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Rehn, Peggy Wrenn - Rhodes

Collection Creator:
Frank K. M. Rehn Galleries  Search this
Container:
Box 11
Reel 5863, Frame 628-727
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1920-1945
Scope and Contents note:
Rehn, Peggy Wrenn (first wife)

Reich, Sheldon

C. J. Reid and Co., Inc.

Reid, John C.

Reiffel, Charles

Reilly, Paul M.

Henry Reinhardt and Son Galleries, Inc.

Reisner, Mrs.

Reiss, Jacob

Renthal, Charles H.

Resor, Mrs. Stanley

Reubling, Agnes

Reynal and Hitchcock, Inc.

Reynolds, Mrs. Jackson

Reynolds, L. M.

Reynolds, Mrs. M. A.

Rhana, Jim

Rheinstein, Sidney

Rhind, J. Massey

Rhode Island School of Design and Museum of Art

Rhodes, Mrs. Leland S.
Collection Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Frank K. M. Rehn Galleries records, 1858-1969 (bulk 1919-1968). Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Frank K. M. Rehn Galleries records
Frank K. M. Rehn Galleries records / Series 1: Correspondence, A-Z
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw952f880d7-3be3-4c10-a6e8-a1a5b22bed83
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-franrehg-ref368

Inventory of Charles Lang Freer's library

Creator:
Freer, Charles Lang, 1856-1919  Search this
Names:
Freer Gallery of Art  Search this
Freer, Charles Lang, 1856-1919  Search this
Collection Creator:
Freer, Charles Lang, 1856-1919  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (typed, with handwritten edits)
Type:
Archival materials
Inventories
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Comprehensive index of Charles Lang Freer's library, mostly relating to art and Asian culture. Headings include authors, countries, and topical subjects. Sections include locations in Freer's original Detroit home; an index of all books transferred to the Smithsonian; a list of collections and collectors catalogues of American and Near and Far Eastern art; sales catalogues, and books in Chinese language.
Arrangement:
Organized in the original manner by the creator.
Local Numbers:
FSA A.01 05.22
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Art, Asian -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Art, American -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Book collecting  Search this
Function:
Libraries
Genre/Form:
Inventories
Collection Citation:
Charles Lang Freer Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Gift of the estate of Charles Lang Freer.
Identifier:
FSA.A.01, Item FSA A.01 05.22
See more items in:
Charles Lang Freer Papers
Charles Lang Freer Papers / Series 5: Art Inventories / 5.22: Printed Books [Library]
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/dc302cb29b7-d6a1-46ad-9b1d-afc360459013
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-01-ref3332
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Fairfield Porter papers

Creator:
Porter, Fairfield  Search this
Names:
Hirschl & Adler Galleries  Search this
Tibor de Nagy Gallery  Search this
Brainard, Joe, 1942-  Search this
Burkhardt, Rudy  Search this
Button, John, 1929-1982  Search this
Day, Lucien B., 1916-  Search this
Downes, Rackstraw  Search this
Elmslie, Kenward  Search this
Evergood, Philip, 1901-1973  Search this
Frielicher, Jane  Search this
Giardelli, Arthur  Search this
Guest, Barbara  Search this
Hartl, Léon, 1889-  Search this
Hess, Thomas B.  Search this
Katz, Alex, 1927-  Search this
Koch, Kenneth, 1925-  Search this
Laning, Edward, 1906-1981  Search this
Lichtenstein, Roy, 1923-1997  Search this
Morse, Carl  Search this
Myers, John Bernard  Search this
O'Hara, Frank, 1926-1966  Search this
Padgett, Ron  Search this
Porter, Ruth W., 1875-1942  Search this
Rivers, Larry, 1925-  Search this
Schloss, Edith, 1919-  Search this
Schuyler, James  Search this
Shapiro, David, 1947-  Search this
Stankiewicz, Richard, 1922-  Search this
Vasilieff, Nicholas  Search this
Extent:
9.3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Travel diaries
Sketches
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Date:
1888-2001
bulk 1924-1975
Summary:
The papers of New York-based painter, lithographer, art critic, and poet Fairfield Porter measure 9.3 linear feet and date from 1888 to 2001, with the bulk of material dating from 1924 to 1975. Papers document Porter's life and career through correspondence, writings, business records, printed materials, photographs, and artwork.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of New York-based painter, lithographer, art critic, and poet Fairfield Porter measure 9.3 linear feet and date from 1888 to 2001, with the bulk of material dating from 1924 to 1975. The collection includes a biographical chronology; certificates, awards, and diplomas; letters to Fairfield and Anne Porter; scattered outgoing correspondence; and reviews, essays, notes, poems, and translations written by Porter and others. Among the writings are poetry manuscripts written by several New York School Poets including Frank O'Hara, James Schuyler, and Kenneth Koch. Also found are gallery records, inventories and appraisals, financial records, exhibition catalogs, clippings, posters, and records of Anne Porter's efforts to place his collection and document and publish his work after his death. Photographs of Porter, his homes, and his family are also present, as well as sketchbooks, loose sketches, and drawings spanning his entire career.

Significant correspondence is present from the Porters' many poet friends, including Kenneth Koch, James Schuyler, Ron Padgett, Kenward Elmslie, Barbara Guest, Carl Morse, David Shapiro, and others. Among the letters are poetry manuscripts by Koch, Morse, Schuyler, Padgett, and Shapiro. Some letters are actually written in verse, especially those from Kenneth Koch.

Artists with letters in the collection include Joe Brainard, Rudy Burkhardt, John Button, Lucien Day, Rackstraw Downes, Philip Evergood, Jane Frielicher, Arthur Giardelli, Leon Hartl, Alex Katz, Edward Laning, Roy Lichtenstein, Larry Rivers, Richard Stankiewicz, Nicolas Vasilieff, among others. Other art world figures represented include John Bernard Myers, curator at the Tibor de Nagy gallery (New York), and Tom Hess, editor of ArtNews. Artwork found within the correspondence includes an illustrated letter from Ron Padgett and an original print on a holiday card by Edith Schloss.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into the following nine series. See the series descriptions below for more information about the content of each series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1916-1975 (Box 1 and 11; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1918-1996 (Boxes 1-2; 1.2 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings by Fairfield Porter, 1924-1975 (Box 2; 0.6)

Series 4: Writings by Others, 1888-1992 (Boxes 2-3; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 5: Personal Business Records, 1944-1996 (Boxes 3-4; 1 linear foot)

Series 6: Anne Porter's Posthumous Projects, 1980-1988 (Box 4; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 7: Printed Materials, 1934-2001 (Boxes 4-6 and 11; 1.5 linear feet)

Series 8: Photographs, circa 1880-1990 (Boxes 6 and 11; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 9: Artwork, 1918-1975 (Boxes 7-10 and 12-17; 2.2 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Fairfield Porter was born near Chicago in 1907, the fourth of five children of James and Ruth Furness Porter. His father was an architect, his mother a poet from a literary family, and Porter grew up in an environment where art and literature were highly valued. His father designed the family homes in Winnetka, Illinois and on Great Spruce Head Island, an island in Maine that he purchased for the family in 1912. Fairfield Porter spent summers there from the age of six, and views of the island, its structures, and neighboring towns were the subjects of many paintings.

Porter attended Harvard from 1924 to 1928, studying fine art with Arthur Pope and philosophy with Alfred North Whitehead. After graduating from Harvard, Porter moved to New York City and took studio classes at the Art Students League from 1928 until 1930, studying with Boardman Robinson and Thomas Hart Benton, and immersing himself in the art and radical politics of Greenwich Village. In the 1940s, he studied at Parson's School of Design with art restorer Jacques Maroger, adopting the Maroger recipe for an oil medium in his own painting.

To further his education as an artist, Porter traveled to Europe in 1931, where he spent time with expatriate art theorist Bernard Berenson and his circle. When he returned to New York, he allied himself with progressive, socialist organizations, and like many of his contemporaries, worked at creating socially relevant art. He did artwork for the John Reed Club, a communist group; taught drawing classes for Rebel Arts, a socialist arts organization; wrote for their magazine, Arise!; and created a mural for the Queens branch of the Socialist Party. Living in the Chicago area for several years in the 1930s, he illustrated chapbooks for the socialist poet John Wheelwright's Poems for a Dime and Poems for Two Bits series. Porter's financial contributions to the radical Chicago publication Living Marxism kept it afloat for several years.

In 1932, Porter married Anne Channing, a poet from Boston, and they settled in New York. The Porters had five children, and their first son, born in 1934, suffered from a severe form of autism. In the next decade, they had two more sons, and spent three years in Porter's hometown of Winnetka, where he had his first solo exhibition of paintings. When they returned to New York in 1939, the Porters became friends with Edwin Denby, Rudy Burkhardt, and Elaine and Willem de Kooning. Porter became an earnest admirer of Willem de Kooning's artwork and was among the first to review and purchase it.

