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#ZooEnrichment: Green Tree Monitor at the Smithsonian's National Zoo

Creator:
National Zoo  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2016-08-08T19:46:28.000Z
YouTube Category:
Pets & Animals  Search this
Topic:
Zoology;Animals;Veterinary medicine;Animal health  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNZP
Data Source:
National Zoo
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNZP
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_TXpTNNBYnL8

Wild Inside the National Zoo: How to Train a Dragon

Creator:
Smithsonian Channel  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2016-12-02T22:00:00.000Z
YouTube Category:
Entertainment  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianchannel
Data Source:
Smithsonian Channel
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianchannel
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_5gre-vnGSnQ

Lucile Quarry Mann Oral History Interviews, 1977

Interviewee:
Mann, Lucile Quarry 1897-1986  Search this
Subject:
Mann, William M. 1886-1960  Search this
Mann, Lucile Quarry 1897-1986  Search this
Stejneger, Leonhard 1851-1943  Search this
Clark, Austin Hobart 1880-1954  Search this
Coward, Noel 1899-1973  Search this
Woollcott, Alexander 1887-1943  Search this
National Zoological Park (U.S.)  Search this
University of Michigan  Search this
United States Bureau of Entomology  Search this
Interviewer:
Henson, Pamela M  Search this
Physical description:
10 audiotapes (Reference copies). 12 digital .mp3 files (Reference copies)
Type:
Audiotapes
Collection descriptions
Transcripts
Date:
1977
Topic:
Publishing  Search this
Entomology  Search this
Zoos  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Local number:
SIA RU009513
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_217681
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Lucile Quarry Mann Oral History Interviews, 1977 digital asset number 1

Index to the scientific names in "The Influence Of Sound On The Behavior Of Amphibians And Reptiles" by Charles M. Bogert

Author:
University of Michigan Museum of Zoology  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Electronic document
Year:
1970
Topic:
Natural History  Search this
Vertebrates  Search this
Animals  Search this
Zoology  Search this
See others in:
Vertebrate Zoology
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILSRO_93041

14 Fun Facts About Bright Pink Animals

Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine  Search this
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Fri, 12 Feb 2021 23:08:14 +0000
Topic:
Custom RSS  Search this
See more posts:
Smithsonian Article Database
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_c2fed71c8eb79037cf71ad41b5468aeb

Why Some of Darwin's Finches Evolved to Drink Blood

Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine  Search this
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Fri, 22 Jan 2021 19:47:29 +0000
Topic:
Custom RSS  Search this
See more posts:
Smithsonian Article Database
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_e8dc4e05c35454ede4b1f139d8e37dee

Minutes

Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Board of Regents  Search this
Extent:
8.70 cu. ft. (9 document boxes) (7 12x17 boxes) (1 16x20 box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Date:
1846-1995
Descriptive Entry:
These records are the official minutes of the Board. They are compiled at the direction of the Secretary of the Smithsonian, who is also secretary to the Board, after approval by the Regents' Executive Committee and by the Regents themselves. The minutes are edited, not a verbatim account of proceedings. For reasons unknown, there are no manuscript minutes for the period from 1857 through 1890; and researchers must rely on printed minutes published in the Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institution instead. Minutes are transferred regularly from the Secretary's Office to the Archives. Minutes less than 15 years old are closed to researchers. Indexes exist for the period from 1907 to 1946 and can be useful.
Historical Note:
The Smithsonian Institution was created by authority of an Act of Congress approved August 10, 1846. The Act entrusted direction of the Smithsonian to a body called the Establishment, composed of the President; the Vice President; the Chief Justice of the United States; the secretaries of State, War, Navy, Interior, and Agriculture; the Attorney General; and the Postmaster General. In fact, however, the Establishment last met in 1877, and control of the Smithsonian has always been exercised by its Board of Regents. The membership of the Regents consists of the Vice President and the Chief Justice of the United States; three members each of the Senate and House of Representatives; two citizens of the District of Columbia; and seven citizens of the several states, no two from the same state. (Prior to 1970 the category of Citizen Regents not residents of Washington consisted of four members). By custom the Chief Justice is Chancellor. The office was at first held by the Vice President. However, when Millard Fillmore succeeded to the presidency on the death of Zachary Taylor in 1851, Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney was chosen in his stead. The office has always been filled by the Chief Justice since that time.

The Regents of the Smithsonian have included distinguished Americans from many walks of life. Ex officio members (Vice President) have been: Spiro T. Agnew, Chester A. Arthur, Allen W. Barkley, John C. Breckenridge, George Bush, Schuyler Colfax, Calvin Coolidge, Charles Curtis, George M. Dallas, Charles G. Dawes, Charles W. Fairbanks, Millard Fillmore, Gerald R. Ford, John N. Garner, Hannibal Hamlin, Thomas A. Hendricks, Garret A. Hobart, Hubert H. Humphrey, Andrew Johnson, Lyndon B. Johnson, William R. King, Thomas R. Marshall, Walter F. Mondale, Levi P. Morton, Richard M. Nixon, Nelson A. Rockefeller, Theodore Roosevelt, James S. Sherman, Adlai E. Stevenson, Harry S. Truman, Henry A. Wallace, William A. Wheeler, Henry Wilson.

Ex officio members (Chief Justice) have been: Roger B. Taney, Salmon P. Chase, Nathan Clifford, Morrison R. Waite, Samuel F. Miller, Melville W. Fuller, Edward D. White, William Howard Taft, Charles Evans Hughes, Harlan F. Stone, Fred M. Vinson, Earl Warren, Warren E. Burger.

Regents on the part of the Senate have been: Clinton P. Anderson, Newton Booth, Sidney Breese, Lewis Cass, Robert Milledge Charlton, Bennet Champ Clark, Francis M. Cockrell, Shelby Moore Cullom, Garrett Davis, Jefferson Davis, George Franklin Edmunds, George Evans, Edwin J. Garn, Walter F. George, Barry Goldwater, George Gray, Hannibal Hamlin, Nathaniel Peter Hill, George Frisbie Hoar, Henry French Hollis, Henry M. Jackson, William Lindsay, Henry Cabot Lodge, Medill McCormick, James Murray Mason, Samuel Bell Maxey, Robert B. Morgan, Frank E. Moss, Claiborne Pell, George Wharton Pepper, David A. Reed, Leverett Saltonstall, Hugh Scott, Alexander H. Smith, Robert A. Taft, Lyman Trumbull, Wallace H. White, Jr., Robert Enoch Withers.

