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Crevices in Minnewaski, N.Y.

Medium:
Glass
Object Name:
Slide
Type:
Slide
Date:
20th century
Credit Line:
Gift of Miss Frances Morris
Accession Number:
1945-201-152
See more items in:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Collection
Drawings, Prints, and Graphic Design Department
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:chndm_1945-201-152

Le Schoenburg from river

Medium:
Glass
Object Name:
Slide
Type:
Slide
Date:
20th century
Credit Line:
Gift of Miss Frances Morris
Accession Number:
1945-201-89
See more items in:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Collection
Drawings, Prints, and Graphic Design Department
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:chndm_1945-201-89

Warsaw -- Sabine Hall

Former owner:
Carter, Robert Wormley, ca. 1735-1797  Search this
Wellford, Armistead Nelson  Search this
Wellford, Dabney S. Rev  Search this
Wellford, Hill B.  Search this
Carter, Landon, 1710-1778  Search this
Carter, Elizabeth, 1717-1806  Search this
Carter, Winifred, ca.1740  Search this
Wellford, Robert, 1775-1844  Search this
Wellford, Ida  Search this
Wellford, William  Search this
Wellford, Katherine Davis  Search this
Carter, Katherine  Search this
Carter, Elizabeth Merrie  Search this
Carter, Landon, II  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Sabine Hall (Warsaw, Virginia)
United States of America -- Virginia -- Richmond County -- Warsaw
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets and photocopies from publications.
General:
Sabine Hall is a plantation residence in the Georgian style built by Robert "King" Carter for his son Colonel Landon Carter, circa 1730, on a property of 4,000 acres, in an axial plan with formal parterre gardens. Sabine Hall was named for Horace's Roman villa and passed down through the Carter family for nine generations. The family kept the original geometric plan intact, although not all the beds were planted over time. Facing the Rappahannock River, and encompassing several hundred feet are six terraced beds with connecting grass ramps, with a centered gravel walk nearly six feet wide leading from the porch steps into the first terrace. Gravel walks continued to at least the second and third terraces. The first terrace, planted in grass, was called a bowling green. There were formal flower beds planted in a symmetrical English style on the second terrace. The third terrace was likely planted in small fruits and medicinal herbs, the fourth and fifth terraces planted in vegetables, and the sixth with fruit trees. There was another vegetable garden (the kitchen garden) planted with necessities that did not conform to the aesthetics of the parterres, planted beyond the boxwood hedges, out of sight from the house. The fifth and sixth terraces were not maintained into the 20th century, but the outlines remain. The borders were hedged in boxwood. The front portico of the house has leads to a planted lawn surrounded and interplanted with both native and imported tree species.
Colonel Landon Carter is presumed to have been responsible for the initial geometrical design of the garden, based on 17th century English and Continental precepts. Indentured English gardeners may have been early workers, as well as slaves passed down through family bequests. The third owner, Robert Wormeley Carter, named slave gardeners in his will of 1794.
Flowers mentioned by Landon Carter include bulbs, roses, and wildflowers. Vegetables included artichokes, French beans, broccoli, cabbages, carrots, cauliflower, cucumbers, endives, lettuce, melons, mushrooms, onions, parsley, peas, potatoes, radishes, savoys, spinach, and turnips.
Following ownership by Colonel Landon Carter (1710-1778) and his wife Elizabeth Wormeley of Rosegill, the estate passed to Robert Wormeley Carter and his wife Winifred Beale; then to their son Colonel Landon Carter II and his wife Katharine Tayloe of Mount Airy; next to Robert Wormeley Carter II and his wife Elizabeth Merrie Tayloe of Mount Airy. Ownership then skipped a generation and went to Robert Carter Wellford (a grandson) in 1861, who married Elizabeth Harrison of Berkeley. She died in 1919, leaving Sabine Hall to two sons, Armistead Nelson Wellford and his wife Katherine Davis and William Harrison Wellford and his wife Ida Beverly. The property was passed on to ensuing sons, the Reverend Dabney S. Wellford and Hill B. Wellford.
Persons associated with the garden include the Carter family (1730) and their descendents.
Related Materials:
Sabine Hall related holdings consist of 1 folder (12 35 mm. slides (photographs))
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Virginia -- Warsaw  Search this
Plantations  Search this
Gardens, English  Search this
Vegetable gardening  Search this
Parterres  Search this
Terraces  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File VA009
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Virginia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref18924

Lapworth -- Packwood House

Former owner:
Featherstone family  Search this
Ash, G. Baron  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Packwood House (Lapworth, Warwickshire, England)
United Kingdom -- England -- Warwickshire -- Lapworth
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, photocopied book excerpts, and additional information about the house and garden.
General:
Packwood House is a timber-framed Tudor manor house initially constructed between 1556 and 1560, which has undergone considerable restoration and modification, especially by former 20th century owner G. Baron Ash. Donated to the National Trust (Great Britain) in 1941, the property is noted especially for its Yew Garden, containing over 100 trees. Originally laid out in the mid-17th century by John Fetherston (the Fetherston/Fetherstone family occupied the house from its construction until 1876), the clipped yews are supposed to represent the Biblical "Sermon on the Mount." Twelve large specimens are known as "The Apostles," while four others are "The Evangelists." A hummock called "The Mount" is topped by a single yew known as "The Master." Smaller yews called "The Multitude" were planted in the 19th century to replace an orchard.
Packwood House was visited during the Garden Club of America's June 1929 tour to England. A complete copy of the GCA tour itinerary was printed in the Bulletin of the Garden Club of America (Fourth Series, No. 5), September 1929, pp. 6-25.
Persons associated with the property include the Fetherstone family (former owners, 1556-1876) and G. Baron Ash (former owner, 1925-1941).
Related Materials:
Packwood House related holdings consist of 1 folder (6 lantern slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- England -- Warwickshire -- Lapworth  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File ENG032
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 2: International Garden Images / United Kingdom -- England
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref4472

