
bulk 1928-1964
Summary:
May Mandelbaum Edel (1909-1964) taught anthropology at Brooklyn College and the New School for Social Research, and founded the Anthropology Department at Rutgers University in 1960. She conducted fieldwork in Washington; Oregon; Uganda; and Brownsville, New York. The collection consists of field notes, lecture notes, language notes, manuscripts, books, correspondence, teaching materials, conference files, and personal papers. Included are lecture notes taken from courses with Franz Boas and Ruth Benedict, and extensive field notes for her work with the Okanagan Indians in Washington, the Bachiga (Bakiga) in Uganda, and Jewish families in Brownsville, New York.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of May Mandelbaum Edel document her student and professional career as an anthropologist. The collection consists of field notes, lecture notes, language notes, manuscripts, books, correspondence, teaching materials, conference files, and personal papers. Some of Edel's lecture notes reflect courses taken with Franz Boas and Ruth Benedict. The language notes include vocabulary lists, and are for Bullom, and possibly Salish and Tillamook. There are also extensive field notes for her work with the Okanagan in Washington, the Chiga in Uganda, and Jewish families in Brownsville, New York. Writings include annotated drafts of manuscripts on the Chiga of Uganda as well as an annotated draft of her book The Story of People. Correspondence includes letters from Franz Boas and Ernest B. Kalibala. Also included is correspondence for Abraham Edel regarding Edel's published works and the donation of her papers.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 7 series:

Series 1: Research, circa 1930s - circa 1960s; Series 2: Writings, 1933-1995; Series 3: Writings By Others circa 1920s-1966; Series 4: Personal Files, circa 1950s-1967; Series 5: Student Files, 1928-1935; Series 6: Correspondence, 1932-1996, undated; Series 7: Professional Files, 1929-1963;
Biographical/Historical note:
May Mandelbaum Edel was born on December 1, 1909 in New York. As a student at Barnard College, she took graduate anthropology classes at Columbia University under Franz Boas and Ruth Benedict. She continued her graduate studies at Columbia University and was awarded her Ph.D. in 1940. Her first fieldwork experience was with the Okanagan in 1930, and in the following year she conducted linguistic research among the Tillamook. As a fellow of the National Research Council, she traveled to Western Uganda in 1932 and stayed in the village of Bufuka (with the Bachiga people) where she did ethnographic work. In 1934 she married philosopher Abraham Edel, whom she would later collaborate with on the book Anthropology and Ethics. She taught anthropology at Brooklyn College and at the New School for Social Research, and in 1960, founded the Anthropology Department at Rutgers University. May Mandelbaum Edel passed away on May 23, 1964 at the age of 54.

Chronology

1909 -- Born on December 1 in New York

1929 -- B.A. from Barnard College

1930 -- Field research in Washington among the Okanagan

1931 -- Field research in Oregon among the Tillamook

1932 -- Field research among the Chiga in Uganda

1934 -- Married Abraham Edel

1940 -- Ph.D. in Anthropology from Columbia University

1947 -- Field research among Jewish families in Brownsville, New York

1956 -- Professor, New School for Social Research

1960 -- Founded the Anthropology Department at Rutgers University

1964 -- Died of illness on May 23
Related Materials:
The Bullom and Kru materials complement three tape recordings, apparently of these same individuals, and said to have been "collected by Franz Boas," that are deposited in the Archives of Traditional Music at Indiana University.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by May Mandelbaum Edel's daughter, Deborah Edel, in 2005.
Restrictions:
The May Mandelbaum Edel papers are open for research.
Rights:
Contact the naa@si.edu for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Northern Bullom language  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Lecture notes
Correspondence
Field notes
Citation:
May Mandelbaum Edel papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2005-27
See more items in:
May Mandelbaum Edel papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2005-27

3. Clement Price - (Re)Presenting America: The Evolution of Culturally Specific Museums

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Symposia
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2012-04-27T23:23:27.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_bU9zRRF6vB4