Regents on the part of the House of Representatives have included: Edward P. Boland, Frank T. Bow, William Campbell Breckenridge, Overton Brooks, Benjamin Butterworth, Clarence Cannon, Lucius Cartrell, Hiester Clymer, William Colcock, William P. Cole, Jr., Maurice Connolly, Silvio O. Conte, Edward E. Cox, Edward H. Crump, John Dalzell, Nathaniel Deering, Hugh A. Dinsmore, William English, John Farnsworth, Scott Ferris, Graham Fitch, James Garfield, Charles L. Gifford, T. Alan Goldsborough, Frank L. Greene, Gerry Hazleton, Benjamin Hill, Henry Hilliard, Ebenezer Hoar, William Hough, William M. Howard, Albert Johnson, Leroy Johnson, Joseph Johnston, Michael Kirwan, James T. Lloyd, Robert Luce, Robert McClelland, Samuel K. McConnell, Jr., George H. Mahon, George McCrary, Edward McPherson, James R. Mann, George Perkins Marsh, Norman Y. Mineta, A. J. Monteague, R. Walton Moore, Walter H. Newton, Robert Dale Owen, James Patterson, William Phelps, Luke Poland, John Van Schaick Lansing Pruyn, B. Carroll Reece, Ernest W. Roberts, Otho Robards Singleton, Frank Thompson, Jr., John M. Vorys, Hiram Warner, Joseph Wheeler.

Citizen Regents have been: David C. Acheson, Louis Agassiz, James B. Angell, Anne L. Armstrong, William Backhouse Astor, J. Paul Austin, Alexander Dallas Bache, George Edmund Badger, George Bancroft, Alexander Graham Bell, James Gabriel Berrett, John McPherson Berrien, Robert W. Bingham, Sayles Jenks Bowen, William G. Bowen, Robert S. Brookings, John Nicholas Brown, William A. M. Burden, Vannevar Bush, Charles F. Choate, Jr., Rufus Choate, Arthur H. Compton, Henry David Cooke, Henry Coppee, Samuel Sullivan Cox, Edward H. Crump, James Dwight Dana, Harvey N. Davis, William Lewis Dayton, Everette Lee Degolyer, Richard Delafield, Frederic A. Delano, Charles Devens, Matthew Gault Emery, Cornelius Conway Felton, Robert V. Fleming, Murray Gell-Mann, Robert F. Goheen, Asa Gray, George Gray, Crawford Hallock Greenwalt, Nancy Hanks, Caryl Parker Haskins, Gideon Hawley, John B. Henderson, John B. Henderson, Jr., A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr., Gardner Greene Hubbard, Charles Evans Hughes, Carlisle H. Humelsine, Jerome C. Hunsaker, William Preston Johnston, Irwin B. Laughlin, Walter Lenox, Augustus P. Loring, John Maclean, William Beans Magruder, John Walker Maury, Montgomery Cunningham Meigs, John C. Merriam, R. Walton Moore, Roland S. Morris, Dwight W. Morrow, Richard Olney, Peter Parker, Noah Porter, William Campbell Preston, Owen Josephus Roberts, Richard Rush, William Winston Seaton, Alexander Roby Shepherd, William Tecumseh Sherman, Otho Robards Singleton, Joseph Gilbert Totten, John Thomas Towers, Frederic C. Walcott, Richard Wallach, Thomas J. Watson, Jr., James E. Webb, James Clarke Welling, Andrew Dickson White, Henry White, Theodore Dwight Woolsey.
Topic:
Museums -- Administration  Search this
Museum trustees  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 1, Smithsonian Institution. Board of Regents, Minutes
Identifier:
Record Unit 1
See more items in:
Minutes
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0001
4 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Minutes digital asset number 1
  • View Minutes digital asset number 2
  • View Minutes digital asset number 3
  • View Minutes digital asset number 4
Online Media:

History of the Conservation and Research Center, National Zoological Park, Oral History Interviews

Extent:
13 audiotapes (reference copies).
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Interviews
Oral history
Date:
1992-1999, 2005
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also interviews conducted by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Wemmer, director of the Conservation and Research Center (CRC), National Zoological Park (NZP), conducted a series of oral history interviews with individuals central to the history of the CRC from 1992 to 1999. He transferred the interviews to the Oral History Collection, Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Institution Archives in 2001 in order to document the early history of this endangered species facility now known as the Conservation Biology Institute (CBI) of the NZP. Wemmer interviewed John F. Eisenberg (1935-2003), former NZP mammalogist, on 13 March 1992. Wemmer and Larry R. Collins, CRC mammalogist, interviewed Eugene Maliniak (1926-1996), former NZP mammalogist, on 9 April 1992. Wemmer interviewed Theodore H. Reed (1922-2013), director of the NZP when CRC was founded, on 18 October 1993. Wemmer interviewed Kenneth E. Stager (1915-2009), ornithologist, on 7 December 1999. Wemmer's remarks and reminiscences at his retirement ceremony on 23 July 2004 were recorded for the collection, and historian of science Catherine A. Christen also conducted interviews with Wemmer in 2005.
Descriptive Entry:
Eisenberg was interviewed in 1992 by Wemmer and discussed his education and career. Maliniak was interviewed by Collins and Wemmer in 1992 and discussed his career before and during his years at the NZP, especially the many animal species he worked with. Reed was interviewed by Wemmer in 1993 and discussed his career at the NZP and reminiscenced about animals and colleagues. Stager was interviewed by Wemmer in 1999 and discussed his field work in Southeast Asia, especially Burma. Wemmer's remarks at his retirement in 2004 were recorded; Christen conducted two interviews of him in 2005, covering his education, field work, research and career as an administrator. The collection consists of 16.5 hours of audiotape recording; and occupies 0.5 linear meters of shelf space. The interviews are not transcribed. There are three generations of recordings for each session: original tapes, preservation recordings and reference recordings. In total, this collection is comprised of 13 original audiocassette tapes; 13 reference copy audiotape cassettes, 37 7" and 7" low torque reel to reel preservation audiotapes and 24 digital preservation .wav files. Box 1 contains cassette copies of the original cassettes and DVDs with 24 .mp3 files. The original cassettes, preservation reel to reel recordings and digital files are in security storage.