Maidenhead -- Cliveden

Architect:
Barry, Charles Sir, 1795-1860  Search this
Landscape architect:
Barry, Charles Sir, 1795-1860  Search this
Former owner:
Sutherland, George Granville Leveson-Gower Duke of, 1786-1861  Search this
Astor, Waldorf Astor Viscount, 1879-1952  Search this
Astor, Nancy Witcher Langhorne Astor Viscountess, 1879-1964  Search this
Gardener:
Fleming, John  Search this
Bridgeman, Charles  Search this
Garden designer:
Jellicoe, Geoffrey Sir, 1900-1996  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Cliveden (Taplow, Maidenhead, Berkshire, England)
United Kingdom -- England -- Berkshire -- Maidenhead -- Taplow
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, photocopied book excerpts, and additional information about the house and garden.
General:
Cliveden is an historically significant estate set on 130-foot high banks above the River Thames, with its grounds sloping down to the river. Comprising about 375 acres, the estate's current mansion was built in 1851 by architect Charles Barry for George Sutherland-Leveson-Gower, the 2nd Duke of Sutherland. Notable owners in the early 20th century included Waldorf and Nancy Astor. The estate's gardens include about 180 acres, while the rest of the property is woodland and paddocks. Highlights of the gardens include a formal four-acre parterre, topiary, a water garden, an herbaceous plant "Secret" garden (replacing an earlier rose garden designed by Geoffrey Jellicoe), a lime tree avenue, and a maze. Temples, pavilions, follies, and sculpture complement the plant material. The property is currently owned by the National Trust (Great Britain), which leases the mansion as a hotel. Cliveden was visited during the Garden Club of America's June 1929 tour to England. A complete copy of the GCA tour itinerary was printed in the Bulletin of the Garden Club of America (Fourth Series, No. 5), September 1929, pp. 6-25.
Persons associated with the property include Sir Charles Barry (architect and landscape architect, 1851); George Sutherland-Leveson-Gower, 2nd Duke of Sutherland (former owner, 1850-1861); John Fleming (gardener, ca. 1851); Charles Bridgeman (gardener, ca. 1720); Waldorf and Nancy Astor, Viscount and Viscountess Astor (former owners, 1906-1942); and Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe (garden designer, 1959).
Related Materials:
Cliveden related holdings consist of 1 folder (6 lantern slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- England -- Berkshire -- Maidenhead -- Taplow  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File ENG006
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 2: International Garden Images / United Kingdom -- England
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref4476

Sutton Courtenay -- Sutton Courtenay Manor House

Garden designer:
Lindsay, Norah Bourke, 1873-1948  Search this
Former owner:
Lindsay, Norah Bourke, 1873-1948  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Sutton Courtenay Manor House (Sutton Courtenay, Oxfordshire, England)
United Kingdom -- England -- Oxfordshire -- Sutton Courtenay
General:
Although various parts of the Sutton Courtenay Manor House were built between the 13th through 17th centuries, development of its gardens did not occur until the early 20th century. Norah Bourke Lindsay, who became an influential garden designer in England after World War I, lived in the house and created its gardens, which demonstrate the influence of Gertrude Jekyll and William Robinson. The property was visited by the Garden Club of America on June 11, 1929, during its English garden tour. At that time the property was in Berkshire, but in 1974 county boundary changes transferred it to Oxfordshire. Two of the six lantern slides in the Archives of American Gardens collection were produced from images taken during the tour by Mrs. P. H. Williams, while the others may have been made from images taken by other tour participants or may have been produced commercially. A complete copy of the GCA tour itinerary was printed in the Bulletin of the Garden Club of America (Fourth Series, No. 5), September 1929, pp. 6-25.
Persons associated with the garden include Norah Bourke Lindsay (former owner and garden designer, 1895-1948).
Related Materials:
Sutton Courtenay Manor House related holdings consist of 1 folder (6 lantern slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- England -- Oxfordshire -- Sutton Courtenay  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File ENG014
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 2: International Garden Images / United Kingdom -- England
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref4485