In 1949, the Porters moved to the small, seaside town of Southampton, New York. Their two daughters were born in 1950 and 1956. Like the family home on Great Spruce Head Island, Southampton became the setting of many of Porter's paintings. In fact, almost all of his mature paintings depict family homes, surrounding landscapes, family members, and friends. Porter was an individualistic painter who embraced figurative art in the late 1940s and 1950s, when abstract expressionism was the prevailing aesthetic trend. Porter once made a comment that his commitment to figurative painting was made just to spite art critic Clement Greenberg, a respected critic and ideologue who had championed abstract expressionism and denigrated realism as passé.

Porter established his reputation as a painter and as a writer in the 1950s. John Bernard Myers of the vanguard Tibor de Nagy gallery gave Porter his first New York exhibition in 1951 and represented him for the next twenty years. That same year Tom Hess, editor of ArtNews, hired Porter to write art features and reviews. Porter went on to contribute to ArtNews until 1967 and also became art editor for The Nation beginning in 1959, the same year his article on Willem de Kooning won the Longview Foundation Award in art criticism. As a critic, Porter visited countless galleries and studios, and he gained a reputation for writing about art with the understanding and vested interest of an artist, and with the same independence from fashionable ideas that he demonstrated in his artwork.

The 1950s and 1960s were prolific years for Porter's writing and art, and saw the development of his critical ideas and the maturation of his painting. Porter enjoyed an elder status among a circle of younger artists such as Jane Freilicher, Larry Rivers, and Alex Katz, and their many poet friends, now known as the New York School of Poetry: Frank O'Hara, John Ashbery, James Schuyler, Kenneth Koch, Barbara Guest, and others. Porter himself wrote poetry and was published in the 1950s, sometimes alongside poems by his wife, who had been publishing poetry since the 1930s (twice in the vanguard Chicago journal, Poetry). The Porters' correspondence is laced with poems they and their friends sent back and forth, often about and dedicated to each other.

Besides his annual exhibitions at Tibor de Nagy and later Hirschl and Adler Galleries, Porter exhibited regularly at the Whitney, and had one-man exhibitions at many museums including the Rhode Island School of Design (1959), The University of Alabama (1963), Cleveland Museum of Art (his first retrospective, 1966), Trinity College (1967), the Parrish Art Museum (1971), the Maryland Institute of Art (1973), and the 1968 Venice Biennale. He also had residencies at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture (1964) and Amherst College (1969). Porter died in 1975 at age 68. A full-scale retrospective of his artwork was held at the Boston Museum of Fine Art, Boston in 1983, and a study center and permanent home for his artwork was established at the Parrish Art Museum in Southampton through a donation made by Anne Porter. A posthumous collection of his poems was published by Tibor de Nagy Editions in 1985, and a catalogue raisonnée, edited by Joan Ludman, was published in 2001.

This biography relies heavily on information found in Justin Spring's biography of Porter, Fairfield Porter: A Life in Art (Yale University Press, 2000).
Related Material:
The Archives of American Art holds an oral history of Fairfield Porter conducted by Paul Cummings in 1968.
Provenance:
The papers of Fairfield Porter were given to the Archives of American Art by the artist's wife, Anne Porter, in five separate accessions between 1977 and 1997.
Restrictions:
The bulk of this collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website. Use of material not digitized requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art critics -- New York (State) -- Southampton  Search this
Topic:
Works of art  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- Southampton  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Poets  Search this
Lithographers -- New York (State)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Travel diaries
Sketches
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Citation:
Fairfield Porter papers, 1888-2001 (bulk 1924-1975). Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.portfair
See more items in:
Fairfield Porter papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9c9535998-330e-4c23-9f84-9c4dff3569e5
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-portfair
Online Media:

Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers

Creator:
Parsons, Betty  Search this
Names:
Betty Parsons Gallery  Search this
Bess, Forrest, 1911-1977  Search this
Congdon, William, 1912-1998  Search this
Pollock, Jackson, 1912-1956  Search this
Reinhardt, Ad, 1913-1967  Search this
Rothko, Mark, 1903-1970  Search this
Extent:
61.1 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketchbooks
Interviews
Video recordings
Drawings
Date:
1916-1991
bulk 1946-1983
Summary:
The Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers measure 61.1 linear feet and date from 1916 to 1991, with the bulk of the material dating from 1946-1983. Records provide extensive documentation of the gallery's operations from its inception in 1946 to its closing in 1983 and of the activities of Betty Parsons as one the leading art dealers of contemporary American Art in the latter half of the twentieth century, particularly the work of the Abstract Expressionists. Over one third of the of the collection is comprised of artists files containing correspondence, price lists, and printed materials. Additional correspondence is with galleries, dealers, art institutions, private collectors, and the media. Also found are exhibition files, exhibition catalogs and announcements, sales records, stock inventories, personal financial records, and photographs. Betty Parsons's personal papers consist of early curatorial files, pocket diaries, personal correspondence, and evidence of her own artwork, including sketchbooks, and files documenting her personal art collection.
Scope and Content Note:
The Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers measure 61.1 linear feet and date from 1916 to 1991, with the bulk of the material dating from 1946-1983. Records provide extensive documentation of the gallery's operations from its inception in 1946 to its closing in 1983 and of the activities of Betty Parsons as one the leading art dealers of contemporary American Art in the latter half of the twentieth century, particularly the work of the Abstract Expressionists. Over one third of the of the collection is comprised of artists files containing correspondence, price lists, and printed materials. Additional correspondence is with galleries, dealers, art institutions, private collectors, and the media. Also found are exhibition files, exhibition catalogs and announcements, sales records, stock inventories, personal financial records, and photographs. Betty Parsons's personal papers consist of early curatorial files, pocket diaries, personal correspondence, and evidence of her own artwork, including sketchbooks, and files documenting her personal art collection. Personal papers also include personal photographs.

Artists files, the largest and most extensive series, consist of a wide variety of documents, including biographical materials, correspondence with or related to the artist, exhibition catalogs and announcements, sales and expense invoices, clippings, price lists, and photographs of the artist, exhibitions, and artwork. The files reflect Parsons's close personal relationships with certain artists, particularly Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Clyfford Still, and Barnett Newman. Extensive documentation is also found for Forrest Bess, William Congdon, Paul Feeley, Thomas George, Alexander Liberman, Seymour Lipton, Richard Pousette-Dart, Jesse Reichek, and Jack Youngerman. Historians and researchers will find these files to be an invaluable resource both in tracing Betty Parsons's role in promoting Abstract Expressionism and researching individual artists.

Exhibition files primarily document the gallery's infrequent group or themed exhibitions. Of particular note are the files on The Ideographic Picture, which was organized by Barnett Newman and included his work, as well as that of Pietro Lazzari, Boris Margo, Ad Reinhardt, Mark Rothko, Theodoros Stamos, and Clyfford Still. Price lists, artist biographies and exhibition schedules are housed in the general exhibition files. Loan exhibition files provide documentation of artwork borrowed by other galleries or institutions for exhibitions, as well as shows outside of the gallery that were organized by Betty Parsons. Also found are gallery exhibition guest books, and announcements and catalogs.

Gallery correspondence is primarily with galleries and dealers, museums, arts organizations, and collectors. Scattered letters from artists are also found, although the bulk of the artists' correspondence is filed in the Artists Files. Also found here are memoranda and letters between Betty Parsons and her staff that contain detailed information concerning Parsons's schedule and gallery activities. Similar correspondence is found amongst the correspondence files within the series Betty Parsons papers.

Appraisal and conservation files include correspondence, appraisal invoices, forms, and appraisal requests and other information from the Art Dealers Association of America, and conservation invoices and reports. The majority of the appraisal records contain information about the specific works of art, including artist, title, date, current owner and the estimated value at the time of the request. Conservation records document conservation treatments undertaken by outside conservators to gallery stock.

Sales, purchases, stock and inventory are well documented in the sales and inventory records. The records provide detailed information about individual sales, prices of individual pieces of artwork, consignments, and loans. Most sales records also include detailed information about the buyer and are a valuable resource for provenance research. Files documenting the general administration, routine business operations, and financial transactions (not individual sales) of the gallery are housed in the general business and financial records. These records include ledgers, receipts, tax records, and banking records. There is some limited information about works of art scattered amongst the receipts and in the "in/out slips" files. Legal records house general legal documents and those concerning specific lawsuits. Of particular note is the file detailing the lawsuit between Betty Parsons and Sidney Janis over the fifth floor of 24 West 57th Street.

The remainder of the collection consists of Betty Parsons's personal papers which document her career prior to opening her own gallery, her work as an artist, and her personal art collection.

Some information about Parsons's work prior to opening her own gallery is found in the early curatorial files she retained from her curatorial and administrative work at the Wakefield Gallery and the Mortimer Brandt Gallery. Clippings, correspondence, announcements, exhibition lists and exhibition files are found. For both positions, she kept only the exhibition files for a small group of exhibitions organized around a specific theme, the most notable being the exhibition of Pre-Columbian Sculpture at the Wakefield Gallery.

Biographical materials include copies of her biography, family genealogies, photographs of Parsons, interviews with Colette Roberts and WYNC radio, memberships, photographs, and ephemera, including a collection of programs and invitations from events that she attended. Throughout her life Parsons gave generously of her time to various cultural and charitable institutions and was awarded for her contributions. There are also a number of files that document her speaking engagements, her participation as a juror in numerous juried exhibitions, charitable work, and awards that she received.