The Eisenberg, Maliniak, and Stager interviews cannot be used without the permission of the interviewees or their heirs or assigns.
Historical Note:
The National Zoological Park's Conservation and Research Center, now called the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, was established in 1975 on 3,100 acres at a former US Army Cavalry Remount Station in Front Royal, Virginia, to encourage development of all aspects of animal sciences. Renamed the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in 2010, the institute's mission is the conservation of biodiversity through scientific research, professional training, and environmental education. Dr. Theodore H. Reed, then director of the National Zoo, had been searching over a decade for a captive breeding facility where animals could be studied and bred without the stress of public viewing, when he heard of the possibility of obtaining the old Remount Station property. Other locations were examined, including La Plata, Maryland; Virginia's Great Dismal Swamp; and a nine hundred acre portion of Camp A. P. Hill in Virginia; but none could compare with the potential and existing on-site facilities offered by the old remount depot. The property was occupied by the Smithsonian in 1974, and title to the land was received in 1975. The facility was named the Conservation and Research Center, and was staffed with a dozen employees from various National Zoo departments, as well as a handful of former Cavalry Remount Station and Beef Cattle Research Station employees. In 2010, the center was renamed the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute. Institute research has always covered a broad array of subjects including ethology, conservation biology, ecology and biodiversity monitoring, reproductive biology and animal health, genetic diversity and systematics, and nutrition and geographic information systems. CRC researchers are involved in groundbreaking research pertaining to the conservation of endangered species and ecosystems locally, nationally, and around the world. The institute breeds and houses a wide range of endangered species. Institute staff have focused on such endangered species as the last living family of black-footed ferrets, the Guam rail, cranes, clouded leopards, Przewalski's wild horses, and Matschie's tree kangaroos. The institute also trains wildlife biologists from developing countries and conducts international research projects, such as the elephants of Southeast Asia led by Christian Wemmer. The goal of their research programs is to develop long-term, collaborative conservation initiatives that utilize a diverse array of scientific, cultural, and political tools to understand and protect species and their ecosystems.

John F. Eisenberg (1935-2003) received his bachelor's degree from Washington State University and his master's and Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 1961. He joined the staff of the National Zoological Park as a mammalogist in 1965. In 1982 he joined the faculty of the University of Florida until his retirement in 2000. He was best known for his 1981 volume, The Mammalian Radiations: An Analysis of Trends in Evolution, Adaptation, and Behavior.

Eugene Maliniak (1926-1996), a World War II veteran, was hired as a keeper at the National Zoological Park in 1951. In his early years at the Zoo, he worked with birds, reptiles, carnivores, and bears before moving to the Small Mammal House from 1957 to 1965. In 1965, he transferred to the Department of Scientific Research where he assisted Zoo curators with research on animal behavior and nutrition, until his retirement in 1985.

Theodore H. Reed (1922-2013), veterinarian and zoo administrator, received the D.V.M. in 1945 from the School of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State College. From 1946 to 1955, he practiced as a veterinarian in Oregon and Idaho. He gained experience with exotic animals while serving as a veterinarian to the Portland Zoological Park from 1951 to 1955. In 1955, Reed was appointed Veterinarian at the National Zoological Park (NZP). In 1956, he was named Acting Director after the retirement of William M. Mann, and in 1958, he advanced to Director. During his tenure, Reed oversaw a capital renovation of the NZP; development of the Conservation and Research Center (CRC) in Front Royal, Virginia, in 1974; a transition from display of exotic specimens to breeding of endangered species; and many advances in exotic animal care and medicine. Reed retired from administration in 1983 and from the NZP in 1984.

Kenneth E. Stager (1915-2009) received a bachelor's degree in 1940 from the University of California at Los Angeles, a master's degree in zoology in 1953 and a doctorate in 1962 from the University of Southern California. He began working at the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History as a student in the 1930s. He was appointed assistant curator in 1941 and curator of ornithology and mammalogy in 1946, remaining at the L.A. County Museum until his retirement in 1976. He was interviewed because of his field research in Southeast Asia and work with NZP staff.

Christen M. Wemmer (1943- ) directed the Conservation and Research Center (CRC), National Zoological Park (NZP) from 1974 to 2004. Wemmer received a B.S. and M.S. from San Francisco State College and the Ph.D. from University of Maryland in 1972, and began his career at the Brookfield Zoo in Chicago. He was the founding director of the Conservation and Research Center of the National Zoological Park since its creation in 1974.
Restrictions:
(1) Restricted; (2) see finding aid for details on restrictions; (3) use of this record unit requires prior arrangement with the Archives staff.
Topic:
Biological stations  Search this
Endangered species  Search this
Zoos.  Search this
Conservation biology  Search this
Biology -- Field work  Search this
Employees  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Interviews
Oral history
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9596, History of the Conservation and Research Center, National Zoological Park, Oral History Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9596
See more items in:
History of the Conservation and Research Center, National Zoological Park, Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9596

A. Stanley Rand Interviews

Creator::
Rand, A. Stanley (Austin Stanley), 1932-2005, interviewee  Search this
Extent:
4 audiotapes (reference copy).
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Audiotapes
Oral history
Place:
Barro Colorado Island (Panama)
Panama
Date:
1986, 1989-1990
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also interviews conducted by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Austin Stanley Rand was interviewed for the Oral History Collection because of his distinguished scientific career, and long tenure at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute as both researcher and administrator. Additional interviews of Rand can be found in Record Unit 9580, Barro Colorado Island Group Oral History Interview, and Record Unit 9553, Conservation of Endangered Species Videohistory Interviews. Additional information about Rand can be found in the Records of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and the A. Stanley Rand Papers which are also housed in Smithsonian Institution Archives.
Descriptive Entry:
The Austin Stanley Rand Interviews were conducted during three sessions from December 1986 through June 1990. The first interview was in December 1986 by Daryl Jones, a student at the University of Maryland; the second, in April 1989 by Smithsonian Institution Archives historian, Pamela M. Henson, and Joel B. Hagen, a Smithsonian postdoctoral fellow; and the third, in June 1990 by Pamela Henson. They consist of 3.5 hours of audiotape and audio cassette which has been remastered into 7 digital audio .wav and .mp3 files, with 81 pages of transcript, and occupy 0.13 linear meters of shelf space.