Newport -- Hammersmith Farm

Former owner:
Brenton, William  Search this
Auchincloss, John Winthrop  Search this
Auchincloss, Hugh D.  Search this
Auchincloss, Janet  Search this
Landscape designer:
Barrett, Nathan Franklin  Search this
Kellaway, Herbert J.  Search this
Timchenko, Boris V., 1898-1975  Search this
Landscape architect:
Olmsted Brothers  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Hammersmith Farm (Newport, Rhode Island)
United States of America -- Rhode Island -- Newport County -- Newport
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, a brochure, and photocopies of photographs of and articles about the garden.
General:
Lying at the meeting of Narragansett Bay and the Atlantic, Hammersmith Farm was originally settled in the 17th century by surveyor William Brenton and named for his English residence. Eventually passing into the Auchincloss family, the property was landscaped by the Olmsted Brothers firm (records show that the firm was involved with the site from 1909 to 1946). Other designs for the property were developed by Nathan Franklin Barrett, Herbert Kellaway, and Boris V. Timchenko. An elaborate Italianate sunken garden was centered on a pool flanked by low mounds of flowers. Geometrically shaped flowers beds lay to either side, while the space was decorated by urns and columns. A pergola enclosed three sides. The property was the site of the wedding reception of Mrs. Hugh D. Auchincloss, Jr.'s daughter, Jacqueline Bouvier, and John F. Kennedy.
Persons and firms associated with the garden include: William Brenton (former owner, after 1638); John W. Auchincloss (former owner, c. 1887); Mr. and Mrs. Hugh D. Auchincloss (former owners, early 20th century); Mr. and Mrs. Hugh D. Auchincloss (former owners, mid-20th century); Olmsted Brothers Landscape Architects (landscape architects, 1909-1946); Nathan Franklin Barrett (landscape designer, 1912); Herbert J. Kellaway (landscape designer); and Boris V. Timchenko (landscape designer, 1959).
Related Materials:
Hammersmith Farm related holdings consist of 1 folder (12 glass lantern slides; 9 35 mm. slides)
Records related to this site can be found at the Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site, Olmsted Job Number 03794, H. D. Auchincloss.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Rhode Island -- Newport  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File RI025
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Rhode Island
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref10559

Newport -- Beacon Ridge South

Former owner:
James, Arthur Curtiss  Search this
James, Harriet Eddy  Search this
Cullen, Tom  Search this
James Foundation of New York  Search this
Roman Catholic Diocese of Rhode Island  Search this
Brainerd Snelling Trustees  Search this
James Trust  Search this
Castle Hill Construction  Search this
Landscape architect:
Olmsted Brothers  Search this
Provenance:
Garden Club of New Haven  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Beacon Ridge South (Newport, Rhode Island)
United States of America -- Rhode Island -- Newport County -- Newport
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes a worksheet, a property plan, and additional information about the Olmsted design and the restoration of the garden.
General:
This four-acre garden is the north section of the extensive rose garden of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Curtiss James laid out on Beacon Hill between granite ridges beginning in 1921. The original, larger James estate was subdivided in the late 20th century. After 1981 the current owner restored many architectural features, including masonry pillars, walls, steps, and balustrades, some ironwork, and the pergola beams. Missing garden ornaments were replaced. The formality of the axial features has been retained, and new plantings of hybrid roses and climbers around these are in the spirit of the original lavish rose garden. Horticultural interest and variety are given by informal plantings at the edge of the lawns and on the rocks.
Persons, organizations, and firms associated with the garden include: Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Curtiss James (former owners, 1910-1941); the James Foundation of New York (former owner, 1942-1951); the Roman Catholic Diocese of Rhode Island (former owner, 1951-1973); Brainerd Snelling Trustees and the James Trust (former owners, 1973-1978); Castle Hill Construction (Tom Cullen) (former owner, 1978-1981); and Olmsted Brothers Landscape Architects (landscape architects, 1921-).
Related Materials:
Beacon Ridge South related holdings consist of 1 folder (34 35 mm. slides)
Records related to this site can be found at the Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site, Olmsted Job Number 03558, Arthur Curtiss James.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Rhode Island -- Newport  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File RI158
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Rhode Island
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref10571

Goose Creek -- Medway Plantation

Architect:
van der Gracht, Ides  Search this
Landscape architect:
Shipman, Ellen  Search this
Creator:
Little Garden Club of Rye--provenance.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Medway Plantation,(Goose Creek, South Carolina)
United States of America -- South Carolina -- Berkeley County -- Goose Creek
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, site plans, plant lists, and photocopies of articles.
General:
Medway Plantation comprises 6700 acres of longleaf and loblolly pine, live oaks, tupelo, swampland and lakes as well as the oldest masonry house in South Carolina. An ornamental garden with irregularly-shaped beds and serpentine paths, known as Miss Lou's garden, was redesigned in the 1930s by Ellen Biddle Shipman. The earlier garden was described as a bird sanctuary and nursery growing anise and Chinese bay trees, azaleas, fringe trees, roses, flowering almond, lilacs, spireas, myrtle, and yellow Jessamine, with wisteria growing up into deciduous trees. The surplus from Miss Lou's garden was planted in long borders alongside three shallow brick terraces, and along paths that led to a schoolhouse on the property. The current drive to the house has double borders of live oak trees hung with Spanish moss that were first planted after the Civil War. In the 1930s architect Ides van der Gracht designed a greenhouse with stepped gables, echoing that feature from the house, and added serpentine brick walls surrounding a garden of flowers and vegetables, on the site of the historic kitchen garden. Prior to the Civil War rice was cultivated at Medway Plantation, followed by cotton and the current crop, timber.
Medway Plantation was first organized as a land grant to Johan (or Jan) van Aerssen in the last quarter of the 17th century. He started the original house which during its long history was burned and rebuilt, nearly abandoned and used only as a hunting lodge, and finally renovated. The house has unusual stepped gables in the Dutch style, reflecting the van Aerssen heritage. After van Aerssen's death circa 1867 and the remarriage of his widow, Sabina de Vignon to Thomas Smith in 1689, the property came into the prominent South Carolina Smith family.
In the early days land parcels routinely were acquired and sold and the dimensions of Medway Plantation changed frequently, finally ending up at 6700 acres under the ownership of Sidney J. and Gertrude S. Legendre in the 20th century, who had purchased and annexed neighboring plantations. Before her death in 2000 Gertrude Legendre put the property in a non-profit foundation with a conservation easement to preserve the pine forests, wetlands, and wildlife. It is recognized as a breeding site for endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers, bald eagles, wood ducks and wintering ring-necked ducks, and provides habitat for deer, turkey and quail.
Persons associated with the garden include Johan van Aerssen (former owner and builder of original house, 1686-circa 1688); Sabina de Vignon, (former owner, 1688-1689); Thomas Smith and members of the Smith family (former owners, 1689-1701); Edward Hyrne (former owner, 1701-1711); Peter Gaillard Stoney and family (former owners, 1833-1930); Sidney J. and Gertrude Sanford Legendre (former owners, 1930-1993; Ides van Waterschoot van der Gracht (architect, 1930s); Ellen Biddle Shipman (landscape architect, 1930s).
Related Materials:
Medway Plantation related holdings consist of 2 folders (2 35mm slides (photographs), 34 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- South Carolina -- Goose Creek  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File SC082
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / South Carolina
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref12480