Parsons's personal correspondence files reflect how deeply Parsons's life was intertwined with the gallery. There are letters from museum directors, dealers, artists seeking representation, and personal letters from artists with whom she had close personal relationships, most notably Larry Bigelow, Alexander Calder, William Condon, and Ad Reinhardt. There are also letters from the English artist Adge Baker, with whom Parsons was romantically involved. Correspondence also includes several files of postcards and Christmas cards.

Pocket diaries and engagement calendars, spanning from 1933-1981, record social engagements, meetings, vacations, and telephone numbers. Also found are circa two linear feet of notebooks and sketchbooks, many of which are annotated with addresses, poetry, journal entries, and other observations of people, places, and travels. Writings by others include writings about Betty Parsons or the Betty Parsons Gallery, such as Lawrence Alloway's unpublished typescript titled "An American Gallery" and other topics.

Printed material consists of exhibition announcements and catalogs, art magazines, and newspaper and magazine clippings about Betty Parsons, her family and acquaintances, artists, and other art related topics, coupled with a miscellaneous selection of clippings, and a video recording, on topics that presumably captured Parsons's attention.

Personal art work records document Betty Parsons's career as an artist through inventories, group and solo exhibitions files, price lists, appraisals, sales and consignment invoices. Photographs are primarily reproductions of her works of art, although there are scattered photographs of exhibition installations.

Betty Parsons's private art collection files document her extensive personal collection of art that included works by Jackson Pollock, Agnes Martin, Romare Bearden, Barnett Newman, and Mark Rothko, in addition to Amlash sculpture from ancient Persia and primitive sculpture from New Hebrides. These files include inventories, lists, exhibition records, sales and purchase invoices, and photographs. There are also files for donations and loans from Parsons's personal collection to museums and fund raising auctions for several non-profit institutions.

Finally, the personal financial records provide information about the Parsons's family finances and her personal financial success as an art dealer. In addition to her own investments, Parsons inherited shares in family investments through the estates of her parents, J. Fred Pierson, Jr. and Suzanne Miles Pierson, and younger sister, Emily Rayner. Real estate files include correspondence, utility bills, receipts, area maps, and land plots for houses in Sheepscot, Maine and St. Maartens, Netherlands Antilles. Tax returns, ledger worksheets, receipts, banking statements, deposit slips, and cancelled checks are among the other financial records.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as seven series. Many of the series are further divided into subseries.

Missing Title

Series 1: Artists Files, 1935-1983 (19.4 linear feet; Boxes 1-18, 51, 55-56, OVs 53, 65)

Series 2: Exhibition Files, 1941-1983 (2.9 linear feet; Boxes 18-21, 51, 55, OVs 54, 66)

Series 3: Correspondence Files, 1941-1983 (3.9 linear feet; Boxes 21-24, 52, 56)

Series 4: Appraisal Files, 1954-1983 (0.7 linear feet; Box 24)

Series 5: Sales and Inventory Records, 1946-1983 (3.9 linear feet; Boxes 25-28, 51)

Series 6: General Business and Financial Records, 1946-1983 (9.3 linear feet; Boxes 28-38, 51, 56)

Series 7: Betty Parsons Personal Papers, 1916-1991 (21 linear feet; Boxes 38-51, 55-64, OVs 65-67)
Historical Note:
Betty Parsons (1900-1982) was one of the leading art dealers in New York City specializing in modern art, particularly the work of the Abstract Expressionists, and an abstract painter and sculptor in her own right. She opened Betty Parsons Gallery in 1946 at 15 E. 57th St., later moving to 24 W. 57th St.

The history of the Betty Parsons Gallery is inextricably bound to the life and experiences of its founder. Betty Parsons was born Betty Bierne Pierson on January 31, 1900 in New York City. She enjoyed a privileged childhood, which included vacation homes in Newport and Palm Beach. Her only formal education was a five-year stint at the prestigious Chapin School from 1910-1915, where she met many of the women who would become life-long friends and supporters. In the spring of 1920, she married Schuyler Livingston Parsons from one of New York's oldest families. The marriage ended after only three years and the couple traveled to Paris where they could obtain a divorce on the grounds of incompatibility. She retained her married surname and purchased a house on the rue Boulard in Paris, where she remained for ten years, pursuing studies in painting and sculpture.

Financial constraints forced Parsons to return to the United States in 1933. She first traveled west to California, but it was her return to New York in 1935 that marked the start of her career as an art dealer. Her first opportunity to connect with the New York art world came after a successful exhibition of her watercolors at the Midtown Galleries where the owner, Alan Gruskin, noted Parson's faithful and wealthy group of supporters and offered her work installing exhibitions and selling paintings on commission. Her work for the Midtown Galleries led to a second position in the Park Avenue gallery of Mary Sullivan, one of the founders of the Museum of Modern Art. Here, Parsons learned the business of running a gallery. By 1940 Parsons was ready to take on more independent responsibility and agreed to manage a gallery within the Wakefield Bookshop. In this job, she exercised full curatorial control by selecting artists and organizing exhibitions. She championed then unknown contemporary American artists and the gallery's roster soon included Saul Steinberg, Hedda Sterne, Alfonso Ossorio, Joseph Cornell, Walter Murch, and Theodore Stamos. Although the majority of the exhibitions were solo shows, there were a few group shows and themed exhibitions, such as Love in Art (1941) and Ballet in Art (1942). Under Parson's direction, the gallery hosted an important exhibition of Pre-Columbian sculpture, curated by Barnett Newman.

When the owners of the Wakefield Bookshop decided to close the gallery late in 1944, Mortimer Brandt, a dealer who specialized in Old Master paintings and drawings, offered her a position as head of the newly created contemporary section of his gallery. Many of the artists who had shown with Parsons at the Wakefield Gallery followed her to her new gallery, where they were joined by Ad Reinhardt, Boris Mango, and Hans Hofmann. While the exhibitions garnered attention from the press and the interest of contemporary artists, the contemporary section was not a financial success and Brandt opted to close his gallery in 1946.

Using $1000 of her own money and an additional borrowed $4000, Parsons sublet the space that previously housed Mortimer Brandt's contemporary section, on the fifth floor of 15 East 57th Street, and opened the Betty Parsons Gallery.

In many respects the early years of the Betty Parsons Gallery were the most vital, as it was during the period of 1947-1951 that the gallery became linked with the Abstract Expressionists and the history of post-WWII American Art. In an unpublished history of the gallery, noted art critic Lawrence Alloway stated that the significance of the gallery's early exhibitions ranks with Durand-Ruel's Impressionists exhibitions or Kahnweiler's shows of the Cubists. Betty Parsons Gallery quickly became one of the most prestigious galleries in New York City associated with new American Art of all styles. Her close friend Barnett Newman organized the gallery's inaugural exhibition of Northwest Coast Indian Art and he soon began to exhibit his own work at the gallery. When Peggy Guggenheim's Art of This Century Gallery closed, Jackson Pollock, Clyfford Still, and Mark Rothko joined Parsons' growing stable of artists. Although Parsons continued to promote and exhibit many of the artists whom she had previously discovered, these four artists dominated this period. Newman, Pollock, Still, and Rothko worked closely together, holding themselves apart from the other artists somewhat. They were actively involved in the curatorial process and often hung their own shows. For these artists, the exhibition itself was an artistic act of creation.

Parsons provided a supportive environment and allowed her artists enormous freedom in planning and designing their exhibitions. She was not, however, an aggressive salesperson. During this early period the gallery ledgers document sales to an impressive array of museums including the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Art Institute of Chicago, as well as important collectors such as Edward Root and Duncan Phillips. Nevertheless, the art that the gallery promoted was not yet widely accepted. Sales were few, prices were low and the business would not turn a profit for several years. Meanwhile, there was mounting pressure from Pollock, Newman, Still, and Rothko to drop some of the other artists from Parsons' stable and focus all resources on them. They wanted to be promoted to a larger audience and have their work sold at higher prices, but Parsons enjoyed discovering new artists and did not want to be restricted in this endeavor. The year 1951 marks the last time that Pollock's drip paintings or the monumental works of Newman, Rothko or Still were shown at the Betty Parsons Gallery.

In the following years the Betty Parsons Gallery continued to attract a diverse group of talented artists. Ellsworth Kelly, Richard Tuttle, Robert Rauschenberg, and Jack Youngerman had their first New York exhibitions at the Betty Parsons Gallery. Parsons opened Section Eleven in 1958, a short-lived annex to the main gallery, so that she could promote younger, less well-known artists. It closed in 1960 due to the administrative difficulties in running two essentially separate galleries.

In 1962, Sidney Janis, another prominent art dealer, started proceedings to evict Parsons from the floor that they shared on 15 East 57th Street. The Betty Parsons Gallery moved to 24 West 57th Street in 1963, where it remained until it closed in 1983, following Parsons' death the preceding year. Throughout the gallery's history, Parsons continued to promote faithful artists such as Hedda Sterne and Saul Steinberg, who had been with her from the beginning and to seek out new talent, both for her main gallery and for other venues, such as the short-lived Parsons-Truman Gallery, which she opened in 1974 with former Parsons Gallery director Jock Truman to show works on paper by emerging artists.