The Austin Stanley Rand Interviews discuss his background, education and early interest in zoology; career at STRI; recollections of colleagues and life on Barro Colorado Island (BCI); discussions of his and his colleagues' major research interests; STRI's regional role; and changes at STRI over the years. Box 1 contains transcripts of the interviews and cassette and digital copies of the original reel-to-reel recordings, which are in security storage.
Historical Note:
Austin Stanley Rand (1932-2005), was a herpetologist and Senior Biologist at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI). He was born on September 29, 1932, in Seneca Falls, New York. He received his B.A. in zoology from DePauw University in 1955, served in the U.S. Army from 1955-1957, and received his Ph.D. in Biology from Harvard University in 1961. In 1961 he married Patricia Rand, and they had three children, Hugh, Margaret and Katherine.

Rand began his scientific career in 1950, when he worked three summers as an Assistant in the Division of Amphibians and Reptiles at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, Illinois. In 1957, he worked as an Assistant in the Division of Mammals at the Field Museum. Upon completing his Ph.D., Rand served as a Research Assistant in Herpetology at the Museum of Comparative Zoology (MCZ) at Harvard University from 1961-1962, and as a Zoologist for the Secretary of Agriculture in Sa Paulo, Brazil from 1962-1964. Rand first arrived at STRI in 1964 as a herpetologist. From 1973-1979, Rand also served as Coordinator of the Tropical Program of the Smithsonian's Environmental Sciences Program, coordinating research projects on marine and terrestrial monitoring. In 1974, Rand was appointed STRI's Assistant Director, with special responsibilities for the operation of the Barro Colorado Island field station, as well as budget and planning for STRI. In 1979, he was appointed Senior Biologist, a position which he held until his death. In 1988, he also became responsible for coordinating scientific activities at STRI's facilities in Gamboa, Panama. At STRI, Rand supervised graduate student and postdoctoral research, and consulted for the Panamanian government as requested.

Rand's research interests were primarily in studies of the behavior and ecology of tropical reptiles and amphibians, particularly social behavior and vocal communication in lizards (Iguana iguana and Anolis limifrons) and Tungara frogs (Physalaemus pustulosus). His major field work included a month or more in Brazil, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Jamaica, Haiti, Panama, Puerto Rico, St. Kitts, Santo Domingo, and Venezuela, as well as shorter visits elsewhere. He was a prolific producer of articles, both alone and as co-author, and both organized and participated in various symposia.

Rand was a member of various professional societies, including the American Society of Naturalists, the Society for the Study of Evolution, the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists, the Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles, Association for Tropical Biology, Herpetologist's League, and Animal Behavior Society.
Topic:
Tropical biology  Search this
Herpetology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Audiotapes
Oral history
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9579, A. Stanley Rand Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9579
See more items in:
A. Stanley Rand Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9579

Curatorial Records

Creator::
Patuxent Wildlife Research Center  Search this
Extent:
9.5 cu. ft. (9 record storage boxes) (1 document box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Clippings
Picture postcards
Black-and-white photographs
Color photographs
Color negatives
Color transparencies
Place:
Latin America
Date:
1955-2012
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of the professional correspondence of research zoologist Roy W. McDiarmid and his work at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, United States Geological Survey (USGS). McDiarmid's research focuses on the systematics, behavior, ecology, and biogeography of amphibians and reptiles in the Neotropics. Some materials predate his time with the USGS. Materials include correspondence, manuscripts, postcards, newspaper clippings, photographs, negatives, and transparencies.
Topic:
Herpetology  Search this
Amphibians -- Behavior  Search this
Reptiles -- Behavior  Search this
Ecology  Search this
Amphibians -- Geographical distribution  Search this
Reptiles -- Geographical distribution  Search this
Zoology -- Research  Search this
Biology -- Classification  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Clippings
Picture postcards
Black-and-white photographs
Color photographs
Color negatives
Color transparencies
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 15-202, Curatorial Records
Identifier:
Accession 15-202
See more items in:
Curatorial Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa15-202

Constance P. Warner Slide Collection

Creator::
Warner, Constance P.  Search this
Extent:
1.25 cu. ft. (1 record storage box) (1 half document box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Color photographs
Color transparencies
Date:
circa 1959-1970
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of slides documenting animals, particularly birds and reptiles, taken by Constance P. Warner. Warner was an animal photographer known for her images of animal eyes, adaptations, and behavior. She often donated her time and images to the National Zoological Park and supplied images for exhibit labels. Materials also include an index and reference prints of some of the slides.
Topic:
Zoos  Search this
Zoo animals  Search this
Zoo exhibits  Search this
Photography of animals  Search this
Birds  Search this
Reptiles  Search this
Photographers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Color photographs
Color transparencies
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 16-158, Constance P. Warner Slide Collection
Identifier:
Accession 16-158
See more items in:
Constance P. Warner Slide Collection
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa16-158

Curatorial Records

Creator::
Patuxent Wildlife Research Center  Search this
Extent:
8 cu. ft. (8 record storage boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Picture postcards
Clippings
Electronic records
Floppy disks
Compact discs
Maps
Illustrations
Black-and-white negatives
Black-and-white photographs
Black-and-white transparencies
Color photographs
Microfiche
Place:
Latin America
Date:
1957-2010
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of the records of research zoologist Roy W. McDiarmid and his work at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, United States Geological Survey (USGS). McDiarmid's research focuses on the systematics, behavior, ecology, and biogeography of amphibians and reptiles in the Neotropics. Records include graduate work; research projects and publications; special projects, such as workshops, committees, and reviews; and activities with professional societies, including the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists (ASIH) and the Herpetologists' League (HL). Some materials predate his time with the USGS.