Moncks Corner -- Mulberry Plantation

Landscape architect:
Briggs, Loutrel W.  Search this
Owner:
Chapman, Clarence  Search this
Provenance:
Little Garden Club of Rye  Search this
Creator:
Broughton, Thomas Col  Search this
Collection, John, Sir  Search this
Barker, Theodore G., Major  Search this
Chapman, Clarence  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Mulberry Plantation (Moncks Corner, South Carolina)
United States of America -- South Carolina -- Berkeley County -- Moncks Corner
Mulberry Plantation (Moncks Corner, South Carolina)
United States of America -- South Carolina -- Berkeley County -- Moncks Corner
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, site plans, and photocopies of book excerpts and articles.
General:
The brick house at Mulberry Plantation was built on a bluff by the first owner, Thomas Broughton in 1714, the date inscribed in iron on the four weathervanes atop the four pavilions at the corners of the house. Situated along the Cooper River the current property comprises 805 acres and includes gardens on three levels: a formal boxwood parterre garden next to the house, a descending camellia walk, and a formal circle garden, all designed by Loutrel W. Briggs (b.1893-d.1977) circa 1930. Other features include a parterre kitchen garden, a Live oak allée, lagoon, rolling lawns and the oldest mulberry tree in the country. The plantation grew rice at various times in its history, as well as indigo and forest products. Another 19th century commercial project that did not succeed was breeding silk worms to produce domestic silk, with mulberry trees planted to house the worms. By the early 20th century the property was in decline and was sold out of the Broughton family to Mr. and Mrs. Clarence E. Chapman as a winter retreat. The Chapmans restored the house and brought in Briggs, known for developing the Charleston style for the many small gardens he designed in the city and at other Cooper River plantations.
Mulberry Plantation was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1966. The style of the house has been described as Jacobean and French, with a mansard roof, rather than a typical low-country wooden structure. The brick house may have been used as a fortress against attacks during the Yamesse War in 1715, between settlers and Native Americans. At one time there were many slave cabins on the property but now only one remains that has been used as a hunting lodge.
Persons associated with the garden include Thomas Broughton and descendents (former owners, 1714-1914); Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Chapman (former owners, 1915-1981); Historic Charleston Foundation (former owners, 1981-1987); Loutrel Winslow Briggs (December 12, 1893-May, 1977) (landscape designer, circa 1930)
Related Materials:
Mulberry Plantation related holdings consist of 2 folders (2 35mm slides (photographs) + 27 digital images)
Mulberry Plantation related holdings consist of 1 slide (photograph) (col., 35mm.)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- South Carolina -- Moncks Corner  Search this
Plantations  Search this
Spring  Search this
Box  Search this
Formal gardens  Search this
Sundials  Search this
Gardens -- South Carolina -- Moncks Corner  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File SC061
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / South Carolina
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref12489