In addition to being an art dealer, Betty Parsons was a respected artist and collector. With her connoisseur's eye and connections, Parsons amassed an impressive private collection of art. She bought her first piece while an art student in Paris in the 1920s, a small gouache by Zadkine, but did not begin acquiring works in earnest until she was established as an art dealer. Partial inventories of her personal collection show that the majority of her collection contained works by artists associated with the gallery. Mark Rothko, Hans Hofmann, Ad Reinhardt, Agnes Martin, and Kenzo Okada were among the artists represented. Many were gifts from the artists, such as an ink drawing by Jackson Pollock, inscribed "For Betty." Selections from her collection appeared in small museums across the United States, including a traveling exhibition organized by Fitch College, New York, in 1968. In her role as a promoter of contemporary American art, Parsons lent generously from her collection, particularly to the federal Art in the Embassies Program. Throughout her life she also donated works to a variety of museums, most notably, the Whitney Museum of American Art, Museum of Modern Art, New York, and the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark.

Parsons frequently claimed that her desire to pursue a career as an artist stemmed from a visit to the Armory Show when she was thirteen. In her late teens, after pressuring her father for art lessons, she studied with the sculptor Gutzon Burglum of Mount Rushmore fame. In Paris, she continued her studies first with Antoine Bourdelle, whose sculptures she had admired at the Armory Show, and later with Ossip Zadkine. The first exhibition of her work, figurative watercolors and sculptures, took place in Paris in 1927. As she matured as an artist, her art became more abstract. Her late works were painted wood sculptures that she pieced together from wood that she found near her studio in Long Island. Parsons's work was exhibited in more than thirty solo exhibitions, including, Betty Parsons; Paintings, Gouaches and Sculpture, 1955-1968, at the Whitechapel Gallery in London. During her lifetime, she would not allow her works to be shown in her own gallery. Shortly after she died of a stroke in 1982, In Memoriam, Betty Parsons: Late Sculptures, opened at the Betty Parsons Gallery.
Related Material:
Also found in the Archives of American Art are oral history interviews with Betty Parsons, June 4-9, 1969, by Paul Cummings, and June 11, 1981 by Gerald Silk.
Separated Material:
Some of the material originally loaned for microfilming in 1968 and 1969 was not included in later donations and can be viewed on microfilm reels N68/62-N68/74 and N69/105-N69/106. Loaned materials are not described in the container listing in this finding aid.
Provenance:
The gallery donated some records in 1974, many of which had been loaned earlier for microfilming. The bulk of the collection was donated in 1984 and 1986 by William Rayner and Christopher Schwabacher, executors of the Estate of Betty Parsons. Additional material was donated by William Rayner in 1998 and Christopher Schwabacher in 2017. Additional material was donated in 2018 by the Lee Hall estate via Carolyn Crozier and Deborah Jacobson, co-executors. Hall was Parsons's biographer and had the material in her possession at the time of Parsons's death. An additional photograph of Parons and Marie Carr Taylor by Henri Cartier-Bresson was donated in 2021 by Mary Carpenter, who inherited the photograph from her mother, Nan Thorton Jones, who received it as a gift from Taylor.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.

Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Gallery owners -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art dealers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Women art dealers  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Abstract expressionist  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Interviews
Video recordings
Drawings
Citation:
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers, 1916-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.parsbett
See more items in:
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
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Online Media:

Althena Award,Rhode Island School of Design

Collection Creator:
Parsons, Betty  Search this
Extent:
(2 folders)
Container:
Box 39, Folder 10-11
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1981-1982
Series Restrictions:
Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers, 1916-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers / Series 7: Betty Parsons Personal Papers / 7.2: Biographical Material / Juries, Seminars, Lectures, and Awards
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw93e7f8b81-7cf3-437b-8200-94fe53cfe360
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-parsbett-ref1486
Online Media:

Art of this Century from the Betty Parsons Collection, Rhode Island School of Design (1980: Providence, R.I.)

Collection Creator:
Parsons, Betty  Search this
Container:
Box 45, Folder 6
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1979-1980
Series Restrictions:
Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers, 1916-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers / Series 7: Betty Parsons Personal Papers / 7.9: Betty Parsons's Private Collection / Exhibitions
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9cdaa2ba2-b11e-43ef-b678-fe00b9053357
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-parsbett-ref1758

Rhode Island School of Design

Collection Creator:
Parsons, Betty  Search this
Container:
Box 22, Folder 47
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1947-1982
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.

Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers, 1916-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers / Series 3: Correspondence Files / 3.1: Institutions and Dealers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw98880e468-0944-472a-81a5-b1d03ff97614
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-parsbett-ref894

General Correspondence

Collection Creator:
McCoy, Esther  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1922-1989
Scope and Contents note:
This subseries primarily contains letters concerning McCoy's career in architectural history and criticism. Her career in fiction writing is covered to a lesser degree. Among the correspondents are researchers, writers, professors, architects, art professionals, publishers, and professional associations. Topics covered include research and writing projects, Los Angeles area preservation and restoration projects, and grant projects.

Major correspondents in this series include the American Institute of Architects, the Graham Foundation, City of Los Angeles Cultural Heritage Board, Domus Magazine, Los Angeles Times, editor Monica Pidgeon, architectural critics Reyner Banham, David Gebhard, William Jordy, Robin Middleton, Allan Temko, and Nathan Shapira, and architects J. R. Davidson, Craig Ellwood, Joseph Giovannini, Hans Hollein, A. Quincy Jones, and Bruno Zevi. Also found is extensive correspondence with the University of California, Berkeley, Santa Barbara, and Santa Cruz. Correspondence for 1959 contains a letter from Albert Camus requesting McCoy's assistance with helping Spanish refugees, and correspondence for 1989 contains photographs of Esther McCoy and others at the Athenaeum at Caltech for the third annual gala of the Historical Society of Southern California.

See Appendix for a list of selected correspondents from Series 2.3.
Arrangement note:
Material is arranged chronologically. The bulk of McCoy's correspondence with architects is arranged in Series 6: Architect Files. Additional correspondence pertaining to specific projects can be found in Series 4: Architectural Writings and in Series 5: Project Files. Correspondence in this series complements the files found in these other series and they should be consulted together for a better understanding of McCoy's career.
Appendix: Selected Correspondents from Series 2.3:
Abbot, Mary Squire (McIntosh and Otis, Inc.), 1949, 1950, 1953, 1957

Adahura, Yuki, 1942

Adams, Christopher, 1962

Albinson, Don, 1989

Alexander, Christopher, 1965

Allen, Albert, 1968

Amantea, Kirjah, 1982

Ambre, Reuth, 1986

American Academy in Rome, 1970

American Federation of Arts, 1966

American Film Institute, 1975

American Institute of Architects, 1959, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1972, 1973, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1987, 1988, 1989

American Institute of Interior Designers, 1974

Anderson, Sherwood, undated

Andrews, Wayne, 1983

Architecture -- , 1985

Architecture in Australia, 1974

Architectural Forum -- , 1965, 1966, 1968

Architectural History Foundation, Inc., 1982, 1983, 1984

Architectural Publishing Co., 1967

Architectural Record -- , 1959

Archive of Women in Architecture, 1975

Archives of American Art, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1989

Arizona Quarterly -- , 1949

Arizona State University, 1969

Arts in Society -- , 1964

Ashton, Raymond J., 1948

Ashton, Ruth (KNX Radio), 1964

Atkinson, Janet Irene, 1980, 1985

Author and Journalist, 1951

Bailey, Van Evera, 1953

Baldauf, Lisa, 1989

Balint, Dr. D. P., 1963

Banham, Reyner (Peter) and Mary, 1964, 1966, 1967, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1973, 1979, 1982, 1983, 1988, 1989, undated

Barnette-Stratford, Mrs. Lou, 1968

Barsocchini, Michael, 1970

Beach, John, 1984

Beebe, Tina, 1989

Behrman, S. N., 1960

Belluschi, Pietro, 1949

Beltram Carla, 1966

Bendixson, T. M. P., 1961

Bennett, Janey, 1986

Berkeley, Ellen Perry, 1975, 1987, 1988, undated

Bicknell, Catherine, 1985

Birkmeyer, Karl, 1968

Blanton, John, 1988

Blau, Milton, 1947

Boaz, Joseph N., 1949

Bowlby, Bob, 1983, 1989

Boyer, John, 1982

Brant, Sandra, 1975

Brooks, Allen, 1975

"The Bradbury Girls," 1972

Brunati, Mario, 1963, 1965, 1966

California Coastal Commission, 1977, 1978

California Council of Architects, 1957

California Department of Parks and Recreation, 1973

California Historical Society, 1979

California Magazine -- , 1985, 1986

California Polytechnic State University, 1978, 1984

California State Office for Historic Preservation, 1978

Camus, Albert, 1959

Carrott, Richard, 1973

Carson, Sam, 1969

Casabella (Gian Antonio Bernasconi), 1965

Charles Scribner's Sons, 1930

Chang, Ching Yu, 1977, undated

Chase, John, undated

Chermayeff, Serge, undated

Choate, Forrest, 1986

Christian Science Monitor -- , 1987

City Attorney, Santa Monica, California, 1968

City of Beverly Hills, 1982, 1983, 1984

City of Los Angeles, Cultural Heritage Board, 1963, 1966, 1967, 1969, 1973, 1974, 1982, 1983, 1987, 1988