Materials include correspondence, notes, research information, manuscripts, proposals, reports, reviews, maps, illustrations, postcards, newspaper clippings, microfiche, photographs, negatives, and transparencies. Some materials are in electronic format.
Topic:
Herpetology  Search this
Amphibians -- Behavior  Search this
Reptiles -- Behavior  Search this
Ecology  Search this
Amphibians -- Geographical distribution  Search this
Reptiles -- Geographical distribution  Search this
Zoology -- Research  Search this
Herpetologists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Picture postcards
Clippings
Electronic records
Floppy disks
Compact discs
Maps
Illustrations
Black-and-white negatives
Black-and-white photographs
Black-and-white transparencies
Color photographs
Microfiche
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 13-082, Curatorial Records
Identifier:
Accession 13-082
See more items in:
Curatorial Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa13-082

A. Stanley Rand Papers

Creator::
Rand, A. Stanley (Austin Stanley), 1932-2005  Search this
Extent:
5 cu. ft. (5 record storage boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Motion pictures (visual works)
Videotapes
Audiotapes
Place:
Caribbean Area
Islands of the Pacific
Date:
1961-1985
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of film footage taken by A. Stanley Rand, a biologist specializing in the ecology and behavior of tropical reptiles and amphibians. After receiving his Ph.D. in biology from Harvard University in 1961, Rand served as a zoologist at the Departamento de Zoologia, Sao Paulo, Brazil. In 1964, he was hired as a biologist at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI). From 1974 to 1979, he served as Assistant Director at STRI and, in 1979, was named Senior Biologist. The majority of the footage in this accession documents the behavior of anoles throughout the Caribbean region and on several Eastern Pacific islands. Materials also include a small number of videotapes and a reel-to-reel audiotape.
Topic:
Tropical biology  Search this
Reptiles  Search this
Amphibians  Search this
Anoles  Search this
Zoology  Search this
Ecology  Search this
Animal behavior  Search this
Zoologists  Search this
Ecologists  Search this
Biologists  Search this
Research  Search this
Fieldwork  Search this
Genre/Form:
Motion pictures (visual works)
Videotapes
Audiotapes
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 17-092, A. Stanley Rand Papers
Identifier:
Accession 17-092
See more items in:
A. Stanley Rand Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa17-092

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute Group Interview

Creator:
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute  Search this
Extent:
1 audiotape (reference copy).
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Audiotapes
Oral history
Date:
1990
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also interviews conducted by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

STRI staff who lived on Barro Colorado Island and raised their families in this unique environment were interviewed as a group to capture what life was like living and and working in this remote tropical location.
Descriptive Entry:
This interview by Pamela M. Henson, historian, Smithsonian Institution Archives, was recorded at the Rands' home in Gamboa, Panama, and documented reminiscences of former colleagues, students, visitors, and staff at STRI from the late 1950s to 1990, including experiences with ants (Paraponera), snakes, food, beer, long-term residence on Barro Colorado Island, increasing institutional management of STRI in recent years, laundry, pets, and children.

This collection is comprised of one interview session, totaling approximately 1.0 hour of recording, and 40 pages of transcript. There are two generations of tape for each session: original reel-to-reel tapes and reference tapes. In total, this collection is comprised of 2 original 7" reels and 1 reference copy audio cassette tape. The original tapes are reserved in preservation storage.

Restrictions: Permission must be secured to quote from the Nicholas D. and Tanis Smythe portions of the interview. Contact SIHistory@si.edu to request permission.
Historical Note:
Many Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) staff live on Barro Colorado Island (BCI), an island located in Gatun Lake, part of the Panama Canal watershed. In 1923, the island was set aside as a nature reserve and site for research in tropical biology. The BCI Research Station was run by a consortium of universities and government agencies in its early years. Called the Canal Zone Biological Area (CZBA), it was transferred to the Smithsonian Institution in 1946 and was renamed the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in 1966.

This group interview documents life on the island from the perspective of five residents, Brian C. Bock, A. Stanley Rand, Patricia Rand, Nicholas D. Smythe, and Tanis Smythe. A. Stanley Rand received his Ph.D. in biology from Harvard University in 1961. After working with Harvard's Museum of Comparative Zoology and the Secretary of Agriculture in Brazil, he began working at STRI in 1964 as a herpetologist. From 1974 to 1979, Rand served as Assistant Director, and he was appointed Senior Biologist in 1979. His interest in the behavior and ecology of reptiles and amphibians led to pioneering studies of frog communications. Patricia Rand came to live on the island with her husband in 1964 and raised their family there. She conducted research and prepared exhibits on the history of BCI.

Nicholas D. Smythe received his Ph.D. in biology from the University of Maryland in 1970. He began working at STRI the same year to develop baseline studies of the rainforest for the Environmental Sciences Program. His research interests centered on frugivorous mammals, and during the 1980s Smythe began a domestication program for the paca, a species of cavy, which is an excellent source of protein and can be raised on forest by-products. Smythe's goal was a large scale paca industry which would prevent further destruction of the rainforest. Tanis Smythe took up residence on BCI with her husband in 1970 and also worked in the STRI library. Brian Bock, a herpetologist at the University of Tennessee, was a visiting scientist in STRI's Biology Program and worked at STRI with the iguana biology and management project.
Rights:
Restricted.
Topic:
Tropical biology  Search this
Conservation of natural resources  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Audiotapes
Oral history
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9580, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute Group Interview
Identifier:
Record Unit 9580
See more items in:
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute Group Interview
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9580

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Type:
Archival materials
Note:
Participants from STRI included researchers who employed a variety of approaches to the study and preservation of tropical biosystems. John H. Christy received his B.S. in biology from Lewis and Clark College in 1970, and his Ph.D. in population ecology and animal behavior from Cornell University in 1980. From 1978 to 1983 he served both as a research assistant and assistant professor at the University of South Carolina. He came to STRI in 1983 as a visiting research scholar and remained as a researcher until 1987, when he assumed the position of biologist. In 1988, he was appointed assistant director for marine research. At STRI, he focused his research on the reproductive behavior of crabs.