Sewickley -- Beeches

Former owner:
Hannaway, Peter J.  Search this
Hannaway, Gertrude T. Mrs  Search this
Architect:
Smith, Brandon, 1931-1935  Search this
Landscape designer:
Keely, Elise E., 2008  Search this
Provenance:
Village Garden Club of Sewickley  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital images
Photographic prints
Place:
Beeches (Sewickley, Pennsylvania)
United States of America -- Pennsylvania -- Allegheny County -- Sewickley
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, historical and biographical information, and images.
General:
The area was settled circa 1790 by soldiers from the Revolutionary War who were compensated with land to farm. Descendants subdivided their properties during the 19th and early 20th centuries, and eventually there were residences and a 9-hole golf course on 40 acres that had been rich farmland. In the 1930's the golf course was converted to residential properties, and this property's slightly more than one-half acre were the first and second holes of the old golf course. The Beaux Arts red brick house has both neoclassical and Italianate features that are complemented by renovations to the house and gardens by the current owners. The property was densely shaded by white pine, hemlock and Norway spruce; about 28 trees have been removed. Existing square brick pillars with globular finials and an acanthus leaf design were replicated and six unadorned pillars were erected on the street side of the property among pleached copper beeches. A hedge of false cypress along the driveway leads to a wooden fence with old and new pillars at either end and new garages. The main entrance is at the side of the house and was remodeled with neoclassical features, as was the rebuilt two-story porch at the rear of the house. A brick freestanding wall opposite the main entrance has Italianate arched insets with topiary shrubs pruned to fit as well as small statues of cherubs.
An existing medallion shaped swimming pool had to be fenced to conform to local codes so graded beds were added and planted with shrubs that eventually will disguise the ornamental wrought iron picket fence. These include hybridized hydrangeas in purple and pink, tree peonies, boxwood and white azaleas. Outside the fence the graded beds are filled with serviceberry, ornamental cherries, Japanese maple, leucothoe, and serviceberry under original hemlocks and pines; and in one corner there is an understory of witch hazel. These beds separate the pool from the rest of the garden. An arbor and gate that is the egress from the pool garden is painted white to match all the trim on the house and planted with clematis and climbing hydrangea. Two espaliered pear trees and a pruned peach tree grow against the new brick wall that separates the pool garden from the driveway. At the back of the property a row of rainbow knockout roses adds color.
Persons associated with the garden include: Peter J. and Gertrude T. Hannaway (former owners prior to October 2006); Brandon Smith (architect, circa 1931-1935); and Elise E. Keely (landscape designer, 2008).
Related Materials:
Beeches related holdings consist of 1 folder (8 photographic prints; 40 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Pennsylvania -- Sewickley  Search this
Genre/Form:
Digital images
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File PA831
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Pennsylvania
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref16578

West Chester -- Square House

Former owner:
Hemphill, Anne Price  Search this
Barr, Everett Dr.  Search this
Landscape architect:
McIlvaine, Gilbert  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Square House (West Chester, Pennsylvania)
United States of America -- Pennsylvania -- Chester County -- West Chester
Scope and Contents:
The folders include worksheets and additional information about the garden.
General:
Also known as Auxillary House, the residential structure on this garden site dates to 1836 and was originally used as a boarding school. Little remains of the garden, which is surrounded by a 12-foot wall built in the early 20th century to ensure privacy. During the ownership of Ann Price Hemphill in the 1920s and 1930s landscape architect Gilbert McIlvaine created a design that incorporated old trees, a marble fountain, and the use of Victorian ironwork. Another unusual decorative feature is ornamentation said to come from cemeteries that could not be maintained during the Great Depression and subsequently sold to Mrs. Hemphill. The property is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as the West Chester Boarding School for Boys.
Persons associated with the garden include: Gilbert McIlvaine (landscape architect, 1920s-1930s); Ann Price Hemphill (former owner, 1920s-1930s); and Dr. Everett Barr (former owner, 1940s-1950s).
Related Materials:
Square House related holdings consist of 2 folders (1 glass lantern slide, 8 35 mm. slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Pennsylvania -- West Chester  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File PA021
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Pennsylvania
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref16585

Alexandria -- River Farm

Former owner:
Washington, George, 1732-1799  Search this
Clifton, William  Search this
Resident:
Lear, Tobias, 1762-1816  Search this
Owner:
American Horticultural Society  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
River Farm (Alexandria, Virginia)
United States of America -- Virginia -- City of Alexandria -- Alexandria
Scope and Contents:
There are three 35 mm. slides depicting horticultural details which were not catalogued.

The folder includes a work sheet, site analysis map-1985, article copy and brochure.
Former Title:
Wellington

Walnut Tree Farm

Cliftons Neck
General:
River Farm was first called Piscataway Neck by Margaret and Captain Giles Brent in 1653. During William Clifton's ownership, the property was known as Cliftons Neck. George Washington bought the property in 1760 to lease. The largest track at this time was called "River Farm." Tobias Lear, a renter, had called the property Walnut Farm. In 1859, a century after Washington purchased the property from Clifton, Charles Augustine Washington sold 652 acres of River Farm to three Quaker brothers, Stacey, Isaac, and William Snowden of New Jersey in order to acquire lumber for the ship building. The Snowdens divided the acreage, then known as Wellington, into three sections. In 1866, 280 acres including the present-day River Farm were sold to three men known as "The Syndicate." A writer from The Washington Sunday Star visited the estate in 1904 and referred to it as "this broken and pathetic house." The Wellington property was subsequently purchased in 1912 by Miss Theresa Thompson, a member of a prominent local family. Miss Thompson made changes and improvements at Wellington, but is was for Malcolm Matheson, who bought the property in 1919, to transform it into the early-20th century country estate we know today. The American Horticultural Society purchased River Farm in 1973 and made it their headquarters. The Society maintains display and test gardens on the 27 acre site. The 1757 main house is furnished in period; and the gardens offer identified plants.
Persons associated with the property include: Captain Giles Brent (former owner, 1653); Giles Brent (former owner); George Brent (former owner); Cliftons of Chotank (former owners 1739); George Washington (former owner, 1760); Charles Augustine Washington (former owner); Stacey, Isaac, and William Snowden (former owners, 1859); "The Syndicate" (former owners, 1866); Miss Theresa Thompson (former owner, 1912); Malcolm Matheson (former owner, 1919); and the American Horticultural Society (owners, 1973-present).
Related Materials:
River Farm related holdings consist of 2 folders (3 glass lantern slides and 10 35 mm. slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Virginia -- Alexandria  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File VA110
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Virginia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref18786