Clark, Alson, 1984, undated

Cochran, Victor E., 1953

Cohen, Elaine Lustig, 1985

Cohen, Stuart, 1979

Colgan, Susan, 1979

Collier's -- , 1953

Columbia Broadcasting System, Inc., 1947, 1948

Columbia University, 1972, 1973

Communication Dynamics, 1963

Compagnia Nazionale Artigiana, 1956, 1960

Contini, Edgardo, 1963

Correa, Frederico, 1975

Craft and Folk Art Museum, 1983

Cragar, Robert, 1949, 1950

Craig, Mary, 1945

Crosbie, Michael, 1985, 1987, 1988, 1989

Cross, Paula, 1981

Culot, Maurice, 1972, 1973

Curtis, William, 1982, 1985, 1987, 1989

Dailey, Gardner A., 1948

Dale, John R., 1989

Davidson, Barnaby, 1984

Davidson, Carlos, 1984

Davidson, Erica, 1983, undated

Davidson, J. R. and Greta, 1973, 1974, 1976, 1977, 1978, undated

Davidson, Tom, 1981, undated

Day, Peter, 1985

De Bretteville, Peter and Sheila (The Woman's Building), 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978

De Long, James, 1947

Dearborn-Massar, 1961

Delano, Leonard H., 1949

Design Quarterly -- , 1975, 1987

Dictionary of American Biography -- , 1975

Dictionary of Art -- , 1986

Diefenbach, John, 1973

Dimster, Frank, 1966

Dixon, John Morris, 1979

Domus -- (Lisa Licitra Ponti), 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1981, 1982

Donohoe, Victoria, 1965, undated

Dorman, Richard, 1970

Dougherty, Carole, 1989, undated

Downing, Holly, 1974

Dudley, George, 1984, 1988, undated

Dukeminier, Jesse, Jr., 1967

Dyson, Arthur, 1985, 1987

Easton, Bob, 1977

Eckbo, Gerrett, 1977, 1982

Eder, Richard, 1987, 1988

Edilizia Moderna, 1965

Eisner, Richard K., undated

Elliott, James, 1986

Ellwood, Craig, 1967, 1968, 1971, 1984, 1988

Elwyn, Adolph, 1946

Emanuel, Muriel, 1979

Emmons, Donn, 1975

E. P. Dutton and Co., 1975

Favro, Diane, 1987

Fetherson, Kate, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1988

Feiss, Carl, 1948, 1949

Field, Ellen, 1964

Filler, Martin, 1986

Fisher, Shirley, 1978

Flack, Peter, 1975

Fonda-Bonardi, Mario, 1989

Ford, Edward R., 1986

Foreign Service of the United States of America, 1959, 1962

Forsyth, Robert J., 1961, 1962

Fortune -- , 1936

Francis, Marcia, 1979

Franks, Milton, 1962

Franzen, Ulrich, 1968, 1969

Frey, Albert, 1988

Friends of Cast Iron Architecture, 1972, 1974, 1977, undated

Friends of Kebyar, 1984

Fulton, Weldon, undated

Gebhard, David, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1977, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, undated

Geddes, Robert L., 1977

General Services Administration, 1973

Giella, Alfonso and Bobbi, 1967, 1974, 1982

Gill, Dorothy, 1985

Giovannini, Joseph (Gio), 1979, 1981, 1986, 1988, 1989, undated

Goldberger, Paul, 1972, 1973, 1975

Goldman, Shifra M., 1979, undated

Goldstein, Barbara, 1981, 1982, 1985, 1989, undated

Gordon, Don, 1980, undated

Gould, Jean, 1965

Graham Foundation for Studies in the Fine Arts (Carter Manny), 1964, 1965, 1966, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1974, 1975, 1978, 1979, 1981, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, undated

Granger, Kathleen, 1981

Gray, Paul, 1977

Greenbaum, Katherine, 1980

Greene, Herb, 1971, 1972, 1976, undated

Greenhill, Nigel, 1973

Gregory, Dan, 1982, 1984, 1986, 1987

Guss, Jack, 1961

Hall, Milly, 1970, 1976, 1977

Hanks, David, 1986

Harnish, John, 1960

Harper and Row, 1979

Harper's Bazaar -- , 1951, 1952, 1961

Harris, Robert, 1981, 1982

Harvard Architecture Review -- , 1977, 1979

Harvey, Harold E., 1972, 1973

Haupt, Peter, 1967

Hayden, Dolores, 1984, undated

Helene Wurlitzer Foundation of New Mexico, 1967, 1969

Hernandez, Diana, 1976, undated

Herron, Ron, 1969

Hess, Alan, 1985

Hillyer, Elinor, 1949

Hinerfeld, Susan and Robert, 1984

Hines, Tom, 1971, 1975

Historical Society of Southern California, 1988, 1989

Hitchcock, H. R., 1956

Hite, Garron S., 1972

Hoag, Paul Sterling, 1981

Hollein, Hans, 1960, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1972, 1976, 1984, undated

Hollywood Revitalization Committee, 1979

Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1977

Houvener, Robert, 1969

Howe, John H., 1980

Howe, Sanora Babb, 1980, 1982, 1989

Humanities West -- , 1984, 1985

Huxley, Aldus, 1960

Ingalls, David K., 1987

Interiors -- , 1984, 1985

Istituto Nazionale per il Commercio Estero, 1970

Jansen, Virginia, 1978

Japan Architect -- , 1968

Jarrico, Paul, 1971

Johnson, Mark R., 1981

Jokl, Magda, 1978

Jonas, Susan, 1963

Jones, A. Quincy and Elaine, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1974, 1975, 1979, 1981, 1984, 1986, 1987, 1988, undated

Jordy, William H., 1959, 1961, 1967, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1984

Jourdan, Erven, 1951

Jurney, David, 1957

Kahn, Louis, 1960

Kamerling, Bruce, 1980, 1985

Kappe, Raymond and Shelly, 1970, 1973

Kazin, Alfred, 1961, 1984

KCRW 89.9 FM, 1989

Kennedy, Jacqueline (letter to and reply from secretary), 1964

Kershner, Irvin, 1960

Khoury, E. M., 1960, 1963

Killingsworth, Edward, 1989

King, Jean, 1975, 1977, 1987, undated

King, Robert I., 1963

Kirsch, Jonathan, 1977

Koeper, Fred, 1980

Kotas, Jerry, 1971, 1973, undated

Kripacz, Francisco, 1985

Kultermann, Udo, 1967

Lagorio, Elena, 1975

La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art, 1977, 1986

Lamb, Paul, 1982

Landau, Sarah B., 1971

Langer, Elinor, 1975, 1983

Lawson, John Howard (Jack), 1947

Lebovich, William, 1979

Lee, Joyce, 1975

Leedy, Walter, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1976, undated

Legorreta, Ricardo, 1971

Lehman, John, 1948

Le Veque, Ann, 1980

Library of Congress, 1983

Lindauer, Theodore, 1983

Lingeman, Richard, 1986, 1987

Longstreth, Richard, 1982

Lorman, William, 1954

Los Angeles Conservancy, 1984, 1986

Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 1966, 1967, 1982

Los Angeles Times, 1957, 1959, 1960, 1966, 1968, 1969, 1971, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1980, 1981, 1983, 1985

Lovell, Gary, 1968, 1978

Lovell, Leah, 1960

Lovell, Philip, 1968, 1972

Lowenkopf, Anne, 1975

Lumsden, Anthony, 1969, 1974

Luna, Fernando, 1971, 1974

Lyman, Frederic, 1974, 1989

Lyndon, Maynard, 1983, 1984, undated

MacDowell Colony Fellows, 1988

Mangiarotti, Angelo, 1970

Manson, Grant, 1974

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1984

Maston, Carl, 1969, 1970, 1972

May, Cliff, 1983, 1985

McCoy, John, 1954, 1976, 1977, 1979, 1981, 1986, 1987, 1988

McCoy, Tori, 1974

McCulloch, Peter, 1962

McWilliams, Carey, 1980

Mendelsohn, Mrs. Eric, 1974, 1975

Meyer, Kurt, 1969

Middleton, Robin, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1987, 1988

Mies Van Der Rohe Centennial Project, 1984

Miller, R. Craig, 1973

Miller, Donald M., 1986

Minister, Chancery of Pakistan, 1965

Moholy-Nagy, Sibyl, 1966, 1969

Mouton, Pierre, 1986, 1988, 1989

Muller, Louis, 1988

Murphy, William (Bill), 1969, 1970, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, undated

Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1989

Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, 1976

Museum of Modern Art, 1961, 1964, 1976

Mutlow, John, 1982

Nakamura, Toshio, 1981, 1982, 1984, 1985

National Building Museum, 1981

National Committee for the Defense of Political Prisoners, 1933

National Endowment for the Arts, 1971, 1975, 1980, 1981, 1982

National Trust for Historic Preservation, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1977