After receiving his B.S. in biochemistry and zoology in 1972 from the James Cook University of North Queensland (JCUNQ), Australia, Norman C. Duke worked as a technical officer for the Queensland Department of Primary Industries, Fisheries Branch. From 1974 to 1989 he worked with the Australian Institute of Marine Science, first as a technical officer and later as an experimental scientist, overseeing the design and implementation of studies about mangrove plants. During this time he completed his M.S. and Ph.D. in botany at JCUNQ, in 1984 and 1988 respectively. In 1989, he accepted the position of mangrove ecologist for STRI's Oil Spill Project to study the effects of recent oil spills on Panamanian mangrove forests.

Robin Foster became a biologist with STRI in 1978, and also held concurrent positions as senior ecologist at Conservation International and research associate in the Department of Botany at the Field Museum of Natural History. He was awarded his B.A. in biology from Dartmouth College in 1966, and his Ph.D. in botany from Duke University in 1974. From 1972-1980 he served as an Assistant Professor of biology at University of Chicago. In 1980, with Stephen Hubbell, Foster embarked on a long term study of forest dynamics on a fifty-hectare plot on BCI.

After receiving a B.S. in biochemistry from Michigan State University in 1970 and a Ph.D. in ecology from The Johns Hopkins University in 1976, Brian D. Keller served as a Research Oceanographer for the Scripps Institute of Oceanography from 1976 to 1979. From 1980 to 1984 he was a Postdoctoral Associate in the Department of Biology at Yale University. In 1984 he accepted the position of acting head of the Discovery Bay Marine Laboratory at the University of the West Indies, Jamaica, and served as Assistant Head from 1985 to 1986. In 1987, Keller joined STRI as project manager for the Oil Spill Project.

Gilberto Ocana joined STRI in 1980 as Superintendent of the Barro Colorado Nature Monument. He was awarded his B.S. from the Ecole Nationale d'Agriculture in Alger, Algeria, in 1955, and a Ph.D. in plant pathology from the University of California, Riverside, in 1967. Prior to his STRI appointment, he was a Professor of plant pathology in the Department of Agronomy at the University of Panama. At STRI, he began an experimental farm to develop alternatives to cattle ranching and slash and burn agriculture.

A. Stanley Rand received his B.A. from De Pauw University in 1955 and his Ph.D. in biology from Harvard University in 1961. He served as Assistant Herpetologist at the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard from 1961 to 1962, and as zoologist for the Secretary of Agriculture, Sao Paulo, Brazil, from 1962 to 1964. Rand came to STRI in 1964 as a herpetologist. From 1974 to 1979 he served as STRI assistant director, and was appointed senior biologist in 1979. His interest in the behavior and ecology of reptiles and amphibians led to pioneering studies of frog communications.

After receiving a B.S. from Queens College in 1959, and a M.A. and Ph.D. in biology from Harvard in 1961 and 1963, respectively, in 1965 Ira Rubinoff served as Assistant to the Curator of ichthyology at the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard. Rubinoff arrived at STRI in 1965 to assume the positions of Biologist and Assistant Director for marine biology. He was appointed Director of STRI in 1973. His research interests include sea snakes, the biological implications of interoceanic canal construction, zoogeography of the Eastern Tropical Pacific, and preservation of tropical forests.

Alan P. Smith was awarded his B.A. from Earlham College in 1967, and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Duke University in 1970 and 1974, respectively. He joined STRI in 1974 as a staff scientist. Concurrently, from 1974 to 1981, he served as an Associate Professor in the Department of Biology at the University of Pennsylvania, and from 1981 to 1988 he served in the same position at the University of Miami. In 1988, while continuing to serve as an adjunct professor of biology at the University of Miami, he assumed the position of Assistant Director for terrestrial research at STRI. Interested in the dynamics of tropical forests, Smith introduced the use of crane towers to study the forest canopy.

Nicholas D. Smythe joined STRI in 1970 as a biologist to study tropical mammals. He received his B.A. from University of British Columbia in 1963 and his Ph.D. from University of Maryland in 1970. His research at STRI focused on the paca and peccary, animals that are widely distributed in Latin America. In 1983, with a grant from the W. Alton Jones Foundation, Smythe began investigating the behavior and physiology of pacas in captivity with a view toward domesticating them to provide an alternative to cattle grazing.

In 1975, after receiving his Ph.D. in neurobiology and animal behavior from Cornell University in 1972, Donald M. Windsor joined STRI as a computer programmer and data analyst for the Environmental Monitoring Program. In 1990, he was appointed research biologist and coordinator of the Environmental Sciences Program. He has conducted extensive research on the ecological and genetic factors influencing the reproductive success of the wasp.

Rolando Perez, Dilia Santamaria, and Eduardo Sierra, students from the University of Panama, Hamilton W. Beltran Santiago and Ernesto Yallico, students from Peru, Zenith O. Batista, coordinator of the Tropical Forest Dynamics Project, Kaoru Kitajima Okada, STRI predoctoral fellow, Kevin P. Hogan, STRI visiting scientist, and Mirna Samaniego, a graduate in forestry from the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil, demonstrated scientific techniques used to study tropical plants. Todd Underwood, a student, demonstrated procedures for crab behavioral studies. Elias Gonzales, a Panamanian farmer participating in the experimental farm program, Arturo Cerezo, a faculty member from the School of Agriculture at the University of Panama, and Juvencio Trujillo, an agricultural assistant, showed how the Las Pavas experimental program actually operated.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9553, , Conservation of Endangered Species Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9553, Series 1
See more items in:
Conservation of Endangered Species Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru9553-refd1e285