Montpelier Station -- Bassett House at Montpelier

Former owner:
Madison, James, 1751-1836  Search this
Madison, Dolley, 1768-1849  Search this
Du Pont, William, 1896-1965  Search this
Scott, Marion duPont, 1894-1983  Search this
Sculptor:
Bassett, Carroll K.  Search this
Landscape architect:
Gillette, Charles F.  Search this
Provenance:
Tuckahoe Garden Club of Westhampton  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Bassett House at Montpelier (Montpelier Station, Virginia)
United States of America -- Virginia -- Orange County -- Montpelier Station
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes a worksheet and garden plans.
General:
This small garden, inspired by Japanese garden design, was built in the mid-20th century (the 1950s and 1960s) by Carroll K. Bassett and Marion duPont Scott with the advice of landscape architect Charles F. Gillette. The naturalistic plantings include Asian and American species. Stone paths link a series of small pools and a waterfall. The garden is enclosed by several different styles of wooden fences. There is a rustic pagoda-shaped dovecote.
Persons associated with the property and garden include: James and Dolley Madison (former owners); William Du Pont (former owner); Marion duPont Scott (former owner); Carroll K. Bassett (sculptor); and Charles F. Gillette (landscape architect).
Related Materials:
Bassett House at Montpelier related holdings consist of 1 folder (8 35 mm. slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Virginia -- Montpelier Station  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File VA356
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Virginia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref18857

Richmond -- Robin Hill

Former owner:
Patterson, Malvern Courtney  Search this
Patterson, Malvern Courtney Mrs.  Search this
Willingham, William A.  Search this
Willingham, William A., Mrs.  Search this
Harrison, Robert  Search this
Harrison, Robert Mrs.  Search this
Rawles, James W.  Search this
Rawles, James W. Mrs.  Search this
Provenance:
James River Garden Club  Search this
Garden restoration:
Garden Graces  Search this
Terraforma  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Robin Hill (Richmond, Virginia)
United States of America -- Virginia -- Henrico -- Richmond
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets and other historical information.
General:
The brick walled formal garden rooms within the 4.5 acre property Robin Hill pay homage to the gardens created on this site by earlier owners - but not until the current owners undertook significant recovery and restoration. In 1915 there was a one hundred acre farm known as Hillcrest with a Tudor style mansion overlooking the James River and historic Kanawha Canal. The pleasure gardens were laid out on crossing axes with brick paths and statuary placed in niches, in the style of the country place movement of the early 20th century. Much of the land was sold to developers as the city of Richmond grew, and the property was reduced to seven acres. During a subsequent owners' forty year tenure the façade of the house was transformed to look like a farmhouse, using brick and white stucco. Brick walls, paths and edging were added as well as truckloads of enormous trees and new garden beds and borders, and another 2.5 acres were sold. But despite prodigious planting the gardens were not tended and many mature trees and shrubs were choked out by English ivy and other vines. It was left to the current owners to dig out the overgrowth, rediscovering the hardscape structure and features of the garden rooms, and to restore crumbling brick walls and arches. New plantings replaced old yews, hollies, camellias, magnolias and other trees and shrubs as necessary, and perennial and annual flowers, particularly white flowers, were added.
The garden rooms at Robin Hill lie to the south of the house and terrace with distinct lawns enclosed by mixed evergreen and deciduous borders and a hedge of mature camellia sasanqua. Alongside the largest upper lawn but separated from the lawn by a brick wall there are ten rectangular beds planted with perennial and annual flowers that spill over the irregular bluestone or basket weave brick walkways. A concrete birdbath sits in the center of these garden beds on the axis that crosses the upper central lawn and leads to a pavilion, approached via a brick walkway between hedges of hydrangea and camellia. To one side of this cross axis there is an American holly grove while on the other side there is a woodland and small pond. At the far end of the lower central lawn on the main axis there is a wall fountain and pool with a gazebo set to one side. The axial design and plant materials used in the gardens of Hillcrest and Robin Hill suggest that landscape architects Warren Manning and Charles Gillette may have worked on this property but no conclusive records have been found.
The James River Garden Club was established in 1915 during meetings at Hillcrest, and owner Juanita Massie Patterson served as its first president. The club dedicated their 1923 book Historic Gardens of Virginia to Mrs. Patterson.
Digital images include copies of lithographs from a 1940s book owned by Mrs. William A. Willingham.
Persons associated with the garden include: Mr. and Mrs. Malvern Courtney Patterson (former owners, 1905-circa 1930); Mr. and Mrs. William A. Willingham (former owners, circa 1930-1947); Mr. and Mrs. Robert Harrison (former owners, 1947-1989); Mr. and Mrs. James W. Rawles (former owners, 1989-1991); Garden Graces (garden restoration, 2011-2012); Terraforma (garden restoration, 2011-2012).
Related Materials:
Robin Hill related holdings consist of 1 folder (35 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Virginia -- Richmond  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File VA450
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Virginia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref18900