Nelson, June Kompass, 1985

Nelson, Sara, 1974

New West -- , 1976

New Yorker -- , 1953, 1962, 1968, 1974, 1975, 1876, undated

Nichols, Henry L., 1982, 1987

Nishimoto, Kenneth, 1959, 1968

Nixon, Peg and Chuck, 1976, 1989, undated

North Carolina State University, 1983

Novotny, Norbert, 1973

Nunis, Doyce, Jr., 1989

Oakley, Susan H., 1974

O'Gorman, Brit and Peter, 1983

O'Gorman, James F., 1973, 1984

Ohannesian, Paul B., 1978, 1979

On Site -- , 1975

Owen, Tom, 1963, undated

Pacific Design Center, 1985

Palazzo Dell'Edilizia, 1963, 1964

Pan American World Airways System, 1955, 1956

Pardee, Clark, 1989

Park, Donald, 1986

Park, Helen, 1979

Paul, Stella, 1988

Peregrine Press, 1971, 1977, 1986, 1989

Perspecta (Jeff Limerick), 1961, 1975, 1976, undated

Pflueger, Donald, 1989

Pidgeon, Monica, 1973, 1974, 1980, 1982, 1986

Plantin Press, Ltd., 1984

Praeger Publishers, Inc., 1972

Price, Joe D., 1969

Price, Martin, 1964

Prinsloo, Ivor, 1988

Producer-Writers Guild of America Pension Plan, 1960

Pyne Press, 1974

Rand, Marvin, 1989

Read, Gardner, 1968

Reinhold Book Division, 1968

Reinhold Publishing Division, 1960, 1970

Rhode Island Historical Society, 1977

Rhode Island School of Design, 1977

Ricasoli, Bettino, 1960

Ricci, Leonardo, 1966

Rice Design Alliance, 1976

Richardson, Betty, 1982

Richardson, Sara, 1987

Riggs, Lutah Maria, 1978

Rinehart, Arley, 1977, 1978

Roark, I. L., Jr., 1948

Robertson, A. G., 1954

Robinson, Sidney, 1973

Roche, Kevin, 1968

Rosa, Joseph, 1987, 1988

Rose, Ronald, 1984

Rosenberg, George, 1952

Rosenstone, Robert, 1973, 1974

Ross, Michael Franklin, 1979

Ross, William D., 1952

Roth, Leland, 1978

Rouillard, Dominique, 1985

Rucker, Karen Conan, 1985, 1986

Ruff, Carl, 1977

Ruocco, Ilse, 1946

Russell, Julia, 1982

Rydell, Roy, 1974, 1976

Sadler, H. G., 1973

San Diego City Council, 1984

San Diego Museum of Art, 1979

San Francisco State College, 1968

Sanders, Terry, 1965

Sanguinetti, Vittorio, 1963, 1964

Santa Monica Landmarks Commission, 1981

Santini, Pier Carlo, 1964

Saturday Evening Post -- , 1959, 1960

Sauer, Louis, 1968

Sawelson-Gorse, Naomi, 1989

Secrest, Meryle, 1988

Serulnic, Mrs. George, 1967

Sewell, Elaine K., 1966

Shapira, Nathan, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1979, 1983, undated

Shaw, Lawrence C., 1948

Shultz, Susan, 1969

Simo, Melanie, 1987, 1988

Simon and Schuster, Inc., 1963

Smith, C. Ray, 1972

Smith, Frank Folsom, 1967

Smith, Kathryn, 1979, 1987, 1988, undated

Smith, Robert, 1972

Smith, Whitney, 1970

Smithson, Alison, 1983, 1985

Snow, C. P., 1960, 1961

Solomon, Barbara Probst, 1984

Southern California Institute of Architecture, 1989

Southwest Review -- , 1952

Space Design -- , 1984

Speiss, Fred, 1977, undated

Stahlberg, Arlen, 1976

Stanfield, Cecil E., 1949

Stegner, Wallace, 1947, 1951

Steinbrueck, Victor, 1964

Stern, Robert and Lynn, 1965, 1966, 1973

Sterner, Carl John, 1974

Stickney, Charles, 1964, 1967

Stone Magazine -- , 1965

Strand, Janann, undated

Straub, Calvin, 1970

Sunset Magazine -- , 1981

Sussman, Deborah, 1987, 1989, undated

Super, Rob, 1974

Taylor, Crombie, 1967

Tazewell, E. Bradford, Jr., 1967

Temko, Allan, 1957, 1966, 1970, 1988, 1989

The Modern Quarterly -- , 1948

The Pacific Spectator -- , 1947

Thiry, Paul, 1949

Tigerman, Stanley, 1965, 1977

Toland, James, 1955, 1957

Travers, David, 1963, 1964, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1972, 1977, 1987, undated

Tulane University, 1982, 1983, undated

Turner, George P., 1960

Underhill, Anna A., 1941

University of California, Berkeley, 1974, 1978

University of California Extension, 1974

University of California, Santa Barbara, 1966, 1969, 1972, 1982, 1987

University of California, Santa Cruz, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1978, 1979

University of Cambridge, Department of Architecture, 1975

University of Oklahoma, 1949, 1985

University of Pennsylvania, 1984

University of Southern California, 1970

University Press of Kentucky, 1974

University Prints, 1957

University Women's Club, 1972, 1975, 1983

Vaccarino, Donna, 1989

Van Doren, Phyllis, 1984

Veret, Jean-Louis, 1960

Ventre, Francis T., 1985

Veronesi, Giulia, 1966, 1974

Via -- , 1976

Victor Gruen Foundation for Environmental Planning, 1972

Victor, Michael, 1983

Voelcker, John, 1968

Von Breton, Harriette, 1969

Von Eckardt, Wolf, 1981, 1983, 1984

Vreeland, Thomas, 1965, 1969, 1974, 1984

W. W. Norton and Co., 1966

Walker Art Center, 1975

Walker, Derek, 1982

Walker, Sam, 1985

Walton, Billy, 1986

Ward, Robert and Sandra Williams Photography of Architecture, 1977, 1978

Ward, Robertson, 1981

Wasserman, Steve, 1984, 1985, 1986

Waugh, Arthur B., 1959

Wayne, June, 1981, 1985

Weirick, James, 1970, 1974

Weiss, Peggy, 1982, 1984

Wemple, Emmet L., 1974, undated

Western Association of Art Museums, 1967

Wicks, Ebba L., 1949

Wight, Frederick S., 1966

Wilk, Christopher, 1987

William Morris Agency, 1957

William Morrow and Company, Inc., 1950

Williams, Alexander Kruse, 1985

Williams, Wayne R., 1952, 1953, 1972

Wills, David, 1969

Wilson, Forrest, 1972, 1975, 1983,1987

Wilson, Richard Guy, 1981

Winslow, Carleton Monroe, 1969, undated

Winter, Bob, 1964, 1975, 1976, undated

Woman's Building, 1987

Woman's Day -- , 1957

Women's Architectural League, 1981

Wood, Donna, 1981

Woodbridge, Sally, 1977, 1982

Woollen, Evans, 1983, 1984

Wright, Eric Lloyd, 1984

Writers Guild of America, West, 1967, 1969

Wurster, William, 1964

Zevi, Bruno, 1959, 1960, 1963, 1965, 1974
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of audiovisual recordings without access copies requires advance notice.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Esther McCoy papers, circa 1876-1990, bulk 1938-1989. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.mccoesth, Subseries 2.3
See more items in:
Esther McCoy papers
Esther McCoy papers / Series 2: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw959b6b072-2801-4a48-897a-dbdaff4b6fde
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-mccoesth-ref115

Biographical Statements, Publication List, and Resumes

Collection Creator:
McCoy, Esther  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 7
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1948-1989
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of audiovisual recordings without access copies requires advance notice.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Esther McCoy papers, circa 1876-1990, bulk 1938-1989. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Esther McCoy papers
Esther McCoy papers / Series 1: Biographical and Family Material
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9e43b3615-82f2-4f74-a974-12ea206e8501
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-mccoesth-ref21
3 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Biographical Statements, Publication List, and Resumes digital asset number 1
  • View Biographical Statements, Publication List, and Resumes digital asset number 2
  • View Biographical Statements, Publication List, and Resumes digital asset number 3

Correspondence

Collection Creator:
Nevelson, Louise, 1899-1988  Search this
Extent:
(Boxes 1-2, 31-35, Sol 42; 6 linear feet)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1931-1984
Scope and Contents note:
Series consists primarily of Nevelson's professional correspondence, as well as some personal and family correspondence. Files are typically made up of letters, invitations, greeting cards, and telegrams received by Nevelson, copies of letters sent on her behalf (by lawyers and assistants) or shared with her by others, and photographs, press releases, clippings, and other printed material enclosed with correspondence. Correspondents include artists, dealers, museums, universities, art critics, collectors, arts-related and social organizations, admirers, along with some friends, colleagues, and family members in addition to her son. (See appendix for a select list of notable correspondents.)