Amy Zaharlick, George L. Trager, and Felicia H. Trager sound recordings and papers on Picuris language

Creator:
Trager, Felicia Harben, 1930-  Search this
Zaharlick, Ann Marie, 1947-  Search this
Trager, George L.  Search this
Extent:
130 Sound recordings
4 Linear feet
Culture:
Picuris Pueblo  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Tiwa Indians  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Field recordings
Field notes
Date:
1952 - 1990
Summary:
This collection consists of Amy Zaharlick's research and sound recordings on Picuris and other Pubeloan languages as well as the field recordings and notes given to Zaharlick by anthropologist and fellow Picuris specialist, George L. Trager.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains sound recordings and notes relating to the Picuris language research of Ann Marie (Amy) Zaharlick and her colleagues George L. and Felicia H. Trager, from 1962-1990. Most of the papers consist of Zaharlick's notes and transcripts from the Kiowa-Tanoan conferences which she organized and chaired, and handouts relating to Zaharlick's bilingual education consultant work. Small portions of the Tragers' field notes on Taos which were copied by Zaharlick, presumably for her own research, are also included. The bulk of the collection consists of 130 sound recordings of songs and stories in Picuris and other Puebloan languages made between 1963-1989. There are few earlier recordings which may be copies of material in Trager's papes at the University of California, Irvine. The titles of the tapes have been transcribed from information on the tape boxes. The content of recordings has not been verified.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 2 series: (1) Papers (1965-1990); (2) Sound Recordings (1952-1989).
Biographical / Historical:
Amy Zaharlick received her Ph.D. in linguistic anthropology from the American University in 1977. Prior to joining the staff at Ohio State University in XXX, she served as director of the Native American Teacher Education Program and as Associate Director of the Multicultural Education Program at the University of Albuquerque in New Mexico. Zaharlick was a professor in the Department of Anthropology at Ohio State University until her retirement in 2012.

George Leonard Trager was born on March 22, 1906 in Newark, New Jersey. He earned a bachelor's degree at Rutgers University and did his graduate work in Slavic and Romance Philology at Columbia University. He received his doctorate in 1932 with the dissertation The use of the Latin demonstratives (especially ille and ipse) up to 600 A.D., as the source of the Romance article. Trager's first teaching position was at Adams State College in Alamosa, Colorado, and it was from here that he begin his fieldwork on Tanoan languages. In 1936 Trager took a position at Yale, joining such influential linguists and Edward Sapir and Benjamin Whorf. From 1956 through 1967 Trager taught at the University of Buffalo (later SUNY-Buffalo). In the late 1960s he left Buffalo for Southern Methodist University and became more involved in Taonoan lanugauge field research. Trager married three times. His second and third wives, Edith Crowell Trager-Johnson and Felicia Harben Trager worked with him in American Indian lingistics and Kiowa-Tanoan Studies. Trager died in 1992.

Felicia Harben Trager graduated from Wayne State University in 1957 and received a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship. She received her M.A. in 1959 from the Department of Anthroplogy and Lingustics at the University of Buffalo where she did graduate work under George Trager. She worked in Washington D.C. as a project associate at the Washington Center for Applied Linguistics and taught English as a foreign language. in 1961 she married George Trager and returned with him to Buffalo where in 1968 she earned a Ph.D. for her dissertation Picuris Pueblo, New Mexico: An Ethnologuistic Salvage Study. In 1967 she moved with George Trager to Dallas where she was a lecturer at Southerm Methodist University's University College. She assisted her husband as a researcher and editor for three of his books, and was the co-author with him in several articles on Tanoan languages. Felicia Trager died in 1972 at the age of 42.

Sources Consulted: Golla, Victor 1993 Obituary George L. Trager (1906-1992). Newsletter of the Society for theh Study of Indigenous Languages of the Americas 2-3.