Newport -- Third and Elm Press, The

Provenance:
Newport Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
United States of America -- Rhode Island -- Newport -- Newport
The Third and Elm Press (Newport, Rhode Island)
General:
18 digital images (2019), 1 file folder, and a copy of "My Garden" Illustrated and written by the owner.
Occupied since the 18th century the gable roofed two story house on a corner 2,500 square foot lot has a four-season pocket garden influenced by Japanese aesthetic. That backyard was used for dumping sand, ash and refuse and for a time in the 20th century was paved over with cement. Starting in 1965 the owners brought in enriched topsoil and planted vegetables and flowers. The desire for year-round beauty led them to add perennials and evergreens; with increasing shade the room has been changed to a predominantly green foliage garden with color accents. There are brick or stone walkways throughout with two island beds of mixed plantings. Iron hand-railings have been added recently to aid the owner's access. Japanese features include a dry pond in one of the beds and a dry waterfall along a perimeter. A large topiary rooster, mountain laurel, persimmon and pear trees fill the shady north side of the garden, underplanted with violet monkshood. In the corner there is a pink climbing rose that blooms all summer, peonies for spring bloom, arborvitae, dwarf Japanese cedar, holly and skimmia flanking the fence and dry waterfall of tumbling rocks with Solomon's seal and larkspur as understory. Continuing along the fence line there are azaleas and rhododendron, Japanese andromeda, hinoki, euonymus, heuchera, Japanese painted fern and hellebore. A small brick dining patio has potted specimens including a calamondin orange, bonsai, olive and oleander. Nearby there are bush blueberries.

One island bed is devoted to tall violet, lavender, deep pink and ivory perennials: echinacea, windflower, bachelor buttons, columbine and iris. Miniature roses, boxwood, hinoki, and artemisia separate the bright colors and add texture. The other island features a Japanese maple, a dry pond comprised of flat river stones surrounded by hosta, astilbes, mugo pine and dwarf hinoki bordered by succulent sedum and hens and chicks. Perimeter trees have grown but most of the plants are best viewed while sitting. The garden participates in Newport's Secret Garden tour in June.

Persons associated with the garden include: Samuel Nichols (former owner, 1771- ); James Tanner (former owner, 1775- ); Gideon Spooner (former owner, 1835- ); Sarah Spooner (former owner, 1876- ); William Harris (former owner, 1893- ); Rose and William Ladyman (former owners, 1921- ); Isabella Basile (former owner, 1947- ); Hyman and Mary Katzman (former owners, 1955- ); Francis and Lillian chase (former owners, 1955- ); John Ettlinger (former owner, 1965- ); Alexander and Ilse Nesbitt (owners and garden designers, 1965- ).
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Rhode Island -- Newport  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File RI180
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Rhode Island
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref33214

Bensalem Township -- Andalusia

Former owner:
Craig, John  Search this
Biddle, Nicholas, Mrs., 1786-1844  Search this
Biddle, Charles J. (Charles John), 1819-1873  Search this
Architect:
Latrobe, Benjamin Henry, 1764-1820  Search this
Walter, Thomas Ustick, 1804-1887  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Andalusia (Andalusia, Pennsylvania)
United States of America -- Pennsylvania -- Bucks County -- Bensalem Township -- Andalusia
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes a worksheet; brief descriptions; and web pages from www.philadelphiabuildings.org.
General:
Andalusia is a National Historic Landmark. The main portion of Andalusia was built in 1794-1795 by John Craig as a summer residence for his wife and daughter. The latter became Mrs. Nicholas Biddle. In 1833, the "Big House" was built with Grecian porticoes--the porticoes being an exact copy of the Greek temple of Neptune at Paestum in Italy. The garden was famous for its grapes grown in forcing houses designed by Thomas U. Walter. The Biddle family harvested grapes from the hothouses until the 1870's. The estate also became known as an experimental farm. The first Guernsey cattle were brought to Andalusia. A 20th century feature of the grounds is the Green Walk with ornamental dwarf evergreens. According to the "List of Gardens of the Members of the Garden Club of America," 1921, Andalusia was typed as an old-fashioned walled garden with specialties being wisteria and white hawthorn trees.
Persons associated with the garden include: John Craig (former owner, 1794-1811); Mrs. Nicholas Biddle (Jane Craig) (former owner, 1814); Charles J. Biddle (former owner); Benjamin Latrobe (architect, 1800); and Thomas U. Walter (architect of Greek Revival additions and Gothic "ruin," 1811).
Related Materials:
Andalusia related holdings consist of 1 folder (5 glass lantern slides and 4 35 mm. slides)
Architectural plans located at John M. Dickey Collection, Athenaeum of Philadelphia.
Registered by HABS (Historic American Building Survey): PA-1248-B.
Additional images located at Mellor, Meigs & Howe Collection, Athenaeum of Philadelphia.
See others in:
J. Horace McFarland Collection, 1900-1961.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Pennsylvania -- Andalusia  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File PA007
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Pennsylvania
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref16439