General correspondence details the exhibition of Nevelson's work in various group and one-man shows; the consignment, sale, and disposition of her work, especially her dealings with the Martha Jackson Gallery and Daniel Cordier (in Europe); her donations of art work to museums and universities, and for auction by charitable organizations; and the various honors and awards received by her later in her career (including the Creative Arts Medal in Sculpture from Brandeis University and honorary degrees from the Philadelphia College of Art and Bowdoin College, among others). General correspondence also concerns Nevelson's various art-related activities, including her participation on various panels, and in workshops, conferences, and lecture series on art; her involvement in professional organizations, such as the Sculptor's Guild; and her service on various award juries and arts committees (such as the Arts and Entertainment Committee for the Rockefeller Team).

Correspondence is arranged chronologically. Correspondence in this series from the 1966-1979 acquisition has been scanned in its entirety, except for Louise Nevelson's correspondence with her son, Mike. The bulk of correspondence donated by the Farnsworth Art Museum includes an item-level inventory, and is mostly separated by personal and business subject matter.

See Appendix for a list of selected correspondents from Series 2.
Appendix: Selected Correspondents from Series 2:
List represents only a selection of correspondents and does not include names of family.

Albright-Knox Art Gallery: 1971

American Federation of Arts: 1961, 1964

American Women in Radio and Television: 1959

Art in America -- : 1963, 1965

Art Institute of Chicago: 1962

The Artists' Gallery: 1955

Bloch, Ernest: 1933

Bourgeois, Louise: undated

Bowdoin College: 1971

Brandeis University: 1971

Brooklyn Museum: 1956

Brooklyn Society of Artists: 1957

Buffalo Fine Arts Academy: 1962

Calder, Sandy: 1955

Chatham College: 1971

City of Scottsdale, Arizona: 1973

Cleveland Museum of Art: 1977

Colby College: 1957, 1973

Contemporary Arts Association of Houston: 1953

Cordier, Daniel: 1961

Dallas Museum of Fine Arts: 1974

Dehner, Dorothy: 1960

Detroit Institute of the Arts: 1966

Dord Fitz School and Gallery: 1960

Feininger, Lyonel: 1955

Galerie Jeanne-Bucher: 1961

Genauer, Emily: 1955

Grand Central Art Galleries: 1959

Guggenheim, Peggy: 1946

Hamline University: 1970, 1971

Harry Salpeter Gallery: 1961

Hirschhorn, Joseph: 1968

Hobart and William Smith Colleges: 1971

Indiana, Robert: 1966

Jackson, Martha (See Martha Jackson Gallery)

Jacobi, Lotte: 1960, 1963, 1965

Kendall, Tom: 1959, 1961, undated

Knox, Seymour: 1968

Kramer, Hilton: 1957

Lipman, Howard: 1962

Lipton, Seymour: 1955

Mademoiselle -- : 1961, 1962

Martha Jackson Gallery: 1956, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1967, 1968, undated

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Center for Advanced Visual Studies: 1971

Miller, Kenneth Hayes: 1931, 1933

Milone, Joe: 1941

Minneapolios College of Art and Design: 1971

Mount Holyoke College: 1962, 1964

Museum of Art, Carnegie Institution: 1967, 1971, 1974

Museum of Fine Arts of Houston: 1954

Museum of Modern Art: 1943, 1953, 1955, 1964, 1967, 1968

National Association of Women Artists: 1953, 1954

National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities: 1966

Neumann, Hans: 1962

Neumann, J. B.: 1954

New School for Social Research: 1961

The New York Times -- : 1968

New York State Council on the Arts: 1968

The New Yorker -- : 1967

Newsweek -- : 1967

Nierenforf, Karl: 1941, 1943, 1946

Nordjyllands Kunstmuseum: 1973

Ono, Yoko: 1971

Pace Gallery: 1976

Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts: 1952, 1970

Philadelphia College of Art: 1961, 1968

Philadelphia Museum of Art: 1965

Princeton University: 1962

Queens College: 1958

Rhode Island School of Design: 1971

Riverside Museum: 1964

Rockefeller, Nelson: 1960, 1962, 1966, 1968

Roberts, Collette: 1952, 1953

Robus, Hugo: 1958

Rosenblum, Robert: 1958

Sewall, Mrs. Sumner: 1943

Silvermine Guild of Artists: 1953, 1954, 1955

Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture: 1970, 1971

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum: 1964, 1966

Tamarind Lithography Work Shop: 1971

Tate Gallery: 1963, 1966, 1967, 1968

Teachers College, Columbia University: 1964

Trenton State College: 1961

Tyler, Parker: 1958

United States Committee of the International Association of Art: 1971

University of Alabama, Department of Art: 1964

University of Bridgeport: 1971

University of Nebraska Art Galleries: 1951

Vogue -- : 1964

Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art: 1962

Walker Art Center: 1971, 1973

Weber, Max: 1947, 1948, 1950, 1951

Western College for Women: 1964

The White House: 1974

Whitney Museum of American Art: 1950, 1956, 1957, 1962, 1964, 1966, 1967

Wichita State University: 1974

The Woman's College of The University of North Carolina: 1951

Women's Interart Center: 1973

Yale University, Department of Art: 1961
Collection Restrictions:
The bulk of this collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website, with the exception of the 2017 addition. Use of material not digitized requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Louise Nevelson papers, circa 1903-1982. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.neveloui, Series 2
See more items in:
Louise Nevelson papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw93cd690b9-9c7f-4b65-95a4-9fb34488e325
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-neveloui-ref37

Rhode Island School of Design

Collection Creator:
Carnegie Institute, Museum of Art  Search this
Container:
Box 118, Folder 56-59
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1900
1904-1905
1908-1916
1918-1921
1923-1924
1926-1927
1929
1931-1934
1936
1939-1940
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Carnegie Institute, Museum of Art records, 1883-1962, bulk 1885-1940. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Carnegie Institute, Museum of Art records
Carnegie Institute, Museum of Art records / Series 1: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-carninst-ref6820

R, General

Collection Creator:
Kraushaar Galleries  Search this
Container:
Box 16, Folder 3
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1931
Scope and Contents note:
(Rhode Island School of Design)
Collection Restrictions:
Use of originals requires an appointment. A fragile original scrapbook is restricted. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
Authorization to publish, quote or reproduce requires written permission from Katherine Kaplan Degn, Kraushaar Galleries. Contact Reference Services for more information.
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Kraushaar Galleries records, 1877-2006. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Kraushaar Galleries records
Kraushaar Galleries records / Series 2: Incoming Letters
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw960223a66-b831-492e-bd8d-a5346ec6dedf
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-kraugall-ref1345

R, General

Collection Creator:
Kraushaar Galleries  Search this
Container:
Box 18, Folder 53
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1935
Scope and Contents note:
(Rhode Island School of Design)
Collection Restrictions:
Use of originals requires an appointment. A fragile original scrapbook is restricted. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
Authorization to publish, quote or reproduce requires written permission from Katherine Kaplan Degn, Kraushaar Galleries. Contact Reference Services for more information.
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Kraushaar Galleries records, 1877-2006. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Kraushaar Galleries records
Kraushaar Galleries records / Series 2: Incoming Letters
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw994656710-3791-4bac-af8c-170a91bba1aa
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-kraugall-ref1543

Rhode Island School of Design

Collection Creator:
Kraushaar Galleries  Search this
Container:
Box 34, Folder 35
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1950
Scope and Contents note:
(James D. Herbert)
Collection Restrictions:
Use of originals requires an appointment. A fragile original scrapbook is restricted. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
Authorization to publish, quote or reproduce requires written permission from Katherine Kaplan Degn, Kraushaar Galleries. Contact Reference Services for more information.
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Kraushaar Galleries records, 1877-2006. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Kraushaar Galleries records
Kraushaar Galleries records / Series 3: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9bacd130a-7590-4538-8aa1-cb4d0332c7ce
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-kraugall-ref2603

Oral history interview with Emmet Gowin, 2010 May 13-14

Interviewee:
Gowin, Emmet, 1941-  Search this
Gowin, Emmet, 1941-  Search this
Interviewer:
Goodyear, Frank H., 1967-  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Educators -- New Jersey -- Interviews  Search this
Photographers -- Pennsylvania -- Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)15913
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)296894
AAA_collcode_gowin10
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_296894