Smith, Henry Lee 1974 Obituary Felicia Harben Trager 1930-1972. American Anthropologist 76(1)78-79.
Related Materials:
Correspondence of George L. Trager can be found in the Esther Schiff Goldfrank papers, John P. Harrington papers, and Anthropological Society of Washington records. NAA Manuscript 4540-a-b contains some of Trager's notes and correspondence. The George L. Trager papers can be found at the University of California Irvine Library, Department of Special Collections (MS-M005).
Provenance:
Received from Ann Marie (Amy) Zaharlick in 2012. The Trager's original sound recordings were given to Zaharlick by George L. Trager in 1974.
Restrictions:
The Zaharlick and Trager sound recordings and papers are open for research.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Field recordings
Field notes
Citation:
Amy Zaharlick, George L. Trager, and Felicia H. Trager sound recordings and papers on Picuris language, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2012-14
See more items in:
Amy Zaharlick, George L. Trager, and Felicia H. Trager sound recordings and papers on Picuris language
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2012-14
Online Media:

Winifred Lubell papers

Creator:
Lubell, Winifred  Search this
Extent:
1.8 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Sketchbooks
Date:
1933-2003
Summary:
The papers of illustrator Winifred Lubell measure 1.8 linear feet and date from 1933-2003. The collection consists of 25 sketchbooks with original drawings and watercolors, as well published books and unpublished manuscripts both written and illustrated by Lubell. There are also loose ink drawings and a folio of drawings.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of illustrator Winifred Lubell measure 1.8 linear feet and date from 1933 - 2003. The collection consists of 25 sketchbooks dating from 1933-1983, with original drawings and watercolors. There are copies of published books and unpublished manuscripts written and/or illustrated by Lubell. There are also loose ink drawings and a folio of drawings.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 1 series:

Series 1: Winifred Lubell Papers, 1933-2003 (Boxes 1-3, OV 4; 1.8 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Winifred Milius Lubell (1914-2012) was a prolific illustrator who worked primarily in the Massachusetts area. She is best known for her illustrations of a series of books by Dorothy Sterling, The Outer Lands, a natural history of Cape Cod.

Winifred Lubell was born in 1914 in New York City. She studied at the Art Students League in New York with George Grosz and other members of the League's faculty from 1933 to 1935. During the Great Depression, Lubell and her fellow students were encouraged by Grosz to go out into the city and document the plight of the homeless. In 1936 she began attending the Duncan Phillips Museum School in Washington D.C. She met and married textile expert and writer Cecil Lubell in 1939, with whom she shared an avid interest in mythology, psychology, linguistics and the history and visual styles of written languages. Together, they had two children David and Stephen.

After World War II Lubell began her long career as an illustrator. With her husband she created a series of children's books emphasizing natural history, animals, plants and ecosystems. Here Comes Daddy, appeared in 1945 with text and illustrations by Lubell. In 1994, Lubell published The Metamorphosis of Baubo, Myths of Woman's Sexual Energy which became an important resource for feminist scholarship. Her artwork can be found in the Rutgers Art Museum and the Kerlan collection in Minneapolis.
Related Materials:
Additional Winifred Lubbell papers are located at Rutgers University and the University of Minnesota.
Provenance:
The Winifred Lubell papers were donated in 2003 by Winifred Milius Lubell.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The collection is publication restricted by Winifred Lubell, until her death. Authorization to publish, quote or reproduce must be obtained from Winifred Lubell.
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Illustrators -- Massachusetts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Sketchbooks
Citation:
Winifred Lubell papers, 1933-2003. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.lubewini
See more items in:
Winifred Lubell papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-lubewini

Haym Beneroya and Third Discussion Panel from the Moving Beyon Earth Symposium

Creator:
Lemelson Center, National Museum of American History  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2012-05-02T17:23:02.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
American History  Search this
See more by:
LemelsonCenter
Data Source:
Lemelson Center, National Museum of American History
YouTube Channel:
LemelsonCenter
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_zn7NTfckuA4

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