Erie -- Stoneybroke Acres

Former owner:
Dennis, Mildred  Search this
Dennis, Edward  Search this
Kearns, John  Search this
Kearns, Ruth  Search this
Provenance:
Carrie T. Watson Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Stoneybroke Acres (Erie, Pennsylvania)
United States of America -- Pennsylvania -- Erie -- Erie
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, site plans, and additional information.
General:
The two and one-half acre property had an unfinished ranch style house, four trees and three arborvitae planted at the foundation in 1971, providing the current owners with a nearly blank landscape to develop into gardens. Once the house and brick porch were finished rhododendrons, azaleas and climbing hydrangea were planted at the foundation of the porch. Flower beds, trees and shrubs followed, with fast-growing Christmas trees and poplars among the shade trees and conifers, now numbering about 40. Also there are 25 island flower beds including naturalized swathes of daffodils intended to reduce the use of fertilizers on the land and a bed of ornamental grasses. There is a shade garden under five poplars planted in the 1970's that has many varieties of hostas, ferns, astilbes, wood poppies, ginger and Joe Pye weed, and does not require much maintenance. Along a dry stone wall are planted beds of bearded iris and day lilies. There is an enclosed garden for vegetables; recent crops include heirloom tomatoes and fingerling potatoes.
At one end of the property a field of native grasses and wildflowers, milkweed and a brush pile under towering conifers planted for Christmases past is an accredited national wildlife habitat. The three arborvitae at the foundation were transplanted many years ago and have grown into a 75 by 75 foot hedge. Two curving perennial flower gardens are connected by a wrought iron trellis that supports a climbing rose. Other decorative iron pieces are placed in flower beds; other features include a staddle stone, an antique statue of a girl holding a sheaf of wheat, an umbrella pine, a 60-foot tall copper beech, and a rock garden with a fountain. After 43 years the owners are still planting trees and an annual flower bed that is different every year.
In 1868 the property was part of the 45-acre Wilkens farm along the south shore of Lake Erie, growing wheat, oats and livestock. At the beginning of the 20th century nine commercial greenhouses were built to grow vegetables, but after five of them blew down in a 1944 snow storm the family's descendant sold the farm for subdivision development.
Persons associated with the garden include Mildred and Edward Dennis (former owners, 1959-); John and Ruth Kearns (former owners, 1965-).
Related Materials:
Stoneybroke Acres related holdings consist of 1 folder (17 digital images; 14 photographic prints)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Pennsylvania -- Erie  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File PA730
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Pennsylvania
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref16458

Fort Washington -- The Highlands

Former owner:
Roosevelt, Nicholas Guy Mr Mrs, 1883?-1965  Search this
Architect:
Eyre, Wilson, 1858-1944  Search this
Landscape architect:
Eyre, Wilson, 1858-1944  Search this
Creator:
Highlands Historical Society  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
The Highlands (Fort Washington, Pennsylvania)
United States of America -- Pennsylvania -- Montgomery County -- Fort Washington
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes a worksheet, narrative history, copies of articles, Garden Club of America correspondence, and copy of "The Highlands Preservation Master Plan" by George E. Patton (December 1977).
General:
The Highlands lies on the old Skippack Pike in the White Marsh Valley. The English-style stone house was built by Anthony Morris in 1796. The Sheaff's developed the garden with two stone walls--one being crenelated. During Caroline S. Sinkler's ownership after 1915, the garden was renovated closely following the original existing features. Along both walls, there used to be lean-to greenhouses. These were removed by Sinkler and used to create a new wall. The plan of the garden had two axes that formed four separate gardens, one of them a parterre with a large sundial. Small pools, Italian sculptures, and garden ornaments were placed in the garden during Sinkler's time. Decay of the garden began after the death of Mrs. Roosevelt, when the property was bequeathed to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.
Persons and organizations associated with the garden include: Anthony Morris (former owner, 1796); George Sheaff (former owner); John Sheaff (former owner, ?-1915); Caroline Sinkler (former owner, 1915-); Nicholas G. and Emily Roosevelt (former owners, ?-1970); Archie Coutts (gardener); Wilson A. Eyre (landscape architect, 1917); George Saylor (gardener); Commonwealth of Pennsylvania (owners, 1970); and Highlands Historical Society.
Related Materials:
The Highlands related holdings consist of 1 folder (5 glass lantern slides and 7 35 mm. slides)
See others in:
The Highlands, ca. 1930.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Pennsylvania -- Fort Washington  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File PA008
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Pennsylvania
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref16467

Malvern -- Longview Farm

Former owner:
Kugler family  Search this
Reed, George  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Longview Farm (Malvern, Pennsylvania)
United States of America -- Pennsylvania -- Chester County -- Malvern
Scope and Contents:
The folders include worksheets, a garden plan, and an extensive bibliography of writings about and published photographs of the garden.
General:
This 17-acre site has been under continuous development by the same individual since 1942. Immediately surrounding the farm's four buildings are a series of small garden rooms. Some of these are level, while others follow the natural slope of the land. A simple underlying architecture ties together the gardens and buildings. Plants soften the hard edges while grass paths and stone or brick steps connect the spaces. The continuation of these paths leads to and through a former vegetable garden and island beds. These larger areas are filled with mass plantings of perennials, both exotic and native. Shrubs, along with an occasional tree, build up the centers of the beds. Their fruits provide fall and winter color. The garden's perimeter is made up of a meadow and woods (part native, part planted to screen a highway). More paths lead into the woods, creating island spaces where shrubs, ground covers, and ferns have been added or natives encouraged. The bulk of the plants are perennials, chosen for hardiness and ease of culture. Many provide more than one season of interest. Bulbs are used throughout the beds and borders and are naturalized in the meadow and woods. Biennials are allowed to self seed throughout. It is a country garden with order and chaos in equal measure.
Persons associated with the garden include: the Kugler family (former owners, before 1780-early 20th century); and George Reed (former owner, 1942-1982).
Related Materials:
Longview Farm related holdings consist of 2 folders (15 35 mm. slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Pennsylvania -- Malvern  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File PA469
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Pennsylvania
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref16487

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