Oral history interview with Emmet Gowin

Interviewee:
Gowin, Emmet, 1941-  Search this
Interviewer:
Goodyear, Frank H., III, 1967-  Search this
Extent:
7 Items (Sound recording, master: 7 memory cards (6 hr., 3 min.), secure digital, 1.25 in.)
81 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2010 May 13-14
Scope and Contents:
Interview of Emmet Gowin, conducted by Frank Goodyear for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution at the Gowins' home in Danville, Virginia, on May 13-14, 2010.
Gowin speaks of his upbringing and how he decided to become a Quaker; his relationship with his sister, who had Down Syndrome; growing up in Chincoteague, VA and other Virginia towns; going to business school in Richmond; meeting his wife Edith; transitioning from Richmond Professional Institute to work with Harry Callahan at the Rhode Island School of Design; learning different techniques of printing pictures; studying with Frederick Sommer; the making and reception of his early family photographs of Edith, the Boohers, and his children; other photographic projects including the Mount St. Helens eruption, photographs in the Middle East, Europe, and South America, nuclear test sites in the western U.S., and his collection of moths; teaching at Princeton University; his attitude toward Postmodernism; how the Light Gallery began; and his artistic influences, including Callahan, Sommer, Robert Frank, Alfred Stieglitz, Walker Evans, Eugéne Atget, Hercules Seghers, William Blake, and others. Gowin also recalls Peter Bunnell, Grant Gentry, Fazal Sheikh, Peter McGill, Ralph Eugene Meatyard, Elaine Pagels, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Interviewee Emmet Gowin (1941- ) is an educator and photographer in Newtown, Pa. Gowin photographed Edith and Rennie Booher and extended family. Interviewer Frank H. Goodyear (1967- ) was at the time of the interview the associate curator of photographs with the National Portrait Gallery, in Washington, D.C.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
This interview is access restricted; written permission is required. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Topic:
Educators -- New Jersey -- Interviews  Search this
Photographers -- Pennsylvania -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.gowin10
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9c55cb7e0-c236-48e2-8b8e-3f7de0f7bc0a
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-gowin10

Starr Ockenga collection

Extent:
5.5 Cubic feet (photographic images; files)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1995-2001
Summary:
The Starr Ockenga Collection includes materials generated or compiled by Ockenga for the writing of her books, 'Earth on Her Hands: The American Woman in Her Garden' (1998, Clarkson Potter) and 'Eden on Their Minds: American Gardeners with Bold Visions" (2001, Clarkson Potter).' Both books feature several individual chapters, each describing a garden owner and their garden.
Scope and Contents Note:
The Starr Ockenga Collection includes photographic images, notes, correspondence, questionnaires, garden plans, planting lists, releases and drafts generated or compiled by Ockenga for the writing and illustrating of her books, 'Earth on Her Hands: The American Woman in Her Garden' (1998, Clarkson Potter) and 'Eden on Their Minds: American Gardeners with Bold Visions' (2001, Clarkson Potter). Both books consist of several individual chapters, each describing a garden owner and their garden and featuring a portrait of the garden owner in their garden. The 40 gardens included in the collection are located across the United States. In addition to the hundreds of images published in 'Eden' and 'Earth,' the Ockenga Collection includes thousands of additional images that, together with the research notes and garden descriptions in the books, provide a rich source of documentation. A number of the images show panoramic garden views.
Arrangement Note:
The collection was organized into two major components by Starr Ockenga, representing materials generated for two books she authored and illustrated, 'Earth on Her Hands: The American Woman in Her Garden' and 'Eden on Their Minds: American Gardeners with Bold Visions.' Within each of the two divisions, the garden files and book chapters, garden images, and garden owner portraits are arranged according to specific garden.
Biographical Note:
Starr Ockenga is a writer, photographer, and lecturer. Her photographs have been exhibited in museums and galleries and are included in both public and private collections. Her images and writings have appeared in numerous publications including Life, Esquire, Camera, and Horticulture. She is the author of several books including 'Earth on Her Hands: The American Woman in Her Garden,' 'Eden on Their Minds: American Gardeners with Bold Visions,' and 'Amaryllis.' Earth on Her Hands received the American Horticultural Society's Annual Book Award in 1999. Ockenga received her Master's degree in photography from the Rhode Island School of Design and has been awarded fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Massachusetts Artists Foundation. She is a former associate professor of photography at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her studio is located in New York City.
Provenance:
Collection of photographic images and garden files generated by Starr Ockenga during the course of writing and illustrating her books, 'Earth on Her Hands: The American Woman in Her Garden' and 'Eden on Their Minds: American Gardeners with Bold Visions,' donated by Ockenga to the Archives of American Gardens in 2014.
Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Starr Ockenga Collection.
Identifier:
AAG.OCK
See more items in:
Starr Ockenga collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6d6656e74-b23d-4ab9-8821-86e0af4500fd
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aag-ock

Drawings and prints of the First Maniera, 1515-1535

Author:
Brown University Department of Art  Search this
Rhode Island School of Design Museum of Art  Search this
Physical description:
115 p. illus. 21 x 26 cm
Type:
Exhibitions
Place:
Italy
Date:
1973
1973]
16th century
Topic:
Drawing, Italian  Search this
Drawing  Search this
Prints, Italian  Search this
Prints  Search this
Mannerism (Art)  Search this
Call number:
NC255 .B75 1973X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_520318

Drawings by Hyman Bloom : [exhibition] The Currier Gallery of Art Manchester, November 2-December 15 [1957], Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, January 10-February 9 [1958], Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford, February 25-March 30 [1958]

Author:
Bloom, Hyman 1913-2009  Search this
Currier Gallery of Art  Search this
Rhode Island School of Design Museum of Art  Search this
Wadsworth Atheneum  Search this
Subject:
Bloom, Hyman 1913-2009  Search this
Physical description:
[14] p. : ill. ; 23 cm
Type:
Books
Exhibitions
Date:
1957
1957]
Call number:
NC139.B55 A4 1957
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_697796

Nanette Carter papers

Creator:
Carter, Nanette, 1954-  Search this
Names:
Pratt Institute. Art School  Search this
Freeman, Bettye  Search this
Pindell, Howardena, 1943-  Search this
Extent:
4.9 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1972-2009
Summary:
The papers of African American abstract artist and educator Nanette Carter measure 4.9 linear feet and date from 1972 to 2009. The collection documents Carter's education and career through biographical materials, correspondence with artists and others, writings including notebooks documenting Carter's studies, exhibition files for Carter's solo and group exhibitions, files documenting teaching and other professional activities, research material including sound recordings for a book project on Carter's mentors, personal business records, and printed material.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of African American abstract artist and educator Nanette Carter document Carter's education and career through 4.9 linear feet of papers dating from 1972 to 2009.

The collection includes biographical materials consisting of an address book, 11 appointment books, resumes, Carter's student records, and a sound recording of an interview with Carter and Vincent Smith for the radio program "Dialogues with Contemporary Artists." Correspondence is with Joan Digby, Bettye Freeman, Miriam Perlman, and various organizations regarding exhibitions, workshops, and employment. Carter's writings and notes include 13 notebooks documenting her studies and career activities, speech notes, and her student papers from Pratt Institute of Art.

Also found in the collection are exhibition files documenting Carter's solo and group exhibitions, and professional activity files consisting of Carter's teaching files, files regarding fellowships and grants, workshop records, and research material for a book project on female mentors that includes 5 sound recordings of Howardena Pindell and Marcia Lloyd. Carter's personal business records include consignment and sales records, contracts and agreements, and price lists; and printed materials consist of announcements and catalogs for Carter's exhibitions, event programs, posters, press releases, and other material relating to Carter's career as an artist.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as seven series.

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1972-1998 (0.7 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1976-2009 (1.2 linear feet; Boxes 1-2, OV 7)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, 1975-2002 (0.5 linear feet; Box 3)

Series 4: Exhibition Files, 1976-2008 (0.7 linear feet; Boxes 3-4)

Series 5: Professional Activity Files, 1977-2008 (0.7 linear feet; Box 4, OV 7)

Series 6: Personal Business Records, 1979-2008 (0.4 linear feet; Boxes 4-5)

Series 7: Printed Materials, 1979-2009 (0.7 linear feet; Boxes 5-6, OV 7)
Biographical / Historical:
Nanette Carter (1954- ) is an African American abstract artist and educator in New York, New York.

Carter was born in Columbus, Ohio, to Frances Hill and Matthew G. Carter. In 1960, Carter and her family, including her sister Bettye Carter Freeman, moved from Ohio to Montclair, New Jersey where her father became the city's first African American mayor. After graduating from Montclair High School, Carter attended Oberlin College studying studio art and art history. She spent her junior year abroad studying in Perugia, Italy and traveling through Europe and North Africa. Carter graduated from Oberlin in 1976 and continued her education at the Pratt Institute of Art receiving a Master of Fine Arts in 1978.

In the 1970s, Carter spent time in Sag Harbor where her parents had a house. She became involved with the local art scene through her college job at the Guild Hall Museum where she met artist Al Loving. Loving became a mentor to Carter and later curated one of her earliest group exhibitions, Eastville Artists (1979), featuring African American artists working in eastern Long Island, New York. Carter has continued to exhibit her artwork frequently throughout the United States, as well as overseas. She has been the recipient of numerous fellowships and grants including Bob Blackburn's Printmaking Workshop, the Pollock-Krasner Foundation grant, and the New York State Council on the Arts residency at Cinque Gallery.

In addition to her career as an artist, Carter has held teaching positions at various institutions including Dwight-Englewood School, Guild Hall Museum, City College of New York, Rhode Island School of Design, and the Pratt Institute of Art where she is a tenured professor.
Provenance:
The collection was donated in 2019 by Nanette Carter as part of the Archives' African American Collecting Initiative funded by the Henry Luce Foundation.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
African American artists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women educators  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American painters  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Nanette Carter papers, 1972-2009. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.cartnane
See more items in:
Nanette Carter papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9a28f9060-aa59-49a9-b48a-54b6b19866ba
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-cartnane
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