Session 12: 25 September 1990

Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9553, , Conservation of Endangered Species Interviews
See more items in:
Conservation of Endangered Species Interviews
Conservation of Endangered Species Interviews / Series 2: National Zoological Park and Conservation and Research Center / Box 1
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru9553-refd1e868

Field Reports

Creator::
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service  Search this
Extent:
66 cu. ft. (132 document boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Black-and-white photographs
Manuscripts
Place:
United States
Canada
Mexico
Central America
South America
Africa
Europe
Asia
Date:
1860-1961
Descriptive Entry:
This collection consists primarily of reports, notebooks, notes, photographs, maps, and related materials documenting field research conducted by staff naturalists of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service and its predecessor, the Bureau of Biological Survey. The reports, which primarily concern biological surveys conducted in the United States, are usually submitted to the Chief of the Bureau or to the division or section responsible for field research. Also included are a substantial number of reports concerning field work carried out in Canada and Mexico. A small amount of reports document work in South and Central America, Africa, Europe, Asia, and Antarctica.

Most of the field reports are of a general nature documenting biological surveys of a particular state or geographical region. They fall into three categories: special reports, physiography reports, and plant reports. Notes on birds and mammals are joined to comprise the special reports and concern the observation, identification, distribution, and collecting of specimens. The physiography reports consist of notes and observations on the natural phenomena of the area surveyed, such as climate, topography, bodies of water, etc. Notes on plant life, trees, and vegetation are recorded in the plant reports.

Reports on specific projects or topics are found throughout the collection. Included are reports on predatory animal control; faunal distribution and migratory studies; national parks and wildlife refuges (including reports on proposed parks and refuges); species introduction projects; wildlife management studies; conservation and wildlife problems; environmental impact studies; animal behavior projects; wildlife diseases and epidemics; bird-banding projects; and fur-bearing animal studies.

The collection also includes correspondence from staff naturalists and the general public usually pertaining to birds or mammals observed; newspaper clippings; and publications.
Historical Note:
The United States Fish and Wildlife Service has its origin in the work of C. Hart Merriam and the old Bureau of Biological Survey in the United States Department of Agriculture. By 1885, the ornithological work being conducted by the American Ornithologists' Union (AOU) and other private organizations and individuals had grown to the point where private interests were no longer able to finance it sufficiently. Congress was then persuaded to establish a section of ornithology in the Division of Entomology of the Department of Agriculture. The purpose of the section was "the promotion of economic ornithology, or the study of the interrelation of birds and agriculture, an investigation of the food, habits, and migration of birds in relation to both insects and plants, and publishing reports thereon." Through the influence of the AOU and Spencer F. Baird of the Smithsonian Institution, Merriam was appointed Ornithologist. The following year the section attained independent rank as the Division of Ornithology. In 1888 its responsibilities were expanded to include mammals, resulting in a new title - the Division of Economic Ornithology and Mammalogy.

Merriam's concept of life zones which are fitted by nature for the life of certain associations of plants and animals, and his estimation of the value which the delimitation of such areas would have for agriculture, led him to propose the establishment of a Biological Survey into which his own division would be merged. The 1896 name change of the Division to the Division of Biological Survey was the result. In 1905, it became a Bureau within the Department of Agriculture.

The Bureau of Biological Survey remained within the Department of Agriculture until 1939 when it was transferred to the Department of Interior. The following year it was combined with the Bureau of Fisheries, which had been transferred to Interior from the Department of Commerce, to form the United States Fish and Wildlife Service.

From the beginning of the Survey's work, field research was of primary importance in gathering information concerning the interrelation of birds, mammals, and agriculture. Field surveys continued to play an important role as the Bureau's work evolved to include game protection, research on fur-bearing animals, the management of game refuges, predatory animal control, and the protection of migratory birds. Surveys conducted by the Bureau usually entailed sending individual naturalists or groups of workers to collect mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians in a particular state or geographic region. The collections would be augmented by detailed notes, specimens of representative plant life, and photographs of the environment being studied. The compiled materials would serve as the basis for a detailed report on the region. Biological surveys were also conducted at several regional field stations administered by the Bureau.
Topic:
Botany  Search this
Ecology  Search this
Mammalogy  Search this
Ornithology  Search this
Biology  Search this
Biologists  Search this
Naturalists  Search this
Botanists  Search this
Ecologists  Search this
Mammalogists  Search this
Ornithologists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Black-and-white photographs
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7176, Field Reports
Identifier:
Record Unit 7176
See more items in:
Field Reports
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru7176

Records

Creator::
National Zoological Park. Office of the Director  Search this
Extent:
50 cu. ft. (100 document boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Black-and-white photographs
Serials (publications)
Maps
Clippings
Manuscripts
Architectural drawings
Date:
circa 1920-1984
Descriptive Entry:
These records provide primary documentation of Theodore H. Reed's twenty-seven year career as Director of the National Zoological Park (NZP). Also included are a few records created during his tenure as Senior Advisor, 1983-1984. A small amount of material was created by Reed's predecessor, William M. Mann. Included are materials concerning the modernization and renovation of the NZP; administrative reorganizations and the creation of a managerial hierarchy at the Zoo; the development of NZP programs in animal management, scientific research, animal health and pathology, education and information, construction management, graphics and exhibits, and police and safety; the evolution of the idea for an NZP breeding farm, and its realization in the creation of the Conservation and Research Center in Front Royal, Virginia, in 1975; and the establishment and programs of the Friends of the National Zoo (FONZ).

Most of the files relating to the history of the NZP under Reed are found in Series 1. Also included is a subject file containing newspaper clippings, articles, and publications concerning the NZP; collected materials documenting NZP history; and files regarding NZP policy and procedures, legislation relating to the Zoo, special events held at NZP, and related materials. Files concerning the administration of the NZP by the Smithsonian Institution also provide documentation of the development of the NZP over the last four decades. Especially important are correspondence and memoranda with Secretary S. Dillon Ripley and Assistant secretaries Sidney R. Galler and David Challinor.

The records also include correspondence of Reed, 1971-1976, primarily from the general public requesting information on the NZP and its programs and files on the NZP animal collection which contain acquisition, exchange, exhibition, and life history information.

NZP's participation in the zoological park professional world is thoroughly documented in these records. The American Association of Zoological Parks and Aquariums (AAZPA) files contain materials concerning Reed's activities as an officer of the organization, as well as records documenting the NZP's membership in AAZPA. Records regarding relations between the NZP and domestic and foreign zoological parks and aquariums are found in two separate series. The files concern animal exchanges, cooperative breeding arrangements, consultation and advice provided by the NZP, and professional issues.

For additional records of the NZP see Record Unit 74.
Historical Note:
Theodore H. Reed joined the staff of the National Zoological Park (NZP) in 1955 when he accepted appointment as Veterinarian. When NZP Director William M. Mann retired in 1956, Reed became Acting Director. He was appointed Director in 1958. Reed continued to lead the NZP until 1983. At that time he was made Senior Advisor, in which capacity he remained until his retirement the following year.

Reed's twenty-seven year tenure as Director of the National Zoological Park was marked by tremendous change. In 1958, the NZP was in desperate need of revitalization. Its newest exhibition building was twenty-one years old, having been constructed in 1937 by the Public Works Administration. Many of the original buildings (dating to 1893) remained in use, and all were in need of repair. NZP administrative operations were housed in the dilapidated 1805 mansion, "Holt House," in dire need of renovation. Utilities were antiquated and unreliable. Inadequate appropriations prevented proper staffing of the Zoo. The professional staff lacked curators, research scientists, and adequate medical personnel.

Under Reed's direction, with assistance from the Friends of the National Zoo, a "Master Plan for the National Zoological Park" was prepared in 1961 by the firm Daniel, Mann, Johnson, and Mendenhall. The master plan was approved by the Smithsonian's Board of Regents in 1962. Federal appropriations began in fiscal year 1963 for a series of phased renovation and construction projects. Buildings renovated included the bird house (along with the construction of a new walk-through flight cage), 1965; the monkey house, 1975; the elephant house, 1975; the reptile house, 1981; and the small mammal house, 1983.

New construction carried out under the master plan included a complex for hardy-hoofed and delicate-hoofed stock, 1967; the Hospital-Research Building, 1969; the William M. Mann Memorial Lion-Tiger Exhibit, 1976; the Education-Administration Building, 1977; the Necropsy Building, 1979; the General Services and Parking Facility, 1978; and a new great-ape house, 1981. Among the several new animal exhibits built during the period were Smokey Bear Park, 1978; Beaver Valley, 1979; the North American Mammal exhibit, 1980; and Monkey Island, 1983.

The 1960s witnessed a new emphasis on developing programs to fulfill the NZP mission of scientific research, recreation, education, and conservation. Increased appropriations allowed for efficient management of the Zoo, as additional staff was hired and new offices, departments, and programs were established. A Scientific Research Department was created in the mid-1960s under the direction of John F. Eisenberg. The Department conducts important original research on aspects of animal behavior and communication, reproduction and breeding, and the structure of mammalian societies. Departmental staff also participated in several field studies in the United States and foreign countries.

Management of the NZP animal collection was reorganized and placed under the direction of a professional staff. Zoologists were hired as curators to oversee the exhibition and welfare of NZP animals. The animal health program was strengthened, and a new department of animal pathology was established. Several important additions to the animal collection were made during the period. Included were the acquisition of the white tigress, Mohini, in 1960; the gift of a pair of Komodo dragons from the government of Indonesia in 1964; and the arrival of a pair of giant pandas from the People's Republic of China in 1972. A strong breeding program was also emphasized at the Zoo. Rare or endangered species born at NZP included a snow leopard (the first born in the Western Hemisphere); lowland gorillas; white tigers; orangutans; bald eagles; a kiwi chick (the first born in captivity outside of Australia and New Zealand); and golden lion tamarins.

The education and information function of the NZP received new direction under Reed. A new system of signs and labels for animal exhibitions was developed, and public programs such as "Zoolab" were established. This aspect of the Zoo's mission benefitted considerably by the creation of the Friends of the National Zoo (FONZ). Established in 1958, FONZ is a non-profit organization designed to help develop community and public support in behalf of the NZP. Originally concerned with capital improvements and modernization, the focus of FONZ activities changed to education by the mid-1960s. Eventually, FONZ took charge of parking, food, and souvenir concessions at the NZP with the proceeds used to augment educational work and scientific research.

Perhaps the most important event in Reed's twenty-seven year career as NZP Director occurred in 1975 when the General Services Administration transferred over 3,000 acres of land in Front Royal, Virginia, to the Smithsonian Institution to establish the Conservation and Research Center (CRC). The goal of CRC is to conduct research on and develop breeding programs for endangered and exotic species.
Topic:
Zoos  Search this
Zoos -- Administration  Search this
Zoo directors  Search this
Genre/Form:
Black-and-white photographs
Serials (publications)
Maps
Clippings
Manuscripts
Architectural drawings
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 326, National Zoological Park. Office of the Director, Records
Identifier:
Record Unit 326
See more items in:
Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0326
Online Media:

Brains through time a natural history of vertebrates Georg F. Striedter, Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, University of California, Irvine, R. Glenn Northcutt, Department of Neuroscience, University of California, San Diego

Author:
Striedter, Georg F. 1962-  Search this
Northcutt, R. Glenn  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource
Type:
Electronic resources
Electronic books
Date:
2020
Topic:
Vertebrates--Evolution  Search this
Brain--Evolution  Search this
Nervous system--Evolution  Search this
Call number:
QL607.5 .S77 2020 (Internet)
Restrictions & Rights:
1-user
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1145085

Islands and snakes isolation and adaptive evolution / edited by Harvey Lillywhite, Marcio Martins

Title:
Isolation and adaptive evolution
Editor:
Lillywhite, Harvey B 1943-  Search this
Physical description:
xvi, 343 pages illustrations (some color, color maps) 25 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
2019
Topic:
Snakes--Habitat  Search this
Island ecology  Search this
Snakes--Habitat--Conservation  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1114431

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